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How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed: A Memoir

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“I feel like I’ve joined an enormous club, something like the Veterans of Foreign Wars. We are weary with battle fatigue and sometimes even gripped by nostalgia for the good old, bad old days, but our numbers are large,” writes Theo Pauline Nestor in this wry, fiercely honest chronicle of life after divorce. Less than an hour after confronting her husband over his massive “I feel like I’ve joined an enormous club, something like the Veterans of Foreign Wars. We are weary with battle fatigue and sometimes even gripped by nostalgia for the good old, bad old days, but our numbers are large,” writes Theo Pauline Nestor in this wry, fiercely honest chronicle of life after divorce. Less than an hour after confronting her husband over his massive gambling losses, Theo banishes him from their home forever. With two young daughters to support and her life as a stay-at-home mother at an abrupt end, Nestor finds herself slipping from “middle-class grace” as she attends a court-ordered custody class, stumbles through job interviews, and–much to her surprise–falls in love once again. As Theo rebuilds her life and recovers her sense of self, she’s forced to confront her own family’s legacy of divorce. “I’m from a long line of stock market speculators, artists of unmarketable talents, and alcoholics,” writes Nestor. “The higher, harder road is not our road. We move, we divorce, we drink, or we disappear.” Nestor’s journey takes her deep into her family’s past, to a tiny village in Mexico, where she discovers the truth about how her sister ended up living in a convent there after their parents divorced in the early sixties. What she learns ultimately brings her closer to understanding her own divorce and its impact on her two daughters. “I knew from experience that for children divorce means half the world is constantly eclipsed. When you’re with one parent, the other must always slip out of view,” Nestor writes. Funny, openhearted, and brave, How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed will speak to anyone who has passed through the halls of divorce court or risked tenderness after loss. It marks the debut of an enchanting, deeply truthful voice. From the Hardcover edition.


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“I feel like I’ve joined an enormous club, something like the Veterans of Foreign Wars. We are weary with battle fatigue and sometimes even gripped by nostalgia for the good old, bad old days, but our numbers are large,” writes Theo Pauline Nestor in this wry, fiercely honest chronicle of life after divorce. Less than an hour after confronting her husband over his massive “I feel like I’ve joined an enormous club, something like the Veterans of Foreign Wars. We are weary with battle fatigue and sometimes even gripped by nostalgia for the good old, bad old days, but our numbers are large,” writes Theo Pauline Nestor in this wry, fiercely honest chronicle of life after divorce. Less than an hour after confronting her husband over his massive gambling losses, Theo banishes him from their home forever. With two young daughters to support and her life as a stay-at-home mother at an abrupt end, Nestor finds herself slipping from “middle-class grace” as she attends a court-ordered custody class, stumbles through job interviews, and–much to her surprise–falls in love once again. As Theo rebuilds her life and recovers her sense of self, she’s forced to confront her own family’s legacy of divorce. “I’m from a long line of stock market speculators, artists of unmarketable talents, and alcoholics,” writes Nestor. “The higher, harder road is not our road. We move, we divorce, we drink, or we disappear.” Nestor’s journey takes her deep into her family’s past, to a tiny village in Mexico, where she discovers the truth about how her sister ended up living in a convent there after their parents divorced in the early sixties. What she learns ultimately brings her closer to understanding her own divorce and its impact on her two daughters. “I knew from experience that for children divorce means half the world is constantly eclipsed. When you’re with one parent, the other must always slip out of view,” Nestor writes. Funny, openhearted, and brave, How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed will speak to anyone who has passed through the halls of divorce court or risked tenderness after loss. It marks the debut of an enchanting, deeply truthful voice. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie

    Since I am going through a divorce right now this memoir attracted my attention. I related to nearly all of her feelings and thoughts on the ending of her marriage. I learned a lot from this book, especially the stages you go through. I found it sad and encouraging at the same time. She has such an easy-going style of writing which made this a quick read. I believe anyone struggling with divorce will benefit from reading it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Travel Writing

    I so wanted to love this book. Theo Nester starts her memoir with a resounding bang! I was captivated and felt like I was being told a profound story from a dear friend about family, love, loss, survival, and , what I hoped to be, triumph Instead, somewhere around the middle the entire story turned ridiculous. Wait? You have family and friends that jet you off to Mexico and Arizona? You don't have to work and complain constantly about money? Wait? What! You started an affair with a man when you w I so wanted to love this book. Theo Nester starts her memoir with a resounding bang! I was captivated and felt like I was being told a profound story from a dear friend about family, love, loss, survival, and , what I hoped to be, triumph Instead, somewhere around the middle the entire story turned ridiculous. Wait? You have family and friends that jet you off to Mexico and Arizona? You don't have to work and complain constantly about money? Wait? What! You started an affair with a man when you were still sifting through this hot mess? And this man was some guy you knew twenty years ago. Oh, you have got to be kidding! To give her credit, Theo tries, valiantly tries to connect with who she thinks her readers will be, but her story is one that will be hard to connect to. She seems like she could have used a few more years of perspective before trotting this out. For example, after she contacted the man she was with 20 years ago, she makes it abundantly clear, beyond clear, obviously clear she intends on sleeping with him when they meet up at his place. Then when she gets there and they are in each others arms, he says, "You know what I would like to see us do...learn to give each other mind blowing sex." He uses the word 'learn', as in we hardly know each other and I want this very important thing for us and I want to learn to do it with you. Theo Nester loses.her.ever living.shit. She curls into a ball, sobs, cries, blames him, starts in on that tired tirade of women everywhere who can obvisouly have sex, have kids, and have been in looooong relationships, but take absolutely no responsibility for their own sensuality. You know, the 40 year old women that spontaneously re-virginize once they get a divorce. Right here is where she lost me. This was a story of a woman who needed therapy and a few years of perspective before she wrote this book before she introduced all kinds of people into her business. I gave it two stars because the writing was engaging, until is wasn't. Some parts of the story were touching, but mostly I finished the book feeling like I had just lost a perfectly good afternoon to a babbling friend who used me for therapy without a co-pay.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Her story was raw and real, and she doesn't shy away from telling about the choices she made, rational or not. Her story was raw and real, and she doesn't shy away from telling about the choices she made, rational or not.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    This is a rare book that I read virtually cover to cover in a single night, not because it was so riveting but mostly because it was a smooth read and I spent a long evening home alone. As a fan of Brain, Child, I was attracted to the book because of the author's role in the magazine. The quality of the writing was high, but the second time I picked it up to finish the last 30 pages, it occured to me that the book seemed like a writer's exercise. Can I make this assignment into a fully fledged b This is a rare book that I read virtually cover to cover in a single night, not because it was so riveting but mostly because it was a smooth read and I spent a long evening home alone. As a fan of Brain, Child, I was attracted to the book because of the author's role in the magazine. The quality of the writing was high, but the second time I picked it up to finish the last 30 pages, it occured to me that the book seemed like a writer's exercise. Can I make this assignment into a fully fledged book? There were a few points towards the end where I thought the author was searching for deeper meaning where there was none, grasping for a way to tie up the end. Like so many books, it started very strong and then just trailed off.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Antonina Zaytseva

    This book was so-so in my opinion. I would have probably been content with skipping it. I found the author a bit annoying, personally. At times I enjoyed her story but at other times she came off as needy and I felt as if though she had a strong sense of entitlement which made it hard to like her. Didn't really learn much from this book. This book was so-so in my opinion. I would have probably been content with skipping it. I found the author a bit annoying, personally. At times I enjoyed her story but at other times she came off as needy and I felt as if though she had a strong sense of entitlement which made it hard to like her. Didn't really learn much from this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Torrence

    A memoir of one woman's divorce and some of her family of origin. While feeling for her certainly, I can't put aside class issues. A memoir of one woman's divorce and some of her family of origin. While feeling for her certainly, I can't put aside class issues.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Smith

    This is the very best kind of memoir: honest, funny, insightful, and expertly told. By that I mean Nestor takes us not just through the difficult journey of her divorce by telling us about seminal events, but through the necessary personal growth that happened, as well. That includes a little bit of mystery about her own experience with divorced parents as a child, and her relationship with her sister.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bryce Van Vleet

    DNF about halfway through (not adding to my year's total). This was fine. There was some really lovely writing and an interesting perspective. But it is a very privileged story, and not quite what I thought it would be. What made me eventually quit was the fact that this is really a very short story told in a lot of pages. In that way, you can tell she's a blogger, which isn't a bad thing, but her writing fits better in short form than it does in long. DNF about halfway through (not adding to my year's total). This was fine. There was some really lovely writing and an interesting perspective. But it is a very privileged story, and not quite what I thought it would be. What made me eventually quit was the fact that this is really a very short story told in a lot of pages. In that way, you can tell she's a blogger, which isn't a bad thing, but her writing fits better in short form than it does in long.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Tarr

    When I got this book I didn’t know it was a memoir. I thought it was more of a self-help book. Although Theo’s story is much different than mine and some of the ways she feels are very different than the way I feel, it was good to read about somebody who has been through a similar situation. I liked the last chapter about sleeping in a king size bed and the different stages you go through when this is new. I completely understand about possibly not feeling happier but feeling more real!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Moore

    This book got me through an absolutely terrible divorce, I was working on healing from abuse and accepting the fact that my marriage was over and this book is something that kept me company each night and made me feel “normal” again. I don’t keep many books (I typically get everything from the library), but I will always keep a copy of this on my shelf to remind myself of how I started to heal in that really dark place.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jill Springer

    This was definitely a different kind of book for me to read. Honestly the only reason I did was because it was on my bookshelf and I was determined to finish it even though I really wasn’t that in to it. I really couldn’t relate to the book which made it very difficult since it is about being a single parent and divorce. It was good just not a favorite or something I really would be recommending to many people since I personally didn’t enjoy it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I appreciated the author's seeing the good and bad in herself and in her ex. Those mixed feelings are part of what makes divorce so painful, but perhaps it's also what may allow for a healthy-ish coparenting relationship as well. I related to the stages of divorce that seem to be a standard as states of child development...the shock and denial, the mixed feelings, the acceptance and renewal. Maybe reading divorce memoirs should be added as a stage? I appreciated the author's seeing the good and bad in herself and in her ex. Those mixed feelings are part of what makes divorce so painful, but perhaps it's also what may allow for a healthy-ish coparenting relationship as well. I related to the stages of divorce that seem to be a standard as states of child development...the shock and denial, the mixed feelings, the acceptance and renewal. Maybe reading divorce memoirs should be added as a stage?

  13. 4 out of 5

    David R. Scott III

    Heart warming book The author is disarmingly honest and lets us into her world as she goes through a continuing life changing experience, as well as linking her feelings now with the things she went through in the past, creating an entire narrative and a hope for others who share some part with her. Also it was well written with no run-on sentences.

  14. 5 out of 5

    SarahBDemille

    Some deeply felt and real descriptions of the pain of divorce and the indignities of the ending of a marriage. A good book to read if you are going through it with bits of humour. But ending seems rushed - as if she run out of steam. 3 stars though and quick to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    From a couple to single A very real woman who honestly shared her journey thru trials, issues, ups and downs of marriage and the single mom life. I could relate to her journey and feelings about it as I have walked n her shoes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Torimac

    I just wasn't in the mood to enjoy the subject material. I just wasn't in the mood to enjoy the subject material.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    The book started off strong and engaging- but slowly fizzled out through the end of the book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Trina

    Although there were many things that I could relate to in this memoir and it wasn't bad writing, I did not love this book. Although there were many things that I could relate to in this memoir and it wasn't bad writing, I did not love this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Just okay. Not what I thought it would be.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

    I guess I didn't read the cover, because I didn't realize this was a memoir...actually a friend had read it and shared it with me. The author shares a frank look into her life of separation and then divorce, and how it affected her and her two girls. One afternoon when she puts a chicken into the over to roast, she is married, before it's done, her husband has moved out of the house, at her request. Just like that. She confronted him about his gambling, he fessed up, and that was the end of thei I guess I didn't read the cover, because I didn't realize this was a memoir...actually a friend had read it and shared it with me. The author shares a frank look into her life of separation and then divorce, and how it affected her and her two girls. One afternoon when she puts a chicken into the over to roast, she is married, before it's done, her husband has moved out of the house, at her request. Just like that. She confronted him about his gambling, he fessed up, and that was the end of their married relationship... She relates the stages she goes through after the break-up, to the stages one goes through following a death. The five stages of death are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. She names them shock and denial, adjustment, and acceptance, with many stops along the way. She had financial help from her mother, and even rekindled an old friendship with a schoolmate/guy. The road is tough, but one gets through it. Favorite Quotes: "How did you lose your husband? I ask myself. At first slowly and then all at once." p 10 "When I wore my wedding rings, I was a different person, emboldened the way you can be in a Halloween costume. I could laugh as loud as I wanted and go out with dirty heair and sweatpants. I was married! I belonged. Someone loved me and it showed." p 55 "I turn the electric blanket on high when I go to bed. I like there soaking up the heat like anutrient. Sometimes I think of this divorce business as something like a flu. The feverish beginnings, miserable and sweaty as they are, are somehow easier to get through---they blur by, really---than the many half-well, half-sick days that follow, days when you're not sure what to do. You're too well to stay in bed watching TV, but too sick to go out and do all the things well people are expected to do. Too sad to carry young by the nape of the neck or to think of mating again." p 56 "I already knew from experience that for children divorce means half the world is constantly eclipsed. When you're with one parent, the other must always slip out of view. I knew, too, how a yearning for home could become a part of you much too young, and unless you were very lucky or strong or some combination of the two, you could spend most of your life searching for that feeling of wholeness that once eluded you, for that ordered kingdom that disappeared before you could ever come into your own and leave it for a world of your own making. I knew this. I knew it all, and still I left." p 58 "when we were younger, these stalemates could extend for hours. But life seems shorter now, and not for the wasting. And maybe this is what love is, after all---knowing who the person is and reaching for them when you know they can't reach for your, going to find them when they are locked up inside themselves, even if you might be hurting or afraid yourself. Maybe this is why we broke up before---because we couldn't talk each other down from our towers. Maybe this is why couples are breaking up everywhere." p 196

  21. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    6/10 This memoir is an honest recount from a writer on how her marriage unraveled, the ensuing chaos and emotions of the split and the process of rebuilding her life. It’s accurate and heartbreaking, while simultaneously hopeful and inspiring. Theo Pauline Nestor discovers her husband has been deceptive about his financial management, using money from his real-estate sells to feed his gamble habit. Theo has two daughters who she cares for as well, forced into a single parenting role. The story d 6/10 This memoir is an honest recount from a writer on how her marriage unraveled, the ensuing chaos and emotions of the split and the process of rebuilding her life. It’s accurate and heartbreaking, while simultaneously hopeful and inspiring. Theo Pauline Nestor discovers her husband has been deceptive about his financial management, using money from his real-estate sells to feed his gamble habit. Theo has two daughters who she cares for as well, forced into a single parenting role. The story does take a turn into the author’s past, her family has a history of divorce and other forms destructive behavior, and she explores the roots of her own parents marriage and it’s implosion and the after effects. She re-enters the career world, re-connects with an old boyfriend and continues a new life that is uniquely her own. The writing is easy-to-read although the subject may not appeal or interest everyone. Overall, a pleasant read but not something I would recommend as a “must-read.” Favorite quote: I don’t know how I am going to get there, but I can imagine a future of comfort and belonging. I’ve felt it before, pulling a blue berry pie out of the oven or watching Jess scooter down a shady sidewalk on a late-summer afternoon or writing in my favorite café. It’s a feeling of rightness uninterrupted by pain, a feeling of home. I could imagine its return. But I also know that this recovery model of divorce is flawed. Some losses-sleep, peace, laughter-are, in fact, temporary; these things will no doubt return to me, boomeranging back through time in that surprising but inevitable way that they do. But there are losses that will not be recouped; some things will be lost forever, just as my twenties and baby teeth are gone for good. I will never again be the person who married the father of my children. I will never again be a woman married to the only man to whom she ever said “I do.” I might recover a great deal of the brightness of my life, but I’m not going to come out of this the same person who went into marriage and then divorce. I’m not sure who she’s going to be-this person who’s going to rise like a phoenix above all the smoldering embers of her old life. I just want to make sure I’m going to like her.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed this book. The beginning scene where the author, a happily married wife--she thinks, puts the chicken in the oven to roast and by the time the chicken is done and she takes it out of the overn, she's found out that her husband is back to lying and compulsive gambling, kicked him out of the house, and ended her marriage. I like how she uses the chicken baking as the measuremnet of time, not days, hours, or minutes. Nestor does a very good job weaving the past and the present of her marri I enjoyed this book. The beginning scene where the author, a happily married wife--she thinks, puts the chicken in the oven to roast and by the time the chicken is done and she takes it out of the overn, she's found out that her husband is back to lying and compulsive gambling, kicked him out of the house, and ended her marriage. I like how she uses the chicken baking as the measuremnet of time, not days, hours, or minutes. Nestor does a very good job weaving the past and the present of her marriage, and the past and present of her life into a cohesive whole. I found it very easy to read and enjoyable. I do have a problem with this book--and many, many, many other "I got divoced and had to start a new life memoir"--is there ever any other happy ending than one that includes the new boyfriend or husband? One? Even one? It really bugs me. A woman can end the marriage or have it taken from her, it can be a complete surprise or something that's been looming on the horizon for years, it can be a tragedy or a relief, but it seems that the book can't end until the new man enters the picture. Then we can have the happy ending we've all been pining for--now we can sigh a sigh of relief and know that all will be right with the world once more. I disagree. And the title of this book brings the subject into even sharper focus. She slept alone in that king-sized bed less than a year. Nobody wants to be alone, I know, but why can't some of these post-divorce memoirs have happy endings sans new partner? It can happen. It is possible. A woman can find out what it means to live for herself, with herself, and find out who she is without another person to live for. A guy too. One of my pet peeves I guess, but a valid one--in my not at all humble opinion.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cecelia Hightower

    Written by Jill Fredston in 2001. Jill and her husband are avalanche experts and co-directors of the Alaska Mountain Safety Center. They live outside Anchorage. According to Jill, she and her husband are such two different types of people that they would never be expected to get together. To me the book is written in the format that made me feel like I was sitting with he author, her husband and some friends and she was sharing stories with us. Jill and her husband would take the summer months o Written by Jill Fredston in 2001. Jill and her husband are avalanche experts and co-directors of the Alaska Mountain Safety Center. They live outside Anchorage. According to Jill, she and her husband are such two different types of people that they would never be expected to get together. To me the book is written in the format that made me feel like I was sitting with he author, her husband and some friends and she was sharing stories with us. Jill and her husband would take the summer months off and row & paddle the Northern waters of the Americas and Europe. Some of their trips were Seattle to Skagway; the Yukon Rive from Whitehorse to Nome; the Mackenzie River from the community of Hay River in the Northwest Territories to Kotzebue Alaska; the Alaskan Peninsule; from Golthenburg Sweden along the coast of Norway to Kirkenes Russia. All total the traveled over twenty thousand miles using only oars and paddles for population carrying the supplies and equipment they would need. Jill used a custom designed rowing type hull and her husband used a seagoing kayak. He paddled facing forward and Jill rowed facing rearward. All in all a great book if one is interested in the joys I finds in life. Some of the things Jill wrote about her husband's youth reminded me of my own. One of the things her husband did was what I used to do, only I spent ten cents where he had to spend fifteen cents. Lots of human interest, lots of adventures, and lots of reminders that life is great.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Addie Capaldi

    I can't really make up my mind about this book. I think I liked it. The narrator has a frankness that makes her funny and likable but about 2/3 of the way through the book she started to irritate me a little bit (really just the parts about her relationship with her new boyfriend). I'm sure she hates being compared to Elizabeth Gilbert but I can't help it. This book is kind of like Eat, Pray, Love but without the beautiful backdrops of Italy, India and Bali and just the grim reality of her navig I can't really make up my mind about this book. I think I liked it. The narrator has a frankness that makes her funny and likable but about 2/3 of the way through the book she started to irritate me a little bit (really just the parts about her relationship with her new boyfriend). I'm sure she hates being compared to Elizabeth Gilbert but I can't help it. This book is kind of like Eat, Pray, Love but without the beautiful backdrops of Italy, India and Bali and just the grim reality of her navigating post-divorce everyday life in Seattle with 2 kids. That makes it sounds bad but I mean it as a compliment because I really didn't like Eat, Pray, Love. I felt like I understood her as a character and she had a lot of depth and her writing felt open and honest. She struck me as a little immature and whiny at times but we're all a little immature and whiny at times so maybe that's just what you get with honesty. Reading this book certainly didn't make me want to get married but it's not completely depressing. I wouldn't take it on vacation but if you're looking for something to read on the subway and you don't mind it being fairly grim I'd recommend it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Santica

    Theo Nestor's memoir of the failure of her marriage and her subsequent journey through the divorce "process." She details her new life as a single mother coping with the three process stages (shock/denial, adjustment and acceptance) with raw honesty and humor. Anyone who has experienced divorce will be able to identify with this book. In many ways I felt like I was reading the story of my own life and finished the book in two days. Although she describes the harsh realities of a split family can Theo Nestor's memoir of the failure of her marriage and her subsequent journey through the divorce "process." She details her new life as a single mother coping with the three process stages (shock/denial, adjustment and acceptance) with raw honesty and humor. Anyone who has experienced divorce will be able to identify with this book. In many ways I felt like I was reading the story of my own life and finished the book in two days. Although she describes the harsh realities of a split family candidly, there is also a message of hope as she allows herself to be vulnerable and find love again.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joelle

    While I am not going through a divorce myself, the title of this book intrigued me. Theo Pauline Nestor finds herself at a place in her life where she no longer knows the man she married. In the time that it takes to cook a chicken Theo went from married to asking her husband to leave. How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed is a story of starting over and finding a way to keep it all together for your self and for your kids. Heartfelt and honest How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed makes me hug While I am not going through a divorce myself, the title of this book intrigued me. Theo Pauline Nestor finds herself at a place in her life where she no longer knows the man she married. In the time that it takes to cook a chicken Theo went from married to asking her husband to leave. How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed is a story of starting over and finding a way to keep it all together for your self and for your kids. Heartfelt and honest How to Sleep Alone in a King-Size Bed makes me hug my husband a little tighter tonight.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Juliej

    I didn't really pay attention when I grabbed this book that it was a memoir - thought it was more "chick lit' and I thought the cover was fun. I was ready for something light, which this was not really. While it is humorous, its the story of betrayal and divorce and trying to pick up the pieces with young children. I stuck with it, and am just glad that I'm with a mate who has never made me doubt his love and integrity to us and to how he lives his life. I didn't really pay attention when I grabbed this book that it was a memoir - thought it was more "chick lit' and I thought the cover was fun. I was ready for something light, which this was not really. While it is humorous, its the story of betrayal and divorce and trying to pick up the pieces with young children. I stuck with it, and am just glad that I'm with a mate who has never made me doubt his love and integrity to us and to how he lives his life.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joellen

    I read this to try to understand what someone very close to me has gone through. Parts of it made me laugh out loud (once known as lol, but I'm pretty sure that's no longer cool*)and other parts made me sad for the childhood the author had. So it tells not only the story of her marriage/divorce but also her family history. She also suggests books on divorce that really helped her. Great book. *if it ever was. I read this to try to understand what someone very close to me has gone through. Parts of it made me laugh out loud (once known as lol, but I'm pretty sure that's no longer cool*)and other parts made me sad for the childhood the author had. So it tells not only the story of her marriage/divorce but also her family history. She also suggests books on divorce that really helped her. Great book. *if it ever was.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I read this after reading "Writing is my Drink" and I thought it was a completely different author. After a great, detailed, vivid, first chapter, the book slows down towards the middle to a point where I lose interest with the authors journey. It is a good book if you are in the process of divorce and want to learn how other women have walked your walked and to learn a few facts about divorce. In this sense it is an important addition to the woman's version of divorce. I read this after reading "Writing is my Drink" and I thought it was a completely different author. After a great, detailed, vivid, first chapter, the book slows down towards the middle to a point where I lose interest with the authors journey. It is a good book if you are in the process of divorce and want to learn how other women have walked your walked and to learn a few facts about divorce. In this sense it is an important addition to the woman's version of divorce.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Barnes

    I am taking Theo's class now. Book definitely fit into the Rolling Stones structure which made it make a lot of sense. I wonder if a memoir really has to reveal so much personal material especially as much of it is quite recent. Really got the sense of what's involved with coping with divorce esp with children. I already know not from direct personal experience but from going through it with family and friends. Clearly written and enjoyable I am taking Theo's class now. Book definitely fit into the Rolling Stones structure which made it make a lot of sense. I wonder if a memoir really has to reveal so much personal material especially as much of it is quite recent. Really got the sense of what's involved with coping with divorce esp with children. I already know not from direct personal experience but from going through it with family and friends. Clearly written and enjoyable

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