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Selected Poetry of William Wordsworth

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Selected Poetry of William Wordsworth represents Wordsworth's prolific output, from the poems first published in Lyrical Ballads in 1798 that changed the face of English poetry to the late "Yarrow Revisited." Wordsworth's poetry is celebrated for its deep feeling, its use of ordinary speech, the love of nature it expresses, and its representation of commonplace things and Selected Poetry of William Wordsworth represents Wordsworth's prolific output, from the poems first published in Lyrical Ballads in 1798 that changed the face of English poetry to the late "Yarrow Revisited." Wordsworth's poetry is celebrated for its deep feeling, its use of ordinary speech, the love of nature it expresses, and its representation of commonplace things and events. As Matthew Arnold notes, "[Wordsworth's poetry] is great because of the extraordinary power with which [he] feels the joy offered to us in nature, the joy offered to us in the simple elementary affections and duties."


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Selected Poetry of William Wordsworth represents Wordsworth's prolific output, from the poems first published in Lyrical Ballads in 1798 that changed the face of English poetry to the late "Yarrow Revisited." Wordsworth's poetry is celebrated for its deep feeling, its use of ordinary speech, the love of nature it expresses, and its representation of commonplace things and Selected Poetry of William Wordsworth represents Wordsworth's prolific output, from the poems first published in Lyrical Ballads in 1798 that changed the face of English poetry to the late "Yarrow Revisited." Wordsworth's poetry is celebrated for its deep feeling, its use of ordinary speech, the love of nature it expresses, and its representation of commonplace things and events. As Matthew Arnold notes, "[Wordsworth's poetry] is great because of the extraordinary power with which [he] feels the joy offered to us in nature, the joy offered to us in the simple elementary affections and duties."

30 review for Selected Poetry of William Wordsworth

  1. 5 out of 5

    E. G.

    Chronology Introduction & Notes Further Reading A Note on the Texts --Old Man Travelling --The Ruined Cottage --A Night-Piece --The Old Cumberland Beggar --Lines Written at a Small Distance from my House --Goody Blake and Harry Gill --The Thorn --The Idiot Boy --Lines Written in Early Spring --Anecdote for Fathers --We Are Seven --Expostulation and Reply --The Tables Turned --Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey --The Fountain --The Two April Mornings --'A slumber did my spirit seal' --Song ('She dwelt amon Chronology Introduction & Notes Further Reading A Note on the Texts --Old Man Travelling --The Ruined Cottage --A Night-Piece --The Old Cumberland Beggar --Lines Written at a Small Distance from my House --Goody Blake and Harry Gill --The Thorn --The Idiot Boy --Lines Written in Early Spring --Anecdote for Fathers --We Are Seven --Expostulation and Reply --The Tables Turned --Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey --The Fountain --The Two April Mornings --'A slumber did my spirit seal' --Song ('She dwelt among th' untrodden ways') --'Strange fits of passion I have known' --Lucy Gray --Nutting --'Three years she grew in sun and shower' --The Brothers --Hart-Leap Well --from 'Home at Grasmere' from 'Poems on the Naming of Places': --To Joanna --'A narrow girdle of rough stones and crags' --Michael --'I travelled among unknown Men' --To a Sky-Lark --Alice Fell --Beggars --To a Butterfly ('Stay near me') --To the Cuckoo --'My heart leaps up when I behold' --To H. C., Six Years Old --'Among all lovely things my Love had been' --To a Butterfly ('I've watched you') --Resolution and Independence --'Within our happy Castle there dwelt one' --'The world is too much with us' --'With Ships the sea was sprinkled far and nigh' --'Dear Native Brooks your ways have I pursued' --'Great Men have been among us' --'It is not to be thought of that the Flood' --'When I have borne in memory what has tamed' --'England! the time is come when thou shouldst wean' --Composed by the Sea-Side, near Calais --'It is a beauteous Evening, calm and free' --To Toussaint L'Ouverture --Composed in the Valley, near Dover, on the Day of Landing --Composed Upon Westminster Bridge --London, 1802 --'Nuns fret not at their Convent's narrow room' --Yarrow Unvisited --'She was a Phantom of delight' --Ode to Duty --Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood --'I wandered lonely as a Cloud' --Stepping Westward --The Solitary Reaper --Elegiac Stanzas --A Complaint --Gipsies --St Paul's --'Surprized by joy -- impatient as the Wind' --Yew-Trees --Composed at Cora Linn --Yarrow Visited --To R. B. Haydon, Esq. ('High is our calling, Friend!') --Sequel to the Foregoing [Beggars] --Ode: Composed upon an Evening of Extraordinary Splendor and Beauty --The River Duddon: Conclusion --'The unremitting voice of nightly streams' --Airey-Force Valley --Extempore Effusion Upon the Death of James Hogg --'Glad sight wherever new with old' --At Furness Abbey --'I know an aged Man constrained to dwell' from 'The Prelude': --Book I --Book II --Book III --Book IV --Book V --Book VI --Book VII --Book VIII --Book IX --Book X --Book XI --Book XII --Book XIII Notes Index of Titles Index of First Lines

  2. 4 out of 5

    fioo ! ♡ ∗ ˚ ˖࣪ ∗ ‎˖ ݁ . ° · ˚ ₊

    "I've come too far to watch some name dropping sleaze, tell me what are my Wordsworth." —Taylor Swift (she's an icon, she's a legend and she is the moment) in her song "The Lakes" I just wanted to note that, and here are some highlights from William's poems: "My whole life I have lived in pleasant thought, As if life’s business were a summer mood; As if all needful things would come unsought To genial faith, still rich in genial good; But how can He expect that others should Build for him, sow for h "I've come too far to watch some name dropping sleaze, tell me what are my Wordsworth." —Taylor Swift (she's an icon, she's a legend and she is the moment) in her song "The Lakes" I just wanted to note that, and here are some highlights from William's poems: "My whole life I have lived in pleasant thought, As if life’s business were a summer mood; As if all needful things would come unsought To genial faith, still rich in genial good; But how can He expect that others should Build for him, sow for him, and at his call Love him, who for himself will take no heed at all?" «This morning gives us promise of a glorious day.» "Thanks to the human heart by which we live, Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears, To me the meanest flower that blows can give." "Whither is fled the visionary gleam? Where is it now, the glory and the dream?" "Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting." "With all the Persons, down to palsied Age, That Life brings with her in her equipage; As if his whole vocation Were endless imitation."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Wright

    I am not a fan of Wordsworth. I find his poems veering towards the sentimental and obscure. I think his influence in this direction has been mostly negative. But I can respect his ability to put one word after another, and his status as a pioneer - albeit of lands I have no wish to tread.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    Conversation with Not while crossing Westminster Bridge earlier this afternoon: N: Let's get off this bridge and go somewhere where there aren't so many fucking tourists. Me: Hey! Remember Earth hath not anything to show more fair! [Pause] N: Than what? Conversation with Not while crossing Westminster Bridge earlier this afternoon: N: Let's get off this bridge and go somewhere where there aren't so many fucking tourists. Me: Hey! Remember Earth hath not anything to show more fair! [Pause] N: Than what?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

    Quando, por vezes, surge a pergunta [complicada] "qual é o teu poema/poeta favorito?", não demoro muito a responder: "...What though the radiance which was once so bright Be now for ever taken from my sight, Though nothing can bring back the hour Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower, We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind; In the primal sympathy Which having been must ever be; In the soothing thoughts that spring Out of human suffering; In the faith that looks through de Quando, por vezes, surge a pergunta [complicada] "qual é o teu poema/poeta favorito?", não demoro muito a responder: "...What though the radiance which was once so bright Be now for ever taken from my sight, Though nothing can bring back the hour Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower, We will grieve not, rather find Strength in what remains behind; In the primal sympathy Which having been must ever be; In the soothing thoughts that spring Out of human suffering; In the faith that looks through death, In years that bring the philosophic mind." William Wordsworth. -- É sempre tão boa a leitura de Wordsworth, uma infinita nostalgia fica connosco quando o livro termina. E ler uma edição bilíngüe enriquece sempre qualquer leitura. A lista de poetas que concorrem com Wordsworth é extensa: Shelley, Lord Byron, Coleridge, Keats... Mas em Wordsworth encontramos o mundo bucólico, a ode à folha que cai, um hino à vida que se desgasta e nos deixa.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Abby Johns

    I can't find the version I read (Folio Society edited by Seamus Heaney) on GoodReads so this will have to do! I can't believe that I hadn't read much Wordsworth before. I think my greater appreciation of the natural world and long walks during lockdown made Wordworth's poetry even more powerful to me. I was also surprised by how many poems dealt with issues of class and family bonds, which I wasn't expecting, and his appreciation of his own privileged position. Cannot recommend enough! I can't find the version I read (Folio Society edited by Seamus Heaney) on GoodReads so this will have to do! I can't believe that I hadn't read much Wordsworth before. I think my greater appreciation of the natural world and long walks during lockdown made Wordworth's poetry even more powerful to me. I was also surprised by how many poems dealt with issues of class and family bonds, which I wasn't expecting, and his appreciation of his own privileged position. Cannot recommend enough!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heidi'sbooks

    I read a selection of the poems found in this book. Isn't the cover gorgeous? I bought this Kindle version, but I wish I could have bought the book. Maybe I'll sneak out to Barnes and Noble sometime and try to find it. You know, I appreciate William Wordsworth much more now than I did in college. I never thought of Wordsworth as one of my favorite poets—I like Emily Dickinson and Frost plus others. But, I think he might move up a bit on my list of favorites. I like the rapturous emotion in his po I read a selection of the poems found in this book. Isn't the cover gorgeous? I bought this Kindle version, but I wish I could have bought the book. Maybe I'll sneak out to Barnes and Noble sometime and try to find it. You know, I appreciate William Wordsworth much more now than I did in college. I never thought of Wordsworth as one of my favorite poets—I like Emily Dickinson and Frost plus others. But, I think he might move up a bit on my list of favorites. I like the rapturous emotion in his poems, and I love his descriptive scenes of nature. I found lots of great quotes. His theme of the carefree nature of children and their enjoyment in nature was great. It was joyful to read, and that theme seemed to carry through many of his poems. His descriptions of the restrictive and dry nature of education was sad. Wordsworth said, “I have said that poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility." This quote reminds me of Lines Written in Early Spring “I hear a thousand blended notes,/While in a grove I sate reclined,/In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts/Bring sad thoughts to the mind.” He goes on to reflect “Have I not reason to lament/What man has made of man?” That seems like his most moody poem or most melancholy. And what about The Prelude when he came home for summer break after being away at Cambridge, “Those walks in all their freshness now came back Like a returning Spring. When first I made Once more the circuit of our little lake, If ever happiness hath lodged with man, That day consummate happiness was mine, Wide-spreading, steady, calm, contemplative. . . Gently did my soul Put off her veil, and, self-transmuted, stood Naked, as in the presence of her God.” I kept trying to figure out if Nature was his god or if he did bring God into it. He capitalized Nature as a Being almost. And sometimes I was sure he worshiped Nature and other times I thought he was just revitalized by it all. He does use the words Worship and Nature together. He says in Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey: “We stood together; and that I, so long/A worshipper of Nature, hither came/ Unwearied in that service.” Then he says in The Prelude—“I am content/With my own modest pleasures, and have lived/With God and Nature communing.” And after reading a bit on the internet, I don't think experts agree. So, I surely don't know, but it seemed to me at first glance that he treated God and Nature equally. One thing for sure, he's definitely a Romantic Poet.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Pewterbreath

    Wordsworth is a guilty dislike for me. So many poets don't only like him but credit him with their very inspiration as to what poetry is and should be. Last summer I endeavored to make peace with Wordsworth once and for all. I skipped the juvenelia, and went straight for the "young" Wordsworth. My complaints I can find very quickly--many many poems about A man wandering unhappy, ill at ease, or at least lonely--he encounters daffodils/a leech gatherer/nature's primal majesty and whatever was bot Wordsworth is a guilty dislike for me. So many poets don't only like him but credit him with their very inspiration as to what poetry is and should be. Last summer I endeavored to make peace with Wordsworth once and for all. I skipped the juvenelia, and went straight for the "young" Wordsworth. My complaints I can find very quickly--many many poems about A man wandering unhappy, ill at ease, or at least lonely--he encounters daffodils/a leech gatherer/nature's primal majesty and whatever was bothering him (it's never mentioned, P thinks he was probably irritated that his sister didn't press his shirts right) evaporates away. I find Wordsworth extraordinarily earnest--and if you take any Romanticism class they will go on and on about how "going back to nature" is supposed to be the cure towards the "evils of society." The trouble is, I don't know if Wordsworth believed it. How many times did he see nature in his mind and not in reality? Also, the very fact that he wrote these poems, aren't they now mere memories and not the reality anymore? And also, if nature is the perfect balm why is he always wandering (I mean it doesn't sound as if the man is on his afternoon constitutional--he is endlessly wandering and searching.) Curiously, this take on him made him much more stomachable for me---I'm much more interested in people saying "What is this?" than "This is it!" Old Wordsworth is much less interesting--he gets preachy, moralistic, and becomes a voice for the old guard. But who can blame him--he long outlived his peers, and was finding himself struggling to be relevant in a new (extremely prosaic) age. I can say I can put my Wordsworth ambivalence to rest, and though I will never entirely like him, I can tip my hat in respect.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Momo

    2.5/5 Semi enjoyed and good narration for the audiobook. I really enjoyed the narrator for this and loved that they listed off some facts about the poet and his life. I liked the flow of the poems but didn't enjoy the poems themselves all that much. I wouldn't mind picking this up physically to see if I like it better in that format. For my GR friends sorry for the spam of reads and reviews I'm a bit behind on my goal of trying to read a book for every day of the month/year (started this in march 2.5/5 Semi enjoyed and good narration for the audiobook. I really enjoyed the narrator for this and loved that they listed off some facts about the poet and his life. I liked the flow of the poems but didn't enjoy the poems themselves all that much. I wouldn't mind picking this up physically to see if I like it better in that format. For my GR friends sorry for the spam of reads and reviews I'm a bit behind on my goal of trying to read a book for every day of the month/year (started this in march so it's not my Goodreads reading goal). Summer term is shorter than the other quarters and I added an extra class for this term and I've been dealing with getting on a medication and then having to get off of it because it messed up my vision so I have been pretty miserable and busy lol.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna Purchase

    i'm torn on wordsworth. 'she dwelt' was probably my favourite of the 15 we studied in class and thus I wanted to explore more of his poetry. however, i found a lot of his poetry was repetitive, with similar vocabulary and themes. i definitely enjoyed his more concise poems than his longer tales. some of his poems were breathtaking and some were duds. while i admit i'm a novice when it comes to reading and enjoying poetry (as opposed to studying it), it was more by force of will than desire of he i'm torn on wordsworth. 'she dwelt' was probably my favourite of the 15 we studied in class and thus I wanted to explore more of his poetry. however, i found a lot of his poetry was repetitive, with similar vocabulary and themes. i definitely enjoyed his more concise poems than his longer tales. some of his poems were breathtaking and some were duds. while i admit i'm a novice when it comes to reading and enjoying poetry (as opposed to studying it), it was more by force of will than desire of heart I completed his poetry.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Thirza

    A good collection of Wordsworth's wonderful poems. A good collection of Wordsworth's wonderful poems.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Robbins

    I didn’t read this collection specifically. I had to read a h*ck ton from an anthology and did not enjoy it, so I needed to document it in some way so that it at least counted for my book challenge. Thx.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Selected Poetry of William Wordsworth represents Wordsworth’s prolific output, from the poems first published in Lyrical Ballads in 1798 that changed the face of English poetry to the late “Yarrow Revisited.” Wordsworth’s poetry is celebrated for its deep feeling, its use of ordinary speech, the love of nature it expresses, and its representation of commonplace things and

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This is proof that tastes change as you age: at university I was not a fan, but now William has the power to move me to tears! I much prefer his earlier work, and I disagree that 'The Prelude' is his greatest work. It does what William wanted it to do - to keep him in people's minds as a great poet; and he is a great poet. This is proof that tastes change as you age: at university I was not a fan, but now William has the power to move me to tears! I much prefer his earlier work, and I disagree that 'The Prelude' is his greatest work. It does what William wanted it to do - to keep him in people's minds as a great poet; and he is a great poet.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Todd Williams

    A couple of minor omissions I would’ve liked to see (Simon Lee, for example), but solid collection from one of the best poets ever. I especially like that this includes a healthy selection of The Prelude.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alex Kartelias

    After skimming through his poetry for 4 years, I've finally read it all the way through. His worship of nature I think should inspire anyone who feels a need to reconnect with God/Nature. The universe spoke through him and his words still vibrate today. After skimming through his poetry for 4 years, I've finally read it all the way through. His worship of nature I think should inspire anyone who feels a need to reconnect with God/Nature. The universe spoke through him and his words still vibrate today.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lizzytish

    Read this for my club, actually just an assortment of his poetry. I love nature, so I enjoyed his perspective. My favorite was " I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud" "And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils." Read this for my club, actually just an assortment of his poetry. I love nature, so I enjoyed his perspective. My favorite was " I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud" "And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils."

  18. 5 out of 5

    Winter Sophia Rose

    Touching, Timeless & Beautiful! One Of The Greatest Poets!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    primal sympathies-- wordsworth's castrated submission to nature is full of beautiful longing and sadnesses. mournful womanliness inheriting the world in a golden twilight, sun on the hills... primal sympathies-- wordsworth's castrated submission to nature is full of beautiful longing and sadnesses. mournful womanliness inheriting the world in a golden twilight, sun on the hills...

  20. 4 out of 5

    saïd

    I think Wordsworth is just not that great of a poet. Except "To a Sky-Lark." That one slaps. I think Wordsworth is just not that great of a poet. Except "To a Sky-Lark." That one slaps.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Whiskey Tango

    Like several other romantic poets, William Wordsworth is a paradox. He aimed to celebrate the changeless things in nature and man. Yet, he writes with a strange boldness and originality that are bracing or unsettling depending upon how willingly we accept a new kind of poetry. If Wordsworth no longer startles moderns, it is because so many later poets have made his strategies familiar, especially his habit of philosophizing from natural emblems. Wordsworth embarked on his most creative period by Like several other romantic poets, William Wordsworth is a paradox. He aimed to celebrate the changeless things in nature and man. Yet, he writes with a strange boldness and originality that are bracing or unsettling depending upon how willingly we accept a new kind of poetry. If Wordsworth no longer startles moderns, it is because so many later poets have made his strategies familiar, especially his habit of philosophizing from natural emblems. Wordsworth embarked on his most creative period by trying to chasten and chastize 18C poetry, using a language of limpid, plate-glass purity freed from mannered artifice. Yet his own manner was so distinctive that he is among the most parodied poets. Wordsworth was born in Northwest England, the scenic Lake District he was to make famous. His mother died when he was 8 and his father died when he was 13, confirming what I believe is the profound effect on the sensitivity and imagination of children who are made vulnerable by the death of a parent. In his lifetime (1770-1850), despite the fact that he had not published, Wordsworth was considered, along with Byron, one of the two pivotal figures of English romanticism, Wordsworth once defied the imagination, which he considered the highest faculty of the creative mind, as something which "produces impressive effects out of simple elements." After spending time in the Alps and upon seeing London which he found a phantasmagoria and, the antithesis of the stable grandeur and dignity of his native hills, Wordsworth spent his life as a bachelor (after fathering a child with a Frenchwoman whom) Wordsworth and his beloved sister Dorothy moved in together, and she helped restore his mental health and remained with him to old age. The friendship between Wordsworth and Coleridge became one of the most fruitful in literary history. They conceived together both a new poetic style and a whole new rationale of what poetry should do. Poetry was to be an agency not of mere diversion but of profound truth in an imaginative union that would spiritually enlighten and heal. Wordsworth treated everyday subjects the medium would be an honest language really spoken by men, cleansed of unfunctional conventionality. Oddly, one of the things that obscures the purpose in many of Wordsworth poems is the very simplicity of the language; one of the hardest things in reading his works is to concentrate on the behavior of words that seem not to be doing anything special at all. The typical movement of Wordsworth's major works is the oscillation: between observation of the external scene and introspective analysis of feelings; between experiences and ideas they generate; between the remembered past and present circumstances; between a personal confession ("I") and universal truths ("we"). We need to keep this back-and-forth movement in mind when we call Wordsworth a nature poet. Though it is everywhere in his work, nature rarely appears simply for its own sake. Rather nature is a mythic emblem-of a mysterious, perhaps divine presence, of a dynamic of steady order in the universe, and especially of the development and experience of individuals. Moreover, nature can cut two ways. It is beauty. It is fear. Wordsworth is a poet of joy but also of the deepest anxiety. Wordsworth's subject is not ultimately nature but the psyche. Wordsworth substitutes imagination for religion for nature is Wordsworth's epic, the providential force leading him by dark ways to heroism which is the development of imaginative-truly human- power.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Fiction Addition Angela

    William Wordsworth my favourite poet once wrote ‘of beauty felt along the heart’ Like waves beating along the shore. “All good poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” William Wordsworth Great poems make us more human. They introduce us to new ways of seeing the world. May is a great month everything is lighter and brighter after the long winter. I feel it’s time to start looking for my precious shells again and spend time watching the ocean talk to me like the ebb and flow of a vo William Wordsworth my favourite poet once wrote ‘of beauty felt along the heart’ Like waves beating along the shore. “All good poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” William Wordsworth Great poems make us more human. They introduce us to new ways of seeing the world. May is a great month everything is lighter and brighter after the long winter. I feel it’s time to start looking for my precious shells again and spend time watching the ocean talk to me like the ebb and flow of a voice. All the mysteries the ocean holds. Maybe one day the ocean will tell us all it’s secrets, but for now I’ll keep on writing down what I think it says to me. I’ll post some pictures of my walk later on stories. What aspect of nature do you love the most? The beaches The Trees The Ocean The Wind and the Breeze The Birds busy chattering The Sunshine smiling so happily down on us The Moon so full of wisdom and wonder.. Tell me what secrets of nature do you want to hear?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Wordsworth is a writer that I ignored for many years, since he seemed to fall into the category of crusty old English poets who are so iconic that their work has been used to fuel Monty Python sketches, to wit: I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills When all at once I saw a crowd A host, of golden worker ants. But I finally made the effort to actually read Wordworth's original verses, and I'm glad I did. His mystical approach to the English landscape is powerful and de Wordsworth is a writer that I ignored for many years, since he seemed to fall into the category of crusty old English poets who are so iconic that their work has been used to fuel Monty Python sketches, to wit: I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills When all at once I saw a crowd A host, of golden worker ants. But I finally made the effort to actually read Wordworth's original verses, and I'm glad I did. His mystical approach to the English landscape is powerful and deeply felt, and although some of his subjects are particular to historic events that occurred in his own lifetime, the bulk of his work remains relevant. For a reader who is sensitive to the ancient magic of unspoiled landscapes, Wordsworth remains a gifted and articulate visionary.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kerri-Lee

    Beautiful collection! This is actually not the version I have but my copy was not on goodreads. My favourite poems include: We are Seven ‘I travelled among unknown men’ Michael ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’ ‘Surprised by joy-impatient as the Wind’ Truly beautiful, invoking poems. Wordsworth manipulates words into poems with such rich depth and meaning in every line that it took me forever to read the collection, because I would have to re-read a stanza several times to understand it fully or I would Beautiful collection! This is actually not the version I have but my copy was not on goodreads. My favourite poems include: We are Seven ‘I travelled among unknown men’ Michael ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’ ‘Surprised by joy-impatient as the Wind’ Truly beautiful, invoking poems. Wordsworth manipulates words into poems with such rich depth and meaning in every line that it took me forever to read the collection, because I would have to re-read a stanza several times to understand it fully or I would love a poem so much I would read it again to get more out of it each time.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    My low rating is surely my fault, not Wordsworth's. I don't generally read poetry, at least from the Romantics onward, but I like to take a shot at the major classics. I read many of his most respected and popular poems. I had a hard time getting into the flow of his blank verse, and often didn't know what he was talking about. I did like a few of his poems, but for the most part I just didn't enjoy them. My low rating is surely my fault, not Wordsworth's. I don't generally read poetry, at least from the Romantics onward, but I like to take a shot at the major classics. I read many of his most respected and popular poems. I had a hard time getting into the flow of his blank verse, and often didn't know what he was talking about. I did like a few of his poems, but for the most part I just didn't enjoy them.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Isn't human being's life just like flower or tree's life? If I can, I wish I'm a daffodils, serene, cheerful, vulnerable yet strong. In early Spring's breeze, coldness or gloriousness, she lowers her head, straight her back, with passion and determination, remains bright and merry, dances sprightly alone or with lake wave. I gazed and gazed, read and read. There are voices came out from my heart, resonating with nature's words, echoing poet's voice.. Isn't human being's life just like flower or tree's life? If I can, I wish I'm a daffodils, serene, cheerful, vulnerable yet strong. In early Spring's breeze, coldness or gloriousness, she lowers her head, straight her back, with passion and determination, remains bright and merry, dances sprightly alone or with lake wave. I gazed and gazed, read and read. There are voices came out from my heart, resonating with nature's words, echoing poet's voice..

  27. 4 out of 5

    Flávio Pereira

    First and for the record: im not a fan of pocket books, i prefer a 100 pages book than a "just smell my writing one" Second and about the book: Wordsworth have a sense of nature and a large sense of feeling everyone can be used to and can be applied to English poets as a piece of cake. Have seen him before having bought Byron poetry but these were guys who would kill for love in their own way of feeling it and Wordsworth have a way to get us ready for more. First and for the record: im not a fan of pocket books, i prefer a 100 pages book than a "just smell my writing one" Second and about the book: Wordsworth have a sense of nature and a large sense of feeling everyone can be used to and can be applied to English poets as a piece of cake. Have seen him before having bought Byron poetry but these were guys who would kill for love in their own way of feeling it and Wordsworth have a way to get us ready for more.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Puj Doo

    Wordsworth has a very interesting view of the world. He writes poetry bringing to light things that you may already know, but have never truly thought out. My favorites being: six years old, I wandered lonely as a cloud, and the castle in a storm. Very relatable and interesting, although I found a few anti religious sentiments that were semi off-putting. But just like most poetry books there is always a few diamonds among the rough.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Grace B.

    I won't even pretend that I understood everything written. No matter how many times I read some of them, the words just couldn't click in my mind. I wonder if it's because I'm reading poetry not in my native language or I'm just not that prepared to understand it. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the poems about nature, I couldn't connect to the ones about the French revolution. Maybe one day I'll come revisit them, but this time with some guidance. I won't even pretend that I understood everything written. No matter how many times I read some of them, the words just couldn't click in my mind. I wonder if it's because I'm reading poetry not in my native language or I'm just not that prepared to understand it. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the poems about nature, I couldn't connect to the ones about the French revolution. Maybe one day I'll come revisit them, but this time with some guidance.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    (4.5 Stars) Although it took me nearly three years to finish this poetry collection, I am glad that I did so, and took my time to enjoy it. Wordsworth writes the most wholesome and sweet poetry I have ever read. His themes of nature, religion and spirituality, and his storytelling ability are superb. I enjoyed this collection very much.

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