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Professional Idiot: A Memoir

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From his early days videotaping crazy skateboard stunts to starring in the Jackass movies, there was little that Stephen "Steve-O" Glover wouldn't do. Whether it was stapling his nutsack to his leg or diving into a pool full of elephant crap, almost nothing was out of bounds. As the stunts got crazier, his life kept pace. He developed a crippling addiction to drugs and alc From his early days videotaping crazy skateboard stunts to starring in the Jackass movies, there was little that Stephen "Steve-O" Glover wouldn't do. Whether it was stapling his nutsack to his leg or diving into a pool full of elephant crap, almost nothing was out of bounds. As the stunts got crazier, his life kept pace. He developed a crippling addiction to drugs and alcohol, and an obsession with his own celebrity that proved nearly as dangerous. Only an intervention and a visit to a psychiatric ward saved his life. Today he has been clean and sober for more than three years.


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From his early days videotaping crazy skateboard stunts to starring in the Jackass movies, there was little that Stephen "Steve-O" Glover wouldn't do. Whether it was stapling his nutsack to his leg or diving into a pool full of elephant crap, almost nothing was out of bounds. As the stunts got crazier, his life kept pace. He developed a crippling addiction to drugs and alc From his early days videotaping crazy skateboard stunts to starring in the Jackass movies, there was little that Stephen "Steve-O" Glover wouldn't do. Whether it was stapling his nutsack to his leg or diving into a pool full of elephant crap, almost nothing was out of bounds. As the stunts got crazier, his life kept pace. He developed a crippling addiction to drugs and alcohol, and an obsession with his own celebrity that proved nearly as dangerous. Only an intervention and a visit to a psychiatric ward saved his life. Today he has been clean and sober for more than three years.

30 review for Professional Idiot: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I will admit it - one of my guilty pleasures is Jackass. As an old skate punk, I knew of these guys back in the day from Thrasher and Big Brother Magazine. I always have had a soft spot in my heart for Steve-O as he seemed to take his stunts so seriously. This memoir proved that true. It is a completely honest, heartbreaking story about a kid who had a childhood a whole lot like mine, actually - feeling invisible due to a narcissistic parent, an alcoholic parent, and an absent father, moving all I will admit it - one of my guilty pleasures is Jackass. As an old skate punk, I knew of these guys back in the day from Thrasher and Big Brother Magazine. I always have had a soft spot in my heart for Steve-O as he seemed to take his stunts so seriously. This memoir proved that true. It is a completely honest, heartbreaking story about a kid who had a childhood a whole lot like mine, actually - feeling invisible due to a narcissistic parent, an alcoholic parent, and an absent father, moving all the time. My choice was to try become the "perfect" child (and feel like crap when this failed), his coping mechanism was to scream "LOOK AT ME!" in every way possible. This memoir is an honest unflinching look into his spiral into addiction, narcissism, the dark sides of fame, and near suicide or death from drug use. I've never read about such deep drug use without heroin thrown into the mix before. Steve admits his failings openly, and the one thing I really wanted to do during, and after, reading this was just give him a big hug and tell him he's awesome for who he is, not what he's done. Steve, if you ever read this, I hope you're able to stay clean and find some peace, find love, and feel great about yourself. You are a survivor.

  2. 5 out of 5

    tee

    Argh mixed emotions on this one. Obviously a fascinating memoir because this dude has lived ten million times the amount of excitement than most people. if there wasn't video footage in the form of Jackass, Wildboyz and his earlier videos then you'd probably struggle to believe that much of it was true. However, even though it was interesting and Steve-O has loveable qualities, he's too complex to love completely. He's an unrelenting attention whore and never fails to drum this into the reader - Argh mixed emotions on this one. Obviously a fascinating memoir because this dude has lived ten million times the amount of excitement than most people. if there wasn't video footage in the form of Jackass, Wildboyz and his earlier videos then you'd probably struggle to believe that much of it was true. However, even though it was interesting and Steve-O has loveable qualities, he's too complex to love completely. He's an unrelenting attention whore and never fails to drum this into the reader - yes, we know that you're an idiot, yep and annoying too - but he reminds us of this every few pages. It goes without saying dude, you're intense as fuck, even in your memoir! It almost comes across a bit like false shame sometimes, like, "oh I'm so embarrassed about the amount of coke I did" but then he seems to really relish telling the sordid details. I think there's a lot of genuine remorse but there's a good deal of pride there too. Another issue I had was with his treatment of women; if this were a fictional book I would've been hating the author for having no women characters other than ones placed here and there for purposes of sex, pissing on or cumming on with a gun to her head (good work Terry Richardson, you fuck). Then there's the simmering homophobia and although he writes of being proud of how homoerotic his work always was and trying to convince the readers that he did it to challenge other people's homophobia, I didn't read it quite that way. There's even a part where he recounts having received a blow job from what "he thought was a hot chick" which "turned out to be a dude". In fact, that "dude" was a post-op transexual and calling her a man shows up his shitty transphobia. Not to mention all the accounts of antagonising animals and vomiting up live goldfish. And travelling around other people's countries and showing a distinct lack of respect (and racism) for various tribes by dressing up in their native costumes whilst acting like a prat. You can't just get away with by writing a few paragraphs on how it like, really opened your eyes to like, poverty man and how it taught you like so much when it didn't cause you to immediately change your shitty behaviour, make amends or try to use your privileged position to do some good. Maybe he eventually reached a state of taking accountability for his actions and it is great to read how apologetic he is for a lot of his bullshit but it's hard because the book is quite a frustrating read. You read about someone being a giant dick and then you have to read about them apologising for it all. I even felt like I hated him for a while until I reached the very end. He stops at nothing to get attention and it unfortunately makes you just want to fucking ignore him otherwise you're giving him what he wants. Which, I guess, is the story of his life? It was really quite traumatising to read the final chapters of the book where he spirals into a pit of desperation and dickishness.He was a trainwreck that you just couldn't look away from and most of his downward spiral was due to the fact that he simply wasn't getting enough attention. But in the end, he seems to have gotten his shit together and is trying to be accountable for his actions. He seems to have a really good heart and I am so chuffed to hear that he's managing to live not only sober, but vegan. Besides, it seems really harsh to judge a dude and get down on him for his fucked up behaviour when he seems to have beaten himself up about it enough. All that aside, the actual book is a good read and I'm glad I read it. He's lived his life to the full and whereas I usually laugh when people write memoirs before they're at least 60 or 70 (unless they've got something worth talking about), I had no problem with this one. He's done more in his life than a lot of people and it was a blast to read, And maybe I even saw some of myself in him, the addictive personality that he said he's now channeled into healthier interests? Yeah me too. I really related to some of what he had to say and he's a super interesting and self-aware dude. Rock on Steve-O, if only I had 5% of your adventurous spirit.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Twerking To Beethoven

    I remember watching the first Jackass movie on dvd with my girlfriend back in 2003. I found it to be hysterical and, when I saw a bloke using a muscle-stimulator on his scrotum, I actually fell off the couch braying. I was laughing so hard at that skit, I was literally curled up on the floor gasping for air... while my then-girlfriend was shooting me dirty looks, going "That's not funny, that's just plain fucking stupid! How old are you?" That happened more than once. The things I find to be funn I remember watching the first Jackass movie on dvd with my girlfriend back in 2003. I found it to be hysterical and, when I saw a bloke using a muscle-stimulator on his scrotum, I actually fell off the couch braying. I was laughing so hard at that skit, I was literally curled up on the floor gasping for air... while my then-girlfriend was shooting me dirty looks, going "That's not funny, that's just plain fucking stupid! How old are you?" That happened more than once. The things I find to be funny are just meh to a lot of people. For example, Type O Negative's "Unsuccessfully Coping with the Natural Beauty of Infidelity" - https://youtu.be/Idfv4wyWfSs - will have me laughing my lungs out every time I listen to it, it'll never get old... to me, that is. I played it to a few friends of mine, but all I got from them was just constipated chuckles and "Aye, mate, that's cool. Do I have to listen to the whole thing?" So I guess I have a thing for crass humour and warped comedy, I never really liked Woody Allen's movies. To be honest, they put me to sleep. But I unconditionally love Balls of Steel, Kevin Bloody Wilson, Neg's Urban Sports, Merrick and Rosso, etc., so "Jackass" and its spin-offs ("Wildboyz" and "Viva La Bam") are naturally right up my alley. Now, this book. Steve-O is one funny bastard, his bits off Jackass are my favs, one in particular, "Poo Cocktail supreme" off "Jackass 3D" I think is his all-time masterpiece. It's one of the funniest things I've ever got to watch, it's on youtube and you can check it out for yourselves but, mind you, it's not for everyone, and I mean it, NOT FOR EVERYONE, you've been warned. "Professional Idiot" is an ok-biography, well crafted and properly put together, some parts are hilarious and some - as you would expect from a bloke who's done all sorts of drugs - are just depressing. So, overall, three stars because I was expecting to laugh from start to finish but didn't.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aja: The Narcoleptic Ninja

    I've gotten a lot of strange looks from people when they saw what I was reading but all I could say in response was that it is a genuinely great book. I bought the book after seeing Steve-O do stand up at a comedy club in Miami. He personalized it and I started reading it shortly after. His experiences and his reflections on them are incredible. There was never a dull moment. This is honestly one of those books I could have read all in one go if it wasn't for school work and such. More than anyt I've gotten a lot of strange looks from people when they saw what I was reading but all I could say in response was that it is a genuinely great book. I bought the book after seeing Steve-O do stand up at a comedy club in Miami. He personalized it and I started reading it shortly after. His experiences and his reflections on them are incredible. There was never a dull moment. This is honestly one of those books I could have read all in one go if it wasn't for school work and such. More than anything it discusses addiction (fame, alcohol, drugs, etc.) in a way that was just so honest and brave. It's an incredible read and I highly recommend it as well as seeing his act in person if you ever get the chance.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natasha A.

    For anyone who loves: Incredibly well written memoir Those who can mock themselves Jackass Why did I read it? Friend won a copy on twitter, so I grabbed it from her! My Rambles: Let me first say that when I first heard of those Jackass movies, I was all WTF! There was no way I was ever going to watch those. They are moronic.... Then my husband put one on... I was riveted! I couldn't believe some of the stunts they pulled off! Disgusting! Crude! Thrilling! As an ex-tabloid junkie, I knew some of Steve-O's ta For anyone who loves: Incredibly well written memoir Those who can mock themselves Jackass Why did I read it? Friend won a copy on twitter, so I grabbed it from her! My Rambles: Let me first say that when I first heard of those Jackass movies, I was all WTF! There was no way I was ever going to watch those. They are moronic.... Then my husband put one on... I was riveted! I couldn't believe some of the stunts they pulled off! Disgusting! Crude! Thrilling! As an ex-tabloid junkie, I knew some of Steve-O's tales. So, when I picked up this book I had an idea of what to expect. I wasn't even close in my expectations. This book blew me away. I was completely riveted by his tale. I am normally not a big bio/memoir fan. I find that despite wanting to know more about the person, the writing is just lacking and boring. I honestly don't know if it is because of David Peisner, who helped Steve-O with this, or Steve-O himself, but I was blow away at the quality of the writing. I was so immersed in this book that I read it all. "Read it all?", you say. You see, I'm a speed reader. I scan much of what I read. But I read every word of this, and I still consumed the entire 322 pages in about 30 hours despite working being at work. Break, lunch break, sitting in the car while my husband drove, making dinner.... During all of that this book didn't leave my hands. My husband looked over at me while he was driving and said "Must be a good book". I grunted my reply. I regaled him with quotes (probably to his dismay). Steve-O has an incredible tale of destruction, and ultimately survival. I was literally blown away. I highly recommend this for parents and teens as a way of broaching the topic of drugs. This book could be used as an excellent way of opening up the channels of communication. Yeah, I wouldn't call this book PG-13 (sex, some language, violence - Jackass but written word), but I think it is a real account of what can happen. I am not just recommending this to parents and teens though. I think that this book can bring a bit of understanding to any reader. Quality of writing: 10+/10 Pace: 10/10 Ease of Reading: 10/10Enjoyability: 10+/10 Overall: 5+/5

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brianne

    Let me preface this by saying I came into this book skeptical. I've developed a fondness for memoirs in the last few years but none of them have really moved me or blown me away save the small handful. Let me also preface this by saying I'm a huge Jackass fan and have been rooting for Steve-O ever since he became clean and sober. Now then, let's get down to business. I loved it. Couldn't put it down. I bought it on a Friday and was done by Saturday night. I loved the fact that it was honest in a Let me preface this by saying I came into this book skeptical. I've developed a fondness for memoirs in the last few years but none of them have really moved me or blown me away save the small handful. Let me also preface this by saying I'm a huge Jackass fan and have been rooting for Steve-O ever since he became clean and sober. Now then, let's get down to business. I loved it. Couldn't put it down. I bought it on a Friday and was done by Saturday night. I loved the fact that it was honest in a way most memoirs don't ever even attempt to be. When Steve-O recounts some of his exploits or talks about some of the things that have happened to him along the way, he doesn't use suffering as justification for his substance abuse problems - he often justifies the angry and sometimes cruel reactions of others to him by admitting that he became intolerable. I won't go into too much detail but let's say that we all knew a kid like Steve-O in school- and reading this book makes me feel bad that I wasn't nicer to that kid. His isn't a "triumph" story so to speak; yes, he does get clean and sober and remains that way to this day, but he speaks of it very honestly in saying that he could relapse tomorrow. After getting to know him the way you do in this book, you really, really want to see him succeed. In short, it gave me a deeper understanding and a greater appreciation for Steven Glover.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    What should you expect when you watch the movie Jackass or read the title of this book? Well, I got what I expected with a unfiltered chronicle of his crazed lifestyle of sex, and drugs, but I also got to know him as a person in recovery. Steve-0 A.K.A Stephen Glover went from being unemployed, penniless and a college dropout to being a well known wealthy celebrity. His tale is worth reading just for that fact. I first thought what a low-life ungrateful asshole he was. He basically played around What should you expect when you watch the movie Jackass or read the title of this book? Well, I got what I expected with a unfiltered chronicle of his crazed lifestyle of sex, and drugs, but I also got to know him as a person in recovery. Steve-0 A.K.A Stephen Glover went from being unemployed, penniless and a college dropout to being a well known wealthy celebrity. His tale is worth reading just for that fact. I first thought what a low-life ungrateful asshole he was. He basically played around doing nonsense and caught an opportunity of a lifetime. He acted like his hard work snorting coke, and drinking while doing "stunts" and "rad" shit qualified him for the big time. When he got this break with the MTV Show and movie Jackass he was finally justified and validated. He could go about being Steve-o the insane addict whose job it was to be Steve-o the insane addict. His mission was to film himself living a jackass lifestyle and becoming rich because of it. So I was at the same time, jealous, angry, resentful and intrigued someone could do this. Next came the real Stephen Glover. He began to see all he was doing both to himself and to anyone who cared about him. He includes commentary from friends and family that show how he affected them and how they dealt with his insanity. After the 2nd Jackass film came and went Steve-o had a lot of money and nothing to do. His fall was fast and he left nothing for the imagination. There are pictures of him projectile vomiting while holding a cigarette and a wippet balloon. After ranting on for months about nonsense online and finally thinking of killing himself, a group of friends forced him to go for a psychiatric evaluation. He goes into treatment from there and into a new life of sobriety. His sober life doesn’t seem to slow him down. He does Jackass 3D and even Dancing with the Stars while speaking out about addiction and recovery. He created a 4 part series on you tube depicting his "Demise and Rise" into the sober life. It seems his life before entertained many people but he now has the ability to help others avoid the pain dugs & alcohol can inflict. I enjoyed reading his memoir and would recommend it to anyone who wants a rags to riches story with near death insanity and a hopeful recovery ending.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    The funny thing is, I've loved Jackass for years, but Steve-O was never one of my favourites. After reading this book - his memoirs since childhood through his career and rehab treatment - now he's trumping Chris Pontius and Johnny Knoxville as my Jackass of choice. It turns out, through out his life, Steve-O's often been sidelined as the 'annoying (and perhaps less likeable) one', a fact that clearly contributed to his eventual alcoholism and drug addiction. His life story is far more interestin The funny thing is, I've loved Jackass for years, but Steve-O was never one of my favourites. After reading this book - his memoirs since childhood through his career and rehab treatment - now he's trumping Chris Pontius and Johnny Knoxville as my Jackass of choice. It turns out, through out his life, Steve-O's often been sidelined as the 'annoying (and perhaps less likeable) one', a fact that clearly contributed to his eventual alcoholism and drug addiction. His life story is far more interesting that I may have assumed - and one aspect of the book I loved the most was how the narrative sounds just like Steve-O's voice. His humility in his new life of sobriety makes the deadpan humour about his troubled past feel very honest and insightful. The fluid story telling made it a page-turner. Despite this piece of media being a book - and not the film clips, TV and movies Steve-O's built his career on - there are still a number of shocking parts that I found satisfying as a Jackass fan. Reading anecdotes about the production of Jackass and Wildboyz sometimes had me re-reading a few lines, just to make sure I read correctly! Overall, if you're familiar with Steve-O, I'd say give this book a chance. It may give some his past work, recent notoriety and new sobriety some much needed context.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This was pretty good. Anyone who is already curious about Steve-O will be pleasantly surprised. Those who aren’t probably will be underwhelmed. Steve-O is clearly a good soul who had an incredibly unique path that will probably never be repeated. What could it possibly be that makes someone want to do what he does? This book doesn’t answer this explicitly but if you read between the lines you can see clues. It reads like a play by play account of every phase and pivotal moment of his life - he h This was pretty good. Anyone who is already curious about Steve-O will be pleasantly surprised. Those who aren’t probably will be underwhelmed. Steve-O is clearly a good soul who had an incredibly unique path that will probably never be repeated. What could it possibly be that makes someone want to do what he does? This book doesn’t answer this explicitly but if you read between the lines you can see clues. It reads like a play by play account of every phase and pivotal moment of his life - he has an amazing memory! But you are still hearing only his voice. I don’t think he knows why he does what he does or is the way he is. I guess most of us don’t. That aside its quite well written and a fun fast paced read. He is as charismatic and lovable as ever even if it’s not clear exactly why this is the case. And it’s admirable to see how much work he clearly put into this book. It’s absolutely terrific to see his battle and victories over his addictions but it feels like he doesn’t fully address the way he treated other people or other various issues - he seems quite entitled in his quest for fame and still has some homophobic opinions regarding Wildboys to name a couple. I think my expectation was that he is fundamentally this great person and getting sober would reveal that but instead it turns out he is still a bit of a Jackass.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bobette Giorgi

    Pretty much confirms what we already knew - there is nothing to Steve O but idiocy. No substance to this loser at all. When one writes an autobiography, the reader is anticipating something with depth. Steve O has no depth. (PS - Someone posted a comment on FB that he had read this book and that he found it "harrowing." That is why I decided to read it. I expected to read something from an addict who had cleaned up and explored his inner depths. There is nothing harrowing about this book; while Pretty much confirms what we already knew - there is nothing to Steve O but idiocy. No substance to this loser at all. When one writes an autobiography, the reader is anticipating something with depth. Steve O has no depth. (PS - Someone posted a comment on FB that he had read this book and that he found it "harrowing." That is why I decided to read it. I expected to read something from an addict who had cleaned up and explored his inner depths. There is nothing harrowing about this book; while Steve admits to drug abuse and other assorted stupid acts and decisions, his life is basically nothing but doing stupid things for attention. That is all there is to Steve O.)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jess Kerschbaumer

    This book was crazy and shocking and honest, and I COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN. I've been a fan of Jackass for years, and it was very neat getting a behind the scenes look at it. I knew Steve-o was pretty messed up, but I really had no idea just how out of hand things had actually gotten with him. Some of the photos, while shocking, really made you realize how low he had gone. Crazy stuff. Definitely would recommend it to anyone to who is into biographies or Jackass. Great book. This book was crazy and shocking and honest, and I COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN. I've been a fan of Jackass for years, and it was very neat getting a behind the scenes look at it. I knew Steve-o was pretty messed up, but I really had no idea just how out of hand things had actually gotten with him. Some of the photos, while shocking, really made you realize how low he had gone. Crazy stuff. Definitely would recommend it to anyone to who is into biographies or Jackass. Great book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    issabella

    If you're reading this and you're like 'Issabella literally wtf??' I get it! Cause yes this is literally such a random book for me to read! However, Jerome and I have recently watched all the Jackass movies and I've become really intrigued and inspired by Steve-O's journey that I really wanted to pick this book up. I won't lie for a lot of this book I was shocked and a bit disgusted at how far Steve-O was willing to take his career all to make a name for himself. You can definitely see how turne If you're reading this and you're like 'Issabella literally wtf??' I get it! Cause yes this is literally such a random book for me to read! However, Jerome and I have recently watched all the Jackass movies and I've become really intrigued and inspired by Steve-O's journey that I really wanted to pick this book up. I won't lie for a lot of this book I was shocked and a bit disgusted at how far Steve-O was willing to take his career all to make a name for himself. You can definitely see how turned off he is from everything in his past and he describes his journey with a lot of self reflection and empathy - knowing he has had a problem since he was very young- something a lot of people never want to come to terms with. It was fun to read about his rise to fame and stories about the Jackass crew, and I'm glad to see how Steve-O was able to take those dark parts of his life and create something brand new and amazing with it. Honestly it was a really good book and I'm glad I read it!

  13. 5 out of 5

    David Veith

    So I have read some rock and roller autobiographies, and Steve-O easily did more drugs! I was floored by what he has done and am surprised he is still alive today! I have always been a huge Jackass fan, my old roommates and I would devote our entire day to the show and do our own little Jackass nights when the show was on. Just a fun time, and the book really lets you see what it was like behind the scenes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Part One of my Review: My (not-so) Secret Love for Jackass - I remember seeing the first episode of Jackass. I was in 10th grade and the 14" TV in my parents' basement was where I spent many, many hours watching MTV. I watched Jackass in awe. I loved it. Crazy guys doing stupid shit and getting hurt. It wasn't a surprise they were getting hurt, they were doing things where in which the end result is pain. LOVED IT. When I heard that kids around the country were copying them, getting hurt, and tr Part One of my Review: My (not-so) Secret Love for Jackass - I remember seeing the first episode of Jackass. I was in 10th grade and the 14" TV in my parents' basement was where I spent many, many hours watching MTV. I watched Jackass in awe. I loved it. Crazy guys doing stupid shit and getting hurt. It wasn't a surprise they were getting hurt, they were doing things where in which the end result is pain. LOVED IT. When I heard that kids around the country were copying them, getting hurt, and trying to sue them, I was appalled. Those idiots were going to get my favorite TV show taken off the air. I remember seeing Steve-O swallow a goldfish and puke it back up. I even remember the smile on the guy's face - the one who got to keep the goldfish - as he walked down the street with a puked-up goldfish in a bowl of pukey water. Hilarious. I remember going to see the first Jackass movie in theaters with my friends a couple years later. For some reason we happened to be off school that Friday. My 4 girl friends and I were the only girls in the theater. Boys from my high school who weren't 17 yet (movie was rated R) were sneaking each other in through the back door of the theater. I actually saw Jackass 2 in theaters twice (once with my roommate and again the next day with my mom, who wanted to see what all of the fuss was about. During the opening credits, when the cast is being chased down by bulls, my mom actually said "aren't they going to get hurt?!" - the movie theater crowd cracked up. Of course, Mom. That's why we are here. To pay $7.50 to watch some dudes get hurt.) Therefore, my history as a Jackass fan is over a decade long. When I saw that Steve-0 did a memoir I had to check it out. Part Two of my Review: Steve-0's "Demise and Rise" - Since I felt like the guys from Jackass were just friends I saw fuck around, I felt like I kind of got to know them. (Obviously I don't. Calm down.) We saw them do stupid stuff, we egged them on and sat in awe if they got legitimately hurt. When I saw that Steve-0 had gone to rehab, I was proud of him. I watched his documentary on MTV as a concerned friend. I even considering sending him an e-mail telling him that as a fan of Jackass, I was proud to see he was getting better and fully supported him. (I never sent that e-mail. I didn't want to be a creepy fan.) I later saw him on a late night talk show and the host mentioned his sobriety and Steve-0 said something along the lines of taking it one day at a time. He couldn't guarantee his sobriety from one day to the next, but was working really hard every day to stay sober. Awesome. Part Three of my Review: The Book Itself - Some parts of the book were a little long-winded (much like this review, I realize). I feel like it was necessary at some points, kind of like someone telling you a long and sordid story of how their life got fucked up enough to be at rock bottom. At other times, the details seemed to be a little overkill... I also think he could have added more about his recovery process/how he's doing now, but I recognize that the balance of the details seems appropriate with his personality at the time. When he was actively using drugs, he was seeking a ton of attention. That part of the book is incredibly detailed. Since he has been in recovery, he has mellowed out substantially and is demonstrates less attention-seeking behavior. That part of the book is less detailed. All in all, if you like Jackass and a good memoir, I think you should read this book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    Glover, Stephen "Steve-O" with David Peisner. Professional Idiot: A Memoir.Hyperion. Jun. 2011. c.336p. ISBN 9781401324339. $25.99. TV Jackass TV star Steve-O is embarrassed by his actions—not stapling his scrotum to his leg or his other notorious stunts but those resulting from his drug addiction, which pushed away friends and family. He opens his memoir with a 1996 prison stay (the first of many), then takes us through his globe-trotting childhood as he and his sister cover for an alcoholic mot Glover, Stephen "Steve-O" with David Peisner. Professional Idiot: A Memoir.Hyperion. Jun. 2011. c.336p. ISBN 9781401324339. $25.99. TV Jackass TV star Steve-O is embarrassed by his actions—not stapling his scrotum to his leg or his other notorious stunts but those resulting from his drug addiction, which pushed away friends and family. He opens his memoir with a 1996 prison stay (the first of many), then takes us through his globe-trotting childhood as he and his sister cover for an alcoholic mother while their CEO father is away on business. Eventually the class clown ends up in clown college, but Steve-O's true passion is concocting and filming elaborate stunts. Skateboard tricks give way to self-immolation and other life-threatening feats, and Steve-O's videos grab the attention of the creators of Jackass. Yet as he realizes his professional ambitions, he succumbs to a flood of narcotics. Verdict: Despite his rampant drug use, Steve-O offers a lucid and candid account of his life, concluding with a Dr. Drew–enabled institutionalization and his subsequent sobriety. With last year's successful Jackass 3D motion picture and a busy touring schedule, Steve-O is still in the spotlight, and this will be popular with his fans.—Terry Bosky, Palm Beach Cty. Lib. Syst., West Palm Beach, FL [Library Journal Xpress Reviews — First Look at New Books, May 20, 2011]

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristīne Brence

    Steve-O is a great storyteller, even through the book you can tell everyone loses their attention on him. Because it's Steve-O and he is the centre of attention. And from just a ''guy who hurts himself for entertainment'', the book not only is an insightful piece of his life, but also, a great evaluation of his development in becoming the person he is today. A complete polar opposite. At least the impression he gives nowadays compared to years back. It is clear, he recognizes his downfalls and h Steve-O is a great storyteller, even through the book you can tell everyone loses their attention on him. Because it's Steve-O and he is the centre of attention. And from just a ''guy who hurts himself for entertainment'', the book not only is an insightful piece of his life, but also, a great evaluation of his development in becoming the person he is today. A complete polar opposite. At least the impression he gives nowadays compared to years back. It is clear, he recognizes his downfalls and how humiliating and wrong his actions were, yet still is positive and humorous in his writing. But you can understand that his writing is sincere. I think after the humiliating and disrespectful events Steve-O has described, I did not think some readers or even I, would score the book highly. However, the book is eventful in every sentence and discusses a balanced insight on the personal, and career life. And describes many events which gather a great emotional value from the reader. Positive or negative. Was surprised to read that he also had met Henry Rollins. One thing I would recommend, is to skip on his podcasts before you read the memoir. It will be interesting to see ''Jackass Forever'' (2021), for sure.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    Holy shit. I've always been a Jackass/Steve-O fan so his whole stint in rehab and the psych hospital was not unknown to me. But I had no idea just how bad it was. The first half of the book was interesting enough, learning about his younger life and how Jackass started, but it was mind-blowingly intense and wonderful to read the second half about his alcoholism, drug addiction, hallucinations and recovery. I know a lot of people hate Steve-O and admittadly I can see why. But after reading this I Holy shit. I've always been a Jackass/Steve-O fan so his whole stint in rehab and the psych hospital was not unknown to me. But I had no idea just how bad it was. The first half of the book was interesting enough, learning about his younger life and how Jackass started, but it was mind-blowingly intense and wonderful to read the second half about his alcoholism, drug addiction, hallucinations and recovery. I know a lot of people hate Steve-O and admittadly I can see why. But after reading this I feel sorry for him and can understand why ended up the way he did. I'm so proud of his new lifestyle and of Knxville, Tremaine, Kosick etc. for standing up to him and getting him the help he so desperately needed. Also, he's kind of tempting me to go back to me old vegan ways. Hearing him talk about his change in attitude and health just makes me so envious and really miss the way being a vegan made me feel. He's spot on.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Flores

    The Memoir "Professional Idiot" is a memoir based on Steven Glover (aka Steve O". The memoir is about from the early days of him videotaping crazy skateboard stunts to being in the Jackass movies. And his crippling addiction to drugs and alcohol and having an intervention to end up saving his life. This book moved me and changed the way i viewed things. The book was deep in a way of him describing all the drugs he did and how it changed him as a person. To have all his friends hating him and nobo The Memoir "Professional Idiot" is a memoir based on Steven Glover (aka Steve O". The memoir is about from the early days of him videotaping crazy skateboard stunts to being in the Jackass movies. And his crippling addiction to drugs and alcohol and having an intervention to end up saving his life. This book moved me and changed the way i viewed things. The book was deep in a way of him describing all the drugs he did and how it changed him as a person. To have all his friends hating him and nobody even wanting to be near him. That was crazy. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who wants a laugh and doesn't even like reading in general. It has a lot of imagery and gets you thinking on a lot of stuff such as the world and celebrities. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants something out of the ordinary.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Linda Johnson

    Huge fan of Steve-O, especially after seeing him in a comedy show last year. I never realized it, but Steve is a big animal lover. During his comedy show, he brought out his rescue dog, Wendy, who he saved from the streets of Peru, and the story literally made me cry. His memoir was interesting and a fast read. It was raw and brutally honest. It's hard to believe that the Steve-O that I met at the comedy show was once a major douchebag, attention whore and raging alcoholic/drug addict. I'm glad Huge fan of Steve-O, especially after seeing him in a comedy show last year. I never realized it, but Steve is a big animal lover. During his comedy show, he brought out his rescue dog, Wendy, who he saved from the streets of Peru, and the story literally made me cry. His memoir was interesting and a fast read. It was raw and brutally honest. It's hard to believe that the Steve-O that I met at the comedy show was once a major douchebag, attention whore and raging alcoholic/drug addict. I'm glad he got his shit together.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Simone

    This was one of the BEST books/memoirs i have ever read. You dont have to love Jackass (although, personally i love them :)) to absolutely crave this memoir. I FREAKING LOVED IT. There isnt another way to put it, unless your expressing a greater love, need, and complete satisfaction for it! It was... Great. I really hope anyone who is skeptical about reading it, just do it. You wont regret it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Esther

    Thanks to Arjen for introducing me to this book. I've always been a big Jackass fan, so of course I know Steve-O. I'm not a non-fiction reader, but when it's something interesting I'm up to try it! This book was, for me, 90% of ramblings where Steve-O is either high, stoned or an asshole and me disliking Steve-O very much. The final 10% felt like the real Steve-O voice that I did like. And I was sad that this book wasn't the other way around. I felt a lot like: "Look at me doing all this stupid Thanks to Arjen for introducing me to this book. I've always been a big Jackass fan, so of course I know Steve-O. I'm not a non-fiction reader, but when it's something interesting I'm up to try it! This book was, for me, 90% of ramblings where Steve-O is either high, stoned or an asshole and me disliking Steve-O very much. The final 10% felt like the real Steve-O voice that I did like. And I was sad that this book wasn't the other way around. I felt a lot like: "Look at me doing all this stupid shit, being high, being stoned and depressed. Oh, yeah, I also got sober and I am better person but lets just leave that as a side note..." Full review can be found at BiteIntoBooks At some point in this book Steve-O calls himself a nasty, arrogant, mean-spirited douchebag, and for the most part in this book I totally agree. I've watched some interviews with the sober, nowadays Steve-O and I like him a lot. I wished the rationaal and sober Steve-O voice could be more present in this book. That final 10% does make me curious about his next book, that's coming out soon. The first 90% makes me scared it's more of the same shit...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bob Comparda

    An interesting and fun read. I grew up watching jackass and the movies, and even had a little crew of my own that would run around doing dumb stuff on a video camera. Even broke my foot once jumping off of things and still have that footage. Reading about steve-os life was intense, and this book covers all stages of it. From the early years of getting into skating and drugs, to his adventures through college and escapades in clown college, all the way up to the release of jackass 3D. It covers t An interesting and fun read. I grew up watching jackass and the movies, and even had a little crew of my own that would run around doing dumb stuff on a video camera. Even broke my foot once jumping off of things and still have that footage. Reading about steve-os life was intense, and this book covers all stages of it. From the early years of getting into skating and drugs, to his adventures through college and escapades in clown college, all the way up to the release of jackass 3D. It covers the highs and the lows. My favorite thing about steve-os is that he is not afraid to talk about himself in a bad light and not afraid to admit the horrible things he has done. He knows he was an awful person and he guides you through it, no matter how dark it gets at times. I'm so glad that steve-o has cleaned up his act and gotten sober, which he also talks about in the final few chapters, and has still remained just as rad and as relevant and he ever was, if not more! If you are interested in steve-o read this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul St Aubin

    Steve-O is insane. So much crazy stuff has happened in his life it's absurd. This book is hilarious, being filled with stunts, jokes, and plenty of humor. This book is sad and dark, focusing heavily on addiction and also on loss. Furthermore, this book is about transforming and the struggles that come with it. I won't lie, the middle of this book feels long; this middle section consists almost entirely of Steve-O being both stupid and a jerk page after page. However, the ending is fantastic and Steve-O is insane. So much crazy stuff has happened in his life it's absurd. This book is hilarious, being filled with stunts, jokes, and plenty of humor. This book is sad and dark, focusing heavily on addiction and also on loss. Furthermore, this book is about transforming and the struggles that come with it. I won't lie, the middle of this book feels long; this middle section consists almost entirely of Steve-O being both stupid and a jerk page after page. However, the ending is fantastic and leaves me with a tremendous amount of respect for Stephen Glover. Very good read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    Yes, I read this, and yes, this exposing my hidden guilty pleasure for Steve-O, Knoxville, and the Jackass franchise at large. (Exhibit A: my copy of this book is signed by Steve-O) Regardless, he does a great job at detailing the ugliness of addiction and never spared any details. It’s cool to read this knowing he has so many more years of sobriety under his belt than he had when releasing this originally.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nadya Ally

    I became interested in Steve-O's life after his appearance on Mike Tyson's podcast. Steve-O may be a lunatic stuntman but solely putting him in that box isn't fair. From growing up in places like London, Rio, and Toronto, having an alcoholic mother, and suffering from drug, alcohol, and fame addictions, it's interesting to see Steve-O transform. His views on wealth and veganism are also alluring. Overall good read; would compare this book to Anthony Kiedis's memoir, Scar Tissue. I became interested in Steve-O's life after his appearance on Mike Tyson's podcast. Steve-O may be a lunatic stuntman but solely putting him in that box isn't fair. From growing up in places like London, Rio, and Toronto, having an alcoholic mother, and suffering from drug, alcohol, and fame addictions, it's interesting to see Steve-O transform. His views on wealth and veganism are also alluring. Overall good read; would compare this book to Anthony Kiedis's memoir, Scar Tissue.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    To read about Steve-O's ups and downs in his life and how he overcomes his drug and alcohol addictions is really inspiring. As he explains in this book he pretty much went to hell and back and is sober living his best life he can. I would definitely recommend reading this book to anyone who enjoys reading biographies that have positive outcomes. To read about Steve-O's ups and downs in his life and how he overcomes his drug and alcohol addictions is really inspiring. As he explains in this book he pretty much went to hell and back and is sober living his best life he can. I would definitely recommend reading this book to anyone who enjoys reading biographies that have positive outcomes.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Benzinger

    Everyone suspects Steve-O led/leads a crazy life. But suspecting and knowing are worlds apart; this book blows the gates open wide in a flood of three day cocaine binges, ball-to-leg staplings, homelessness antics, drug-induced psychoses, and the rough road to sobriety. Steve-O and David Peisner make a great team in writing this. Between Steve's wild life experiences and the way Peisner strings them along, I found myself much more engrossed in - and grossed out by - this book than the last five Everyone suspects Steve-O led/leads a crazy life. But suspecting and knowing are worlds apart; this book blows the gates open wide in a flood of three day cocaine binges, ball-to-leg staplings, homelessness antics, drug-induced psychoses, and the rough road to sobriety. Steve-O and David Peisner make a great team in writing this. Between Steve's wild life experiences and the way Peisner strings them along, I found myself much more engrossed in - and grossed out by - this book than the last five or ten I've read. I'm teetering on the edge between 4 and 5 stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Henrion

    (Audiobook)The biography of the most annoying person on the planet. Listened to this with my 15 year old sons, arguably the target market, and even they were bored by the repetition of classless stupidity and shallowness. There were some serious hysterical anecdotes, but the book came across as showcasing an attention whore who has no regard for other people.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I'm a bit on the fence with this book. Steve-O has done some inexcusable things but he has really seemed to grow since then and he deserves credit for that. It was a really easy read however and i've learnt a lot about him and perhaps even from him I'm a bit on the fence with this book. Steve-O has done some inexcusable things but he has really seemed to grow since then and he deserves credit for that. It was a really easy read however and i've learnt a lot about him and perhaps even from him

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jack Kennedy

    Yeahhh Dude!

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