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The New Digital Shoreline: How Web 2.0 and Millennials Are Revolutionizing Higher Education

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"A fascinating overview of where education is heading. Parents, teachers, and everyone else involved in learning would be well-advised to read this book.--The Futurist Roger McHaney not only deftly analyzes how Web 2.0 is shaping the attitudes and motivations of today's students, but guides us through the topography of existing and emerging digital media, environments, appl "A fascinating overview of where education is heading. Parents, teachers, and everyone else involved in learning would be well-advised to read this book.--The Futurist Roger McHaney not only deftly analyzes how Web 2.0 is shaping the attitudes and motivations of today's students, but guides us through the topography of existing and emerging digital media, environments, applications, platforms and devices and the potential they have for disrupting teacher-student relationships; and, if appropriately used, for engaging students in their learning.


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"A fascinating overview of where education is heading. Parents, teachers, and everyone else involved in learning would be well-advised to read this book.--The Futurist Roger McHaney not only deftly analyzes how Web 2.0 is shaping the attitudes and motivations of today's students, but guides us through the topography of existing and emerging digital media, environments, appl "A fascinating overview of where education is heading. Parents, teachers, and everyone else involved in learning would be well-advised to read this book.--The Futurist Roger McHaney not only deftly analyzes how Web 2.0 is shaping the attitudes and motivations of today's students, but guides us through the topography of existing and emerging digital media, environments, applications, platforms and devices and the potential they have for disrupting teacher-student relationships; and, if appropriately used, for engaging students in their learning.

38 review for The New Digital Shoreline: How Web 2.0 and Millennials Are Revolutionizing Higher Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Augustine

    The New Digital Shoreline by Roger McHaney, a professor of management information systems at Kansas State University’s College of Business Administration. There are few passages that stood out the most for me in this book – The New Digital Shoreline . The first was in the first chapter of the book. “The Law of the Few” – Gladwell uses the Pareto principle to explain a source of societal obsession. The Pareto principle states that 80 percent of the ‘work’ of any enterprise will be done by 20 The New Digital Shoreline by Roger McHaney, a professor of management information systems at Kansas State University’s College of Business Administration. There are few passages that stood out the most for me in this book – The New Digital Shoreline . The first was in the first chapter of the book. “The Law of the Few” – Gladwell uses the Pareto principle to explain a source of societal obsession. The Pareto principle states that 80 percent of the ‘work’ of any enterprise will be done by 20 percent of the participants. Disease may spread in the same way: 80 percent of the cases spread from 20 percent of the population. Social epidemics work in a similar mode: The efforts of a handful of exceptional people with vision and the ability to make things happen start the wave. Their impact comes from attributes such as being sociable, energetic, knowledgeable, and influential among their peers. These same ideas can be extended into higher education. When a critical mass of 20 percent of teachers uses the new technologies favored by tech-savvy millennials, an irreversible tipping point will occur” (McHaney, 2011, p. 3). This passage stood out because it tells us that if we are able to get at least 20 percent of teachers to use the new technology and actually use it and it will impact the whole school to follow the suit. It compared to the time when we are trying to get faculty to use Blackboard in their courses and we were able to get at least 20% of faculty members to use the tool before the wave begins. More and more students demand their teachers to use Blackboard because other teachers were using it, before you know it, everyone is using Blackboard to distribute materials. Once you are able to get 20% of your faculty body to use a device, a tipping point to occur. According to Gladwell, there are several key players that must be involved to make the tipping point to occur. The three main key players are: “Mavens, connectors, and salemen/advocates” (McHaney, 2011, p. 3). Gladwell uses salemen while McHaney uses advocates in education field. Another passage that stood out – “The tech-savvy millennial has a different sense of time than previous generations. This movement, at least in part, can be traced to the advent of VCRs and the ability to tape a television program to view it at a more convenient time and fast-forward through the commericals. The tech-savvy millennial takes this even further with TiVo/DVR and other video-recording services, and with the ability to digitally capture television broadcasts and post the result on peer-to-peer networks like Bit Torrent. Many shows even end up on video-sharing sites such as YouTube, often with the blessing of the broadcasters” (McHaney, 2011, p. 24). The tech-savvy millennial has a different sense of time which is called Time Shifter. According to McHaney, the millennial will watch the television or listen to lectures at their own leisure time rather than going to a class at specific time to listen the lecture. In order to meet millennial’s needs, we need to adapt our learning materials where they can learn at their leisure time. Some children learn better in the mornings, while others learn better in the afternoon and if we use technology to meet everyone’s needs, everyone will be learning at the same rate. I especially like when McHaney re label multitask to timeslice. When I read that he redefine the concept of multitasking and timesharing, and he thinks that the timeslicing is the best word to describe the concept. When I read that and since I am Information Technology major, this term makes more sense to me, because you don’t share the computer’s resources but you slice some of computer’s resources to do your tasks. For example, when a student is surfing Facebook as well as doing her assignment, she is not multitasking, but she timeslices her resources to do several things at the same time. She might focus on assignments more than Facebook because of the importance of completing the assignments is more than surfing her friends’ statuses (McHaney, 2011, pp. 34-35). When I was asked to do a book review report, I have searched the books that were suggested by the professor, many of those books are designed for K-12 field and since I work at a higher education institute, I need to find a book that I can understand and relate, so I did a research on Amazon.com and found this book. It was just released and was fairly new and I was hoping to purchase it in eBook, but it was not available (the irony of the book itself, it encourages eBooks and it is not even available!?!?). So I purchased it and had to wait over one week for it to arrive and caused me some stress waiting for it. “To the tech-savvy millennial, time is at a premium, and their attention is a commodity. Anything perceived as too slow results in latency intolerance and produces stress” (McHaney, 2011, p. 24). Basically, the order of the digital-theme book caused me some stress waiting for the book to arrive so I can begin read it for the class assignment. The main theme of this book is how the new generation are changing the way professors teach at higher education institutes. Teaching students with just a board and markers are not cutting in, students expect more from their professors. For example, McHaney’s colleague, Mike, a professor of Cultural Anthropology at Kansas State University, developed a video called “Web 2.0 … The Machine is Us/ing Us”. It shows what students are experiencing today – the video may be a little out of date, but now you can see what it is like and there are new technologies coming out every day. One year, it was iPad, the next year, it was iPad2 with a camera. A teacher at elementary school is experimenting with iPad2 and plan to lend it to a student who comes from a poor family with no communication – the child is deaf and the parents don’t communicate in sign language so the child is not learning anything at home. The teacher developed a series of stories in American Sign Language and set a time for the teacher and student to communicate over the summer period. I have seen this first-hand with my own children. When my oldest son was only 2 years old, he was able to figure how to use my handheld to call my father in Canada and sent a text message to my boss! The beginning and ending of the book is something that I learned. In the middle of the book, the author just stated tools and what they are for and how teachers are using them. McHaney used some real-life situations to apply the concept, for example – McHaney described his allergies to all mammal’s meats while he was aboard in New Zealand for his one-year appointment at a University there. As he arrived at the hospital in anaphylactic shock and after a series of tests, he discovered that he’s allergic to any mammals. He used this example to describe the current technologies that higher education institutions are using. “Our education institutions have suffered an anaphylactic reaction to old technologies and must change their ways or suffer in slow agony until they deteriorate” (McHaney, 2011, pp. 148-149). McHaney had to adapt his diet so he doesn’t get shocks every time he eats mammal’s meats. He refers the educational institutions need to do the same thing, they need to adapt their teaching styles for millennial to survive. There also is another life situation where McHaney used to apply the comparison between self-favoring your own dish instead having a chef to do it for you and listen those who are learning from us. Every individual has their own preference in eating and it goes the same with the students, every student has their own preferred learning style. With this concept, we can use this as a starting point toward constructivism and connectivism. Connectivism is a new learning theory that was just documented in 2004 in answering the new generation who have different thinking style than older generation (McHaney, 2011, pp. 195-196). I gave this book a 5-star rating. I really enjoyed reading this book and I already made a requirement for my staff to read this book because it applies our jobs. We are the eLearning Specialists who work with faculty members on how integrate technology with curriculum. By reading this book, we can lead the faculty members in the right path. In order to keep our higher education institutions alive, we need to come up with a better way to teach our students. More and more students are going into online learning because it is convenient for them. With that in mind, the higher education institutions need to offer some online courses to meet their needs. The only one part about the book is boring was the summaries of all Web 2.0 tools because I already knew most of them, but they may be good for those who are not experienced with Web 2.0 tools. References McHaney, R. (2011). The New Digital Shoreline. Sterling, Virginia: Stylus Publishing, LLC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda Hammond

    This book points out where the future of education is going. It looks at the social aspects of today's students and points out ways their world-view needs to influence teaching. I learned a lot about technology and the ways it needs to be used in the classroom. This book doesn't just talk about how changes are needed in education. It actually provides ideas about how to change it. It also has interesting stories about teaching experiences. I enjoyed reading it and would recommend it to others. This book points out where the future of education is going. It looks at the social aspects of today's students and points out ways their world-view needs to influence teaching. I learned a lot about technology and the ways it needs to be used in the classroom. This book doesn't just talk about how changes are needed in education. It actually provides ideas about how to change it. It also has interesting stories about teaching experiences. I enjoyed reading it and would recommend it to others.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Greg Sampson

    At first I didn't want to read this because I was 'forced' to as part of my job. The good thing was, once I started it, I really enjoyed it. I think it really gives a good, interesting overview of the way education is moving and helps you see the world through the eyes of the new generation. Many of the concepts are put into the context of interesting personal stories by the author and that makes it fun to read. He talks a lot about connectivism, second life, and other new digital tools that can At first I didn't want to read this because I was 'forced' to as part of my job. The good thing was, once I started it, I really enjoyed it. I think it really gives a good, interesting overview of the way education is moving and helps you see the world through the eyes of the new generation. Many of the concepts are put into the context of interesting personal stories by the author and that makes it fun to read. He talks a lot about connectivism, second life, and other new digital tools that can be used in education. I think it is a gem and should be read by anyone who is an educator.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dale Schwartz

    Well written book about the future of education. Actually, the future is already here and this book gives ideas about how to adapt. I recommend this to all teachers and people that are interested in education.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    Interesting and unique. The last two chapters were the best... Chapter one was a bit metaphysical but I still liked it...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kim Sui

    Enjoyed reading this. It was thought provoking. Good writer with a definite point of view. Some things I don't agree with but think he's on to something with the way education needs to change. Enjoyed reading this. It was thought provoking. Good writer with a definite point of view. Some things I don't agree with but think he's on to something with the way education needs to change.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Roger McHaney

    I hope you enjoy reading this book as much as I enjoyed working on it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lori

  10. 5 out of 5

    Randy

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Dull

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe Sabado

  13. 4 out of 5

    Edward

  14. 4 out of 5

    Zack

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mahesh Jampala

  16. 4 out of 5

    PewdiepieSubscriber

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kim Sui

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Timmons

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ralph Timmons

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  21. 5 out of 5

    John

  22. 4 out of 5

    Riss

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kai

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris Manriquez

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Swain

  26. 4 out of 5

    Roger

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dee Price

  29. 5 out of 5

    Elliedakota

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sannie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Shauna Bell

  32. 4 out of 5

    Debi Rush

  33. 5 out of 5

    John

  34. 4 out of 5

    David

  35. 5 out of 5

    Lori Turec

  36. 4 out of 5

    prema

  37. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  38. 4 out of 5

    Luis

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