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Batman and the Monster Men

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Matt Wagner takes the Dark Knight through his sophomore season in this new trade paperback collecting the 6-issue miniseries! Batman has spent his first year fighting organized crime — but nothing thus far in his early career as the Caped Crusader has prepared him for the new menace facing Gotham: super-powered villains!


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Matt Wagner takes the Dark Knight through his sophomore season in this new trade paperback collecting the 6-issue miniseries! Batman has spent his first year fighting organized crime — but nothing thus far in his early career as the Caped Crusader has prepared him for the new menace facing Gotham: super-powered villains!

30 review for Batman and the Monster Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    poor Hugo Strange! according to one of my closest friends, Wikipedia, the now sadly left behind Mr. Strange was one of Batman's earliest antagonists: he debuted prior to such luminaries as Joker and Catwoman, was sharp enough to deduce Batman's secret identity, and apparently created a whole bunch of, shall we say, "Monster Men". and yet time has not been kind to him, and his infamy has faded. all we are is dust in the wind! unless there is a big screen version of us, I guess. this title seeks to poor Hugo Strange! according to one of my closest friends, Wikipedia, the now sadly left behind Mr. Strange was one of Batman's earliest antagonists: he debuted prior to such luminaries as Joker and Catwoman, was sharp enough to deduce Batman's secret identity, and apparently created a whole bunch of, shall we say, "Monster Men". and yet time has not been kind to him, and his infamy has faded. all we are is dust in the wind! unless there is a big screen version of us, I guess. this title seeks to redress that sad state of affairs, with poor result. set a year after Batman became active, the book tries very hard to capture a sort of retro appeal. unfortunately Matt Wagner - usually an intriguing writer - is surprisingly stale here, resorting to overly familiar characterization that does little to breathe new life into his cast. he does a particularly poor job with the annoying female lead. his art is also decidedly on the mundane side of things with an over-reliance on square jaws, even on his women - rather than looking atypical, the unfortunate Miss Madison ends up looking like Bruce Wayne in drag. Wagner does try though. he juggles multiple first-person perspectives, to no great interest, but at least he tried to juggle. and despite the mainly unattractive line work, there is the occasional panel here and there with imagery that is bold and compelling. the MVP of Batman and the Monster Men is actually inker Dave Stewart, who shades Wagner's drawings in pleasing tones of gray and mud-brown (plus the occasional mold-green) that create a noirish retro atmosphere sorely lacking elsewhere.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    "He arrives, [clad in] all black and real - no urban myth. And I think of how I spent the better part of the last year trying to uncover his secrets . . . Now, I call him 'friend.'" -- Captain Jim Gordon (GCPD), on his burgeoning 'professional' relationship w/ Batman Set during those early days in the Dark Knight's crime-fighting career - though the technology displayed is decidedly 21st-century - Monster Men features our title character taking on two factions that are uneasily working together. "He arrives, [clad in] all black and real - no urban myth. And I think of how I spent the better part of the last year trying to uncover his secrets . . . Now, I call him 'friend.'" -- Captain Jim Gordon (GCPD), on his burgeoning 'professional' relationship w/ Batman Set during those early days in the Dark Knight's crime-fighting career - though the technology displayed is decidedly 21st-century - Monster Men features our title character taking on two factions that are uneasily working together. On the one side there is top Gotham crime boss Sal Marconi and his unending supply of goons, while on the other there is the jealous longtime adversary Professor Hugo Strange (who actually pre-dates appearances by better-known villains Joker and Penguin in the series during the 40's). The titular 'Monster Men' are a trio of genetically-enhanced yet grotesque guys - shades of Frankenstein's monster - turned into mindlessly harsh muscle working for Strange. It was a pretty tight if not particulary memorable story, featuring Batman performing some actual investigative work along the usual head-bashing. Captain Jim Gordon (still years away from being commissioner) lends a hand when needed, and the first true Batmobile also makes an appearance.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I thought Matt Wagner did a great job with this! It's a look at a newbie Batman having his first run-in with Hugo Strange. Freaky monster mutations and a peek at the first Batmobile...who could ask for anything more? I thought Matt Wagner did a great job with this! It's a look at a newbie Batman having his first run-in with Hugo Strange. Freaky monster mutations and a peek at the first Batmobile...who could ask for anything more?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lono

    Batman and the Monster Men is another tale by Matt Wagner that is set in the early years of Bruce’s war on crime. This book is really part one of a two part story continued in Batman and the Mad Monk. While these were collected separately, the books are really one story. Wagner does of great job of giving this Batman tale an old school, gangster noir kind of feel. Some of the set pieces seem to be lifted right out of a Chandler novel mixed with a dash of Univeral Monster flick. Matt's bridging t Batman and the Monster Men is another tale by Matt Wagner that is set in the early years of Bruce’s war on crime. This book is really part one of a two part story continued in Batman and the Mad Monk. While these were collected separately, the books are really one story. Wagner does of great job of giving this Batman tale an old school, gangster noir kind of feel. Some of the set pieces seem to be lifted right out of a Chandler novel mixed with a dash of Univeral Monster flick. Matt's bridging the gap between Batman’s early battles with mobster types and the freakish creatures he would eventually encounter. I like that Bats is starting to have to put aside the rational and explainable and accept that there are some things even his brilliant mind can’t wrap itself around. I couldn’t help but think about Batman: The Animated Series while reading this one too. This book has similar qualities to classic episodes like "On Leather Wings" or "Moon of the Wolf". Wagner’s love of Miller and Mazzucchelli’s Batman: Year One is obvious here. Bats is still honing his skills as a fledgling crime fighter. Rookie Bats is cool. He’s also learning how to balance being Batman with being Bruce Wayne. Bruce is still flirting with the idea of having a life without Bats at some point. Batman’s relationship with Gordon continues to evolve in this one as well. They are just starting to build trust in each other. Wagner also gives a lot of artistic nods to Year One. A couple of images are clearly meant to be a tribute to Mazzucchelli’s masterpiece. Matt’s art is simple by today’s standards, but it’s for that reason his stuff has always appealed to me. Here's a couple of bits from both books. You get the idea. This book also acts as something of an origin story for Hugo Strange. He is more of the “Dr. Frankenstein” type instead of the diabolical psychiatrist in this one. Personally, I like the twist. I never really bought into the demented Sigmund Freud persona. Not that I don’t think most shrinks are crooks, just not “scary” crooks. Other notable appearances include Sal Maroni, the original Batmobile, and a cameo by the Red Hood. This one’s loaded with fun little tidbits. Matt is great at telling uncomplicated stories with a “classic” feel to them. He squeezes in just enough action and violence to keep my attention. I recognize that my love for most of Matt’s catalogue of work probably prevents me from giving an unbiased review, but fuck it. And while it’s not what I would label “required reading” for the average comic fan, I would certainly recommend a look-see if you’re a fan of any of Wagner’s other stuff, enjoyed Batman: Year One, or Batman: The Animated Series. The average Bat-fan will probably find a little something to appreciate in this one. And if you like it, make sure to check out Batman and the Mad Monk. Get this review and more at:

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    Batman : Monster Men (2006) Modern Batman #3 While I was reading this story, which is set in early crime fighting days of Batman, I couldn't shake the the feeling that Hugo strange and his faithful 'exotic-poisonous-dart-shooting' man servant Sanjay were in fact 70's Bond Villains! If we are following the linear time line, this story marks the appearance of Hugo Strange as one of the first Batman's long term adversaries. Oh, also Batmobile debuts in this storyline! Not a disappointing story, but n Batman : Monster Men (2006) Modern Batman #3 While I was reading this story, which is set in early crime fighting days of Batman, I couldn't shake the the feeling that Hugo strange and his faithful 'exotic-poisonous-dart-shooting' man servant Sanjay were in fact 70's Bond Villains! If we are following the linear time line, this story marks the appearance of Hugo Strange as one of the first Batman's long term adversaries. Oh, also Batmobile debuts in this storyline! Not a disappointing story, but not a great one either.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Will Robinson Jr.

    Is it campy? Yes. Is it cheesy? Yes. Is it somewhat retro? Yes. But these are not at all bad qualities in a Batman story. I know many Batman fans look down on this story and in a way it really is not the most spectacular read. But for seasoned Batman comics readers there may be some great things to offer in this tale by Matt Wagner. Wagner does a great job with the characterization of Batman. There are times when reading this book I felt like I was watching an episode of the old Batman the Anima Is it campy? Yes. Is it cheesy? Yes. Is it somewhat retro? Yes. But these are not at all bad qualities in a Batman story. I know many Batman fans look down on this story and in a way it really is not the most spectacular read. But for seasoned Batman comics readers there may be some great things to offer in this tale by Matt Wagner. Wagner does a great job with the characterization of Batman. There are times when reading this book I felt like I was watching an episode of the old Batman the Animated Series from the 90s. This story chronologically fits nicely behind Batman: Year One. Much of year one is referenced in this book. The artwork was nothing spectacular but was not horrible. The artwork fits the tone of the book perfectly. I never got bored with the book and it doesn't carry any weight on the over history of Batman except as it being Batman's first encounter with Hugo Strange. The language of the mobsters is stereotypical and I have to admit I did not care to much for Bruce's love interest. The minor characters other than Hugo Strange are somewhat forgettable. I still really going back to read a book about Batman in his early career. What really brought to this book was the rebooted monster men tale: Batman: Night of the Monster Men for DC Rebirth. I really enjoyed the Rebirth story as well. The later has a larger scope while this book works more like a single episode. I am looking forward to reading Wagner's other Batman book. Overall not to bad.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Set in the early days of Batman’s career, Monster Men follows the epic Year One storyline with a less than stellar volume that shares none of the preceding book’s quality. Monster Men has more in common with other early-Batman books that suck like Year Two, The Long Halloween, and Prey, the latter of which this book is a prequel to. It’s also a remake of a classic Batman story from 1940, so in theory, this book should be fun – except it’s not. Matt Wagner tells the story no-one wanted to read of Set in the early days of Batman’s career, Monster Men follows the epic Year One storyline with a less than stellar volume that shares none of the preceding book’s quality. Monster Men has more in common with other early-Batman books that suck like Year Two, The Long Halloween, and Prey, the latter of which this book is a prequel to. It’s also a remake of a classic Batman story from 1940, so in theory, this book should be fun – except it’s not. Matt Wagner tells the story no-one wanted to read of how Dr Hugo Strange became so obsessed with Batman in Prey. In this book – and in line with the campy b-movie horror tone of the book’s title and original story – Strange is a mad scientist trying to cure genetic defects inherited at birth, in order to create perfect humans. Except his experiments go horribly wrong and wind up giant, brain-dead cannibals. Because he’s broke and being hounded by creditors, Strange decides to harness these Monster Men’s strength to kill the gangsters he’s borrowed money from to get them off his back – enter Batman. Monster Men could be a fun story – could – but this one isn’t because Wagner’s treatment of the story is so very unimaginative. The familiar gangsters – Maroni, Falcone, etc. – are still stereotypes, “talkin’ like dat, bawss – hey it’s da bat!”, toothpicks or cigars sticking out of their mouths, flipping coins, while Strange feels like he stepped out of a Hammer horror movie, making long mad-scientist-y speeches from his first appearance and even having a be-turbaned assistant called Rajan! I know this latter point is intentional as this book is supposed to echo cheesy horror movies and the 1940 Batman story, but it just doesn’t work here as the tone is far too serious. The Monster Men are exactly what you’d expect – caveman types with large, irregular teeth, low brows, and frequently near-naked to showcase their hairiness. How wrong can you go when trying to create a perfect human? Strange is the worst geneticist ever! There’s a pointless attempt at a romance story between Bruce and Julie Madison, possibly the least memorable of Bruce’s girlfriends, which ties into the boring gangster storyline, and Bruce gets his first Batmobile. This book isn’t amazingly written or drawn especially well but neither are terrible - they’re just kinda average. I did like that Wagner referenced that panel in Year One where Bruce kicks a tree while training and Wagner replicates that movement exactly when Bruce is fighting the Monster Men. Also like a lot of other early Batman books, this one shows the decline of traditional crime figures like gangsters and the rise of the new criminals, the colourful villains like Strange, alongside the rise of the costumed vigilante. But inspired moments are unfortunately few in this book. Strange sees Batman beating up his Monster Men and realises Batman is the perfect human specimen, instantly becoming obsessed with him leading in to the events of Prey –an awful and contrived reason, especially as the whole geneticist thing isn’t touched on in Prey where Strange has somehow reinvented himself instead as a prominent psychologist and master hypnotist! Monster Men isn’t as awful as Prey but it’s still not good. Hugo Strange remains a crappy character whose presence in a book is a clear sign that what’s about to follow will be garbage. Wagner’s not a bad artist/writer but Monster Men is definitely not one of his better efforts. Books like Monster Men show why Batman’s best foes aren’t physically powerful, because guys who just hit things really hard tend not to produce imaginative stories while guys like Joker and Riddler become icons. Conceptually this is a good story, but the finished book is very poor.

  8. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Cool art and a few cool moments can't save this mostly snooze fest of a book. Too campy and cheesy. Not really worth reading TBH. Cool art and a few cool moments can't save this mostly snooze fest of a book. Too campy and cheesy. Not really worth reading TBH.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    MINI REVIEW: it has been one year since the appearance of the Batman the local crime has learned to fear him but this is one of the early tales in which he deals with the supernatural. Batman's cleverness is well displayed in this tale. The batmobile is introduced. We meet one of Wayne's early lovers, see Dr. Hugo Strange in action and the early relationship between Gordon and the Bats. Artwork did a nice job playing on the shadowy elements in contrast to vivid lightings. OVERALL GRADE: B plus. MINI REVIEW: it has been one year since the appearance of the Batman the local crime has learned to fear him but this is one of the early tales in which he deals with the supernatural. Batman's cleverness is well displayed in this tale. The batmobile is introduced. We meet one of Wayne's early lovers, see Dr. Hugo Strange in action and the early relationship between Gordon and the Bats. Artwork did a nice job playing on the shadowy elements in contrast to vivid lightings. OVERALL GRADE: B plus.

  10. 5 out of 5

    elizabeth • paper ghosts

    While not necessarily a bad story, it is a bit of a disappointment after the stellar Batman: Year One. Even though it was recommended on a few places I checked to read next for chronological order, I really think I could've done without it entirely and been perfectly happy. This takes place pretty soon after Year One and is one of Batman's first encounters with a more unusual (and what will become the norm) super-powered villain. Hugo Strange is a scientist obsessed with making perfect humans. As While not necessarily a bad story, it is a bit of a disappointment after the stellar Batman: Year One. Even though it was recommended on a few places I checked to read next for chronological order, I really think I could've done without it entirely and been perfectly happy. This takes place pretty soon after Year One and is one of Batman's first encounters with a more unusual (and what will become the norm) super-powered villain. Hugo Strange is a scientist obsessed with making perfect humans. As per usual, this never works, and he's left with completely mad, giant, cannibalistic, ugly, hairy...creatures. There's also some romance going on with Julie Madison and Bruce Wayne that also feels a little...unimportant? Or perhaps more realistically, uninteresting. (But that might be my own bias showing.) This is a quick read, and leads right into the next story arc of Batman and the Mad Monk. The dialogue does leave something to be desired after reading Frank Miller, and the art definitely suffers without Mazzucchelli's beautiful work. (Especially the women - poor things. They all kind of end up looking quite masculine and unattractive.) Stewart does try with the colors, but he doesn't have the quality of art to work with that Lewis did in Year One. Overall, not terrible, but not one I would recommend as a must-read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Matt Wagner places his story at an interesting nexus, as supervillains start to infiltrate the world of Batman's Year One. And, he makes that intersection interesting, by having Huge Strange come into conflict with one of Gotham's crime families. Unfortunately, the story's plotting doesn't hold up to that great premise. It's too often slow and ponderous, and Batman sometimes feels a bit too much like Hunter Rose's Grendel. Still, it's got a great early relationship for Bruce, and the ending is q Matt Wagner places his story at an interesting nexus, as supervillains start to infiltrate the world of Batman's Year One. And, he makes that intersection interesting, by having Huge Strange come into conflict with one of Gotham's crime families. Unfortunately, the story's plotting doesn't hold up to that great premise. It's too often slow and ponderous, and Batman sometimes feels a bit too much like Hunter Rose's Grendel. Still, it's got a great early relationship for Bruce, and the ending is quite exciting.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dr Rashmit Mishra

    The ratings for this one on goodreads surprise me , coz honestly I enjoyed this a lot . I thought Matt Wagner did a wonderful job in recreating the feel of the Batman the animated series . The story was approximately set in Year 2 of Batman and debuted Dr Strange . The main focus however was Batman squaring off with Marconi and most on display was his detective skills . The story for major part was grounded in reality , but towards the midway point became a little supernatural but even that was The ratings for this one on goodreads surprise me , coz honestly I enjoyed this a lot . I thought Matt Wagner did a wonderful job in recreating the feel of the Batman the animated series . The story was approximately set in Year 2 of Batman and debuted Dr Strange . The main focus however was Batman squaring off with Marconi and most on display was his detective skills . The story for major part was grounded in reality , but towards the midway point became a little supernatural but even that was explained away . As I said , if u grew up watching Batman the animated series , or if that show was your entry into the batman world , I bet you would like this . The only downside of the book was the art , which is subjective imo and their speed of narration which was arguably slow at most times . Overall I enjoyed it a lot

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Solid Batman versus some monsters story, from the same writer as Batman and the Mad Monk (Vampire story). This is set early in the Batman timeline, with love interest Julie Madison, as well as mobster Sal Maroni, and also features prominently Hugo Strange. Entertaining, but nothing essential.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    The next book in my DC re-read list. It makes more sense for this to be set between Year One and The Man Who Laughs in my DC chronology, but since I read it all before it's not like I needed to worry about spoilers. I like that Bruce and Hugo Strange are two sides of the same coin. They both came from childhood tragedy, both trained their bodies to peak physical condition, both have taken matters into their own hands to do what they think is right. Granted one of them is creating giant monster me The next book in my DC re-read list. It makes more sense for this to be set between Year One and The Man Who Laughs in my DC chronology, but since I read it all before it's not like I needed to worry about spoilers. I like that Bruce and Hugo Strange are two sides of the same coin. They both came from childhood tragedy, both trained their bodies to peak physical condition, both have taken matters into their own hands to do what they think is right. Granted one of them is creating giant monster men, so it's a little more black and white than I may be letting on. Having this story set so early on allows Wagner to explore the early days of Batman and Bruce Wayne. He doesn't have a lot of gadgets and tricks, he's still figuring things out, and I like that it's very much about street level thugs for a lot of it. Seeing Batman fight mobsters is a nice change of pace from the regular super villains he later faced. The exploration of Bruce's personal life reminded me a lot of Mask Of The Phantasm. Bruce isn't as emotionally connected in this one, but it does show the disconnect between him being happy and his crusade as Batman. One is always going to lose out to the other. This is also the first appearance in this chronology of sassy Alfred, may he live forever. The art is also really solid, Matt Wagner's style definitely suits Batman. I'm keeping my original rating of 4 stars.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

    This is a pretty good one and it sees quite a chilled batman dealing with maroni and hugo strange, this is just a cake walk for batsy, you almost feel bad for the guy like you've got a storm coming bruce. He smiles at one point, he's flirting terribly with his girlfriend (those law student jokes got so old, so fast) so it was kinda cool to see a different, less brooding batman and more of a focus on him than the villains. I've got to mention Alfred, who is just amazing in this, his level of sass This is a pretty good one and it sees quite a chilled batman dealing with maroni and hugo strange, this is just a cake walk for batsy, you almost feel bad for the guy like you've got a storm coming bruce. He smiles at one point, he's flirting terribly with his girlfriend (those law student jokes got so old, so fast) so it was kinda cool to see a different, less brooding batman and more of a focus on him than the villains. I've got to mention Alfred, who is just amazing in this, his level of sass is off the charts i mean look at this: it's worth reading just for Alfred alone! It's more of a mellow batman read but it's still interesting enough that it's worth picking up!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    As a 'year two' thing, it kind of works. It is essentially a horror comic, and the art is more underground than mainstream. Bronze age kids remember the monster men from Batman (1940-2011) #1: As a 'year two' thing, it kind of works. It is essentially a horror comic, and the art is more underground than mainstream. Bronze age kids remember the monster men from Batman (1940-2011) #1:

  17. 5 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    Batman and the Monster Men is an enjoyable read, but nothing out of the extra-ordinary. We get a glimpse of Batman being Batman and Alfred being Alfred, but many other characters felt underdeveloped.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    A six-issue mini-series made as a sequel to year one and is supposedly Batman's first mission. This mini-series deals with batman facing Dr. Hugo Strange who is conducting genetic experiments on people he encounters that he dislikes and mental patients from Arkham Aslyum. He borrows money from gangsters to fund his experiments. He experiments in order to reverse deficiencies from birth, but all his test subjects become monster men, gigantic cannibalistic beasts. He uses them to steal money to pa A six-issue mini-series made as a sequel to year one and is supposedly Batman's first mission. This mini-series deals with batman facing Dr. Hugo Strange who is conducting genetic experiments on people he encounters that he dislikes and mental patients from Arkham Aslyum. He borrows money from gangsters to fund his experiments. He experiments in order to reverse deficiencies from birth, but all his test subjects become monster men, gigantic cannibalistic beasts. He uses them to steal money to pay back his loans and Batman eventually fights them and Strange begins to believe Batman is the perfect man. Bruce Wayne is seeing Julie Madison at this time and it is shown that her father is doing business with Salvatore Maroni, the same man funding Strange's experiments. Strange eventually uses the Monster Men to kill the gangsters under Maroni and this catches his attention and has him on alert. Maroni relocates and Strange eventually tracks him down and sends his monster men after him. While at the estate he's been moved to, Julie's father comes to visit Maroni to pay him back the money he borrowed. A lot of gangsters are killed and Batman gets involved in the fight ad tries to stop them, in the end Maroni survives, Batman saves Julies father, and the monster men and all proof linking Hugo Strange to the crime is destroyed, so he lives with no punishment for his crimes. Julie's father however, is afraid because he believes Batman will come after him because of his dealings with Maroni and becomes mentally unstable. There is a sequel called Batman and the Mad Monk.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    This was pure Bat-goodness, hands down. Matt Wagner managed to pick up the stride of the Batman world immediately after "Batman Year One" with out really making it feel out side of the normal narrative timestream. This is a very interesting Batman/Bruce Wayne to read about, as he is still finding his way. He has some experience under his belt, but he is still fairly new at being Gothams's Dark Knight. I think Matt Wagner does a very good job of writing this aspect of the character. I also found th This was pure Bat-goodness, hands down. Matt Wagner managed to pick up the stride of the Batman world immediately after "Batman Year One" with out really making it feel out side of the normal narrative timestream. This is a very interesting Batman/Bruce Wayne to read about, as he is still finding his way. He has some experience under his belt, but he is still fairly new at being Gothams's Dark Knight. I think Matt Wagner does a very good job of writing this aspect of the character. I also found the added twist of an early genetic manipulation foe, fore shadowing the eventual arrival of Man-Bat, very interesting. Professor Strange is very real, and at times I almost sympathise with him. I would like to also say I found it very entertaining that Matt Wagner (a man in my mind, famour for among other things giving us the very magical/mythical world of "Mage: Hero Discovered"..et all) put what are essentially Ogres (or trolls depending on how you define them) into a non-magical Batman story. Good work sir! I wish I could find something bad to say about this book, but even the art was great. I liked the way it maintained the Matt Wagner "Mage" feel. I am only sad that perhaps the character of Professor Strange will die with this storyline. I hope not. I hope we see a return to the Professor Strange, with even more unusual mutations in the future.

  20. 5 out of 5

    JB

    The story takes places shortly after Batman Year One as we continue to follow a young an still unexperienced Batman. This story involves one of my favorite villains, Hugo Strange. I have a love-hate relationship with him. I hate him so much that I love him as a villain. Hugo Strange tries to outsmart the mob by paying them back a loan with their own money he had stolen at a poker game. He is trying to create super men but instead creates monster men. If you are like me and love to dig into the older The story takes places shortly after Batman Year One as we continue to follow a young an still unexperienced Batman. This story involves one of my favorite villains, Hugo Strange. I have a love-hate relationship with him. I hate him so much that I love him as a villain. Hugo Strange tries to outsmart the mob by paying them back a loan with their own money he had stolen at a poker game. He is trying to create super men but instead creates monster men. If you are like me and love to dig into the older stories before you start with the New 52 stories or if you're following the New 52 and want to start reading some older Batman stories, put this one on your list! It has great art, I love the brownish tones and the speech bubbles especially the narrative ones. Catwoman makes an appearance, Batman even makes a reference to their first encounter in Batman Year One. Pick this one up, it's a great read and if you like this one, pick up it's sequel Batman and the Mad Monk!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    Very good! So this takes place shortly after Year One, batman is still fighting the mafia, the early days of batman's career. First off the art was awesome, i like how the artist draws characters, specifically batman! The story is also good, simple and easy to follow, my kind of story! I also liked how they did the narration, the book is narrated by many characters: first 2 pages would be narrated by Gordon, then Batman, then Hugo Strange etc, i feel it was a unique writing style. Hugo Strange i Very good! So this takes place shortly after Year One, batman is still fighting the mafia, the early days of batman's career. First off the art was awesome, i like how the artist draws characters, specifically batman! The story is also good, simple and easy to follow, my kind of story! I also liked how they did the narration, the book is narrated by many characters: first 2 pages would be narrated by Gordon, then Batman, then Hugo Strange etc, i feel it was a unique writing style. Hugo Strange is the villain for this one, and you get to see why he becomes obsessed with Batman.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    Loved this one especially Bruce and Julie !!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt Thomas

    Simple but sophisticated artwork, this title tells the story of Bat-man fighting Maroni, romancing Julie Madison, and meeting Professor Hugo Strange. Fun.

  24. 4 out of 5

    RG

    Pretty good crime horror novel. Ive read better Batman stories though.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    Taking place shortly after Batman Year One, Bruce is still growing used to his life as a crimefighter, hiding his identity and balancing his busy double life with his romantic relationships with women and his complex relationship with the police. A mad scientist adequately named Dr. Strange is performing all kinds of sick experiments that turn people into a monsters and unleashing horror in Gotham. The father of Batman's new girlfriend Sarah gets himself wrapped up in some money scandals that ge Taking place shortly after Batman Year One, Bruce is still growing used to his life as a crimefighter, hiding his identity and balancing his busy double life with his romantic relationships with women and his complex relationship with the police. A mad scientist adequately named Dr. Strange is performing all kinds of sick experiments that turn people into a monsters and unleashing horror in Gotham. The father of Batman's new girlfriend Sarah gets himself wrapped up in some money scandals that get him in trouble with the doctor and a gang of mafia thugs. Batman being Batman dives into the bottom of the situation to put an end to the madness. The main plot is decent, but the real joy of this arc is watching Bruce learn how difficult it can be to balance a healthy social life with his alter ego of a brooding vigilante. He has no time, he makes himself look suspicious by disappearing all the time, he's forced to keep everyone at a distance out of fear of getting them involved in his dangerous affairs, playing the role of a hero can be very tiring and depressing. *** My Social Media My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPs... My Instagram Account: https://www.instagram.com/michael_sor... My Wattpad Account: https://www.wattpad.com/user/Michael-... My Paypal Donation Link: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted... My Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/SorbelloHorror My Facebook Account: https://www.facebook.com/michael.sorb...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kinan Diraneyya

    Batman and the Monster Men is another story following Batman's early years and also the prequel to Batman: Prey, which I haven't read yet. The Monster Men features Hugo Strange, a villain borrowed from the 40's. I hated everything about Dr. Strange and his Monster Men, they should have stayed in the 40's where they belonged, but I sensed some Animated Series vibes and I happened to be a fan of the series. THE FOLLOWING CONTAINS SPOILERS! Dr. Strange is not exactly the traditional mad scientist; h Batman and the Monster Men is another story following Batman's early years and also the prequel to Batman: Prey, which I haven't read yet. The Monster Men features Hugo Strange, a villain borrowed from the 40's. I hated everything about Dr. Strange and his Monster Men, they should have stayed in the 40's where they belonged, but I sensed some Animated Series vibes and I happened to be a fan of the series. THE FOLLOWING CONTAINS SPOILERS! Dr. Strange is not exactly the traditional mad scientist; he doesn't laugh out loud nor does he seek senseless killing. This doesn't make him a great villain, yet it makes the book slightly better. Dr. Hugo is a passionate man seeking to perfect genetic engineering in order improve humans, but his "unethical" motivations resulted in his suspension form wherever he used to work, and his only solution was to borrow money from the Mafia. Meanwhile, Mr. Madison, the father of Bruce's new girlfriend, is having a similar problem. Mr. Madison's company was losing investments and he decided to secretly borrow Mafia money in hope to improve the company's situation. Dr. Hugo's experiments produce huge, hairy cave men (AKA the Monster Men). This is where things revert back to complete 40s. He decides to use the Monster Men to steal money in order to cover his debts. He sends the Monster Men into an illegal private poker party and they basically disassemble every human in there leaving a huge mess. This incident gives Batman enough leads to find Dr. Hugo, and so he does; However, Batman gets his ass kicked by the Monster Men and he barely flees the place leaving some of his DNA for Dr. Hugo to collect and create an even stronger Monster Man. The Mafias begin threatening both Dr. Hugo and Mr. Madison for more money. Mr. Madison brings them the money, but he demands delivering it to the Roman in person and so he is taken to the Roman's house. Dr. Hugo decides to deal with the threats by sending all of his Monster Men (including the new one created using Bruce's DNA) to the Roman's house to kill everyone in there. The final fight doesn't offer any great moments, which is pretty much like the whole story. All of the Monster Men end up dead, so does half of the Roman's people. Batman tells the Roman to forget about Mr. Madison's debts. Dr. Hugo flees the place and later shows up on TV talking about his opinion of Batman. Obviously the man became a TV figure and a Batman specialist overnight (despite being a suspended scientist), and suddenly everybody cares about what he things of Batman. Bruce's new girlfriend, Julie, is a central character in the book, but I left here out of the narrative because she only serves as a tool to threat Mr. Madison with. I am not sure whether or not she shows up in Batman: Prey and I don't feel like she would contribute that much in there either. I am generally seeing so many "one shot girls" in the 90's Batman era and it is honestly getting boring.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Evan Leach

    This was a fun Batman story set during the Caped Crusader's first year on the job. Bruce is dating Julie Madison, and is optimistic that he may be able to win his war on crime and lead a more normal life. He's working on busting the leaders of the Gotham mob, but the situation is complicated by Julie's father (who has some mob connections of his own) and Dr. Hugo Strange. Dr. Strange relies on mob funding to keep his...unorthodox genetic experiments running, but before long these "monster men" a This was a fun Batman story set during the Caped Crusader's first year on the job. Bruce is dating Julie Madison, and is optimistic that he may be able to win his war on crime and lead a more normal life. He's working on busting the leaders of the Gotham mob, but the situation is complicated by Julie's father (who has some mob connections of his own) and Dr. Hugo Strange. Dr. Strange relies on mob funding to keep his...unorthodox genetic experiments running, but before long these "monster men" are a bigger threat to Gotham's safety than any group of mobsters. Batman stories that depend on superhuman/supernatural villains are always a dicey proposition, and scientific jibber-jabber aside, that is precisely what the monster men are. But Wagner makes this one work. The artwork is very good (but definitely a little gory...the cover with the cartoony lettering makes this look like a Scooby-Doo style Batman tale, but there is some real carnage going on inside), and the story is exciting and well-paced. The presence of a bat-girlfriend, and an interesting one at that, was a particularly nice touch that helped set this story apart from many other Batman volumes. Julie is not just a wet blanket, hanging around mostly to be a nuisance, but an interesting character in her own right. And Wagner does a fine job in tying two loosely connected plot-lines into a pretty thrilling finale. This is not the most famous of Batman's formative year stories, but it's very good and well worth your time if you're a fan of the Dark Knight. 4 stars, recommended. P.S.: This book also features the first appearance of the Batmobile! What more could you want!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    I unknowingly read the second part of this, Batman and the Mad Monk, before I read this and this one is better. It takes place about a year after Batman: Year One, and documents Batman's first meeting with Dr. Hugo Strange along with continuing the story of Carmine Falcone and Sal Maroni. Wagner is able to keep the same tone as Miller did, and added to the mythos by introducing the Batmobile and extending the relationship with Gordon. It's unfortunate all of the interior work couldn't be painted I unknowingly read the second part of this, Batman and the Mad Monk, before I read this and this one is better. It takes place about a year after Batman: Year One, and documents Batman's first meeting with Dr. Hugo Strange along with continuing the story of Carmine Falcone and Sal Maroni. Wagner is able to keep the same tone as Miller did, and added to the mythos by introducing the Batmobile and extending the relationship with Gordon. It's unfortunate all of the interior work couldn't be painted like the covers, but it still fits the time period of the story. A nice read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    faatima

    This plot line didn’t particularly interest me, but I enjoyed the artwork (especially Wagner’s use of silhouettes) and the care taken to outline different narration styles among the various primary characters. I expect I’ll gain a little more interest in reading the subsequent Mad Monk run.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rafael Nobre

    I didnt like this in many aspects, i found it boring and i really didnt like the art. I just dont know why i sticked to the end, some subplots seemed a lot unintersing too. I wish i hadnt wasted my time Mau desenhado e chato pra cacete

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