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Vagabond (Audiobook)

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12 sound discs (14 hr., 30 min.) Vagabond is a follow-up to Harlequin (The Archer's Tale in the US) - and starts almost as soon as the earlier book ends, carrying on Thomas of Hookton's story. He has been sent back to England to pursue his father's mysterious legacy which hints that the Holy Grail might exist and gets tangled with the Scottish invasion of 1347. He survives 12 sound discs (14 hr., 30 min.) Vagabond is a follow-up to Harlequin (The Archer's Tale in the US) - and starts almost as soon as the earlier book ends, carrying on Thomas of Hookton's story. He has been sent back to England to pursue his father's mysterious legacy which hints that the Holy Grail might exist and gets tangled with the Scottish invasion of 1347. He survives that only to discover that various powerful folk in France are pursuing the same quest, a complication that takes Thomas back to Brittany and the brutal fighting about La Roche-Derrien.


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12 sound discs (14 hr., 30 min.) Vagabond is a follow-up to Harlequin (The Archer's Tale in the US) - and starts almost as soon as the earlier book ends, carrying on Thomas of Hookton's story. He has been sent back to England to pursue his father's mysterious legacy which hints that the Holy Grail might exist and gets tangled with the Scottish invasion of 1347. He survives 12 sound discs (14 hr., 30 min.) Vagabond is a follow-up to Harlequin (The Archer's Tale in the US) - and starts almost as soon as the earlier book ends, carrying on Thomas of Hookton's story. He has been sent back to England to pursue his father's mysterious legacy which hints that the Holy Grail might exist and gets tangled with the Scottish invasion of 1347. He survives that only to discover that various powerful folk in France are pursuing the same quest, a complication that takes Thomas back to Brittany and the brutal fighting about La Roche-Derrien.

30 review for Vagabond (Audiobook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kaora

    He could hear the hoofbeats now and he thought of the four horsemen of the apocalypse, the dreadful quartet of riders whose appearance would presage the end of time and the last great stuggle between heaven and hell. War would appear on a horse the color of blood, famine would be on a black stallion, pestilence would ravage the world on a white mount, while death would ride the pale horse. I love this series. The search for the holy grail continues with Thomas Hookton, a character I instantly con He could hear the hoofbeats now and he thought of the four horsemen of the apocalypse, the dreadful quartet of riders whose appearance would presage the end of time and the last great stuggle between heaven and hell. War would appear on a horse the color of blood, famine would be on a black stallion, pestilence would ravage the world on a white mount, while death would ride the pale horse. I love this series. The search for the holy grail continues with Thomas Hookton, a character I instantly connected with as he struggles to survive as an archer in some of the bloodiest battles I've ever read. I couldn't help but cheer him on as he searched for the relic and vengeance for those he loves. Cornwell has definitely done his research and I love the tie in between real battles and the fictional characters he makes come alive. On to the next!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stjepan Cobets

    The search for the Grail continues, Tomas of Hookton continues its adventure in the border of England and Scotland. King Edward the third sent him to find out whether there is truth to Grail. But this adventure brings him only pain and suffering because he is not the only one seeking the Grail. Continuation of the book is a bit more intriguing than the first part but still good.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    3.5/5. Not quite the same standard as the Uhtred novels, but still an enjoyable read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dana Ilie

    And as always in Cornwell’s books, along with the great characters, such vivid descriptions of seiges and battles that you feel you were there. Another great read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    I wasn't prepared for the setting to switch from France to the Scottish/English border in this second installment of Bernard Cornwell's Grail Quest series. I was thrown off and needed time to acclimate, but once I got my feet under me again, I fell into the flow of another battle-packed book by one of historical-fiction's best! I wasn't prepared for the setting to switch from France to the Scottish/English border in this second installment of Bernard Cornwell's Grail Quest series. I was thrown off and needed time to acclimate, but once I got my feet under me again, I fell into the flow of another battle-packed book by one of historical-fiction's best!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Well...what can I say here? It took me forever (not literally of course) to get around to this book. It's one I kept moving other books "in front of" so to speak (please forgive the poor grammar). Thomas is still somewhat undecided here...well actually he's not. He simply wants to lead archers in battle but he's been charged with finding the Holy Grail (sadly he doesn't really believe the Grail is real and he does believe that his father was a bit...well...cracked[?]) So accordingly he makes some Well...what can I say here? It took me forever (not literally of course) to get around to this book. It's one I kept moving other books "in front of" so to speak (please forgive the poor grammar). Thomas is still somewhat undecided here...well actually he's not. He simply wants to lead archers in battle but he's been charged with finding the Holy Grail (sadly he doesn't really believe the Grail is real and he does believe that his father was a bit...well...cracked[?]) So accordingly he makes some very, shall we say, poor decisions? These of course lead us into the rest of the story and giive us another reliably readable adventure from Mr. Cornwell. Recommended, enjoy. Oh, and now I have to make a spot on my reading list for the next one.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anna Maria

    Sequel of a breath-taking and captivating book, even this one is a page turner. What can I say? Only that the reading was superb, I loved it right from the first page. Couldn't put it down, the story was just so gripping and it kept me going through the book at a very fast pace. I loved this book, there were many twists and a lot of action. I will immediately start reading the next book of the series, hoping that it will be as gripping as the first two books. While I was reading it felt as if I Sequel of a breath-taking and captivating book, even this one is a page turner. What can I say? Only that the reading was superb, I loved it right from the first page. Couldn't put it down, the story was just so gripping and it kept me going through the book at a very fast pace. I loved this book, there were many twists and a lot of action. I will immediately start reading the next book of the series, hoping that it will be as gripping as the first two books. While I was reading it felt as if I was right in the story and that made me consider how it must have been difficult for the peasants to live in the middle ages with all those battles.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I enjoy reading historical books, this the second book of the ( The Grail Quest series )from Bernard Cornwell

  9. 5 out of 5

    Clemens Schoonderwoert

    Read this book in 2005, and its the 2nd part of the "Thomas of Hookton" series. In this book Thomas is sent back to England to find to Holy Grail. During his hunt he will become involved with many enemies specialized in the art of sword fights, and he only being an archer, while his greatest fear will come at the Battle of Neville's Cross, where he will learn that a lot more people are in search for the Holy Grail and wanting him dead. The only option fot Thomas will be to escape England and head t Read this book in 2005, and its the 2nd part of the "Thomas of Hookton" series. In this book Thomas is sent back to England to find to Holy Grail. During his hunt he will become involved with many enemies specialized in the art of sword fights, and he only being an archer, while his greatest fear will come at the Battle of Neville's Cross, where he will learn that a lot more people are in search for the Holy Grail and wanting him dead. The only option fot Thomas will be to escape England and head to France, and there to rescue his old commander, Will Skeat, but even there they are not safe from enemies who will try to hunt them down. What is follow is a gripping and action-packed tale about the Hundred Years War, and especially how to be an archer of England and feel king of the battlefields. Very much recommended, for this is another terrific tale that will take us back to the war between England and France, and that's why I like to call this episode: "A Glorious Thomas Of Hookton Sequel"!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    The second volume in the Grail Series, this story was not nearly as interesting or exciting as the first book in the series, "The Archer". It opens with the 1346 battle of Neville's Cross in Northern England, which is peripheral to the main plot of Thomas of Hockton's search for the grail which is supposedly under the control of his family and has been hidden by his dead father. It ends with the 1347 battle of La Roche-Derrien in Brittany between the forces of Charles of Blois and the English occ The second volume in the Grail Series, this story was not nearly as interesting or exciting as the first book in the series, "The Archer". It opens with the 1346 battle of Neville's Cross in Northern England, which is peripheral to the main plot of Thomas of Hockton's search for the grail which is supposedly under the control of his family and has been hidden by his dead father. It ends with the 1347 battle of La Roche-Derrien in Brittany between the forces of Charles of Blois and the English occupiers. In between Thomas struggles with his doubts that the Grail even exists and travels around England and Northwestern France while working off his guilt at not being able to save his two early travel companions from being murdered. As usual, Cornwell's battle descriptions are as good as any in historical fiction. His description of this Middle Ages' environment is also excellent. I was particularly impressed with his analysis of the power and influence of the Catholic Church in those days. The story does tend to drag, though, through the middle of the book. Nevertheless, I will continue with the third book in the series, "The Heretic". I also recommend this offering. It's just not as compelling as some of his other books.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Master of battle scenes and the details of the soldier. It gets you thinking about life in the middle ages and how you might have suvived the age. Couldn't put it down. Master of battle scenes and the details of the soldier. It gets you thinking about life in the middle ages and how you might have suvived the age. Couldn't put it down.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ned Lud

    4.5*. I have not read a book from Cornwell that I have not throughly enjoyed. Is it possible this streak will be compromised? I doubt it. Time will tell.

  13. 4 out of 5

    B.J. Richardson

    This is book two of Cornwell's Grail Quest series also called The Archer's Tale series. They follow Thomas of Hookton as he travels around somehow managing to entangle himself in every single major battle England fought during the early part of the Hundred Years War. The early part of this book was very familiar to me but the last third or so was not. I am guessing that my first time through I DNF'd this book right about the point Thomas got caught up by the (SPOILERS). I feel like a broken reco This is book two of Cornwell's Grail Quest series also called The Archer's Tale series. They follow Thomas of Hookton as he travels around somehow managing to entangle himself in every single major battle England fought during the early part of the Hundred Years War. The early part of this book was very familiar to me but the last third or so was not. I am guessing that my first time through I DNF'd this book right about the point Thomas got caught up by the (SPOILERS). I feel like a broken record when it comes to my reviews of Bernard Cornwell's books because there are two things that stand out no matter what he is writing or when his historical fiction is to take place. 1) BC does an amazing job of recreating the battles and other major historical events he is depicting. He also does so in a way that truly draws the reader in through the character and plot development. 2) BC hates the church and his personal bias is like a toxic flood seeping into his otherwise pristine writing. In this work especially BC throws away historical fact and plays up the popular myth of what the inquisition was really like. Rather than continue a long rant here, I would encourage the interested reader to do a quick fact check for yourself. This article by the National Review might be a good place to start.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    A lot better book than Archer's tail! It began quite interesting and then came the boring part. Luckily, very quickly it became very intense and unpredictable. The book has finished quite interesting luring us to read the next one in the series. This one surprised me actually. I was postponing reading it because I didn't want to deal with a lot of boring descriptions and prolonged battles. This time it was quite the opposite, battles were the best parts, a lot of things happend in short time, m A lot better book than Archer's tail! It began quite interesting and then came the boring part. Luckily, very quickly it became very intense and unpredictable. The book has finished quite interesting luring us to read the next one in the series. This one surprised me actually. I was postponing reading it because I didn't want to deal with a lot of boring descriptions and prolonged battles. This time it was quite the opposite, battles were the best parts, a lot of things happend in short time, mystery was there... But still, there were a number of boring parts. I get that so much description belong here because of the genre but I feel it is unnecessary. Can't wait to finish this trilogy and I hope that it will be the best one yet.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    This was a great book. This is the second of three. I will give a full review later. Be Blessed.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Val Penny

    Bernard Cornwell, OBE was born in London, England on 23 February 1944. His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother was English, a member of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, WAAF. He was adopted at six weeks old and brought up in Thundersley, Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People. That is a strict sect who were pacifists, banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine. So, he grew up in a household that forbade alcohol, cigarettes, dances, television, conventi Bernard Cornwell, OBE was born in London, England on 23 February 1944. His father was a Canadian airman, and his mother was English, a member of the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force, WAAF. He was adopted at six weeks old and brought up in Thundersley, Essex by the Wiggins family, who were members of the Peculiar People. That is a strict sect who were pacifists, banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine. So, he grew up in a household that forbade alcohol, cigarettes, dances, television, conventional medicine and toy guns. Unsurprisingly, he developed a fascination for military adventure. Cornwell was sent to Monkton Combe School which is an independent boarding and day school of the British public school tradition, near Bath, Somerset, England and as a teenager he devoured the Hornblower novels by CS Forrester. After he left the Wiggins family, he changed his name to his mother’s maiden name, Cornwell. He tried to enlist three times but poor eyesight put paid to this dream and he went to the University of London to read theology. On graduating, he became a teacher, then joined BBC. He is an English author of historical novels. He is best known for his novels about Napoleonic rifleman Richard Sharpe which were adapted into a series of Sharpe television films. He started to write after his life changed in 1979, when he fell in love with an American. His wife could not live in the UK so he gave up his job and moved to the USA. He could not get a green card, so he began to write novels. The result was his first book about that 19th century hero, Richard Sharpe, Sharpe’s Eagle. Today Bernard Cornwell has 20 Sharpe adventures behind him, plus a series about the American Civil War, the Starbuck novels; an enormously successful trilogy about King Arthur, The Warlord Chronicles; the Hundred Years War set, Grail Quest series; and his current series about King Alfred. The author has now taken American citizenship and owns houses in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and Florida, USA and two boats. Every year he takes two months off from his writing and spends most of his time on his 24 foot Cornish crabber, Royalist. Vagabond is the first book by Bernard Cornwell that I had read. I was on holiday, had read the books that I had taken with me, so I borrowed this book from my husband. He has read many Bernard Cornwell books and enjoys them immensely. I was quite excited to read a book by a new author. The Grail Quest is a trilogy of books set in the 14th Century. Vagabond is the second book in the series. It starts in 1346 with the Battle of Neville’s Cross in Northern England. While King Edward III fights in France, England lies exposed to the threat of invasion. The battle is peripheral to the main plot of the hero, Thomas of Hockton’s, search for the grail which is supposedly under the control of his family and has been hidden by his dead father. Thomas, is a protagonist drawn quite pithily. He is an archer and hero of Crécy, finds himself back in the north just as the Scots invade on behalf of their French allies. Thomas is determined to pursue his personal quest: to discover whether a relic he is searching for is the Holy Grail. It is the archers whose skills will be called upon, and who will become the true heroes of the battle. Thomas struggles with his doubts that the Grail even exists and travels around England and Northwestern France while working off his guilt at not being able to save his two early travel companions from being murdered. Cornwell’s battle descriptions are as good as any in historical fiction. His description of this Middle Ages’ environment is also excellent. I was particularly impressed with his analysis of the power and influence of the Catholic Church in those days. The sheer verve of Cornwell’s storytelling here is irresistible. The reader is plunged into a distant age: bloody, colourful and dangerous. However, I found that the story did tend to drag a bit through the middle of the book. Still, I really did enjoy this book. I recommend it and I will read more by this author.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hudson

    **Actual rating 4.5** Bernard Cornwell is one of my favorite authors so please don't expect any kind of unbiased review here, I loved this book just like I love all his books. (According to GR I have read 22 of his books which puts him in 2nd place behind Stephen King.I don't think anyone will ever catch King.....) This is the 2nd installment of the Grail Quest series and it takes place in France around 1350. Thomas of Hookton is an English archer and he's on a quest for, you guessed it, the Holy **Actual rating 4.5** Bernard Cornwell is one of my favorite authors so please don't expect any kind of unbiased review here, I loved this book just like I love all his books. (According to GR I have read 22 of his books which puts him in 2nd place behind Stephen King.I don't think anyone will ever catch King.....) This is the 2nd installment of the Grail Quest series and it takes place in France around 1350. Thomas of Hookton is an English archer and he's on a quest for, you guessed it, the Holy Grail. Lots of great bloody warfare and religious mysteries ass well as an interesting back-story in this book. Evil enemies (and allies), castle sieges, love gained and love lost (butchered). Great stuff! I really enjoyed all the info about the English archers of the day and how it made them such a superior fighting force. The siege weapons were fun to read about as well. Highly recommended for any historical fiction fan!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    This is book two in “The Grail Quest” series by Bernard Cornwell. The story takes place in 1346 to 1347 with Thomas of Hookton an English archer is seeking the Holy Grail by following a book his father wrote. Thomas’s father was a priest and was said to be the keeper of the Grail. He was killed by Guy Vexille, Thomas’ French cousin in book one. The book has great adventure, distressed damsels, armored knights, wayward bishops and beleaguered castles. Cornwell is famous for his meticulous histori This is book two in “The Grail Quest” series by Bernard Cornwell. The story takes place in 1346 to 1347 with Thomas of Hookton an English archer is seeking the Holy Grail by following a book his father wrote. Thomas’s father was a priest and was said to be the keeper of the Grail. He was killed by Guy Vexille, Thomas’ French cousin in book one. The book has great adventure, distressed damsels, armored knights, wayward bishops and beleaguered castles. Cornwell is famous for his meticulous historical fact and of battle scenes; he gives a magnificent description of the Battle of Durham, Neville’s Cross and La Roch-Derrien. If you do not like violent scenes skip this book but if you are a fan of historical fiction this book is for you. I read this book in audio book format. Tim Pigott-Smith does a great job with the narration of the book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    LOUISE FIELDER

    Sequel to Harlequin. Another fantastic book of early English battles, torture, death and victory. The Holy Grail moves a little further forward in revealing its secret hiding place and unlikely friends band together to hunt it down while revenging family honours. Again the characters are wonderfully portrayed and the book moves with ease through all the turmoil associated with the mid 1300's. Can't wait to move on to the third and last book in this series " Heretic ". Sequel to Harlequin. Another fantastic book of early English battles, torture, death and victory. The Holy Grail moves a little further forward in revealing its secret hiding place and unlikely friends band together to hunt it down while revenging family honours. Again the characters are wonderfully portrayed and the book moves with ease through all the turmoil associated with the mid 1300's. Can't wait to move on to the third and last book in this series " Heretic ".

  20. 4 out of 5

    HBalikov

    Amazing detail of a "new" slash and burn type of war. Continues the rush of action and character development of The Archer's Tale Amazing detail of a "new" slash and burn type of war. Continues the rush of action and character development of The Archer's Tale

  21. 5 out of 5

    A.L. Sowards

    The Battle of Neville’s Cross near Durham stretching all the way to page 130 was a little long, but the rest of the book made up for it. (Don’t get me wrong—the battle was well written, but after about 100 pages I was ready for something else to happen.) I loved Robbie (maybe because of my Scottish ancestry), hated the Scarecrow, and of course cheered for Thomas the entire book. I liked Jeanette, too, even though in the first book I was kind of neutral about her. I’ve got my predictions about th The Battle of Neville’s Cross near Durham stretching all the way to page 130 was a little long, but the rest of the book made up for it. (Don’t get me wrong—the battle was well written, but after about 100 pages I was ready for something else to happen.) I loved Robbie (maybe because of my Scottish ancestry), hated the Scarecrow, and of course cheered for Thomas the entire book. I liked Jeanette, too, even though in the first book I was kind of neutral about her. I’ve got my predictions about the grail—guess I’ll read the next book and see if I’m right. As with the first book in this series, great history, great writing, and great plotting. Probably best for adult readers due to the violence and language. 4.5 stars, rounding up for Goodreads.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maria Thermann

    The entire first third of the book is devoted to the infamous battle of the Scots and the English that took place at Durham in October 1346. Just before blood-soaked part one of the novel begins in earnest, Cornwell sows the seeds for the actual plot, the meeting between Thomas of Hookton and his arch nemesis, his cousin, the evil Guy of Vexhille. Guy is heir to the ancient aristocratic title Thomas' father once held: Count of Astarac. And the Vexhille family were once hunted down as heretics, a The entire first third of the book is devoted to the infamous battle of the Scots and the English that took place at Durham in October 1346. Just before blood-soaked part one of the novel begins in earnest, Cornwell sows the seeds for the actual plot, the meeting between Thomas of Hookton and his arch nemesis, his cousin, the evil Guy of Vexhille. Guy is heir to the ancient aristocratic title Thomas' father once held: Count of Astarac. And the Vexhille family were once hunted down as heretics, allies of the Knights Templar who, among other precious religious treasures, had had possession of the Holy Grail. The Templars made a member of the Astarac clan the cupbearer, or treasurer, and charged the Vexhille family with the safekeeping of the Grail, when European kings and papal clerics became jealous of the Knights Templar riches and power and declared them heretics. Slow-cooked Scottish Stew Admittedly, I got rather fed up reading about men-at-arms, knights and archers chopping each other to bits by a variety of gruesome methods. Seven or eight thousand agonising Scottish deaths later, the plot finally got started. In drip feed fashion we learn that Thomas' father, a mad priest with a taste for sin, believed that his heretic family had been put in charge of looking after the Grail, the most holy of all relics in Christendom. In a book he charted his thoughts and discoveries, shrouding what was already a mystery into an even deeper one with ancient religious quatations only the most educated of people can still decipher. Before Thomas can even decide, if he believes in the existence of the Grail or not, he's up to his eyeballs in papal conspiracies and hounded by fortune hunters, his cousin and an obsessed Inquisitor, who will stop at nothing to get his hands on the grail. It's a brutal part of medieval history and Cornwell never lets us forget that life was cheap and meant little, when priests could give absolution for sins for a few coins and assure sinners of everlasting happiness in the afterlife. As the character Robbie Douglas puts it: "I've never liked priests. Hell is full of priests". I couldn't agree more and in this Cornwell novel we see some of the worst examples of clerics imaginable. Ambitious Cleric + Grail Quest = Torture ensues. Beware of Stereotyping My greatest critique of Cornwell's books is that he is so intent on writing for a male audience that he is incapable of writing about women. His readers' obvious fixation with rape fantasies has gotten the better of this author. Every single time a woman is mentioned in any of his books, she either has been raped repeatedly, is about to be raped or died because of it. This novel is more of the same. As a result, I am now determined to write a historic novel, where my Valkyrie-style heroines will castrate every single man they meet. Chopped up, boiled, fricasseed, simmered over a small Saxon campfire flame or freeze-dried outside Valhalla, cooked in a cauldron on Walpurgis Night or nailed to the elegant walls of a Roman villa by druids, the private parts of my male characters will be served up at every turn in response to Cornwell's typecasting of women as the eternal victim. I shall dedicate my novel to him and his readers! No, but seriously: Nearly all of Cornwell's female characters are one-sided, while all his male characters are fully rounded, even those who are mere "walk-on's" like the tragic character of Will Skeat in this novel. Take Cornwell's character Jeanette Chenier, the Comtesse d'Armorique in La Roche-Derrien in Brittany, for example. She was raped by Charles de Blois, who also stole her infant son and heir and gave the child to somebody else to raise. Then he hired a solicitor who effectively steals Jeanette's ancestral house in the town. Having spent some considerable time learning how to shoot a crossbow, she finally has the chance to kill Charles de Blois and get her revenge. What does she do? She merely calls him a "worm" and spits in his face, then walks away - and patronisingly, Thomas of Hookton pats her on the back with a "well done, my lady". My feminist stomach nearly turned when I read that. Museum archives all over Europe hold plenty of household accounts, diaries and other documents from the Middle Ages that show us how wives, daughters and dowager mothers had to cope when their knights went off to fight on behalf of king and country. These women had to look after vast estates, order tenants and serfs about, and be able to command household garrisons who were protecting their castles. They didn't do that by being shrinking violets or timid bunnies, and if you think about it, knights would hardly have left their womenfolk in charge of these estates, if they had to worry about their women getting raped by supposedly faithful retainers the moment knights had trotted off across the drawbridge. Why then are all female characters in Cornwell's novels weak? Because Cornwell can't be bothered to do proper research into the way people lived during the period he writes about - and by "people" I mean of course both sexes. Sorry, this really isn't good enough, Mr. Cornwell, and for that reason, I'm marking down the star rating here on Goodreads. Somebody, hand me a hatchet, this Valkyrie is ready to chop some male ego!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cathal Kenneally

    Loved this and the preceding book in the series. I have ordered the third and final book. It has already arrived. Great storyline that contained from the first to the second book. Let's hope it will be the same in the third book. English archers did have a reputation as being just as good as any in Europe. Laws were passed to train young lads from the age of eight upwards to practice with a longbow. Although they came from lowborn backgrounds till firearms replaced archer on the battlefield, arc Loved this and the preceding book in the series. I have ordered the third and final book. It has already arrived. Great storyline that contained from the first to the second book. Let's hope it will be the same in the third book. English archers did have a reputation as being just as good as any in Europe. Laws were passed to train young lads from the age of eight upwards to practice with a longbow. Although they came from lowborn backgrounds till firearms replaced archer on the battlefield, archers were essential in battles and often decided wars. The author provides a historical note at the end where he explains where he's been liberal with the facts. A lot of authors write historical fiction but do they research it? I have found myself looking up words he uses in this series. Archaic words that are no longer used. So you can be the judge of the research

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    I'm really enjoying this series. While I was saddened by the fate of a couple of characters, the writing certainly didn't disappoint. Loved this book, really enjoying the series. Fantastic battle descriptions, great character development, intrigue, action, emotion . . . very well done. Might have given five stars (which I don't do often), but wrapped up just a little too neatly at the end for my taste. I already have "Heretic," the third book in the series; but there wasn't anything at the end of I'm really enjoying this series. While I was saddened by the fate of a couple of characters, the writing certainly didn't disappoint. Loved this book, really enjoying the series. Fantastic battle descriptions, great character development, intrigue, action, emotion . . . very well done. Might have given five stars (which I don't do often), but wrapped up just a little too neatly at the end for my taste. I already have "Heretic," the third book in the series; but there wasn't anything at the end of this that makes me want to rush to start the next one. I'm a fan of the cliff-hanger. I suppose that if I wasn't binge-reading the series, and had to wait for the next edition, I might feel differently.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Puscas Mircea

    A fantastic book , I liked the way the battles were described.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    Thomas of Hookton is back again. He's still searching for the grail, as his father's book is stolen and restolen by his enemny. Romance is found and lost as the story continues. Thomas of Hookton is back again. He's still searching for the grail, as his father's book is stolen and restolen by his enemny. Romance is found and lost as the story continues.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    Will skeat! What a great character! All the characters are so well done. Fill their roles perfectly. The battles are incredible. 5 stars.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeff P

    Book Two of a three book series about an English archer's quest for the Grail, that his father may or may not have had at one time. I enjoy the actual history that Cornwell uses. Book Two of a three book series about an English archer's quest for the Grail, that his father may or may not have had at one time. I enjoy the actual history that Cornwell uses.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Justin Langlois

    Vagabond was a nice follow-up to The Archer's Tale. Thomas of Hookton continues on his quest to find the man who murdered his father and to find the "Holy Grail". Cornwell continues to impress me with his amazing attention to historical detail. I've learned more about Europe during the time leading up to the Black Plague then I ever thought I would! Vagabond was a nice follow-up to The Archer's Tale. Thomas of Hookton continues on his quest to find the man who murdered his father and to find the "Holy Grail". Cornwell continues to impress me with his amazing attention to historical detail. I've learned more about Europe during the time leading up to the Black Plague then I ever thought I would!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stan Vlieg

    4.5 stars but the glass is half full. Mister Cornwell delivers yet again. It's amazing how all of his book i read to this date have been pushing all the right buttons for me. He is very good in creating a world of history where the characters come to life. From torture to love, you can't help to feel for Thomas of Hookton. Although the recipe in his storys are quite similar it still keeps me on edge. It's a pleasant feeling to know i still have his Sharpe series (22 books) to entertain myself wit 4.5 stars but the glass is half full. Mister Cornwell delivers yet again. It's amazing how all of his book i read to this date have been pushing all the right buttons for me. He is very good in creating a world of history where the characters come to life. From torture to love, you can't help to feel for Thomas of Hookton. Although the recipe in his storys are quite similar it still keeps me on edge. It's a pleasant feeling to know i still have his Sharpe series (22 books) to entertain myself with.

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