Hot Best Seller

Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels: A History of Graphic Narratives

Availability: Ready to download

Graphic narrative art is a fascinating phenomenon that emerged centuries ago with the expansion of literacy and the publication industry. The earliest example of a repeating comic character dates back to the late 1700s. By following the growth of print technology in Europe and Asia, it is possible to understand how and why artists across cultures developed different strate Graphic narrative art is a fascinating phenomenon that emerged centuries ago with the expansion of literacy and the publication industry. The earliest example of a repeating comic character dates back to the late 1700s. By following the growth of print technology in Europe and Asia, it is possible to understand how and why artists across cultures developed different strategies for telling stories with pictures. This book is much more than a history of graphic narrative across the globe. It examines broader conceptual developments that preceded the origins of comics and graphic novels; how those ideas have evolved over the last century and a half; how literacy, print technology, and developments in narrative art are interrelated; and the way graphic narratives communicate culturally significant stories. The work of artists such as William Hogarth, J. J. Grandville, Willhem Busch, Frans Masereel, Max Ernst, Saul Steinberg, Henry Darger, and Larry Gonick are discussed or depicted.


Compare

Graphic narrative art is a fascinating phenomenon that emerged centuries ago with the expansion of literacy and the publication industry. The earliest example of a repeating comic character dates back to the late 1700s. By following the growth of print technology in Europe and Asia, it is possible to understand how and why artists across cultures developed different strate Graphic narrative art is a fascinating phenomenon that emerged centuries ago with the expansion of literacy and the publication industry. The earliest example of a repeating comic character dates back to the late 1700s. By following the growth of print technology in Europe and Asia, it is possible to understand how and why artists across cultures developed different strategies for telling stories with pictures. This book is much more than a history of graphic narrative across the globe. It examines broader conceptual developments that preceded the origins of comics and graphic novels; how those ideas have evolved over the last century and a half; how literacy, print technology, and developments in narrative art are interrelated; and the way graphic narratives communicate culturally significant stories. The work of artists such as William Hogarth, J. J. Grandville, Willhem Busch, Frans Masereel, Max Ernst, Saul Steinberg, Henry Darger, and Larry Gonick are discussed or depicted.

45 review for Comics, Manga, and Graphic Novels: A History of Graphic Narratives

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lulu

    c. 200 BCE - https://blog.britishmuseum.org/a-hist... https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early... https://killervisualstrategies.com/bl... Late 4th https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gu_Ka... John Furnival, Semiotic Folk Poem, 1966 •• Exekias, Achilles killing Penthesilea, queen of the Amazons, c. 545-530 BCE ••"Inferno XVIII, 8th Circle of Hell: Punishment of Panderers, Seducers," ca. 1480 "The Bubblers Medley, or a Sketch of the Times Being Europes Memorial for the Year 1720" (sic] ••Leonardo da Vinci, F c. 200 BCE - https://blog.britishmuseum.org/a-hist... https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early... https://killervisualstrategies.com/bl... Late 4th https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gu_Ka... John Furnival, Semiotic Folk Poem, 1966 •• Exekias, Achilles killing Penthesilea, queen of the Amazons, c. 545-530 BCE ••"Inferno XVIII, 8th Circle of Hell: Punishment of Panderers, Seducers," ca. 1480 "The Bubblers Medley, or a Sketch of the Times Being Europes Memorial for the Year 1720" (sic] ••Leonardo da Vinci, Five caricature heads, after 1490 “What is this my son Tom" [sic), 1774 Suzuki Harunobu, The Elegant and Horny Maneemon (Füryü enshoku Maneemon), ca. 1768-1770 William Hogarth, A Harlot's Progress, plate 1, April 1733 James Gillray, Presages of the Millennium, 1795 Gustave Doré, Histoire pittoresque de la Sainte Russie, 1854 Frans Masereel, Passionate Journey (Mon livre d'heures), 1919 Max Ernst, "The Court of the Dragon" from A Week of Kindness, 1934 Charlotte Salomon, Life? or Theatre? (Leben? oder Theater?), ca. 1941-1943 Charles Philipon The Metamorphosis of King Louis-Philippe into a Pear (La Métamorphose du roi Louis-Philippe en poire), 1831 J. J. Grandville, "Apocalypse du ballet" from his collection Another World (Un autre monde), 1844 John Leech, "Cartoon No. 1: Substance and Shadow," Punch, June 24, 1843 Cover, Illustrated Police News, September 22, 1888 Jean-Charles Pellerin, "Don Quichotte," Imagerie d'Épinal, no. 36, ca. 1880 Wilhelm Busch, The Two Ducks and a Frog (Die beiden Enten und der Frosch), 1862 Marie Duval and Charles Ross, "En Route for Suez," 1869 Richard Felton Outcault, "The Yellow Kid and His New Phonograph," Hogan's Alley, 1896 Bill Mauldin, "Didn't we meet at Cassino?" ca. 1943–1945 Saul Steinberg, "The Spiral," 1964 André Bertrand, Le Retour de la colonne Durutti (The Return of the Durutti Column), 1966 Henry Darger, "6 Episode 3 Place not mentioned. Escape during violent storm, still fighting though persed for long distance," [sic) ca. 1950–1970 Larry Gonick, The Cartoon History of the Universe, Book 1: From the Big Bang to Alexander the Great, 1997

  2. 5 out of 5

    Evan

    This book has an awkward scope, which is too expansive to achieve sufficient depth but too niche to engage a casual reader. It would probably have functioned better as two volumes, focusing on proto-comic art and modern comics' interplay with culture. Oh, and the chapter on digital media and distribution is terrible. The author is clearly out of his depth in it. This book has an awkward scope, which is too expansive to achieve sufficient depth but too niche to engage a casual reader. It would probably have functioned better as two volumes, focusing on proto-comic art and modern comics' interplay with culture. Oh, and the chapter on digital media and distribution is terrible. The author is clearly out of his depth in it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Yan

    The author must have been very poorly prepared for writing that book. When it comes to the japanese part of the history of comics there can be observed a striking lack of knowledge of not only the proper japanese words (writing katagana instead of katakana - page 128), but also the history itself. The book is very inconsistent and written in very facile manner.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aybike

  5. 5 out of 5

    .Heliana

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katarina

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nuha

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rs Petersen

  9. 4 out of 5

    Adrianas Veidas

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chiara

  11. 5 out of 5

    yube

  12. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm Schwantler

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alma Marhamati

  14. 5 out of 5

    Muhammad Khan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mikaela

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fabiano Curi

  17. 4 out of 5

    Juan Francisco

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Rico

  19. 5 out of 5

    Etienne

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eugene booker

  21. 5 out of 5

    Saloni

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Hoogterp

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Siddartha

  26. 5 out of 5

    Khulud

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mario

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bumpleberry

  29. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kimikimi

  31. 4 out of 5

    Hessah

  32. 4 out of 5

    Antonia

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jean

  34. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  35. 4 out of 5

    Dena

  36. 5 out of 5

    Svetlana Sotnikova

  37. 4 out of 5

    Mélanie

  38. 4 out of 5

    Rosa

  39. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad Khan

  40. 4 out of 5

    Christian Crochet

  41. 4 out of 5

    Julian Patton

  42. 4 out of 5

    Ane Erkomaishvili

  43. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Rose

  44. 4 out of 5

    Vicente

  45. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad Aladawi

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...