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What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful: Round Table Comics

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The corporate world is filled with men and women who have worked hard to reach upper level management. They're intelligent, skilled, and even charismatic. But only a handful of them will ever reach the pinnacle--and as executive coach Marshall Goldsmith shows in this book, subtle nuances make all the difference. These are small transactional flaws performed by one person a The corporate world is filled with men and women who have worked hard to reach upper level management. They're intelligent, skilled, and even charismatic. But only a handful of them will ever reach the pinnacle--and as executive coach Marshall Goldsmith shows in this book, subtle nuances make all the difference. These are small transactional flaws performed by one person against another that, using Goldsmith's straightforward, jargonfree advice, are easy behaviors to change. EDITORIAL REVIEWS: From Publishers Weekly Goldsmith, an executive coach to the corporate elite, pinpoints 20 bad habits that stifle already successful careers as well as personal goals like succeeding in marriage or as a parent. Most are common behavioral problems, such as speaking when angry, which even the author is prone to do when dealing with a teenage daughter's belly ring. Though Goldsmith deals with touchy-feely material more typical of a self-help book--such as learning to listen or letting go of the past--his approach to curing self-destructive behavior is much harder-edged. For instance, he does not suggest sensitivity training for those prone to voicing morale-deflating sarcasm. His advice is to stop doing it. To stimulate behavior change, he suggests imposing fines (e.g., $10 for each infraction), asserting that monetary penalties can yield results by lunchtime. While Goldsmith's advice applies to everyone, the highly successful audience he targets may be the least likely to seek out his book without a direct order from someone higher up. As he points out, they are apt to attribute their success to their bad behavior. Still, that may allow the less successful to gain ground by improving their people skills first. (Jan. 2) Copyright (c) Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. From Booklist By now, the CEO as celebrity is old hat. (Just start counting the books from former company heads.) That goes for the executive-recruiter-cum-president-makers. What has yet to be explored--until now--is the celebrity business coach, the individual who helps C-level executives correct flaws, whether invisible or public. A frequent interviewee in major business magazines like Fortune, Goldsmith, with the sage help and advice of his collaborator Reiter, pens a self-help career book, filled with disguised anecdotes and candid dialogue, all soon slated for bestsellerdom. His steps in coaching for success are simple, honest, without artifice: gather feedback from appropriate colleagues and cohorts, determine which behaviors to change (and remember, Goldsmith specifically focuses on behavior, not skills or knowledge), apologize, advertise, listen, thank, follow up, and practice feed-forward. Admittedly, this shrewd organizational psychologist only works with leaders he knows will listen, follow advice, and change--especially considering that he doesn't receive fees until improvements are secure and visible. On the other hand, these are words and processes anyone will benefit from, whether wannabe manager or senior executive. Barbara Jacobs Copyright (c) American Library Association. All rights reserved--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


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The corporate world is filled with men and women who have worked hard to reach upper level management. They're intelligent, skilled, and even charismatic. But only a handful of them will ever reach the pinnacle--and as executive coach Marshall Goldsmith shows in this book, subtle nuances make all the difference. These are small transactional flaws performed by one person a The corporate world is filled with men and women who have worked hard to reach upper level management. They're intelligent, skilled, and even charismatic. But only a handful of them will ever reach the pinnacle--and as executive coach Marshall Goldsmith shows in this book, subtle nuances make all the difference. These are small transactional flaws performed by one person against another that, using Goldsmith's straightforward, jargonfree advice, are easy behaviors to change. EDITORIAL REVIEWS: From Publishers Weekly Goldsmith, an executive coach to the corporate elite, pinpoints 20 bad habits that stifle already successful careers as well as personal goals like succeeding in marriage or as a parent. Most are common behavioral problems, such as speaking when angry, which even the author is prone to do when dealing with a teenage daughter's belly ring. Though Goldsmith deals with touchy-feely material more typical of a self-help book--such as learning to listen or letting go of the past--his approach to curing self-destructive behavior is much harder-edged. For instance, he does not suggest sensitivity training for those prone to voicing morale-deflating sarcasm. His advice is to stop doing it. To stimulate behavior change, he suggests imposing fines (e.g., $10 for each infraction), asserting that monetary penalties can yield results by lunchtime. While Goldsmith's advice applies to everyone, the highly successful audience he targets may be the least likely to seek out his book without a direct order from someone higher up. As he points out, they are apt to attribute their success to their bad behavior. Still, that may allow the less successful to gain ground by improving their people skills first. (Jan. 2) Copyright (c) Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition. From Booklist By now, the CEO as celebrity is old hat. (Just start counting the books from former company heads.) That goes for the executive-recruiter-cum-president-makers. What has yet to be explored--until now--is the celebrity business coach, the individual who helps C-level executives correct flaws, whether invisible or public. A frequent interviewee in major business magazines like Fortune, Goldsmith, with the sage help and advice of his collaborator Reiter, pens a self-help career book, filled with disguised anecdotes and candid dialogue, all soon slated for bestsellerdom. His steps in coaching for success are simple, honest, without artifice: gather feedback from appropriate colleagues and cohorts, determine which behaviors to change (and remember, Goldsmith specifically focuses on behavior, not skills or knowledge), apologize, advertise, listen, thank, follow up, and practice feed-forward. Admittedly, this shrewd organizational psychologist only works with leaders he knows will listen, follow advice, and change--especially considering that he doesn't receive fees until improvements are secure and visible. On the other hand, these are words and processes anyone will benefit from, whether wannabe manager or senior executive. Barbara Jacobs Copyright (c) American Library Association. All rights reserved--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

30 review for What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful: Round Table Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andy Mitchell

    The author summarizes 20 of the worst interpersonal habits successful employees exhibit in the workplace: 1) Feeling the need to win too much 2) Adding too much value to a conversation 3) Passing judgment 4) Making destructive comments 5) Starting with "No," "But," or "However" 6) Telling people how smart we are 7) Speaking when angry 8) Negativity, "Let me explain why that won't work" 9) Withholding information 10) Failing to give proper recognition 11) Claiming credit that we don't deserve 12) Making excu The author summarizes 20 of the worst interpersonal habits successful employees exhibit in the workplace: 1) Feeling the need to win too much 2) Adding too much value to a conversation 3) Passing judgment 4) Making destructive comments 5) Starting with "No," "But," or "However" 6) Telling people how smart we are 7) Speaking when angry 8) Negativity, "Let me explain why that won't work" 9) Withholding information 10) Failing to give proper recognition 11) Claiming credit that we don't deserve 12) Making excuses 13) Clinging to the past 14) Playing favorites 15) Refusing to express regret 16) Not listening 17) Failing to express gratitude 18) Punishing the messenger 19) Passing the buck 20) An excessive need to be "me" After identifying your worst one or two bad habits, use the following process to improve your effectiveness: 1) apologize 2) advertise your plan to change 3) listen 4) give thanks 5) follow up monthly for 12-18 months 6) practice feedforward, not feedback: ask for two ideas for future improvement, listen, say thank you, and repeat the process with several other people If you'd like to improve your life at work and at home, I highly recommend this book!

  2. 4 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    Q: ... this “we will succeed” attitude leads to staff burnout, high turnover, and a weaker team than the one you started with... (c) Q: People who believe they can succeed see opportunities where others see threats. (c) Q: Successful people become great leaders when they learn to shift the focus from themselves to others. (c) Q: We spend a lot of time teaching leaders what to do. We don’t spend enough time teaching leaders what to stop. Half the leaders I have met don’t need to learn what to do. They n Q: ... this “we will succeed” attitude leads to staff burnout, high turnover, and a weaker team than the one you started with... (c) Q: People who believe they can succeed see opportunities where others see threats. (c) Q: Successful people become great leaders when they learn to shift the focus from themselves to others. (c) Q: We spend a lot of time teaching leaders what to do. We don’t spend enough time teaching leaders what to stop. Half the leaders I have met don’t need to learn what to do. They need to learn what to stop. (c) Q: Treat every piece of advice as a gift or a compliment and simply say, “Thank you.” (c) Q: Try this: For one week treat every idea that comes your way from another person with complete neutrality. Think of yourself as a human Switzerland. Don’t take sides. Don’t express an opinion. Don’t judge the comment. If you find yourself constitutionally incapable of just saying “Thank you,” make it an innocuous, “Thanks, I hadn’t considered that.” Or, “Thanks. You’ve given me something to think about. (c) Q: Successful people never drink from a glass that’s half empty. (c) Q: If you want to change anything about yourself, the best time to start is now. Ask yourself, “What am I willing to change now?” Just do that. That’s more than enough. For now. (c) Q: All other things being equal, your people skills (or lack of them) become more pronounced the higher up you go. In fact, even when all other things are not equal, your people skills often make the difference in how high you go. (c) Q: But for some reason, many people enjoy living in the past, especially if going back there lets them blame someone else for anything that’s gone wrong in their lives. That’s when clinging to the past becomes an interpersonal problem. We use the past as a weapon against others. (c) Q: Warren Buffett advised that before you take any morally questionable action, you should ask yourself if you would want your mother to read about it in the newspaper. (c) Q: When you start a sentence with “no,” “but,” “however,” or any variation thereof, no matter how friendly your tone or how many cute mollifying phrases you throw in to acknowledge the other person’s feelings, the message to the other person is You are wrong. (c) Q: cognitive dissonance. It refers to the disconnect between what we believe in our minds and what we experience or see in reality. The underlying theory is simple. The more we are committed to believing that something is true, the less likely we are to believe that its opposite is true, even in the face of clear evidence that shows we are wrong. For example, if you believe your colleague Bill is a jerk, you will filter Bill’s actions through that belief. No matter what Bill does, you’ll see it through a prism that confirms he’s a jerk. Even the times when he’s not a jerk, you’ll interpret it as the exception to the rule that Bill’s a jerk. It may take years of saintly behavior for Bill to overcome your perception. That’s cognitive dissonance applied to others. It can be a disruptive and unfair force in the workplace. (c) Q: As a general rule, people in their 20s want to learn on the job. In their 30s they want to advance. And in their 40s they want to rule. No matter what their age, though, understanding their desires is like trying to pin down mercury. (c) Q: The only natural law I’ve witnessed in three decades of observing successful people’s efforts to become more successful is this: People will do something—including changing their behavior—only if it can be demonstrated that doing so is in their own best interests as defined by their own values. (c) Q: 1. Winning too much: The need to win at all costs and in all situations—when it matters, when it doesn’t, and when it’s totally beside the point. 2. Adding too much value: The overwhelming desire to add our two cents to every discussion. 3. Passing judgment: The need to rate others and impose our standards on them. 4. Making destructive comments: The needless sarcasms and cutting remarks that we think make us sound sharp and witty. 5. Starting with “No,” “But,” or “However”: The overuse of these negative qualifiers which secretly say to everyone, “I’m right. You’re wrong.” 6. Telling the world how smart we are: The need to show people we’re smarter than they think we are. 7. Speaking when angry: Using emotional volatility as a management tool. 8. Negativity, or “Let me explain why that won’t work”: The need to share our negative thoughts even when we weren’t asked. 9. Withholding information: The refusal to share information in order to maintain an advantage over others. 10. Failing to give proper recognition: The inability to praise and reward. 11. Claiming credit that we don’t deserve: The most annoying way to overestimate our contribution to any success. 12. Making excuses: The need to reposition our annoying behavior as a permanent fixture so people excuse us for it. 13. Clinging to the past: The need to deflect blame away from ourselves and onto events and people from our past; a subset of blaming everyone else. 14. Playing favorites: Failing to see that we are treating someone unfairly. 15. Refusing to express regret: The inability to take responsibility for our actions, admit we’re wrong, or recognize how our actions affect others. 16. Not listening: The most passive-aggressive form of disrespect for colleagues. 17. Failing to express gratitude: The most basic form of bad manners. 18. Punishing the messenger: The misguided need to attack the innocent who are usually only trying to help us. 19. Passing the buck: The need to blame everyone but ourselves. 20. An excessive need to be “me”: Exalting our faults as virtues simply because they’re who we are. (c) Q: There is never anyone in the other boat. When we are angry, we are screaming at an empty vessel. (c) Q: If you keep your mouth shut, no one can ever know how you really feel. (c)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Appu Sasidharan

    (Throwback Review) This book tells us how to build a solid relationship with our colleagues by showing gratitude and remaining open for criticism. He tells us how a simple thank you to our coworkers can bring an extraordinary change in our life. This book might not give us too many new ideas. But it is still a good one to read, especially if you are new to the world of self-help books. “We spend a lot of time teaching leaders what to do. We don’t spend enough time teaching leaders what to sto (Throwback Review) This book tells us how to build a solid relationship with our colleagues by showing gratitude and remaining open for criticism. He tells us how a simple thank you to our coworkers can bring an extraordinary change in our life. This book might not give us too many new ideas. But it is still a good one to read, especially if you are new to the world of self-help books. “We spend a lot of time teaching leaders what to do. We don’t spend enough time teaching leaders what to stop. Half the leaders I have met don’t need to learn what to do. They need to learn what to stop.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tom LA

    If you made it to the executive suite and you're a gigantic asshole, congratulations!! This book is just for you. Marshall Goldsmith will be happy to get paid good money to teach you how to pretend that you're not an immature ego-maniac. Anyone else: steer away, far away. Also, something about biz books in general: far too often they bear abstract and general titles that promise great depths of analysis and solutions, but once you get through them you realize they are either an ego-trip by the aut If you made it to the executive suite and you're a gigantic asshole, congratulations!! This book is just for you. Marshall Goldsmith will be happy to get paid good money to teach you how to pretend that you're not an immature ego-maniac. Anyone else: steer away, far away. Also, something about biz books in general: far too often they bear abstract and general titles that promise great depths of analysis and solutions, but once you get through them you realize they are either an ego-trip by the author (I'll take you through what I have done and why I'm the best ape in the world) or a collection of anecdotes that, while interesting to read, almost never represent a serious analysis of the subject at hand.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brandice

    What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful isn’t full of novel ideas (even in 2007, when it was published), but is a solid reminder of the importance soft skills play in achieving success. Over the last several years, it seems companies have placed greater emphasis on soft skills, which is good — People want to like their coworkers and feel they can rely on their team. Marshall Goldsmith, an executive coach, provides reminders on how to make career p What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful isn’t full of novel ideas (even in 2007, when it was published), but is a solid reminder of the importance soft skills play in achieving success. Over the last several years, it seems companies have placed greater emphasis on soft skills, which is good — People want to like their coworkers and feel they can rely on their team. Marshall Goldsmith, an executive coach, provides reminders on how to make career progress, most notably by building credible work relationships. Some suggestions are obvious and easy (Say thank you). Others can be a little more challenging, particularly with egos at play (Soliciting honest feedback then openly committing to trying to be better). What Got You Here Won’t Get You There was recommended at a conference I attended last year by one of the panel speakers. I’m not sure I would’ve otherwise read it, but it was a nice refresher. The biggest takeaway is the reminder to do things. Follow up on what you learn — Implement small steps, practicing them routinely in order to build them into habits. Don’t watch, do.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Smith

    There is so much good stuff in here. I particularly like the 20 habits section as, although they are common sense things, they all need to be brought up again and again. The thrust of the book is all about how, as a successful person, you can go to the next level. It also points out how these destructive behaviors don't hold you back until you get to a certain level in a company, then they become a problem. Some of the points are well made and insightful. So far (having not finished it yet) the b There is so much good stuff in here. I particularly like the 20 habits section as, although they are common sense things, they all need to be brought up again and again. The thrust of the book is all about how, as a successful person, you can go to the next level. It also points out how these destructive behaviors don't hold you back until you get to a certain level in a company, then they become a problem. Some of the points are well made and insightful. So far (having not finished it yet) the bias is very strongly toward those in a corporate, management situation which is where Goldsmith works and is extremely succcessful himself. Although well illustrated by stories and anecdotes (including about himself) I find the continual reference to how he worked with highly successful people and made them better grates after a while. There is too much emphasis on "this client of mine" and every story doesn't need to start with that phrase which begins to be self-congratulatory to my mind and eventually annoying. I am going to stop reading it now - may come back to it

  7. 5 out of 5

    Yevgeniy Brikman

    One of those books on communication, behavior, etiquette, and leadership that made me realize I'm a terrible human being I have a lot to learn. I'm guilty of so many of the "bad" behaviors in the book that I felt almost personally attacked. At least I'm aware of this now and can start to change. The key argument in the book is that it's behavior, not technical skills, that separate the great from everyone else, and this book details a number of behavioral changes you can make to be more successfu One of those books on communication, behavior, etiquette, and leadership that made me realize I'm a terrible human being I have a lot to learn. I'm guilty of so many of the "bad" behaviors in the book that I felt almost personally attacked. At least I'm aware of this now and can start to change. The key argument in the book is that it's behavior, not technical skills, that separate the great from everyone else, and this book details a number of behavioral changes you can make to be more successful. Here are some of the highlights: * As you go higher in an organization, (a) the more your success depends on making other people successful & effective rather than yourself, (b) the more your suggestions become interpreted as orders, and (c) the more your success depends on inter-personal skills rather than technical skills. I've spent my whole career trying to build up my technical skills as a software engineer and writer, but I'm becoming keenly aware that to level up further, I'm going to have to focus much more on inter-personal skills. * It is possible to try to add too much value. When someone brings up an idea, your first instinct may be to critique or add to that idea. Sometimes, that adds value, but more often, especially if you're in a leadership position, doing this will kill that person's excitement and sense of ownership around that idea. So before critiquing, stop, and ask, "is it worth it?" Unless you've identified a show-stopping problem or come up with a game-changing addition (which is rare!), you may be better off keeping your feedback to yourself, and just encouraging the other person to run with their idea. I don't quite know how to balance this with my love of tossing ideas back and forth and coming up with clever hacks and elegant solutions... * Taking this idea further, don't interrupt people if you already know what they are going to ask, don't tell them you've already heard their idea before, don't show off your knowledge by pointing out how you discovered this thing years before. When someone brings you a new idea or asks a question, don't use it as an opportunity to show you're smart or knowledgeable! I'm so damn guilty of this :( * Most successful people need to create a "to-stop" list rather than a "to do" list, as they are already doing way too many things. You are "drowning in a sea of opportunity." The only solution is to examine where you're spending your time and to eliminate all but the most critical items. * The correct way to respond to ALL feedback, positive or negative, is to say, "Thank you" and NOTHING ELSE. Don't judge the feedback, don't reply with a comment or snide remark, and don't get into an argument. If you do, you'll never get honest feedback again. Instead, stay neutral, genuinely thank the person for taking the time to share their feedback, save that feedback for your own future consideration, and move on. * If people aren't volunteering feedback, the only valid question you can use to seek out feedback is, “how can I do better?" You can use more specific variations of this, such as, "how can I do better at X?" This works because people are often willing to share advice on what can be done in the future, whereas they might be hesitant to critique what you did wrong in the past (especially if you're in a position of power). The only way to get feedback for other types of questions is to have other people ask on your behalf and to use anonymous surveys. * Gratitude is not a scarce or limited resource. Say thank you often. Say thank you publicly. Who are the 25 people that helped you most to get here in life? Make a list of them and review that list on a regular basis to make sure you're thanking them often and clearly. * If you've done something wrong in the past, to fix it, the first step is to apologize. Apologies have incredible power and most people don't use them enough. The proper way to apologize is: (1) Say, "I'm sorry. I will try to do better." Don't add anything else. Don't make excuses. Just admit you did something wrong, apologize for it, and make it clear you'll try to improve in the future. (2) Make sure people know you're making a change. That means that after apologizing, you need to follow up regularly to make people aware of your new behavior and see if it's working. You'll have to follow up many, many times before the message gets through at all. * When you're talking to someone, devote your entire attention to them. This sort of active listening requires a lot of energy, but is incredibly powerful. Bill Clinton was known for making people he talked to feel like they were the only person in the room—maybe even the only person in the world. He had the ability to, "brag about you to you." That ability can get you pretty far. * As a manager, you need to remember that you’re not managing you. That is, the golden rule doesn't always apply, as treating people the way you'd want to be treated does not work since (a) not everyone wants to be treated the same way and (b) due to a power imbalance, employees can't possibly treat you the same way. Example: you might love to come to a decision through vigorous debate, but (a) not everyone likes to make decisions that way and (b) if you're in a leadership position, it's not a fair fight, as due to the power imbalance, subordinates won't be able to argue with you at the same level. * Making changes like the ones described in this book doesn't mean you're changing your whole personality or who you are. Tweaking small traits and behaviors can have a profound impact and no one will think lesser of you for making these changes. * You will never not be busy. Stop waiting for the time when "things will be less crazy." Instead, start making changes right now. So many useful insights. So much to work on. I guess here's one small step forward: thank you Marshall Goldsmith for writing a great book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    Copied-and-pasted summary: 1. Winning too much: the need to win at all costs and in all situations - when it matters, when it doesn't, and when it's totally beside the point. 2. Adding value: the overwhelming desire to add our two cents to every discussion. 3. Passing judgment: the need to rate others and impose our standards on them. 4. Making destructive comments: the needless sarcasms and cutting remarks that we think make us sound sharp and witty. 5. Starting with "No," "But," or "However": the o Copied-and-pasted summary: 1. Winning too much: the need to win at all costs and in all situations - when it matters, when it doesn't, and when it's totally beside the point. 2. Adding value: the overwhelming desire to add our two cents to every discussion. 3. Passing judgment: the need to rate others and impose our standards on them. 4. Making destructive comments: the needless sarcasms and cutting remarks that we think make us sound sharp and witty. 5. Starting with "No," "But," or "However": the overuse of these negative qualifiers which secretly say to everyone, "I'm right. You're wrong." 6. Telling the world how smart you are: the need to show people we're smarter than they think we are. 7. Speaking when angry: using emotional volatility as a management tool. 8. Negativity, or "Let me explain why that won't work": the need to share our negative thoughts even when we weren't asked. 9. Withholding information: the refusal to share information in order to maintain an advantage over others. 10. Failing to give proper recognition: the inability to praise and reward. 11. Claiming credit that we don't deserve: the most annoying way to overestimate our contribution to any success. 12. Making excuses: the need to reposition our annoying behavior as a permanent fixture so people excuse us for it. 13. Clinging to the past: the need to deflect blame away from ourselves and onto events and people from our past; a subset of blaming everyone else. 14. Playing favorites: failing to see that we are treating someone unfairly. 15. Refusing to express regret: the inability to take responsibility for our actions, admit we're wrong, or recognize how our actions affect others. 16. Not listening: the most passive-aggressive form of disrespect for colleagues. 17. Failing to express gratitude: the most basic form of bad manners. 18. Punishing the messenger: the misguided need to attack the innocent who are usually only trying to help us. 19. Passing the buck: the need to blame everyone but ourselves. 20. An excessive need to be "me": exalting our faults as virtues simply because they"re who we are.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Pros: Solid content. What Goldsmith says makes sense. His "Twenty Habits That Hold You Back" are a great list of things everyone should stop doing. Similarly, his fixes - "How We Can Change for the Better" - are practical, worthwhile and beneficial. Cons: Reliance on personal experience and anecdotes to the point of solipsism; a skewed view of human behavior that favors extrinsic motivators (power, money, status, popularity, legacy, rewards, etc) over intrinsic ones (purpose, autonomy, mastery); Pros: Solid content. What Goldsmith says makes sense. His "Twenty Habits That Hold You Back" are a great list of things everyone should stop doing. Similarly, his fixes - "How We Can Change for the Better" - are practical, worthwhile and beneficial. Cons: Reliance on personal experience and anecdotes to the point of solipsism; a skewed view of human behavior that favors extrinsic motivators (power, money, status, popularity, legacy, rewards, etc) over intrinsic ones (purpose, autonomy, mastery); a definition of "successful people" that relies almost exclusively on a corporate/hierarchical model; excessive golf analogies.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth M.

    Where do you want/need to go? Do you have a plan to get there?If not, or ifyour lack of planning has always been a source of anxiety for you, may I suggest you pick up Marshall Goldsmith’s newest book, "What Got You Here Won’t Get You There?"? The book contains 20 habits that hold you back (from getting “there”, remember?) as well as a plethora of other bejewelled nuggets such as how you can change for the better. Here are some of my biggest takeaways which relate to everyone, not just the corpo Where do you want/need to go? Do you have a plan to get there?If not, or ifyour lack of planning has always been a source of anxiety for you, may I suggest you pick up Marshall Goldsmith’s newest book, "What Got You Here Won’t Get You There?"? The book contains 20 habits that hold you back (from getting “there”, remember?) as well as a plethora of other bejewelled nuggets such as how you can change for the better. Here are some of my biggest takeaways which relate to everyone, not just the corporate leaders in our midst: 1) Habit #3 that holds you back: Passing Judgments. Just don’t do it. We discuss this concept at length in Uncommon Confidence. Basically, Marshall and I are advising the same thing: don’t inflict your world view on anyone except yourself. As each of us are unique, authentic beings. What works for us may not necessarily work for someone else. Judging others, Marshall tells us, pushes people away and limits our opportunities for success. 2) Habit #5 that holds you back: Starting with “No”, “But” or “However”. When we start sentences with these qualifiers, we are negating what the other person is saying. Let’s not do that. It seems obviously but here again, when we negate someone else’s worldview, we are pushing them away. We are also sending the message that we are more important than they are. We are also telling them that they are wrong. Ouch. That’s not the way to build a strong support team, now is it? 3) Changing for the better: Using active listening. When listening to someone, focus on them and add one more thing to the equation. Weigh your comment with Marshall’s indispensable sage advice, ask yourself “Is it worth it?” before you add your two pennies to the conversation. Asking yourself this will force you to focus on how the other person will feel after your comment. “Is it worth it?” will also show the other person who you are and that you care about them. 4) Changing for the better: Practicing gratitude. I have a gratitude journal and write in it daily. I feel like I do pretty well with the gratitude thing but Marshall, bless him, gave me a really good idea in this area which is so important to me. Marshall says “thank you” at the end of each phone call instead of goodbye. I love this! This is a fabulous way to show your respect for the person on the other end of the phone. It also sends a message to that person that you appreciate his or her words. You almost cannot overdue gratitude. Think about it: how many times are you sincerely thanked in one day? Not that many I would guess. Gratitude is a gift. Give and take it with grace and sincerity. You Can’t Get There From Here, while marketed as a business/success book, offers so many riches to the average person. Interestingly what might hold the corporate executive back from getting to her place of desire is exactly what will hold you back. Perhaps every habit doesn’t apply to you (I hope not) but some will. As always, take what you want, what applies to you and leave the rest. What is holding you back from getting There?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Really? You couldn't have told me all this in like 10 pages. I felt like he kept saying the same thing over, and over, and over again. Commonsense 101, how unfortunate that we live in a society that has to write a book to tell people you should send a thank you note. Isn't that a sweet little lesson grandma's teach you when your four? Really? You couldn't have told me all this in like 10 pages. I felt like he kept saying the same thing over, and over, and over again. Commonsense 101, how unfortunate that we live in a society that has to write a book to tell people you should send a thank you note. Isn't that a sweet little lesson grandma's teach you when your four?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    Actual advice in this book: "Treat every day as if it were a press conference during which your colleagues are judging you, waiting to see you trip up." (p. 146) Actual advice in this book: "Treat every day as if it were a press conference during which your colleagues are judging you, waiting to see you trip up." (p. 146)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robert Chapman

    This was the first book I have read written by Marshall Goldsmith, and it most certainly will not be the last. From its title one could think that this is one of those fluffy motivational “change yourself overnight” books. In reality it is anything but that, it’s a grounded and well written book that focuses on the problems which come from moving up the leadership ladder while still retaining old habits. As the title indicates, the very qualities that get people promoted and make them successful This was the first book I have read written by Marshall Goldsmith, and it most certainly will not be the last. From its title one could think that this is one of those fluffy motivational “change yourself overnight” books. In reality it is anything but that, it’s a grounded and well written book that focuses on the problems which come from moving up the leadership ladder while still retaining old habits. As the title indicates, the very qualities that get people promoted and make them successful can often be the ones that cause them trouble in their new positions and responsibilities. The biggest impact senior leaders can often make in their ongoing career success comes in the form of behavioural changes. The author describes numerous examples of behaviour which can have destructive consequences at the senior leadership level and how to correct them. Just one example is being over competitive, sure it can make a person very successful as they climb the ladder, but once in higher positions it can have adverse effects. I’ve used the terms senior and higher positions, but anyone who is changing roles through promotion can benefit from this book. I challenge anyone who has been through a transition in the last few years to read this book and not say to themselves at least once “yeah I recall doing that”. Since reading this book I have picked up another book written by the author, Mojo, and I’m looking forward to diving into it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    TabbyCat

    Horrible book unless someone is completely unaware of their impact on others in the workplace. Do not read it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    thewestchestarian

    A more accurate subtitle might be ”Just Be Nice”. Apparently getting to the corner office on the top floor just requires much of what your kindergarten teacher tried to impart on you: listen to people, say ”please” and ”thank you” and always use your inside voice. Goldsmith and Reiter claim these principles are gleamed from hundreds of coaching sessions with CEO’s and their direct reports. Where are these magical companies where nice guys finish first and what do they manufacture? Sunbeams? Rain A more accurate subtitle might be ”Just Be Nice”. Apparently getting to the corner office on the top floor just requires much of what your kindergarten teacher tried to impart on you: listen to people, say ”please” and ”thank you” and always use your inside voice. Goldsmith and Reiter claim these principles are gleamed from hundreds of coaching sessions with CEO’s and their direct reports. Where are these magical companies where nice guys finish first and what do they manufacture? Sunbeams? Rainbows? In truth many executives are tall on height but short on people skills and to some limited degree the Goldsmith/Reiter politeness prescription would definitely help. However, generally those with the sharpest elbow and loosest scruples (e.g., ”Chainsaw” Al Dunlap) have the advantage against similarly savvy executives. In short Goldsmith can help you once you are there but can’t help you get there.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    I'm not really sure how to rate this book, since I wasn't really reading it of my own volition, but for work. One thing that consistently bugged me, though, was how often it felt like the author wanted to name drop but couldn't for various reasons. It also made me think a lot about impostor syndrome, because something none of the people he referenced in the book seemed to suffer from was doubt, and that is something I definitely suffer from. The stuff about feedback and apologies and gratitude an I'm not really sure how to rate this book, since I wasn't really reading it of my own volition, but for work. One thing that consistently bugged me, though, was how often it felt like the author wanted to name drop but couldn't for various reasons. It also made me think a lot about impostor syndrome, because something none of the people he referenced in the book seemed to suffer from was doubt, and that is something I definitely suffer from. The stuff about feedback and apologies and gratitude and just generally inventorying your own behavior was good, though not revolutionary? I don't know. Like I said, not really reading it for my own purposes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Simon Eskildsen

    This book joins High Output Management as most influential management books I've read. What a gem with 10s of incredibly practical ideas that I'm eager to start incorporating. Without a doubt will enter my re-read list. This book joins High Output Management as most influential management books I've read. What a gem with 10s of incredibly practical ideas that I'm eager to start incorporating. Without a doubt will enter my re-read list.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    I cannot express adequately how much I enjoyed this book! Because at first glance, this books seems directed toward those in corporate or business work, initially I can understand why those not in those fields (like myself: a housewife, mother) wonder if it would be a beneficial expense of time. But it totally is! Why? We are all traveling down a road toward something (being a better ____ [mother, wife, financier, teacher, person]. And we all need to improve. So wherever you are in life, if you I cannot express adequately how much I enjoyed this book! Because at first glance, this books seems directed toward those in corporate or business work, initially I can understand why those not in those fields (like myself: a housewife, mother) wonder if it would be a beneficial expense of time. But it totally is! Why? We are all traveling down a road toward something (being a better ____ [mother, wife, financier, teacher, person]. And we all need to improve. So wherever you are in life, if you want to improve, move beyond where you are at this moment or become successful in whatever field, you have to tap into those things that will take you from where you are now to where you want to be. These are the steps to do it! The author talks about 20 every day habits that hold people back from being more successful at whatever ambition is in their head. Every person on the planet is involved in at least 2-3 of them whether it's apparent to you or not. They are: 1. Winning too much. 2. Adding too much value. 3. Passing judgment. 4. Making destructive comments. 5. Starting with "No", "But" or "however". 6. Telling the world how smart you are. 7. Speaking when angry. 8. Negativity. 9. Withholding information. 10. Failing to give proper recognition. 11. Claiming credit that we don't deserve. 12. Making excuses. 13. Clinging to the past. 14. Playing favorites. 15. Refusing to express regret. 16. Not listening. 17. Failing to express gratitude. 18. Punishing the messenger. 19. Passing the buck. 20. An excessive need to be "me". This section of the book alone would be worth acquisition of the book! But there are chapters on how to implement lasting change in your life once your bad habits are realized. And my especial favorite was the chapter on feedback from others: solicited, unsolicited and observational. (And in the case that you're wanting solicited feedback from people you know, there's a 250 question survey you can copy and send along for your betterment!) Some of the book delves into the psychological aspect of our brains: humans consistently rate themselves higher than they're worth, for instance. Knowing a bit about our tendencies is a good place to start when trying to become more self aware, conscious and growth minded. I would totally recommend this book to EVERYONE! If I could afford to buy it for everyone I know for Christmas, I would! It's written in an easy format with lots of humor and anecdotes of his interactions with clients. (The author is an executive coach: he gets called in to "fix" CEO's of big companies) And if you're wanting to move up the corporate ladder or become financially successful, this is a MUST READ!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Aditia Dwiperdana

    This is a book for those that are already 'successful' (by your own definition), so it may not be for everyone. Things that I learned: - You will need help from others to become a better person. You are not a good judge for your self improvements. - The ones that can validate your improvement is your peers or colleagues. - Even the most successful people can still improve themselves by using feedback from other people. This is a book for those that are already 'successful' (by your own definition), so it may not be for everyone. Things that I learned: - You will need help from others to become a better person. You are not a good judge for your self improvements. - The ones that can validate your improvement is your peers or colleagues. - Even the most successful people can still improve themselves by using feedback from other people.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I couldn't finish it, this is the first time in over 20 years I walked away from a book Halfway in I could no longer take the self promoting writing style and the suggestion to adopt a personality of superficial responses. I was hoping the book would be a bit more insightful. Perhaps I was not in the "right emotional place to read it I couldn't finish it, this is the first time in over 20 years I walked away from a book Halfway in I could no longer take the self promoting writing style and the suggestion to adopt a personality of superficial responses. I was hoping the book would be a bit more insightful. Perhaps I was not in the "right emotional place to read it

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aparna B.

    This was a great book for personal and professional growth. It lists out the habits you want to be mindful of as you’re pursuing a role in leadership. It made me do a serious self-introspection of things I want to work on for myself! I highly recommend this as professional reading for individuals looking to build up their soft skills.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ambika Rani K

    One of the best non-fiction books I have read off late. Read this book if you want to identify the blind spots in your behavior which might sabotage your own career at some point of time.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jaideep Khanduja

    http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget... 20 Great Lessons For Project Managers From Marshall Goldsmith What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful by Marshall Goldsmith is a fantastic collection of 256 pages and is a bouquet of learning for Project Managers across the globe. The title itself says a lot. You cannot win each battle with the same strategy. Every battle has to be brainstormed so as to formulate a suitable strategy. Each project is a battle http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget... 20 Great Lessons For Project Managers From Marshall Goldsmith What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful by Marshall Goldsmith is a fantastic collection of 256 pages and is a bouquet of learning for Project Managers across the globe. The title itself says a lot. You cannot win each battle with the same strategy. Every battle has to be brainstormed so as to formulate a suitable strategy. Each project is a battle for a project manager. An off-shore project would require a different kind of strategy as compared to an in-shore project. A CRM project would be a different ball-game in comparison to a project related to ERP. This wonderful book has multiple magical gems that can transform your life from a project manager to empowered project manager. There is a fantastic learning in whatever Marshall Goldsmith is trying to convey in What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful. It is simple to understand but slightly difficult to absorb and more difficult to adhere to. By the time you are able to adhere to these points, you are a totally transformed project manager who will look at everything with a different perspective. Marshall calls these gems as self-defeating factors which stop you from reaching next level in your profession while you have all those capabilities that are required to reach there. Why I call them gems is because these are the critical points to understand. And any learning that helps in delivering your best and is applicable everywhere in your life, throughout, is a gem. Here are the 20 gems: 1. We emphasize more on learning how to DO things and forget to apply our learning on HOW, WHEN and WHERE to STOP. Once we are able to learn the STOP factor, it becomes easier to drive on a road that is not as smooth as a super-highway. And we all know, no project runs smooth. Ability to harness accelerator, clutch and gears in sync is what is required in life. 2. We try our best to win at any cost under any situations and due to that forget to keep the focus on delivering the best. As per Marshall, it is not important to win in all situations. That learning is very crucial. 3. We focus more on self-importance and thus try to participate in everything that matters (or even does not matter). We tend to add too much value to everything even where it is not at all required. For every discussing being held, it is not important to add your point of view. 4. We tend to be judgemental all the times. Rating others are not our job and on top of it telling others to follow you and do the things in the way you want is really absurd. 5. We feel that real smartness is in being sarcastic while making comments which are not true. And then it becomes our habit to be like that at all places. 6. We tend to overuse words like – But, However, No etc. that silently but clearly declares that we are living in a world of our own with a feeling that everyone else except us is wrong. 7. We always tend to estimate how smart others think we are and how to project ourselves more than that to them. In this unending chase, the real momentum of the game is lost and things start moving in a wrong direction. 8. The balancing act is lost when you are angry. Getting angry is not wrong but getting out-of-control at that moment of time is wrong. When you speak, ensure not to use to appear angry as a tactics. And when you are really angry, don’t speak for a while till you cool down. 9. Even when someone else is accountable for a job that is not done, we tend to explain why it did not work. 10. Keeping information to self by thinking that sharing information will reveal you as a weak person or will take control out of your hands. Sharing information appears to us as giving an advantage to other which we tend to hold all the time. 11. Blaming situations (present or past) and people from the past for failures with a clear-cut intention of trying to keep yourself clean. 12. Intentionally or unintentionally staying away from recognizing others for their achievements. 13. Clinging to the past is not a good habit. One of my ex-boss used to tell me that to survive in a corporate world, one has to keep delivering something visible and in its best, every day. You just can’t sit on your laurels. The job that is done well is the past, think of the next best deliverables to go in a best possible way. 14) Playing favorites is another bad game that we play. At times, we might be doing it unintentionally or we are being driven by someone else to do it. In both the cases, it is wrong at our end. We need to realize it beforehand and then simply stay away from it. 15) We tend to refuse to express regret at the time it is required. In fact, we try to avoid it all the time and forever. 16) Not listening is not only a disrespect to others but also can be treated as a breach of trust that others are doing on you while talking to you. When someone is talking to us, we need to give our full intention. I have seen people intentionally expressing their urgency in some important email or some emergency phone call. 17) We fail to regret when it is out turn and also fail to express gratitude to others where it deserves. 18) A person who comes to us with a negative news generally becomes the victim of our harsh behavior even if he is just a messenger and has no fault in the negative that has happened. 19) Passing the buck in case something wrong has happened rather than owning it. 20) We give unnecessary importance to ourselves to a very high extent which is useless.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    Second Review - graphic novel version - 4 stars - 31st Dec 2016 My work role has now changed and as a senior person within a different organisation this book is a bit more relevant. I enjoyed this graphic novel version. It acts as a summary of the key points in the written version and is a very helpful aide memoir. It is a quick easy to read version. I read it to help me reflect on my work as a leader of others and to see how and whether I embrace some of the unhelpful habits. This time round I f Second Review - graphic novel version - 4 stars - 31st Dec 2016 My work role has now changed and as a senior person within a different organisation this book is a bit more relevant. I enjoyed this graphic novel version. It acts as a summary of the key points in the written version and is a very helpful aide memoir. It is a quick easy to read version. I read it to help me reflect on my work as a leader of others and to see how and whether I embrace some of the unhelpful habits. This time round I found the book much more helpful. First Review - paperback version - 2 stars - 10 Jan 2015 - 17 Jan 2015 I don't normally read management text books and I would much rather have read something else, but I was sent on a leadership programme by my employers and this book was compulsory reading for the programme. At first I found the book very hard going. It is written for top CEO's in the business sector and I am a middle level programme manager in a public sector organisation. It was hard getting to grips with the text because so much of the material was just not relevant to me or my working life. I was bored stiff. Nevertheless I gritted my teeth and worked my way through it. I decided to read it with an open mind and take what I could from it. (Ever the optimist) Half way through I started to enjoy it a little because although I don't really have huge teams to manage, I am managed as an employee. The book provides good examples that I can learn from for the future but the book really resonated with my experiences of being managed and with my experiences of being managed badly. It gave me insight into certain leadership styles and showed me why I have disconnected from certain managers. I found this aspect interesting and really amusing especially with the list of twenty bad habits. Alas! Quite a few of which I recognise in my current work place. What the author is seeking to do is to explain how to be more 'human' in the work place. The book is focused on interpersonal skills and how to be successful but to be kind, polite, thankful, thoughtful of others etc etc (human) in the work place. This is something that really should be normal work place behaviour but it isn't and apparently the more senior a person becomes the more they forget what it is to be human. That's if they ever knew in the first place. So perhaps there are things I can learn from this for when I begin to get to those senior levels of management (should I ever want to). I won't be reading this book again (no way) but I will think about what I learnt here so that whenever I find myself working with people or leading them I can be aware of negative or disempowering styles of leadership and make sure I don't inflict those styles of leadership on others. I only wish my manager would read this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Boni Aditya

    I never thought that I would read another organizational behavior book ever again in my life. The last time I read about organizational behavior was in my Sophomore year at College. There was this extremely easy elective, to get good scores and I choose it. After so many years, this book is still relevant. The need for managers to be self-conscious and self-correcting with respect to the people they interact with hubris, is the gist of this book. Pretty common place if you ask me and the Subordi I never thought that I would read another organizational behavior book ever again in my life. The last time I read about organizational behavior was in my Sophomore year at College. There was this extremely easy elective, to get good scores and I choose it. After so many years, this book is still relevant. The need for managers to be self-conscious and self-correcting with respect to the people they interact with hubris, is the gist of this book. Pretty common place if you ask me and the Subordinates tolerate the quirks of the experienced and talented managers, due to the lack of authority and power. Speaking truth to power. The Emperor clothes are typical metaphors that come into mind. The first half of the book where the author deals with the fatal flaws of mangers is the best part of the book. What follows next is one personal experience after the other, of the author dealing with jerks at high places in the corporate ladder and helping them out and what he has learned from his experience. If somebody can afford to hire a coach to correct his behavior than he definitely is a big shot and it is assured that he did not come from humble origins or does not care about those who did. The second half of the book where he offers solutions is extremely boring and sometimes it dribbles down into utter non-sense. All that being said, if you are a manager leading a bunch of people, then you stand to gain a lot by reading this book, than not reading it. So the book is half full and half empty, the second half, which adds very little value as opposed to the first part. The author summarizes 20 of the worst interpersonal habits successful employees exhibit in the workplace: 1) Feeling the need to win too much 2) Adding too much value to a conversation 3) Passing judgment 4) Making destructive comments 5) Starting with "No," "But," or "However" 6) Telling people how smart we are 7) Speaking when angry 8) Negativity, "Let me explain why that won't work" 9) Withholding information 10) Failing to give proper recognition 11) Claiming credit that we don't deserve 12) Making excuses 13) Clinging to the past 14) Playing favorites 15) Refusing to express regret 16) Not listening 17) Failing to express gratitude 18) Punishing the messenger 19) Passing the buck 20) An excessive need to be "me" After identifying your worst one or two bad habits, use the following process to improve your effectiveness: 1) apologize 2) advertise your plan to change 3) listen 4) give thanks 5) follow-up monthly for 12-18 months 6) practice feed forward, not feedback: ask for two ideas for future improvement, listen, say thank you, and repeat the process with several other people

  26. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Meyer

    This is one of the most influential/personally impactful books I have ever read. This is likely because it was the right message at the right time in my life and career. While I cannot promise it will have the same impact on your, nor know if this is the season in your life and journey where you need it it them, I can confidently say that you will walk away from it a better person, leader, coach, and friend. You will walk away with practical and tactical steps you can take to be a better person. This is one of the most influential/personally impactful books I have ever read. This is likely because it was the right message at the right time in my life and career. While I cannot promise it will have the same impact on your, nor know if this is the season in your life and journey where you need it it them, I can confidently say that you will walk away from it a better person, leader, coach, and friend. You will walk away with practical and tactical steps you can take to be a better person. The title made me think it would be another book about the differences between tactical level leadership and the organizational level. Instead I got a gut-punch of reality. Goldsmith provides practical lessons on the what stops highly successful leaders from being great. What stops them from making the next step? In his 20 Habits that hold us back from the top, Goldsmith outlines practical examples and how to go to work fixing them. These examples are rich with the very same 360 degree feedback so many probably receive - especially those in the Army who use the 360 feedback form. And they come from Goldsmith's career in performance and leadership coaching of highly successful leaders and executives. As the William Shakespeare quote in the front of the book from Much Ado About Nothing says, "Happy are they that can hear their detractions and put them to mending."

  27. 5 out of 5

    uosɯɐS

    Why do I keep consuming business books when I generally find them so unfulfilling? Yes, this book was on the dry side, and since I have no desire to go into "management" or any kind of leadership I do wonder if it was a waste of my time. Still, for the genre, this book was better than most. Most "leadership" oriented books seem to be all about pep-talking people into having more confidence. This books is written by a guy who works with people who are already successful, and are heading to even hi Why do I keep consuming business books when I generally find them so unfulfilling? Yes, this book was on the dry side, and since I have no desire to go into "management" or any kind of leadership I do wonder if it was a waste of my time. Still, for the genre, this book was better than most. Most "leadership" oriented books seem to be all about pep-talking people into having more confidence. This books is written by a guy who works with people who are already successful, and are heading to even higher levels. He pretty much assumes that if you are at this level, you have plenty of confidence (Has he ever heard of "impostor syndrome?" If so, he doesn't let on.), and in fact your own success and confidence have probably put you in a bubble where you cannot see what weaknesses that you have left to work on, or that a great deal of your success may have even been due to luck. What this guy does is work with highly successful people who are ready to take their game to the next level. He gets feedback from their subordinates, and if there are character flaws, he finds them, and then he makes you focus on those until you get better. Sounds like a good strategy, actually. But again, I have no subordinates. Not really planning to either. *shrug*

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sumit Singla

    In his inimitable style, Marshall Goldsmith proves why he's one of the most sought after coaches and practitioners in the world. He uses anecdotes and real-life stories to drive home his point about the bad habits we all collect, on the way to being more successful. And those bad habits tend to restrict our success (unless we happen to be dictators of mid-sized nations, or a phenomenon like Steve Jobs, or an inexplicable creature like Donald Trump) Marshall also provides insights into what we can In his inimitable style, Marshall Goldsmith proves why he's one of the most sought after coaches and practitioners in the world. He uses anecdotes and real-life stories to drive home his point about the bad habits we all collect, on the way to being more successful. And those bad habits tend to restrict our success (unless we happen to be dictators of mid-sized nations, or a phenomenon like Steve Jobs, or an inexplicable creature like Donald Trump) Marshall also provides insights into what we can do to mitigate the effects of these bad habits on the trajectory to success. I'm not too fond of the term 'feedforward', but the concept surely makes sense. And of course, a sage piece of advice is, "If you want to change anything about yourself, the best time to start is now." So go on, get going. :)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Simon Hohenadl

    Full of practical examples and concrete advice on how to improve as a leader. It is based on anecdotes and the author's personal experience, but that is totally valid. Much better than Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts—Becoming the Person You Want to Be. Full of practical examples and concrete advice on how to improve as a leader. It is based on anecdotes and the author's personal experience, but that is totally valid. Much better than Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts—Becoming the Person You Want to Be.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rod White

    I like practical thoughts from business dudes. They help me keep thinking about how to lead. Goldsmith is helping people not just succeed at being skilled, but succeed at relating well -- that is key to making something worthwhile happen. Kind of a "duh!" -- but it is amazing what we don't think about, once we are in the habits of being jerks. I like practical thoughts from business dudes. They help me keep thinking about how to lead. Goldsmith is helping people not just succeed at being skilled, but succeed at relating well -- that is key to making something worthwhile happen. Kind of a "duh!" -- but it is amazing what we don't think about, once we are in the habits of being jerks.

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