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The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook: Slaying the Living Dead Within

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Ben Forman was just an ordinary guy, a young professional starting his first job and falling in love with his girlfriend. Living on the outskirts of a southern city, he didn't think the zombie activity so common in metropolitan areas would hit so close to home. But it was becoming clear that the mysterious infection reanimating the dead would soon be a worldwide epidemic. Ben Forman was just an ordinary guy, a young professional starting his first job and falling in love with his girlfriend. Living on the outskirts of a southern city, he didn't think the zombie activity so common in metropolitan areas would hit so close to home. But it was becoming clear that the mysterious infection reanimating the dead would soon be a worldwide epidemic.   Cutting-edge and culturally relevant, The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook is a unique combination of fiction and nonfiction. It delivers a fresh approach to sin, grace, and salvation, exposing the raging beast within us all, and how to overcome life as a zombie.  Endorsements Jeff Kinley has found a way to communicate God’s grace to a new audience. The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook is culturally relevant, deeply perceptive and really inspires us to discover the truth for ourselves. In this volume, you will find a gripping, face-paced zombie survival story as good as any you’ll read in a mainstream horror novel or see in the latest Romero film. But, you’ll also find a parallel commentary providing a startlingly honest insight and unique perspective on our struggle with sin. ?Sean T Page, author of War against the Walking Dead & The Official Zombie Handbook.


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Ben Forman was just an ordinary guy, a young professional starting his first job and falling in love with his girlfriend. Living on the outskirts of a southern city, he didn't think the zombie activity so common in metropolitan areas would hit so close to home. But it was becoming clear that the mysterious infection reanimating the dead would soon be a worldwide epidemic. Ben Forman was just an ordinary guy, a young professional starting his first job and falling in love with his girlfriend. Living on the outskirts of a southern city, he didn't think the zombie activity so common in metropolitan areas would hit so close to home. But it was becoming clear that the mysterious infection reanimating the dead would soon be a worldwide epidemic.   Cutting-edge and culturally relevant, The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook is a unique combination of fiction and nonfiction. It delivers a fresh approach to sin, grace, and salvation, exposing the raging beast within us all, and how to overcome life as a zombie.  Endorsements Jeff Kinley has found a way to communicate God’s grace to a new audience. The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook is culturally relevant, deeply perceptive and really inspires us to discover the truth for ourselves. In this volume, you will find a gripping, face-paced zombie survival story as good as any you’ll read in a mainstream horror novel or see in the latest Romero film. But, you’ll also find a parallel commentary providing a startlingly honest insight and unique perspective on our struggle with sin. ?Sean T Page, author of War against the Walking Dead & The Official Zombie Handbook.

30 review for The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook: Slaying the Living Dead Within

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zee

    The thing I can’t wait to say about this book: it rocked my socks off! No, seriously. When I was choosing a book to get from BookSneeze, I had several options and rating-wise, CZKH was not the top choice. However, for some reason, when I had another book option open and was about to click “Request,” I suddenly changed my mind and clicked on Christian Zombie Killers Handbook. I guess I am attracted to oddly-named theology books (the other theology book that I love is written by a guy with a great l The thing I can’t wait to say about this book: it rocked my socks off! No, seriously. When I was choosing a book to get from BookSneeze, I had several options and rating-wise, CZKH was not the top choice. However, for some reason, when I had another book option open and was about to click “Request,” I suddenly changed my mind and clicked on Christian Zombie Killers Handbook. I guess I am attracted to oddly-named theology books (the other theology book that I love is written by a guy with a great last name of Stoner and it’s called God Who Smokes.) I didn’t regret the choice – even considering that I am not into zombies and used to consider them only as an annoying topic of mass hysteria. But, back to the book. There are two “plots” – one fictional story and the other one – the non-fictional meat for the mind (forgive me the pun on zombie food). The fiction part deals with a story of one family who had to deal with walking dead in different situations. The non-fiction reminded me of the letter to Romans Paul wrote. Using the language that is understandable for the people of our age, Jeff Kinley discusses sin, sinful nature of the man (and woman), and grace. I was blown away by this book! I don’t think I’ve ever highlighted so many quotes in my iPod (except Harry Potter, but that’s a different story). The best part about it – it was theologically sound – and not one of the “touchy-feely” stuff the only aim of which is to make you feel good. It’s the real deal. All in all, I highly recommend this book to those who want to understand the sinful nature and how it affects our lives… and how to overcome it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Casie Coggin

    I would not normally read a book about Zombies. Honestly, I stay clear of movies, books, or magazines with any type of horror topic. However, the Christian and Zombie combination of this book appealed to me. I was pleasantly surprised that I was sucked into the fictional Zombie story line and honestly hope to see more of those characters in the future. MY FAVORITE part of this book was the explanation of "Christianity" though. After every fictional chapter, there is a chapter that explains the B I would not normally read a book about Zombies. Honestly, I stay clear of movies, books, or magazines with any type of horror topic. However, the Christian and Zombie combination of this book appealed to me. I was pleasantly surprised that I was sucked into the fictional Zombie story line and honestly hope to see more of those characters in the future. MY FAVORITE part of this book was the explanation of "Christianity" though. After every fictional chapter, there is a chapter that explains the Bible in simple terms and attempts to clear out some of the common misconceptions that people have about "church" and "christians" but is still packed with God centered truth. I highly recommend this book!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Neal

    A meandering, directionless, and ultimately discouraging discussion of the Christian's fight against the "living dead" sin nature, interspersed with scenes from a rather underwhelming, uninspired, and largely unrelated fictional tale of zombie warfare. So, John Owen's Mortification of Sin by way of Max Brooks' World War Z. But minus all the awesome. The book starts off with an interesting premise--your sin nature is supposed to be crucified with Christ . . . yet it continues to live in and war ag A meandering, directionless, and ultimately discouraging discussion of the Christian's fight against the "living dead" sin nature, interspersed with scenes from a rather underwhelming, uninspired, and largely unrelated fictional tale of zombie warfare. So, John Owen's Mortification of Sin by way of Max Brooks' World War Z. But minus all the awesome. The book starts off with an interesting premise--your sin nature is supposed to be crucified with Christ . . . yet it continues to live in and war against you. Hence the zombie metaphor. And it works . . . at first. Kinley encourages his readers to realize that their sin nature is like a decaying, malevolent beast, etc. The opening chapters are full of the reality of man's filthy, decrepit wickedness, and most Christians will be able to identify with this idea of warring against something rotten that lives inside them and assaults the regenerate man within. Unfortunately, the metaphor rapidly breaks down. After all, this "zombie" of sin is inside you--it is you. All conventional zombie-warfare methods don't fit the metaphor. You can't avoid being bitten, because you're already a zombie. (And if you're already a zombie, there is no redemption for you. If there are any honest-to-goodness live humans around, their best bet is to waste you before you infect them.) A zombie is an inherently external threat, and sin is an inherently internal evil. This presents very real problems for Kinley--problems that become increasingly noticeable as the fictional narrative drifts further and further from the points Kinley is trying to make in his "spiritual" sections. Indeed, it is not entirely clear what those points are, as Kinley wants to address demonic activity and bad influences but is uncertain how to fit them into the zombie metaphor. And then there's the fact that, as a Christian, you never fully slay the sin zombie within. It's a lifelong struggle. The issue is further clouded by Kinley's reluctance to attibute victory to any particular action by the regenerate man. And wisely so. After all, apart from Christ we cannot kill our sin. Only Christ can truly sanctify. Which is great from a theological standpoint, but makes for a lousy "handbook"--especially one that relies on a warfare analogy. The result is a disheartening "handbook" that does a great job of telling you the problem--that is, that there's a sin zombie living inside you--but doesn't actually tell you anything about how to kill him. Instead, the ideas become increasing scattered, and the relationship between the lackluster fictional tale and the incoherent spiritual discussions becomes more and more tenuous. The end result is a book that feels like an attempt to capitalize on the zombie zeitgeist. Two other minor critiques: 1) The books is chock full of "current" references--both Justin Bieber and Facebook statuses are mentioned--that will rapidly date this book (further evidence of its "seize the moment, ride the zeitgeist" feel). 2) Kinley devotes an entire chapter to his own very specific eschatology. I don't particularly mind that he holds these beliefs, but they are far from universal among Christians, and I fail to see how they are necessary here. He doesn't really tie these beliefs to the rest of the text, so it ends up feeling like a rant connected only by the fact that zombie warfare has an inherently apocalyptic flavor. Ultimately, I can't decide if the metaphor itself is to blame, such that this could never have been a good book, or if the fault lies with Kinley's inability to shape the metaphor well. Either way, the end result is far from impressive. Still, I liked his treatment of man's spiritually dead state, pre-regeneration, so it's not a total wash. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hallie (Hallie Reads)

    In a culture that is now obsessed with stories of zombies, vampires, etc., it is important to understand how to interact with these stories from a Christian perspective. Kinley’s The Christian Zombie Killer’s Handbook attempts to do just that. Using the fiction of the zombie narrative, Kinley explores a Christian’s experience with sin. When I first noticed this book, this premise captivated me. I really looked forward to reading it. Each section has two parts – the first a fictional account of B In a culture that is now obsessed with stories of zombies, vampires, etc., it is important to understand how to interact with these stories from a Christian perspective. Kinley’s The Christian Zombie Killer’s Handbook attempts to do just that. Using the fiction of the zombie narrative, Kinley explores a Christian’s experience with sin. When I first noticed this book, this premise captivated me. I really looked forward to reading it. Each section has two parts – the first a fictional account of Ben Forman’s experiences in a zombie-infested area, and the second a loosely-connected explanation of Christian theology in zombie-relevant language. However, as I began reading, I quickly lost interested. The narrative was flat and cheesy, while the theology – although truthful in many ways – did not challenge me with new material. I felt that Kinley’s use of allegory, meant to connect the two parts, was a stretch, manipulating every aspect of the zombie narrative in order to fit neatly with the biblical narrative. Devoid of the clever wit and authentic engagement I was hoping for, this book left me unsatisfied in the end and I cannot say that I would recommend it to a friend. However, I do appreciate BookSneeze for providing me with a free copy of this novel and the opportunity to review it. http://pagebypagebookbybook.blogspot....

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laurin

    Although I am more of a fiction fan, I felt that this book would've been much better without the fiction parts. The nonfiction sections were wonderful - very reaffirming for me and would be great for new Believers and those who have questions about sin and God's grace. Although I am more of a fiction fan, I felt that this book would've been much better without the fiction parts. The nonfiction sections were wonderful - very reaffirming for me and would be great for new Believers and those who have questions about sin and God's grace.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Kingsley

    I don't think this book really knew what it wanted to be. A Christian book about zombies? A funny guide to zombie killing from the Christian perspective? A zombie horror? What? What are you? I don't think this book really knew what it wanted to be. A Christian book about zombies? A funny guide to zombie killing from the Christian perspective? A zombie horror? What? What are you?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Patrick D'Orazio

    I will freely admit that when I first heard of the Christian Zombie Killers Handbook, I presumed it would be along the lines of the Zombie Survival Guide or perhaps a tongue in cheek guide like the ones created by Scott Kenemore, such as "The Zen of Zombie." So even after I had read a few pages into the book, I was still waiting for the punch line or the snarkiness to come out. I guess that despite expecting something different initially, I can't say I'm surprised that a Christian minister has e I will freely admit that when I first heard of the Christian Zombie Killers Handbook, I presumed it would be along the lines of the Zombie Survival Guide or perhaps a tongue in cheek guide like the ones created by Scott Kenemore, such as "The Zen of Zombie." So even after I had read a few pages into the book, I was still waiting for the punch line or the snarkiness to come out. I guess that despite expecting something different initially, I can't say I'm surprised that a Christian minister has embraced the concept of zombies in an effort to use the rotting buggers as a euphemism for original sin. The proposal here is that each of us has an inner zombie-an evil that dwells inside that is genetically encoded into our DNA. It isn't something we can get rid of, because it's been there since Adam and Eve ate the apple. This zombie makes us pull away from God-we are driven to pull away because of the lusts and desires that we are always battling with inside. The zombie is our dark passenger that rides with us everywhere we go, and is always urging us to step away from the light and the promises for salvation that Jesus offers. In tandem with the extended sermon that Jeff Kinley serves up, he gives us the story of Ben, who lives in an alternate universe filled with real zombies. They crop up every so often, killing the innocent, before they are put down by the police or other authorized execution squads. Ben's story is doled out in bits and pieces, between each chapter of the sermon, and it really doesn't go anywhere. It might have been more interesting had it come to some sort of conclusion that allowed it to be a stand alone tale, but since its whole purpose is to create parables for each individual chapter of the book, it is sorely lacking. I don't think it would be fair for me to judge this book based on my misplaced expectations when I first opened it up. I think it better that I stress something to anyone who has not yet read the book: this book is a sermon that strives to make you accept that if you are a Christian, you are undeniably weak and fallible, but that Jesus loves you like that, and expects you to be strong, and resist the temptations put to you by your inner zombie which manipulates and twists you into wanting to serve your own needs above all else. It is that simple. The author uses the increased popularity of zombies in our society to drive home this point. Jeff Kinley recognizes that zombies, since they first appeared in George Romero's Night of the Living Dead, have been used as symbols in one form or fashion both in books and on the big screen. We are the zombies-drones who robotically go about our routine, driven by lust and greed and undeniable urges to do evil. With that said, I don't necessarily buy into the author's analogy here. I think vampires would be a more apt representation of our dark, greedy, evil side. Because while zombies do represent undeniable urges in us, they are mindless feeding machines that (for the most part, in most movies and literature) are not evil, but just forces of nature. Evil requires thought, and zombies do not have thoughts. They just do what they are designed to do. If each of us had an inner zombie, I seriously doubt we could resist its urges, since they are not based on any sort of debate on whether we should be good or bad people. Zombies just do what they do, with no compunction and no guilt. Again, I would propose that the vampire-tormented by its desire to drink blood and to kill, while at the same time corrupting others as it does so, is more of an apt metaphor for original sin. Doing battle with our inner vampire makes more sense to me. This was not a book for me, thought I might find it interesting to discuss the concept of the inner zombie with the author, as well as zombies in general. This is a book that can and will find the right audience, though I suspect that quite a few people will never be attracted to its message. Even so, for the right person, this book has a very compelling message.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor

    I know what you're thinking. Christians...and zombie killers? How much more oxymoronic can you get? But I like mindbenders, and the title of this book alone was enough to intrigue me. Still, I wasn't expecting much more than a thrill and maybe a laugh. Wrong. This is not another half-hearted attempt to mishmash some cliches from popular culture with lukewarm Christian theology, which I suspected it might be as I leafed through the first few pages. Written in the style of The Zombie Survival Guid I know what you're thinking. Christians...and zombie killers? How much more oxymoronic can you get? But I like mindbenders, and the title of this book alone was enough to intrigue me. Still, I wasn't expecting much more than a thrill and maybe a laugh. Wrong. This is not another half-hearted attempt to mishmash some cliches from popular culture with lukewarm Christian theology, which I suspected it might be as I leafed through the first few pages. Written in the style of The Zombie Survival Guide by Max Brooks, The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook is a blend of fiction infused with essay-style segments in between chapters, which sometimes tempts the reader to skip ahead to find out what happens next when Kinley ends a section at a particularly agonizing moment. And yes, the narrative side is somewhat lacking--the characters are a little flat and some of the descriptions of the zombie attacks become repetitive--but what redeems the book is Kinley's theological discourses and his ability to move between his apocalyptic drama and the premises he seeks to defend. The opening pages depict the main character, Ben Forman, discovering a zombie's victim--bloody and brainless. Shortly afterward, we are given a lengthy but chilling history of zombies and the deadly Z-38 virus that causes it with a Biblical timeline in the background, melding into a depiction of the fallout after sin's curse and the entrance of evil into our planet. The attacks in the small town Ben lives in come closer and become more personal as the story grows ever nearer to zombie apocalypse. Throughout, Kinley weaves in the treacherous reality we all face--maybe not recognizable zombies, but a form of zombies nonetheless. And occasionally, he injects a bit of humor into the grimness. Overall, this book was well-worth reading. The author's insights were valuable and thought-provoking, and lend a fresh perspective on society's zombie craze. Favorite Quotes: "When your identity is found through being accepted by others, you will never be able to understand who you really are. You won't be able to discover the person God meant for you to become because you are constantly morphing into someone else, blending into the environment in order to be accepted. [...] God doesn't want you to conform to some cookie-cutter Christian image. There's only one character image you should ever seek." (p. 113-114) "Perhaps the freedom we're all looking for isn't freedom to do what we want, but rather freedom from the con artist inside." (p. 81) "And though we commit individual 'sins,' sin itself is the evil principle that inherently dwells within us. It's more than some invisible disease we've acquired or a spiritual condition. It's actually a part of who we are. Inseparably intertwined in our spiritual DNA. It's as much a part of us as our gender or skin color, illegitimately encoded in us the moment our first parents bit into that fruit." (p. 31) "Until you look in that dungeon soul mirror and see the grotesque image staring back, you will never really understand what Jesus did for you. You might want to go back and reread that last sentence again. To rappel down to that pit of your heart is the best field trip you could ever take." (p. 97) "This is your Jesus. Your conquering Hero. Your zombie-killer." (p. 242) Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: (http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/wa...) “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mikejencostanzo

    I chose to read The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook: Slaying the Living Dead Within because I wanted to try and understand the whole zombie fad. Not being a horror aficionado myself, I was immediately repulsed by the direction the first chapter took. Admittedly, I was curious to see how author Jeff Kinley could possibly tie his gruesome subplot into a wholesome, evangelical read. Kinley accomplished the feat by alternating between a spine-tingling fictional account of a mounting zombie-holocaus I chose to read The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook: Slaying the Living Dead Within because I wanted to try and understand the whole zombie fad. Not being a horror aficionado myself, I was immediately repulsed by the direction the first chapter took. Admittedly, I was curious to see how author Jeff Kinley could possibly tie his gruesome subplot into a wholesome, evangelical read. Kinley accomplished the feat by alternating between a spine-tingling fictional account of a mounting zombie-holocaust and a pastoral discussion of our struggle against inner sin. I found myself reeling from the whiplash of transitioning from chapter to schizophrenic chapter. I would at one moment experience that creepy sensation where you are afraid to look over your shoulder, and the next moment with the flip of a page, I would be basking in a virtual Sunday school class. Not having read any other zombie literature, I can't speak to the relative quality of the fictional portion of the book. However, I can say I was pleasantly surprised at much of the content Kinley offers in the theological chapters. One favorite portion for me was a passage where Kinley takes the reader through an imagery exercise involving "rappelling into our own hearts." As for Kinley's solution to our inner struggle with sin, it's theologically sound, and also fits well with some of the approaches to conquering addiction that are used in 12 step groups like AA. I believe Kinley unwittingly identifies early on in his book a tension that his audience will likely struggle with in reading Zombie Killers. On page 12, he laments, "Why can't Christians concentrate on God for more than a few minutes at a time without our minds jumping to another subject?" And yet, this book really caters to this very mentality. We are given nuggets of spiritual truth, and then before we really get a chance to digest them, are diverted by another "fun" chapter. Later in the book, Kinley asserts, "...affection for God and affections for worldly values are mutually exclusive... It is impossible to both love God and be romantically involved with the spirit of this age." Sheepishly, I will admit, I found myself slogging through some of the theological chapters, anticipating the upcoming thrill of the zombie chapter just a few pages away. In a way, this felt like the very tension between love for God and the spirit of the age that Kinley earlier alerted us to. Ultimately does his book fight this tension, or rather feed it? I'm left not quite certain. I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. --Jen

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    I must say I'm a little embarrassed, based on the title/cover, to have people know I read this book. I'm not a zombie kinda girl. But the title is precisely what prompted me to want to read it. From the second I saw it on the list of books at booksneeze.com, I knew I wanted it. The title was compelling, and based on the subtitle, "Slaying the Living Dead Within," I figured it was a non fiction Christian self-help type book with a catchy title to get people like me hooked into buying (or otherwis I must say I'm a little embarrassed, based on the title/cover, to have people know I read this book. I'm not a zombie kinda girl. But the title is precisely what prompted me to want to read it. From the second I saw it on the list of books at booksneeze.com, I knew I wanted it. The title was compelling, and based on the subtitle, "Slaying the Living Dead Within," I figured it was a non fiction Christian self-help type book with a catchy title to get people like me hooked into buying (or otherwise acquiring). The book was not a whole lot like what I was expecting, but it was very intriguing! It is half fiction and half non fiction, which is weird to read together, but the author makes it work. For every 'episode' of the zombie story (which is pretty gory and grotesque at times), there's a corresponding chapter on how our sin nature is like a zombie, how when we succumb to it we are like the living dead because we die inside. Humans do wicked things, and that capacity to do wrong is born into each of us. Paraphrasing from the book: 'It affects everyone; male and female; old and young; civilized and barbarian; religious and pagan; ancient and postmodern... Our default mode is self and anti-God.' Kinley pulls some amazing analogies, describing how horridly wretched we are from birth, explaining in detail how the fall of Adam is the beginning of our downfall. When Adam and Eve sinned they died inside. It was like a virus entered them (just like a virus passed from person to person makes people become zombies; at least in Kinley's created story). "This sin virus is 100 percent lethal and 'heir'-born, passed from parent to child in an unbroken chain of humanity. Currently 6 billion carriers worldwide." Most of the book is actually quite negative, as Kinley writes again and again how we are dirty and not worthy of God's salvation, but it is somehow written in a way that doesn't feel overly depressing, but as to make you really want to change and strive to be free in Christ from your 'inner zombie.' I felt the book was written with teens in mind, though it definitely applies to my life as well. It is culturally relevant, with references to Facebook and even Justin Beiber, and of course the zombie genre is currently fairly popular. And the way he explains our downfalls and how we can redeem ourselves, not through our own works, but only through a real relationship with Jesus and by accepting the salvation He's bought for us, just totally clicked with me and I imagine would with many people. I enjoyed this book, even though this was not the kind of book I anticipated. It is well done and interesting. **I received this book free from booksneeze to review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lainy

    Blurb From the back cover Ben Forman was just an ordinary guy, a young professional starting his first job and falling in love with his girlfriend. Living in the outskirts of a southern city, he didn't think the zombie activity so common in the major cities would hit so close to home. But it was becoming clear that the mysterious infection reanimating the dead would soon be a worldwide epidemic. My Review Well from reading the above blurb I assumed this book was purely a zombie novel with a Christi Blurb From the back cover Ben Forman was just an ordinary guy, a young professional starting his first job and falling in love with his girlfriend. Living in the outskirts of a southern city, he didn't think the zombie activity so common in the major cities would hit so close to home. But it was becoming clear that the mysterious infection reanimating the dead would soon be a worldwide epidemic. My Review Well from reading the above blurb I assumed this book was purely a zombie novel with a Christian slant on it, that maybe the virus was battled with faith along with the usual zombie ways. It couldn't be further from it and I suppose it is my fault for not researching it better before reviewing. The book is split into episodes and chapters, episode one which is the start of the zombie story followed by chapter one which is the author discussing where and how we are drawn to wickedness and a brief history of it. We also visit the initial start of sinning with Adam, Eve and the serpent, I actually enjoyed this wee story as it has been many years since I read it or heard it. The rest of the book is episodes (back to the story) and then chapters with the author telling stories and observations he has had and made over the years, scripture and bible quotes. The zombie story was quite thin and I felt the characters quite weak and not very likable. Had I known the book was going to be so split and focused more on religion I may have liked it better however I went into it thinking it was a great new spin on a zombie war with religion as a tool against them. I really struggled to get through it and although some of the side stories in the chapters were interesting and thought provoking it just wasn't for me so 2/5 for me. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    I'd like to thank Thomas Nelson/BookSneeze for the opportunity to read and review "The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook", by Jeff Kinley. This story although fictional, brings to light the very things that are happening within each and every one of us as Christians. We think that once we have accepted Christ into our lives and hearts, that we will be covered no matter what we do. Kinley, has taken this his time in developing a story line which he then can describe with the use of Scripture, ju I'd like to thank Thomas Nelson/BookSneeze for the opportunity to read and review "The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook", by Jeff Kinley. This story although fictional, brings to light the very things that are happening within each and every one of us as Christians. We think that once we have accepted Christ into our lives and hearts, that we will be covered no matter what we do. Kinley, has taken this his time in developing a story line which he then can describe with the use of Scripture, just how our past lives are in constant battle with the new or born again Christian. As the book begins, you will find that it is set up with an Episode, followed by it's corresponding Chapter. The Episodes are those set aside for the story line that Kinley has set up and each episode follows up with its chapter where we can learn about the aspects of dealing with the living dead or Zombies within each of us. Ben Foreman, one of the main characters in this story must deal with many tragedies and accomplishments just as any of us do, but he is also dealing the what appears to be an outbreak of Zombies taking over the neighborhood and town in which he lives. Corazon City, is located in the Smokey Mountains of North Carolina and you would think that a place like that would be exempt from such goings on. Little did Ben and his family and friends know, but the Zombies are gathering to take over the area. Dan Foreman, Ben's older brother is and always has been more athletic and apparently more ambitious, and joins the elite group of Zombie Hunters/Killers known as the ZTF or Zombie Task Force. Follow Ben and Dan Foreman along with their mother, and Crystal, Ben's girlfriend as they battle the Zombies, with each Episode. Then learn how to defeat the Zombies in your lives as you read and gain insight from each Chapter. "The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook is a must read. Not only is it an entertaining read, but it also gives pertinent information that each reader can relate in his or her everyday life. Thank you Jeff Kinley, for providing such a thought provoking insight into our lives and to the Zombies within each of us.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Vampires, Werewolves,Zombies, and more all creatures, some say there not real, some say they are. Every few years a new fad for these creatures seems to come around. I myself like all these creatures finding them fascinating and cool was one thing that helped really catch my eye with this book. 'cause i love zombies! this book really takes a twist on zombies though, it makes them real, i sometimes think it would be cool if a George A. Romero zombie were real, sure it would want to eat my brains, Vampires, Werewolves,Zombies, and more all creatures, some say there not real, some say they are. Every few years a new fad for these creatures seems to come around. I myself like all these creatures finding them fascinating and cool was one thing that helped really catch my eye with this book. 'cause i love zombies! this book really takes a twist on zombies though, it makes them real, i sometimes think it would be cool if a George A. Romero zombie were real, sure it would want to eat my brains, but the walking dead are interesting. Even Mr. Kinley's zombies, he does make them real and not in a "hugable" way...yes if there were a zombie apocalypse everyone else would be shooting them, or chopping there heads off while i would be the one hugging them. lol ok so i'm weird. deal with it. Let me go into more detail on Mr. Kinley's zombies, we all have an inner zombie, the sinful part of us, it rages and us having to defeat it within ourselves and others, not to let the other zombies get to us, and infect us with worldly things and desires. This book has both a fictional story which is broken down into episodes, and a non-fictional part. after each episode the chapter would come in with the non-fiction story of it with Bible verses and other inspirational stories, or guided stories, the fictional story was good, but i myself liked the non-fiction sections better. Bible verses were included, there was even a section in the back of the book with all the verses and notes in it for easy reference. Overall i think it was a decent read and i think those of Christian faith and the love for zombies would enjoy it, i received this book from the BookSneeze team from Thomas Nelson, as i was not required to give a positive review but a review of my own opinions of the book. Thank you for letting me read it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacquline

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I would have given this book five stars if it was better written. The story on both ends are compelling: the Christian and zombie. Kinley makes some amazing points about how the zombie within literally eats us alive because humans are sinners by nature, and we are selfish creatures, always forgetting about our beloved Creator instead of thanking Him for all that He does. Before I get into all the gory details, Kinley took something that is really popular in today's culture and related it back to I would have given this book five stars if it was better written. The story on both ends are compelling: the Christian and zombie. Kinley makes some amazing points about how the zombie within literally eats us alive because humans are sinners by nature, and we are selfish creatures, always forgetting about our beloved Creator instead of thanking Him for all that He does. Before I get into all the gory details, Kinley took something that is really popular in today's culture and related it back to Christianity. That takes a lot of skill to write a creative zombie story and then having a matching lesson reflecting Christian values. Now, the zombie story needed a lot of work, but it had a compelling story line. Ben Forman experiences many zombie attacks, and it seems that he dies at the end because the story is told from his brother, Dan. The world is finally consumed and taken over by zombies. It's sad, but it also shows our sinful nature. The only aspect that I didn't like about the zombie story was how Ben kept experiencing all these zombie attacks in a small, quiet town where there was only one zombie attack in like two years, and now, all of a sudden, Ben sees many zombie attacks in this little town in the matter of a month or so. It's absurd, but it's whatever. The story was still great. Now, onto the Christian lessons. Kinley talks about our sinful natures and how difficult it is to be good Christians when it is so much easier to retreat back into our selfish selves and commit sin because it suits us. Every point that Kinley made, I kept thinking, "Yes! I agree with this! I feel like this guy really gets me!" All I know is that I am definitely going to recommend this book to anyone who is interested in reading zombie stories and understanding more about our sinful lives and how to prevent it as much as possible by letting God take more control.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paula Phillips

    In a world of literature that was once over-run with Vampires , then Werewolves, Angels and Demons are now being overthrown with the world of Zombies. From Zombie movies like Dawn of the Dead, Land of the Dead, I am Legend and Zombieland come Zombie novels like Generation Dead by Dab Waters , Warm Bodies by Issac Marion and Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Vampires have infiltrated our Christian Fiction line with Plain Fear Forsaken , so it seems only fair that Zombies can crawl or in their case In a world of literature that was once over-run with Vampires , then Werewolves, Angels and Demons are now being overthrown with the world of Zombies. From Zombie movies like Dawn of the Dead, Land of the Dead, I am Legend and Zombieland come Zombie novels like Generation Dead by Dab Waters , Warm Bodies by Issac Marion and Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Vampires have infiltrated our Christian Fiction line with Plain Fear Forsaken , so it seems only fair that Zombies can crawl or in their case stumble heavy-footed into the world of Christian Fiction with Jeff Kinley's The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook. The Christian Zombie Killer Handbook follows the life of Ben Foreman , who lives in a small town , has a good job and believes he is safe from Zombie attacks as they only seem to be happening lately in the major cities . This is until one day the Zombies attack Ben's hometown and now armed with the Bible and God's Help , Ben must kill the Zombies. The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook tracks the fictional life of Ben Forman and offers solid Bible teaching to help readers understand the gravity and consequences of life without God, of life as a zombie. Ephesians 2:4-5 says, "But because of his great love for us, God, who is rich in mercy, made us alive with Christ even when we were dead in our transgressions--it is by grace you have been saved." Without the salvation Jesus offers, we are all as good as dead. But as this book teaches in a winsome, cutting-edge, culturally relevant style, anyone can kill the zombie inside, escape the clutches of the undead, and come alive by the supernatural power of God's salvation. A fun read for all , especially if you are a Christian and following the Zombie Craze

  16. 4 out of 5

    Penny Layne

    This book is part fiction, part commentary on the Christian life. The author goes back and forth between a fictional story of a man who is confronted with a world of zombie attacks brought on by a virus that is inside everyone. Between each chapter of this story, the author gives a commentary of the analogy between this fictional story of zombie attacks, and what he calls the “zombie” that lives inside each Christian which is the sinful part of us that constantly struggles against our new Christ This book is part fiction, part commentary on the Christian life. The author goes back and forth between a fictional story of a man who is confronted with a world of zombie attacks brought on by a virus that is inside everyone. Between each chapter of this story, the author gives a commentary of the analogy between this fictional story of zombie attacks, and what he calls the “zombie” that lives inside each Christian which is the sinful part of us that constantly struggles against our new Christian self. This book had the potential to be intriguing, but somewhere fell short for me. The idea that the sinful man in each of us is like a zombie waiting to come out rings true of the struggle each Christian goes through to change the person they are to the person God calls us to be. Saying this, it was somewhat disorienting to go back and forth between the fictional story and the commentary, taking away from both parts for me. It also felt somewhat insulting that as the reader I was not given the opportunity to draw the analogy myself from the story. Much of what the author wrote I agreed with, though I did not feel his view of baptism being figurative rather than literal was accurate. I also did not agree with his view that we are born as sinful people. I cannot say I would recommend this book to others, but I would not discourage others from reading it. Previously posted on 10/22/11 as a Book Sneeze Review Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255

  17. 4 out of 5

    Curtis

    This book is unique as it contains both fiction and non-fiction portions. The story of Ben Foreman and his encounters with the living dead is interspersed with the non-fiction portions of the book that somewhat coincide with the previous portion of the story. "The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook" was not only entertaining, but it included some great teaching/truths on the subjects of our sin nature (old self, or Zombie within), grace, works, finding our identity in Christ and being authentic C This book is unique as it contains both fiction and non-fiction portions. The story of Ben Foreman and his encounters with the living dead is interspersed with the non-fiction portions of the book that somewhat coincide with the previous portion of the story. "The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook" was not only entertaining, but it included some great teaching/truths on the subjects of our sin nature (old self, or Zombie within), grace, works, finding our identity in Christ and being authentic Christ followers. Kinley did a great job of explaining the origin of sin as well as why each of us commit sinful acts; he deals directly with these meaty topics and doesn't seem to fluff them. Kinley also makes sure to reference certain portions of scripture from which he draws his teaching. I wasn't quite sure what this book would be like, as I had never gotten on board the Zombie train. But I have to admit, I really enjoyed the read. The storyline and writing could have been improved. But it's a ZOMBIE book and proved to be an entertaining read.The non-fiction portions really make this book shine. Kinley takes the zombie virus and the living dead metaphor and relates them to the sin nature that lives within each one of us. He presents some great truths throughout the book that are relevant to any person at any stage in life. "The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook" would make a great choice for a youth group or discipleship group or for any reader that might be into the zombie genre; there is even a discussion guide in the back. But, like I said, the best portions of this book are the spiritual truths that are artfully communicated in the non-fiction sections.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Bronder

    This is a world where a virus infects people and makes them mad with rage. After they die, they come back as zombies. Part of the book follows Ben Forman. A couple years prior, his father was attacked by a zombie and killed so he couldn’t rage and return as a zombie himself. We start as Ben stumbles upon a zombie kill. The story follows Ben as he tries to get on with his life but seems to have interactions with zombies every time he turns around. The other part of the book explains how there are This is a world where a virus infects people and makes them mad with rage. After they die, they come back as zombies. Part of the book follows Ben Forman. A couple years prior, his father was attacked by a zombie and killed so he couldn’t rage and return as a zombie himself. We start as Ben stumbles upon a zombie kill. The story follows Ben as he tries to get on with his life but seems to have interactions with zombies every time he turns around. The other part of the book explains how there are zombies in all of us. Through our love for the Lord and following his word, we can over come the selfishness and inner rot. There are many references and a good correlation between zombie and our regular lives. When I first got this book, I was under the impression that intertwined in the story would be the religious aspect, like the Left Behind series. I was completely wrong. There are two sections to each chapter. The first is the story about Ben then you have the preaching about how we can better ourselves. I’m sorry to say this but I was a little put off with all the preaching. I understand what was being said, and if you want to say that my zombie was taking charge I will agree. I ended up skipping the preaching sections. This is a good story, but be warned that it does get very heavy. If this is something that you don’t mind, I think you will really like this book. If you are like me, you might want to think twice about reading this book. Like I said, the story about Ben is great, but you might be skipping through half of the book. I received this book from Book Sneeze in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    This book, I thought, had promise. Boy was I wrong. This book is really two books in one. One is the actual story, following a guy named Ben in a world full of zombies. The second is the devotional book that uses the fictional story as a lesson about the state of our souls. First, from a theological standpoint, Kinley is coming from a different place than I am. He assumes a lot in his theology that I just wouldn't say is so. You may find yourself starting from the same assumptions he does, in whi This book, I thought, had promise. Boy was I wrong. This book is really two books in one. One is the actual story, following a guy named Ben in a world full of zombies. The second is the devotional book that uses the fictional story as a lesson about the state of our souls. First, from a theological standpoint, Kinley is coming from a different place than I am. He assumes a lot in his theology that I just wouldn't say is so. You may find yourself starting from the same assumptions he does, in which case you'll probably follow along better with the devotional aspect of the book. I just found the theological difference to be too much for me to get anything from the book devotionally. (I am free church Wesleyan, if that makes a difference to you.) Second, the allegory is such a stretch. And Kinley tries to make it all so literal and really stretch it. It just doesn't work well and feels very stretched and very manipulated. Third, the story is lacking. If you are reading it for the fictional zombie story, don't bother. Kinley isn't the best story teller. Character development is what you'd expect reading an amateur's novel. The plot doesn't even make sense at times, because it is being stretched to fit the allegory. Overall, the book was not enjoyable at all on any level. I didn't enjoy the story telling aspect. I didn't enjoy the devotional aspect.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Thee_ron_clark

    While browsing the book section at Ollie's, this book caught my eye. At 2 bucks with zombies in it, how could I resist? This is actually two books in one. It contains a story about flesh-eating zombies in one part. In the other part, it discusses sin and how to keep your moral compass pointed in the right direction. I will admit to have only skimmed through the latter section. As for the zombie story, a guy named Ben lives in a world where zombies have existed as long as the history of man goes ba While browsing the book section at Ollie's, this book caught my eye. At 2 bucks with zombies in it, how could I resist? This is actually two books in one. It contains a story about flesh-eating zombies in one part. In the other part, it discusses sin and how to keep your moral compass pointed in the right direction. I will admit to have only skimmed through the latter section. As for the zombie story, a guy named Ben lives in a world where zombies have existed as long as the history of man goes back. These creatures consume flesh and particularly love human brains. Although zombie attacks occur, they are pretty random and infrequent. Ben simply appears to be unlucky enough to have four such encounters in a matter of a few weeks. Well, the book wouldn't have been the book without Ben having such poor luck in that area. At one point, I found myself groaning? Why Ben? Why would you get into such a potentially deadly situation with your recent string of bad luck? I nearly had to cover my eyes or look away because I knew something was about to go down. It wasn't a bad story. It flowed pretty well and the author has a decent writing style. Kinley has some pretty neat ideas as to how the epidemic spreads and the history of the living dead. Kudos for that. All in all, it's a fair and quick read. Zombie enthusiasts need to pick up a copy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    In Jeff Kinley's book The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook, he puts a creative spin on communicating the Gospel. It caters to the current cultural zombie craze that is all over the place. This is my favorite part of the book: the way that Jeff communicates the Gospel in reference to zombies. This book is really two books in one. Jeff lays out the format with a chapter of a story of a world trying to survive a zombie outbreak, followed by a chapter of Biblical truth of the Gospel with a zombie tw In Jeff Kinley's book The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook, he puts a creative spin on communicating the Gospel. It caters to the current cultural zombie craze that is all over the place. This is my favorite part of the book: the way that Jeff communicates the Gospel in reference to zombies. This book is really two books in one. Jeff lays out the format with a chapter of a story of a world trying to survive a zombie outbreak, followed by a chapter of Biblical truth of the Gospel with a zombie twist to it. This format seems like a cool idea, but it left me distracted throughout. I was often trying to understand the correlation between the story and the Biblical truth chapter, but wasn't able to link the two very much or very easily. Overall, there was some solid Biblical truth but nothing I haven't heard before. The story was just average. I did like the creative twist that Jeff threw on it. But it still left me unsatisfied, unchallenged, and feeling like I wanted more. 3 out of 5.

  22. 5 out of 5

    JenniferJ

    This was a wonderful double whammy of a zombie adventure tale. It's kind of like getting two stories in one...You have Ben's zombie story and then you have the theoretical story of how there is a little bit of zombie (sin) in all of us and how we can overcome our wicked side and live in harmony with God. It took me a while to get used to the way the the book was divided up. It would give us episodes of the ongoing zombie adventure with Ben and his family and then would lead into a chapter of the This was a wonderful double whammy of a zombie adventure tale. It's kind of like getting two stories in one...You have Ben's zombie story and then you have the theoretical story of how there is a little bit of zombie (sin) in all of us and how we can overcome our wicked side and live in harmony with God. It took me a while to get used to the way the the book was divided up. It would give us episodes of the ongoing zombie adventure with Ben and his family and then would lead into a chapter of the theoretical/nonfiction story. There were things I admit I didn't want to read in this book on the spiritual side because they "hit to close to home" but after doing so I had a greater awareness of my relationship with God and how I want to live my life. There is a notes section as well as a discussion guide for each chapter of the book which I found very helpful in helping me follow along especially the notes section with the Bible verses that corresponded to the passages in the story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shalim

    This is a good book, simply because it has offered something new to the table. The writer has creatively found a way of expressing the Christian message in a way that many readers will find meaningful and engaging. In an age of a growing apathy to religion, books refreshing like this are what is needed. What I admired most was the writer’s willingness to give the Gospel and be Biblical full throttle. Mixed with a creative, relevant edge and yet determined that the Bible can actually truthfully g This is a good book, simply because it has offered something new to the table. The writer has creatively found a way of expressing the Christian message in a way that many readers will find meaningful and engaging. In an age of a growing apathy to religion, books refreshing like this are what is needed. What I admired most was the writer’s willingness to give the Gospel and be Biblical full throttle. Mixed with a creative, relevant edge and yet determined that the Bible can actually truthfully give answers to our lives and our 'zombie-like' behaviour, I think this book will be appreciated by religious and non-religious people.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Zwecker

    I really enjoyed this book as a whole. The only real concern I have is in the last chapter because the author, like so many others, believes in a pre-tribulation "rapture." Personally, I choose not to guess when or how Christ will return for his bride, but just in case we have to live through the tribulation I believe the "rapture theory" may be giving false hope and if it doesn't happen that way, many will turn away from following Christ. We need to be prepared no matter what happens. I really enjoyed this book as a whole. The only real concern I have is in the last chapter because the author, like so many others, believes in a pre-tribulation "rapture." Personally, I choose not to guess when or how Christ will return for his bride, but just in case we have to live through the tribulation I believe the "rapture theory" may be giving false hope and if it doesn't happen that way, many will turn away from following Christ. We need to be prepared no matter what happens.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    I bought this book because it handles 2 subjects that I love zombies and God. I regularly use the illustration of the living (spiritually dead). But when I read this book I found 2 things: a terribly written and disjointed zombie story and a very directionless theology book. A complete waste of time. Find a good zombie book and a quality theology book and you will be much better off.

  26. 5 out of 5

    James

    Will post full review on December 15th. Here and on my blog matichuk.wordpress.com Suffice to say funny, insightful allegorical fiction. Not great literature but certainly on par with much popular comsumption (which I think was the point). I have more thoughts. Wait for it. Wait for it. hey we are in Advent, the season of waiting. Jesus is coming. Wait for it. Wait for it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Chung

    Reviewed at Small Kucing : The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook By Jeff Kinley Reviewed at Small Kucing : The Christian Zombie Killers Handbook By Jeff Kinley

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    My review here: http://wp.me/pttRS-1aW View all my reviews here: http://lunchboxsw.wordpress.com/categ... My review here: http://wp.me/pttRS-1aW View all my reviews here: http://lunchboxsw.wordpress.com/categ...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarai

    Not brilliant and slightly biblically incorrect at times but overall an interesting take on incorporating zombies into christian living.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Monica

    Loved this book!!!!

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