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The Complete Sherlock Holmes, Volume I

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Eccentric, arrogant, and ingenious, Sherlock Holmes remains the world's most popular and influential fictional detective. In four novels and fifty-six short stories, Holmes with his trusted friend Dr. Watson, steps from his comfortable quarters at 221B Baker Street into the swirling fog of London. Combining detailed observation with brilliant deduction, Holmes rescues the Eccentric, arrogant, and ingenious, Sherlock Holmes remains the world's most popular and influential fictional detective. In four novels and fifty-six short stories, Holmes with his trusted friend Dr. Watson, steps from his comfortable quarters at 221B Baker Street into the swirling fog of London. Combining detailed observation with brilliant deduction, Holmes rescues the innocent, confounds the guilty, and solves the most perplexing puzzles crime has to offer. Volume I of The Complete Sherlock Holmes begins with Holmes's first appearance, A Study in Scarlet, a chilling murder novel complete with bloodstained walls and cryptic clues. This is followed by the baffling The Sign of Four, which introduces Holmes's cocaine problem and Watson's future wife. Volume I also includes the story collections The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and concludes with the tale "The Final Problem," in which Conan Doyle, tired of writing Holmes stories, kills off his famed sleuth. (back cover)


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Eccentric, arrogant, and ingenious, Sherlock Holmes remains the world's most popular and influential fictional detective. In four novels and fifty-six short stories, Holmes with his trusted friend Dr. Watson, steps from his comfortable quarters at 221B Baker Street into the swirling fog of London. Combining detailed observation with brilliant deduction, Holmes rescues the Eccentric, arrogant, and ingenious, Sherlock Holmes remains the world's most popular and influential fictional detective. In four novels and fifty-six short stories, Holmes with his trusted friend Dr. Watson, steps from his comfortable quarters at 221B Baker Street into the swirling fog of London. Combining detailed observation with brilliant deduction, Holmes rescues the innocent, confounds the guilty, and solves the most perplexing puzzles crime has to offer. Volume I of The Complete Sherlock Holmes begins with Holmes's first appearance, A Study in Scarlet, a chilling murder novel complete with bloodstained walls and cryptic clues. This is followed by the baffling The Sign of Four, which introduces Holmes's cocaine problem and Watson's future wife. Volume I also includes the story collections The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, and concludes with the tale "The Final Problem," in which Conan Doyle, tired of writing Holmes stories, kills off his famed sleuth. (back cover)

30 review for The Complete Sherlock Holmes, Volume I

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    I had forgotten so many little things about Holmes and Watson and the original stories of ACD. It seems like a phenominal statement to make doesn't it? Holmes and Watson have been fixtures in my life, since I can't remember when. I have been watching movies and TV shows about them since my parents got our 1st TV when I was six years old. The can still remember the horror I felt watching one of the The Hound of the Baskervilles movies (I do not remember which version). This year, there is a new TV I had forgotten so many little things about Holmes and Watson and the original stories of ACD. It seems like a phenominal statement to make doesn't it? Holmes and Watson have been fixtures in my life, since I can't remember when. I have been watching movies and TV shows about them since my parents got our 1st TV when I was six years old. The can still remember the horror I felt watching one of the The Hound of the Baskervilles movies (I do not remember which version). This year, there is a new TV show called Elementary where Dr. Watson is a woman. I am still watching the Jeremy Brett episodes on public TV as well as the newer verson called Sherlock. There is a blog on the internet written by Dr. John Watson that chronicles Sherlock from the show. I can watch them all in the same week AND pop in a DVD of the newest movies any time I want. The greatest thing though, is that I can still read all of the original stories and books - written over 100 years ago because they are still in print. I can download them onto my e-reader or go to the library and check them out or go to the bookstore or internet and buy a book. What I liked about this book is the editor's notes and the history and timeline information. The foot notes about the British terms, and translations of the French, German and Latin sayings and mini history notes referenced about the people mentioned in the stories is wonderful. Author Cannon Doyle put SO MUCH in his stories besides just Holmes and Watson. Don't get me wrong - I love them, I do, but I love the people, history, art, and literature in the stories too!!! Next up, volume II...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    4 stars. The stories in Volume 1 of The Complete Sherlock Holmes provided a good escape for me as a reader. The diversity of the stories in this collection kept my interest and I enjoyed reading this Sherlock Holmes collection. The character Sherlock Holmes is an icon of literature and rightfully so. What I believe makes that character so memorable is because he’s ultimately a force for good. Look past the facts that he’s cocky, and his methods and personal habits have a lot to be desired - his 4 stars. The stories in Volume 1 of The Complete Sherlock Holmes provided a good escape for me as a reader. The diversity of the stories in this collection kept my interest and I enjoyed reading this Sherlock Holmes collection. The character Sherlock Holmes is an icon of literature and rightfully so. What I believe makes that character so memorable is because he’s ultimately a force for good. Look past the facts that he’s cocky, and his methods and personal habits have a lot to be desired - his morality defines why and how he lives his life. There’s a lot to be said for that!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Since 8th grade I have been head over heals for Holmes. I guess I just like moody intellectuals. It is so intertaining to watch him demonstrate his superior intellect again and again. I am really glad I picked these up a B&N. It's great to have all of Sherlock Holmes in two volumes. Since 8th grade I have been head over heals for Holmes. I guess I just like moody intellectuals. It is so intertaining to watch him demonstrate his superior intellect again and again. I am really glad I picked these up a B&N. It's great to have all of Sherlock Holmes in two volumes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Well, I think I can appreciate the fascination with the character of Sherlock Holmes and his stories. LOL...I never knew he was a raging cokehead though. A good collection of detective stories!! I have to admit though, that I grappled with this thing a bit, and I'll have to reread it at some point in the near future. Well, I think I can appreciate the fascination with the character of Sherlock Holmes and his stories. LOL...I never knew he was a raging cokehead though. A good collection of detective stories!! I have to admit though, that I grappled with this thing a bit, and I'll have to reread it at some point in the near future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    A truly awesome collection of short stories and novels. There's no doubt in my mind that Sherlock Holmes is a master at his craft. Thoroughly entertaining; can't wait to dive into Volume II! A truly awesome collection of short stories and novels. There's no doubt in my mind that Sherlock Holmes is a master at his craft. Thoroughly entertaining; can't wait to dive into Volume II!

  6. 5 out of 5

    P.S. Winn

    If you are a fan of Sherlock Holmes and love a good mystery, grab this classic collection.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rishi Prakash

    We have all heard about these stories, seen early Hollywood productions about them and even today these books are being filmed with modern perspectives. Amazingly they still fascinate! I remember picking the first book from my school library with a picture of big hound on it and getting completely immersed into it; and the same happened again when I picked it up- that is the charm of this book. I also remember how i was pulled into watching my first web-series by my dearest friend with Benedict We have all heard about these stories, seen early Hollywood productions about them and even today these books are being filmed with modern perspectives. Amazingly they still fascinate! I remember picking the first book from my school library with a picture of big hound on it and getting completely immersed into it; and the same happened again when I picked it up- that is the charm of this book. I also remember how i was pulled into watching my first web-series by my dearest friend with Benedict and Freeman duo leading as Sherlock and Watson and what a fabulous watch it was :-) This is the beauty of Sir Doyle's creation; it can still thrill people after 133 years since the first official publication happened in 1887! Go for the book if you have missed it; a must read for all age group.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    The Complete Sherlock Holmes: Volume I by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is great fun to read. Other than the three short novels, A Study in Scarlet, The Sign of the Four, and The Hound of the Baskervilles, this first volume is comprised of a collection of Holmes stories (also published under the titles of Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes). I read this large volume over the course of three months or so, reading stories between the run of bad books I’ve unfortunately had this The Complete Sherlock Holmes: Volume I by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is great fun to read. Other than the three short novels, A Study in Scarlet, The Sign of the Four, and The Hound of the Baskervilles, this first volume is comprised of a collection of Holmes stories (also published under the titles of Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes). I read this large volume over the course of three months or so, reading stories between the run of bad books I’ve unfortunately had this winter. I’ve never been interested in Sherlock Holmes, probably due to his over-exposure. He’s everywhere and thus I felt no need to read the original stories. That changed when I began watching BBC’s excellent Sherlock. I found the character of Sherlock intriguing (to say nothing of my newly-formed Cumberlust) and the relationship between Sherlock and Holmes is complex and funny and intriguing. So I bought this volume at my local Barnes & Noble and I’ve enjoyed it so much. Even the not-so-great stories are fun. What I enjoy so much about the stories aren’t necessarily the mysteries. I’ve read much more complex and suspenseful mysteries by other authors. I didn’t have the crimes solved before Sherlock did, but I usually had a fairly good idea of what was going on. What I like is the excellent, no-nonsense, crisp writing. The writing is so economical and practical and what long descriptions there are set the mood effectively. I don’t have to read long annoying passages about how the characters feel. Doyle lets the reader figure that out. I like that Sherlock isn’t overly emotional and his intelligent conversation and deductions are enjoyable. His deductive skills are best displayed in The Sign of Four when Sherlock looks at a watch Watson recently inherited and deduces much from it. This scene is also brilliantly adapted by Sherlock for “A Study in Pink” (1.1). In this episode, Watson’s cellphone (which was given to him by his sister) is the modern substitution for the watch, and the scene is just as enjoyable to watch as it is to read (although I think the modern mystery is better). I like Watson and his bemusement at Sherlock’s deductive powers. He also struggles to understand why a man who is so intelligent in some areas is completely ignorant in others. There is a scene in a Study in Scarlet in which Watson makes a list entitled: “Sherlock Holmes—his limitations.” Sherlock’s knowledge of literature, philosophy and astronomy are summed up thusly: “nil” and his knowledge of politics is “feeble.” This is also when Watson is flabbergasted to learn that Sherlock doesn’t know that the earth goes around the sun: “My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to me to be such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it” (14). When Watson reproaches him for his ignorance, Sherlock interrupts impatiently: “What the deuce is it to me? You say that we go round the sun. If we went round the moon it would not make a pennyworth of difference to me or to my work” (15). Benedict Cumberbatch, by the way, said this line with such childish irritation and arrogance while flouncing around in his robe; a great interpretation of the complex, mercurial personality that is Sherlock Holmes. The Sherlock Holmes stories are very evocative of nineteenth century London and I feel as if I am there walking the foggy streets dimly lit by gas lights. The descriptions of the moor in The Hound of the Baskervilles make the story even more creepy and scary: “Our wagonette had topped a rise and in front of us rose the huge expanse of the moor, mottled with gnarled and craggy cairns and tors. A cold wind swept down from it and set us shivering” (615). This was creepy story and I enjoyed it immensely. What surprised me to learn is that the things Sherlock is most famous for (the cape, the curved pipe and the deerstalker cap) don’t exist in the stories. Sherlock does smoke a pipe, but it’s straight, not curved. An early illustrator of the original stories added these affectations. Sherlock’s famous line, “It’s elementary, Watson” (and variations on that) is said only once in all the stories. What Sherlock most often says is, “You know my methods, Watson,” but apparently that’s too wordy and not as catchy. Also, Professor Moriarty, Sherlock’s genius evil alter-ego, only appears in one story: “The Final Problem.” Since so much is made of him, I thought he would be a repeating character, but he is not. However, he is so clever and evil and so like Sherlock, he makes an impressive and lasting impression. I would have enjoyed these Sherlock Holmes stories anyway, but my enjoyment was heightened whenever I came across a plot or character habit or dialogue that had been adapted directly into the BBC’s Sherlock. The two mediums together are a special treat. However, when I read the stories, I don’t picture Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock. The Sherlock Holmes and John Watson of the stories are similar, but not the same, as the characters in the television show. If you are a fan of the show, you may want to go right to the source and read the stories. I absolutely loved them and look forward to starting volume two and the resurrection of Sherlock in “The Empty House.”

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hope

    Since I’ve been reading this off and on since February (yeah, that’s right, ten months!), I’ve forgotten a lot of particular criticisms and compliments for individual mysteries. So, although I can’t be exactly in-depth with this, I can account for the general, over-all feel of the Sherlock Holmes stories. When I first started reading, I found it difficult to picture Holmes and Watson as younger men. They’re in their mid-30s, probably, but for some reason the tone of the book makes them feel like Since I’ve been reading this off and on since February (yeah, that’s right, ten months!), I’ve forgotten a lot of particular criticisms and compliments for individual mysteries. So, although I can’t be exactly in-depth with this, I can account for the general, over-all feel of the Sherlock Holmes stories. When I first started reading, I found it difficult to picture Holmes and Watson as younger men. They’re in their mid-30s, probably, but for some reason the tone of the book makes them feel like they're much older than that. Basically, when I began, I was picturing them as looking quite a lot like this: Blame it on my childhood, will you?! A Study In Scarlet was a strange tale, but I remember laughing out loud when Holmes was “sniffing about the room like some highly trained dog” (or something like that), and the introduction to Holmes as a character was very interesting. The mystery would’ve been fine if not for the Mormon plot-line, which really took me off guard. I guess it added depth, but it made the story drag along since it wasn’t all that interesting and it was long-winded and…well, strange. The Sign of Four was about on the same level, without the weird Mormon plot. I had a happy little moment when Toby showed up to smell out the criminal, since Toby was also in The Great Mouse Detective (I know, I know! But I loved that cartoon when I was younger). And also, Watson gets married at the end, which was kinda sweet. We’re also informed near the beginning that Holmes is a crack addict. AHEM *cough cough cough.* We all know this of Holmes with or without reading the mysteries, but it was rather disturbing to read about him stabbing himself with the needle repeatedly and syringing the stuff into his bloodstream. Ugh. Gross. And yet, when I informed my sister, “Sherlock Holmes really is a druggie!” I kind of um…busted up laughing. :S I am a horrible person… Then I was thrust into all the little short stories from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. These were all good, but not exciting enough to keep me from setting the book aside for other pursuits. My favorite in The Adventures was, I think, “The Five Orange Pips.” I remember that interesting me more than many of the others, although the one about the blue carbuncle in the goose was also quite intriguing, with a few memorable lines about, you know, food. After that was another series of short stories/mysteries called Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. These were also good, but I was starting to get bored because there wasn’t really anything too remarkable. I didn’t feel like I was getting to know the characters any better and they seemed dull and unchanging. Also, half of the story would be taken up by someone coming to 221B Baker Street and laying out the mystery in the most minute detail. I know this was probably necessary, but sometimes it just got BORING. The most entertaining part of Memoirs was the first page of The Musgrave Ritual, in which Watson shares with us that Holmes was unorganized with his papers, kept his tobacco in a Persian slipper, and would sit in his armchair with his hair-trigger and adorn the opposite wall with a V.R. done in bullet-holes. After that it got better for me. And although it’s sad, and it’s not actually a mystery, The Final Problem may very well have been my favorite from Memoirs. Which is strange, of course, since Sherlock "DIES" in that one. :S But I saw more life and excitement in Sherlock Holmes just before his "death," which reminded me of the movie that finally succeeded in getting me to pick this volume up at Barnes & Noble. When Sir Arthur Conan Doyle finally decided to write about his beloved detective again, he did it with style. The Hound of the Baskervilles was my favorite of them all. Very well written and exciting the whole way through. It’s suspenseful, appropriately dark, and just…WOW. Bravo, Doyle, I applaud you. This would have gotten 4 stars if not for that last one. I have to say that I like the novel form for the mysteries a lot more than the short story form which ACD used more often for Holmes, since there’s more time to create a deeper plot and build up to a proper climax. If you've been wanting to read about the famous detective, but haven't worked up the bravery to read the complete series, then I recommend reading A Study In Scarlet since it is the introduction to Holmes, and The Hound of the Baskervilles because it is an absolute masterpiece in classic mystery. Really just phenomenal. I'm looking forward to getting my hands on Volume 2! Also looking forward to movie #2. ;) P.S. Random quote from Watson about Holmes: "I have not heard him laugh often, and it has always boded ill to somebody." xD Yep, pretty much.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ~Emily Bosanac~

    Wowie. That was really good lol. So I ended up rating it 3.75 but I might change it to 4 stars in the end.. Sir Arthur has a way with words, and I really like Sherlock Holmes cuz he’s just got the right amount of arrogance that makes him an awesome character. I loved all of the stories and it all fit so extremely well together. Amazing book. 👍🏼😊

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This is the first of a two volume set containing all Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s published works featuring Sherlock Holmes. Collected here in order of original publication, this first volume includes the first two novels (A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four), followed by the first two collections of short stories (Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes) and ends with the third novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles. Overall, it a wonderful collection featuring some of the m This is the first of a two volume set containing all Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s published works featuring Sherlock Holmes. Collected here in order of original publication, this first volume includes the first two novels (A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four), followed by the first two collections of short stories (Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes) and ends with the third novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles. Overall, it a wonderful collection featuring some of the most well known mysteries such as “The Red-headed League”, “The Adventure of the Speckled Band”, and “The Final Problem”. Indeed, “Speckled Band” is reportedly Doyle’s personal favorite of all the Homes tales. Doyle’s first Holmes novel, A Study in Scarlet, is clearly his weakest, though it is amusing for the Holmes fan to see the introduction of the now-famous consulting detective to the world. The second Holmes work, also a novel (The Sign of Four), is a little better, but still falls short of Doyle’s general quality. To the casual reader, I would recommend skipping these two and jumping straight into the two collections of short stories and the third novel. The short stories from the Adventures and Memoirs collections range from amusing (e.g. “The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle”) to the bizarre (e.g. “The Five Orange Pips” in which Holmes and Watson take on the Ku Klux Klan) to the truly disturbing (e.g. “The Adventure of the Engineer’s Thumb”), but they are always clever and endearing. My favorite stories are “The Man with the Twisted Lip” and “The Musgrave Ritual”, but the best tale in this volume is Doyle’s third Holmes novel, The Hound of the Baskervilles which is far improved over his early novels.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    It's amazing how much English literature became less dense between Austen, Dickens and Thackeray to Doyle. I admit I was avoiding reading this because I thought it would take the same level of time and commitment as a Dickens novel, but I was (pleasantly) surprised by how much easier it was to read. I really enjoyed reading this compilation of four of Doyle's Holmes novels. It's easy to see why so many people love Sherlock Holmes and the books are so widely read. However, I have to admit that "A It's amazing how much English literature became less dense between Austen, Dickens and Thackeray to Doyle. I admit I was avoiding reading this because I thought it would take the same level of time and commitment as a Dickens novel, but I was (pleasantly) surprised by how much easier it was to read. I really enjoyed reading this compilation of four of Doyle's Holmes novels. It's easy to see why so many people love Sherlock Holmes and the books are so widely read. However, I have to admit that "A Study in Scarlet" was not in the least my favorite, because of its stereotyping of Mormons and its mischaracterization of Brigham Young and overdramatization of polygamy, which members of the LDS church (aka Mormons) practiced at the time and abandoned more than a century ago.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kim Savage

    I love Sherlock Holmes. Written in the late 1800s/early 1900s in London. I love the old vocabulary and the history. I can hear the horsedrawn hansons clattering down the brick streets. I can smell the tobacco of Holme's pipe. I have enjoyed the odd friendship of Holmes and Watson. And I have enjoyed the adventure and mystery these 2 gentlemen find themselves in. This volume takes some time to read, but I recommend anyone who is interested in mystery to read about this famous detective's adventur I love Sherlock Holmes. Written in the late 1800s/early 1900s in London. I love the old vocabulary and the history. I can hear the horsedrawn hansons clattering down the brick streets. I can smell the tobacco of Holme's pipe. I have enjoyed the odd friendship of Holmes and Watson. And I have enjoyed the adventure and mystery these 2 gentlemen find themselves in. This volume takes some time to read, but I recommend anyone who is interested in mystery to read about this famous detective's adventures.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Whatever you do, read Hound of the Baskervilles. Holy cow, that's now one of my favorite books. The short stories are fun, but some are better than others. It feels like Holmes and Watson are really fleshed out as dynamic characters in Baskervilles. Is it the longer length? Is it because it was written so much later than the short stories? Whatever you do, read Hound of the Baskervilles. Holy cow, that's now one of my favorite books. The short stories are fun, but some are better than others. It feels like Holmes and Watson are really fleshed out as dynamic characters in Baskervilles. Is it the longer length? Is it because it was written so much later than the short stories?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alondra Miller

    3.5 Stars I cannot believe I am finished! I started, stopped, sputtered-to-life, halted, then started again. It took me 4 months to plow through this book; which is rare, since size does NOT matter. I have tackled larger books in less time. I did not find this book very interesting in the beginning, but once I set my mind to it this last month, it went quickly (I mostly read it on the weekends this past October). The stories were relatively short, and actually quite humorous (Robert Downey Jr. pla 3.5 Stars I cannot believe I am finished! I started, stopped, sputtered-to-life, halted, then started again. It took me 4 months to plow through this book; which is rare, since size does NOT matter. I have tackled larger books in less time. I did not find this book very interesting in the beginning, but once I set my mind to it this last month, it went quickly (I mostly read it on the weekends this past October). The stories were relatively short, and actually quite humorous (Robert Downey Jr. played in my head the entire time). With a wonderful British accent, humor and obsessiveness down pact; the stories became quite enjoyable. A Scandal in Bohemia, which introduces us to Irene Adler; The Woman; and The Hound of the Baskervilles; were my favorites. The rest of the adventures were nicely done, and made me use my brain, trying to figure out the dastardly deeds of these criminals. The crimes were no different than today's; with murder, adultery, theft and pure scandal. Thrilling indeed. I think I would have enjoyed the stories more in "bite-sized chunks" (wal-mart layaway commercial, sorry); than has a complete set. I think the size of it unnerved me and set me up for failure. Well, I don't give up unless the book sucks. This one did not; I didn't even throw it against the wall... count it blessed. I do recommend reading the stories individually, and not as a set. This book or the stories within would have received 4 stars, due to Sherlock's ability to solve the crimes while being entertaining at the same time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charity

    I loved the novels (The Hound of the Baskervilles was a reread for me), but the stories were very much hit-or-miss.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Ugh I love Sherlock stories.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mary Killian

    I loved this book! However, I'm a slow reader and it took me about a year and a half to finish. But if you're like me and love mystery, then I would highly recommend this book. I loved this book! However, I'm a slow reader and it took me about a year and a half to finish. But if you're like me and love mystery, then I would highly recommend this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Kammerdiener

    "My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplace of existence." Reread: May—June 2020 I sort of reread this on a whim after recently reading A Study in Charlotte and finally watching the very last episode of BBC's Sherlock. It had been so long that I really only recalled the outcome of a few of these stories, so my perspective was able to remain much more fresh and objective than I would have expected in such a reread. To be honest, Sherlock Holmes is not as impressiv "My life is spent in one long effort to escape from the commonplace of existence." Reread: May—June 2020 I sort of reread this on a whim after recently reading A Study in Charlotte and finally watching the very last episode of BBC's Sherlock. It had been so long that I really only recalled the outcome of a few of these stories, so my perspective was able to remain much more fresh and objective than I would have expected in such a reread. To be honest, Sherlock Holmes is not as impressive as I remember finding him at fourteen. I think I was more in awe of BBC's Sherlock than I was of Conan Doyle's original character, and that may have tainted my initial impression. What really surprised me, though, was the lack of action present in these stories. Nearly all of them are relayed secondhand to Watson, who then relays them thirdhand to the reader, so that there is a certain distance from the immediate drama of the crime which I found rather disappointing. I also found I can't really stand Watson himself anymore, as here he came across to me as somewhat annoying and, rather than opening up the intricate world of Holmes' mind, somewhat of a bumbling hindrance to much of the stories' unfoldings. The whole approach of Watson as chronicler just seems so lazy and unnecessary to me now. In this reread, I really ended up enjoying the novellas best, particularly The Hound of the Baskervilles, and I think this was because they actually contained a much larger amount of action than the typical short story did, centering upon dramatic action unfolding across the wild moors or the American West rather than focusing on a client unburdening his woes in Baker Street and Sherlock subsequently disappearing to solve the mystery alone. I'm leaving my rating the same as before, as I can truly appreciate Conan Doyle's inventiveness and the legacy of these works, but I am maybe not as much of a proponent of Sherlock Holmes' as I was before. I now know what I like in a good mystery, and, unfortunately, Holmes and Watson did not quite live up to my preferences upon this little revisit.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

    I had read many of these before but there were a few new ones that led to this read, and I reread the rest in order to refresh for a book group. Holmes stories are interesting in that they are mysteries, but not ones where you are given the information to try to actually solve it as more recent ones go with the hints and the red herrings and such. These you just go along for the ride admiring Holmes' genius. I did notice this time through that most, if not all, of the female characters were very I had read many of these before but there were a few new ones that led to this read, and I reread the rest in order to refresh for a book group. Holmes stories are interesting in that they are mysteries, but not ones where you are given the information to try to actually solve it as more recent ones go with the hints and the red herrings and such. These you just go along for the ride admiring Holmes' genius. I did notice this time through that most, if not all, of the female characters were very strong. They were smart, observant, deep-thinking, strong-willed, brave, even with a fainting spell here or there, there was a lot of respect to the women despite Holmes' wanting to write off the female sex. And the one person to fully "beat" him that we read about was a woman. There is only one character I can think of off the top of my head that might not fit the profile, but even she had many admirable qualities and had some good insights. But then again, it took me almost a month to read this through so I may be forgetting or muddling.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Athena

    Sherlock Holmes has impressed me to no end. I thoroughly enjoyed these stories, I liked that even though they were separate the narrator maintained a timeline to connect them. Similar to Nancy Drew I was a little disappointed that there were only hints of the supernatural with every case having a logical, practical resolution, but only a little. I originally wanted to put the second volume on hold, as I was not ready to depart from Watson and Holmes, until I came to the last story where Watson a Sherlock Holmes has impressed me to no end. I thoroughly enjoyed these stories, I liked that even though they were separate the narrator maintained a timeline to connect them. Similar to Nancy Drew I was a little disappointed that there were only hints of the supernatural with every case having a logical, practical resolution, but only a little. I originally wanted to put the second volume on hold, as I was not ready to depart from Watson and Holmes, until I came to the last story where Watson annouced that he believed Holmes to be dead. I was almost in tears. Surely Holmes appears in volume two? Now I have to read it just to make sure.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Spencer

    I have read and re-read so many of the stories in this collection enough times that Watson and Holmes feel like old friends (well, Watson, at least . . . Holmes is a bit more reticent in the friend-making department), and I will always be fond of these adventures. I'm not sure if my love of spooky old manor houses out in the country is because of Sherlock Holmes, or if I love the Sherlock Holmes stories because they so often feature spooky old manor houses out in the country. Either way, it's ha I have read and re-read so many of the stories in this collection enough times that Watson and Holmes feel like old friends (well, Watson, at least . . . Holmes is a bit more reticent in the friend-making department), and I will always be fond of these adventures. I'm not sure if my love of spooky old manor houses out in the country is because of Sherlock Holmes, or if I love the Sherlock Holmes stories because they so often feature spooky old manor houses out in the country. Either way, it's hard not to appreciate all the gothic and Victorian spookiness that you'll find in these tales, whether it's on a dark fog-shrouded London street in the long hours of the night or out on the moors under the cold, silver light of the moon. For a self-proclaimed non-reader of mysteries - not particularly a genre that gets me going, in most instances - I really do love these stories a lot. Now, on to Volume II!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Avery Judd

    Yayyy!!! i finally finished it! it was a huge book! i loved the stories, although some of them just weren’t that fun. you didn’t really figure anything out until the end and i love the mysteries where you can figure things out yourself along the way. other then that, it was super good! 😊

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Vega

    Sherlock Holmes . I’ve had Volume 1 & 2 of Sherlock Holmes for two years now? And made it a goal to read Volume 1 in the month of July. . I failed. It took me a month and a half to finish it! 😂 . I really enjoyed reading these stories. -Sherlock is a genius. The way he uses his powers of deduction are quite brilliant. -Dr. Watson is such a great friend. I’m not sure I would have followed through on half of the errands that Watson followed Holmes on. 😂😂😂 Some of that stuff sounded really dangerous! Sherlock Holmes . I’ve had Volume 1 & 2 of Sherlock Holmes for two years now? And made it a goal to read Volume 1 in the month of July. . I failed. It took me a month and a half to finish it! 😂 . I really enjoyed reading these stories. -Sherlock is a genius. The way he uses his powers of deduction are quite brilliant. -Dr. Watson is such a great friend. I’m not sure I would have followed through on half of the errands that Watson followed Holmes on. 😂😂😂 Some of that stuff sounded really dangerous! -This was a little bit comical in parts. And not just the little jokes that individuals would make. But more of the times they lived in and how different they are from now. . 4.5 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫 Although I really enjoyed it, I am going to hold off on Volume 2 for awhile. 😅😅 I need to bit of a break.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Val Wilkens

    This book was definitely good! Kept me entertained, even though at some points it can get slightly boring. Still amazing, and reading about the most famous detective was super fun!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shareen Ghabrial

    I appreciated the style and direct writing, but I struggled with distinguishing among the few characters.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aubrey

    Fantastic. Brilliant. A Study in Scarlet was my very favorite.

  28. 4 out of 5

    robinie

    Sherlock Holmes - everybody knows him, everybody loves him. Me too. Nevertheless, 50% was enough for me. I enjoyed the little detective stories, especially Sherlock himself. But I don't feel the urge to finish this book as the structure is always the same. There is a case and Sherlock and Watson solve it. The End. Sherlock Holmes - everybody knows him, everybody loves him. Me too. Nevertheless, 50% was enough for me. I enjoyed the little detective stories, especially Sherlock himself. But I don't feel the urge to finish this book as the structure is always the same. There is a case and Sherlock and Watson solve it. The End.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The world’s most revered and famous fictional detective first appeared from the pen of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle almost a 130 years ago, but the author did not finish with his greatest creation until almost 40 years later even after unsuccessfully killing him off. In this first volume of all the collected works that feature Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr. John Watson, the reader first meets the great detective and his friend through two short novellas, 23 short stories, and the best-known and gr The world’s most revered and famous fictional detective first appeared from the pen of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle almost a 130 years ago, but the author did not finish with his greatest creation until almost 40 years later even after unsuccessfully killing him off. In this first volume of all the collected works that feature Sherlock Holmes and his friend Dr. John Watson, the reader first meets the great detective and his friend through two short novellas, 23 short stories, and the best-known and greatest case the pair ever faced. The two-volume collection of the original works of Conan Doyle in the American publication order, begins with the first two Holmes novelettes Study in Scarlett and The Sign of Four which are very well written stories that both introduce the main character Holmes, but also through the eyes of his friend Watson. The next 23 short stories then show the genius and resource of the London-based detective and throughout we are given references to cases we have yet to personally read. Of the those short stories I found six the best of the bunch: “A Scandal in Bohemia”, “The Five Orange Pips”, “The Man with the Twisted Lip”, “Silver Blaze”, “The Musgrave Ritual, and “The Naval Treaty”. This volume ends with the most famous and definitely the best Sherlock Holmes story of them all, The Hound of the Baskervilles. Even though there have been numerous adaptations of this most famous novel, upon reading it one senses the place on edge, nature seeming on the verge of overpowering man, and the sounds and shadows of mysterious beings across the moor. It was no small fact that nine years after killing off Holmes, Conan Doyle wrote a novel that no only brought make his character but wrote it in such a way that made people engage with both of the main characters instantly. There seem to be several missteps, namely “The Final Problem” which seems more to do about setting up the final struggle as is to learn more about Professor Moriarty and see the net Holmes had cast instead of just being told. There are just as many of the other short stories that are not the best than there are very good if not great. Sometimes the eye is in the beholder, but others it is not. Upon finishing this first volume, I enjoyed reading these 26 stories. As a first time reader of Conan Doyle it was fascinating to see how more human Sherlock seems to slowly become over the course of the stories with him as their focus. In the end I can’t stress enough how you should get this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    This month, I have read ten of the short stories for 12th grade British Literature. I am a little disappointed that this was my first foray into the adventures of Holmes and Watson. But, to be trite, better late than never. What is there to say that hasn't already been said? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote incredibly compelling tales and created one of the most magnificent characters in the history of literature. Despite more than a century in popular culture with countless interpretations in books, This month, I have read ten of the short stories for 12th grade British Literature. I am a little disappointed that this was my first foray into the adventures of Holmes and Watson. But, to be trite, better late than never. What is there to say that hasn't already been said? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote incredibly compelling tales and created one of the most magnificent characters in the history of literature. Despite more than a century in popular culture with countless interpretations in books, films, and television, there is nothing overrated about Sherlock Holmes. His methods of deduction are brilliant and contagious; I find myself attempting to use them whenever possible. His personality is interesting, especially given its differences with many well-known portrayals of the character. (On a humorous note, Holmes' keen awareness of his own abilities sometimes reminds me of that of Hercule Poirot.) The following is a list of the stories I have read thus far, the first five being a part of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, and the latter five from The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes: A Scandal in Bohemia - Probably my favorite of the bunch. The first paragraph alone is captivating. The Red-Headed League The Boscombe Valley Mystery The Adventure of the Speckled Band - Another favorite of mine. Highly suspenseful. The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet Silver Blaze The Crooked Man The Resident Patient The Naval Treaty The Final Problem - This is the only story that left me feeling dissatisfied. I can clearly see how, in its day (view spoiler)[(when no one knew Holmes would come back), readers felt betrayed. It was an easy out, and contrived, at that. If Moriarty had been in, or even alluded to, in previous stories, and if Holmes' beloved methods had actually been on display, then this story would have been one of the very best. Thank goodness Doyle eventually decided to revive, as Dr. Watson states, "the foremost champion of the law... whom I shall ever regard as the best and the wisest man whom I have ever known." (Pg. 570) (hide spoiler)] I am very excited to continue reading these books and short stories; I might even try watching one of the movies about them. I'm a little choosy when it comes to Holmes, so I'll probably play it safe and stick with Basil Rathbone. I'm pretty sure he actually was Sherlock Holmes.

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