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Inspector Henry Tibbett Mystery


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Inspector Henry Tibbett Mystery

30 review for Dead Men Don't Ski

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sharla

    The atmosphere of ski country in the Italian Alps is perfectly portrayed and adds tremendously to the story. The mystery plot is pretty good and well laid out. Henry Tibbett is an interesting detective, who genuinely cares about people and solves problems along the way to solving the mystery. I also like the team effort of Henry and his wife, Emmy. This is the first in the series and I will definitely be reading more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    There were too many characters to keep straight and also the story line did not hold my interest so I put this one aside. I know I've read some of these books long ago so am familiar with the author. I think that the setting and pace were the factors which decided me into not going on with this read. There were too many characters to keep straight and also the story line did not hold my interest so I put this one aside. I know I've read some of these books long ago so am familiar with the author. I think that the setting and pace were the factors which decided me into not going on with this read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Justus

    I came across a mention of *Dead Men Don't Ski* via *The Invisible Event*, a blog dedicated to old & mostly forgotten mystery books from the early- the mid-20th century. It was given a favorable 4 out of 5 star review and it seemed like an opportunity to try something a little bit out of my normal reading habit. Having read a few more reviews, I can appreciate the historical place of this book. It appears to be one of the first (possibly the first?) "cosy mysteries" that now are quite commonplace I came across a mention of *Dead Men Don't Ski* via *The Invisible Event*, a blog dedicated to old & mostly forgotten mystery books from the early- the mid-20th century. It was given a favorable 4 out of 5 star review and it seemed like an opportunity to try something a little bit out of my normal reading habit. Having read a few more reviews, I can appreciate the historical place of this book. It appears to be one of the first (possibly the first?) "cosy mysteries" that now are quite commonplace. It is also a "travelogue" mystery -- that is, it occurs in some exotic or unique locale -- which was also uncommon at the time. A large part of the draw to readers at the time would have been descriptions of the Italian ski resort that were both expensive & cumbersome to get to. (It appears to take ~24 hours by train to get there with multiple changes of train to smaller and smaller lines.) Outside of that kind of historical curiosity, though, I was fairly underwhelmed by the book. You have a standard set up: a dozen or so people in a remote hotel, someone ends up murdered, it turns that nearly every guest has a motive for killing the dead man. Then follows some detection, which largely involves building a time table of who was doing what when. "Mrs Smith had lunch from 12-1" and so on. And then from that the detective can figure out whodunnit. This has always been my least favorite style of mystery book. The idea that people can remember what they did when with any accuracy, much less that various people with different watches would agree on the exact timing of things, always has struck me as ridiculous. In this case, it felt even more ridiculous because a) the most likely murderer seemed obvious to me quite early on and I never felt there was a plausible reason for discounting him b) it turns out there was a witness who saw the whole thing and would have come forward in another day or two By about the 50% part the detective claims to have solved the murder. A second murder occurs which doesn't actually add to the mystery much -- the most likely culprit of the second murder is even more obvious than the first -- but does drag out the book quite a bit more. Like many mystery books, the author engages in poor writing and underhanded tricks in order to sustain the mystery for the reader until the end. The detective explains his suspicions to the Italian police and they formulate a plan of action....but that all happens off-screen for no reason other than to maintain the mystery to the reader. Even worse comes later when they author becomes even more elliptical to maintain the mystery: "He asked Emmy a question, and very surprised, she answered, "Yes, I suppose so. That morning. But what has that got to do with it?" or "He ran downstairs, and out to the ski-lift. There, he commandeered the telephone, and rang Carlo. He asked him two questions—and received the answers he expected."

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jessi

    I heard about this book on the Classic Mysteries podcast and was happy to see it was available at my local library. It took me three tries (and renewing it twice both times) for me to finally get it read. Not that it was bad. In fact, it's a delightful story, it just took awhile to get into it. Henry Tibbet, a well-known detective, is going on vacation with his wife to a remote skiing village. When his bosses find out, they tell him that there has been a problem with drug smuggling coming out of I heard about this book on the Classic Mysteries podcast and was happy to see it was available at my local library. It took me three tries (and renewing it twice both times) for me to finally get it read. Not that it was bad. In fact, it's a delightful story, it just took awhile to get into it. Henry Tibbet, a well-known detective, is going on vacation with his wife to a remote skiing village. When his bosses find out, they tell him that there has been a problem with drug smuggling coming out of that particular Italian town. While Henry works for Scotland Yard, he is known to Interpol and they want his help. On the way up, Henry and Emma meet several people on a train, all of whom are going to Santa Chiar with them. There is a trio of young people, an English colonel and his stereotypical wife, as well as a countess getting away from her rather stiff and cold husband. There are more people that they meet once they get to the hotel, the most notable being Herr Hauser. He seems like a slimy sort who is more than a little interested in the daughter of a German family staying at the hotel. Of course, it should come as no surprise that Herr Hauser is the one to get bumped off. It's just sorting through the myriad characters and each of their motives.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    “Behind the railway line, the mountains reared in white splendour: by now, the sun had left the village, but lingered on the rosy peaks and on the high snowfields. Far up the mountain , where the trees thinned out, just on the dividing line between sunshine and shadow, was a single isolated building…” This is Bella Vista, the place where the team of Henry Tibbett and his wife, Emmy begin their detective work. This mystery novel is the first of Moyes’ stories about Tibbett and “his nose”. Moyes’ t “Behind the railway line, the mountains reared in white splendour: by now, the sun had left the village, but lingered on the rosy peaks and on the high snowfields. Far up the mountain , where the trees thinned out, just on the dividing line between sunshine and shadow, was a single isolated building…” This is Bella Vista, the place where the team of Henry Tibbett and his wife, Emmy begin their detective work. This mystery novel is the first of Moyes’ stories about Tibbett and “his nose”. Moyes’ tales are entertaining and fun to read. I would imagine that many people have read them for the story – the plots are good and interesting to follow. I, however, like Henry and Emmy. Every time my friend gives me one of these crime novels, I read them to see how the Tibbetts are getting on. They seem like friendly, kind people, people who I would have liked to meet. If you enjoy reading British mysteries and don’t mind a bit of time travel back to simpler times, these stories may be for you.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    A good read, a good plot, good color and characters, and a good puzzle, with a neat wrapup. Moyes kept me guessing throughout at all levels, not just about technical factors such as timing, but about the basic plausibility of various hypotheses. I'm looking forward to reading more. Later: I'm definitely enjoying this series. I've read about six of the early ones as of this writing. Moyes's writing, plotting, and construction get better with time and practice, and I've been giving them four stars. A good read, a good plot, good color and characters, and a good puzzle, with a neat wrapup. Moyes kept me guessing throughout at all levels, not just about technical factors such as timing, but about the basic plausibility of various hypotheses. I'm looking forward to reading more. Later: I'm definitely enjoying this series. I've read about six of the early ones as of this writing. Moyes's writing, plotting, and construction get better with time and practice, and I've been giving them four stars. The local color is also quite enjoyable, and is not limited to Britain, but extends to much of Western Europe (reflecting Moyes's background): so far, Tibbett has done a good deal of traveling to Switzerland, The Netherlands, and France. So far, the books are free-standing--there's no particular reason to read them in order.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    'Henry Tibbett was not a man who looked like a great detective. In fact, as he would be the first to point out, he was not a great detective, but a conscientious and observant policeman, with an occasional flair for intuitive detection which he called "my nose".' Originally published in 1959, this is a welcome re-issue of the first Inspector Tibbett mystery by Patricia Moyes. Accompanied by his wife Emmy and a motley group of fellow travellers, Tibbett finds himself in the isolated ski resort of 'Henry Tibbett was not a man who looked like a great detective. In fact, as he would be the first to point out, he was not a great detective, but a conscientious and observant policeman, with an occasional flair for intuitive detection which he called "my nose".' Originally published in 1959, this is a welcome re-issue of the first Inspector Tibbett mystery by Patricia Moyes. Accompanied by his wife Emmy and a motley group of fellow travellers, Tibbett finds himself in the isolated ski resort of Santa Chiara. He is not there by accident, as he is mixing business with pleasure, having been asked to sniff out a possible smuggling ring. When a dead body turns up, things take on a more serious urgency - and, as Tibbett tries to find the killer, things get even more tricky when a second body turns up... This is a fun, breezy kind of murder mystery. The list of suspects is small, helped by the isolation of the hotel; the local police inspector is, of course, clearly on the wrong track; and everyone, as it turns out, has a shady past and a motive for killing - this is classic whodunnit territory. What lifts this to the realm of really wonderful is Patricia Moyes' writing, which is full of such enthusiasm that this truly is a page-turner. Her character observations are spot on, often funny, and she has an eye for description that is at once precise whilst being loaded with glee. As Henry and Emmy arrive at Victoria Station to start their journey they observe the other travellers setting out to various winter destinations: 'They were not all young, Henry noted with relief, though the average age was certainly under thirty: but young or middle-aged, male or female, all were unanimous in their defiant sartorial abandon - the tightest trousers, the gaudiest sweaters, the heaviest boots, the silliest knitted hats that ever burst from the over-charged imagination of a Winter Sports Department.... The whole dingy place had the air of a monstrous end-of-term party.' To my shame I had never read any of Moyes previously. It appears there are 19 books in the series, so now some serious catch-up to be done. perfect for fans of Golden Age crime writing, these deserve to be re-discovered. Absolutely cracking stuff. 4.5 stars happily rounded up.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Max

    I enjoyed this book, but it wasn't exactly a page turner that I couldn't put down. It romanticized skiing in a remote Italian town in the 1950's (what's not to like!), but the story centered on a "locked door" type mystery where the murder could not have been committed the way it appears to have been committed. Typically, all of the characters were suspects and the ending was unexpected, but not exactly exciting. I enjoyed this book, but it wasn't exactly a page turner that I couldn't put down. It romanticized skiing in a remote Italian town in the 1950's (what's not to like!), but the story centered on a "locked door" type mystery where the murder could not have been committed the way it appears to have been committed. Typically, all of the characters were suspects and the ending was unexpected, but not exactly exciting.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jay Maxfield

    This is Patricia Moyes first crime book published in 1959 by Collins Crime Club - I will add below the book taster contained in the Collins Crime Version. This is my third reading & review of a Patricia Moyes novel - as I have said in my other reviews the author has an exceptionally good writing style that is easy to read (no re-reading of sentences required) and her ideas for plots rivals even Agatha Christie's ingenuity as well as the fact she has a great sense of humour & bitchiness that is s This is Patricia Moyes first crime book published in 1959 by Collins Crime Club - I will add below the book taster contained in the Collins Crime Version. This is my third reading & review of a Patricia Moyes novel - as I have said in my other reviews the author has an exceptionally good writing style that is easy to read (no re-reading of sentences required) and her ideas for plots rivals even Agatha Christie's ingenuity as well as the fact she has a great sense of humour & bitchiness that is sprinkled through out her novels. This novel being the authors first is plainly obvious to regular cosy crime readers in that it is simply too long and everything turns out nicely in the end for everyone except for the victims and whoever seems villainous - this seems to happen to most new writers in the crime genre - and they either develop from the experience or tend to lapse in mediocre novels and rarely become well known authors. This author strips back her wordage and everything turns out nicely in the end in subsequent novels. If you are new to Patricia Moyes then I advise starting with Who saw her die? which I have rated 5 stars - whereas this novel is very enjoyable to read (especially for Cosy Crime Readers) but it is just too long which makes it a 3 1/2 star book only which isn't bad for a first attempt. (Below Book Taster) "The whole thing is probably a wild goose chase," said Chief Inspector Henry Tibbett to his wife. "Heavens knows I don't want any trouble. I want to learn to ski. After all we are on holiday." Santa Chiara is high up in the Italian Dolomites and very close to the Austrian border--close enough for the Narcotics Department of Interpol to be suspicious of the activities which seemed to be centred on the Hotel Bella Vista, where Henry and Emmy had, in all innocence, arranged to spend their holiday. Knowing this the British police had now asked him to keep his eyes open while he was there. But Henry's hopes of a wild goose chase died with one of his fellow guests, who was alive at the top of the ski-lift to the hotel but who had been shot dead before reaching the bottom, having been passed en route by seven of the hotel residents who were riding up. Lastly - Moyes uses a German word Vorlages as some kind of female clothing item. Does anyone have an idea what this is?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sue F

    Patricia Moyes has long been one of my favorite mystery authors, from back in the days when paperbacks of her books were crowded onto my shelves. Somewhere along the way, though, most of those books got loaned out or lost, and so I was really happy to be offered an electronic review copy of the first title in Moyes’ Henry and Emmy Tibbett series, Dead Men Don’t Ski, in exchange for my honest review. As soon as I opened the book on my e-reader, I remembered again why I like Moyes’ writing so much Patricia Moyes has long been one of my favorite mystery authors, from back in the days when paperbacks of her books were crowded onto my shelves. Somewhere along the way, though, most of those books got loaned out or lost, and so I was really happy to be offered an electronic review copy of the first title in Moyes’ Henry and Emmy Tibbett series, Dead Men Don’t Ski, in exchange for my honest review. As soon as I opened the book on my e-reader, I remembered again why I like Moyes’ writing so much. It’s crisp, clear, and has a good dose of the dry British humor that I like so much. Her descriptions of places and activities, although probably contemporaneous when written (in this case, the late 1950s), now read almost like a historical mystery, but don’t suffer at all for it. And I find it all still quite relatable. The “2nd class” ski train to Italy could easily, without too much imagination, be a Friday ski bus from Los Angeles to Mammoth. The bars and restaurants of the little ski town, with the subtle differences in clientele and décor, also are quite recognizable. The various skiers, from the terrified beginners to the easy intermediates to the competitive advanced skiers, ring true as well. And the plot, about which I won’t say too much to preserve its surprises, is still solid as well. So I was quite happy and ended up (re)reading this in just a couple of sittings. If there is one way in which this doesn’t age quite as well, it’s in the nature of the illicit drug trade which forms an element in the narrative. Without giving away any spoilers, suffice it to say that, unlike the skiers and the ski town, I don’t think drug smuggling now looks anything like it did back then. But even the occasional dissonant element doesn’t spoil the story, since it’s pretty easy to remember that this is all taking place decades ago. All-in-all, I am quite thankful to Felony & Mayhem Press/Edelweiss for the review copy, and am now going to have to go re-read the rest of the titles in the series! I don’t give 5 stars to many books, reserving that level for books which I imagine I will enjoy re-reading again in the future. But in this case, I’ve just proved I really enjoyed re-reading this one (!!!), and so it’s getting five stars from me.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ferne

    After I finished reading this novel I noticed that there's a little box promo on the back cover entitled, "Who's Likely to Like This?" The answer reads, "Fans of Caroline Graham and Susannah Stacey." That made me smile as I thoroughly enjoyed the novel by Patricia Moyes and I am a definite fan of "Midsomer Murders" based on the crime-novel series by author Caroline Graham. Now I'd like to not only read more Inspector Henry Tibbett Mysteries but I'm also adding Susannah Stacey's* name to my book After I finished reading this novel I noticed that there's a little box promo on the back cover entitled, "Who's Likely to Like This?" The answer reads, "Fans of Caroline Graham and Susannah Stacey." That made me smile as I thoroughly enjoyed the novel by Patricia Moyes and I am a definite fan of "Midsomer Murders" based on the crime-novel series by author Caroline Graham. Now I'd like to not only read more Inspector Henry Tibbett Mysteries but I'm also adding Susannah Stacey's* name to my book wish list for my own reading investigations. "Whodunit?" From the moment Inspector Henry Tibbett and his wife Emmy boarded the train for their skiing vacation at Bella Vista in Santa Chiara, Italy, I was already trying to pay attention to the intricacies of the characters as one could feel there was to be an upcoming murder to solve. I must confess that I have pictured Henry as a British version of Peter Falk from Columbo days with some of his questioning techniques. Whatever your delight with this genre I highly recommend adding this series to your wish list. I've added it to my own. Since writing the initial review I've learned there are even more novels to investigate. Nothing could delight a reader more than an endless stream of novels to add to their wish list.*Susannah Stacey is a pseudonym used by writers Jill Staynes and Margaret Storey. Under this name, the team have produced a series of mystery novel featuring widowed British police Superintendent Bone. They also write a series of mysteries set during the Italian Renaissance under the name of Elizabeth Eyre.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scilla

    Henry Tibbett and Emmie go to Santa Chiara, Italy for a vacation. Henry is also going to check out possible smuggling from there. They meet other English people on the train, and are friendly throughout the visit. When Hauser is dead from a gunshot when he reaches the bottom of the chair lift, Henry is asked to help Capitano Spezzi solve the murder. There are no shortness of suspects, since Hauser is not very popular. He was inducing several to smuggle, wanted to marry the young German girl who Henry Tibbett and Emmie go to Santa Chiara, Italy for a vacation. Henry is also going to check out possible smuggling from there. They meet other English people on the train, and are friendly throughout the visit. When Hauser is dead from a gunshot when he reaches the bottom of the chair lift, Henry is asked to help Capitano Spezzi solve the murder. There are no shortness of suspects, since Hauser is not very popular. He was inducing several to smuggle, wanted to marry the young German girl who didn't want to marry him, and was blackmailing others. When Henry thinks the lift man Mario is going to tell him what happened, Mario is also shot on the life before he can have his talk with Henry. When three of the guests of the Inn go off with the ski instructor, Henry knows he must stop them or someone else might die.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Lewis

    Chief Inspector Henry Tibbett and his wife Emmy are heading for a skiing holiday in Santa Chiara on the Austria/Italy border. Tibbett has also been tasked with looking in to a smuggling gang working in the area. After a bright and enjoyable beginning local doctor Fritz Hauser is shot dead. Tibbett joins forces with local policeman Captaino Speiz as the unravel the past of the friendly doctor. Patricia Moyes creates an atmospheric look at post war Italy which still has links to the Nazi party and Chief Inspector Henry Tibbett and his wife Emmy are heading for a skiing holiday in Santa Chiara on the Austria/Italy border. Tibbett has also been tasked with looking in to a smuggling gang working in the area. After a bright and enjoyable beginning local doctor Fritz Hauser is shot dead. Tibbett joins forces with local policeman Captaino Speiz as the unravel the past of the friendly doctor. Patricia Moyes creates an atmospheric look at post war Italy which still has links to the Nazi party and smuggling virtually anything is easy. A real page turner with a whole host of suspects and plenty of turns which stands up well to Crossed Skies by E.C.R. Lorac.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Thank you to Felony & Mayhem for their Vintage titles! I had forgotten the Henry Tibbitt mysteries that I read a zillion years ago until I found this re-issue on the new book rack at my public library. Set in the Dolomites at an Italian ski resort, this clever tale has aged wonderfully! It was a smoothly told and thoroughly entertaining mystery with all the comfortable feeling of meeting an old friend. I'm so happy to have found this and will definitely be re-reading the entire series. Thank you to Felony & Mayhem for their Vintage titles! I had forgotten the Henry Tibbitt mysteries that I read a zillion years ago until I found this re-issue on the new book rack at my public library. Set in the Dolomites at an Italian ski resort, this clever tale has aged wonderfully! It was a smoothly told and thoroughly entertaining mystery with all the comfortable feeling of meeting an old friend. I'm so happy to have found this and will definitely be re-reading the entire series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Take your basic isolated manor house mystery and substitute isolated ski lodge. Murder occurs. The suspects are limited. It turns out that many of the guests have reason to wish the murdered man dead. A classic tale which Inspector Tibbett solves. It turned a bit too much on understanding the minute by minute timing of the lift up to the lodge but all and all it was a decent period mystery.

  16. 5 out of 5

    M^TTEO

    Dead Men Don’t Ski is one of the few crime/murder mystery novels that I have read as I usually prefer other genres. This novel however was an exception and I really enjoyed Moyes’ prolific descriptions of the alpine setting of Santa Chiara and the Ski resort Bella Vista. The mystery surrounding the murder and the hotel’s residents was also brilliant and I certainly didn’t see the end coming.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was a fun read. Very classic mystery vibes. Good sense of place in a remote Italian ski resort, with some back history from WWII. The use of the ski lift was genius. I generally liked our sleuths, though a bit less the whole "we'll-confer-in-private-so-the-reader-doesn't-know-our-secrets" thing. Will definitely be reading more of this series! This was a fun read. Very classic mystery vibes. Good sense of place in a remote Italian ski resort, with some back history from WWII. The use of the ski lift was genius. I generally liked our sleuths, though a bit less the whole "we'll-confer-in-private-so-the-reader-doesn't-know-our-secrets" thing. Will definitely be reading more of this series!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shauna

    Henry Tibbett is no Peter Shandy, however he is a very competent, and friendly inspector that I wouldn't mind having coffee with again. My favorite line from the book; "It's frightfully suburban to fall for your ski instructor". Henry Tibbett is no Peter Shandy, however he is a very competent, and friendly inspector that I wouldn't mind having coffee with again. My favorite line from the book; "It's frightfully suburban to fall for your ski instructor".

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vintagebooklvr

    Murder and a ski getaway. That is what dreams are made of, well, sort of. The setting is great; I could just picture being at the hotel. The mystery kept you guessing until the end. Henry and Emma were a great couple and a nice mystery-solving duo. I will definitely read more in this series.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I couldn't stop reading this page-turning mystery, about a humble, but brilliant detective who solves a mystery while on vacation at a ski chalet. I have no interest in skiing, but the place descriptions were so vivid, I kept wishing I were there. I couldn't stop reading this page-turning mystery, about a humble, but brilliant detective who solves a mystery while on vacation at a ski chalet. I have no interest in skiing, but the place descriptions were so vivid, I kept wishing I were there.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julie Farrell

    First time readi g this author and I was hooked from the first page. I was transported to a ski resort in the Italian alps at the golden age of travel. Such a well written mystery. Great for fans of the classics like Christie and Sayers.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Having discovered this mid-20th century Golden Age of Mystery writer, I am determined to read the Henry Tibbett mysteries in total. This, the second, takes us out of England to a ski resort. Henry is up to the challenge, whether it is drug smuggling or murder or something else!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    This is the first book I read by this author and I'm happy I discovered an excellent mystery writer. Great characters, engrossing plot and a lot of British humour. It was an enjoyable read that I strongly recommend. Many thanks to the publisher and Edelweiss for this ARC, all opinions are mine This is the first book I read by this author and I'm happy I discovered an excellent mystery writer. Great characters, engrossing plot and a lot of British humour. It was an enjoyable read that I strongly recommend. Many thanks to the publisher and Edelweiss for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    Very good. I like polite British mysteries. Detectives, police or otherwise, acting like adults not children. I dislike modern American ones with constant infighting of the detectives and physical violence with the crooks.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erlend Tyrmi

    I’ve read a bunch of ski crime novels, and this is one of the best. Should be on the shelf in every chalet and ski hotel in the world. It’s a classic whodunnit, with Turkish cigarettes and countesses and things like that.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Penrod

    One of my favorite mystery series. I decided to reread some of my favorites by Patricia Moyes and this was my first one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Cooper

    Loved it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cherie Bush

    First in a new (to me) series. I enjoyed it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    A great traditional mystery with a plethora of suspects and clues, eventually intrically worked out with the classic timetable. Lots of twists and turns--and not just on the ski slopes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Good mystery - nice to think of ski slopes and snow in this 80 degree plus weather! The British policeman Henry and his wife Emmy are likable characters. I will probably read more in this series.

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