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Dungeons & Dragons Classics Volume 1

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The classic DC Comics Advanced Dungeons & Dragons series returns to print for the first time! This action-packed volume collects the first eight issues of the fan-favorite series by writer Dan Mishkin and artist Jan Duursema.


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The classic DC Comics Advanced Dungeons & Dragons series returns to print for the first time! This action-packed volume collects the first eight issues of the fan-favorite series by writer Dan Mishkin and artist Jan Duursema.

30 review for Dungeons & Dragons Classics Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Once upon a time, talent and storytelling chops were often less crucial qualities than earnestness and enthusiasm when it came to working in comics, music, movies and other pop culture mediums. That magical time was called the 1980s. How else to explain this eight-issue collection of Dungeons & Dragons comics, which details the exploits of a lackluster quintet of characters whose ability scores would make a seasoned gamer groan and whose names are equal parts cringe- and giggle-inducing: centaur Once upon a time, talent and storytelling chops were often less crucial qualities than earnestness and enthusiasm when it came to working in comics, music, movies and other pop culture mediums. That magical time was called the 1980s. How else to explain this eight-issue collection of Dungeons & Dragons comics, which details the exploits of a lackluster quintet of characters whose ability scores would make a seasoned gamer groan and whose names are equal parts cringe- and giggle-inducing: centaur warrior Timoth Eyesbright (I mentally inserted a “y” at the end of his first name every fricking time I saw it); drunken sot/fallen paladin with withered hands Agrivar (more like Aggravating); dwarven fighter Onyx the Invincible (who, ironically, is as white as they come); half-elven mage Cybriana (if that’s not a horrible wannabe 80s pop star name, I don’t know what is); and, last but certainly not least when it comes to cringe-worthiness, former gladiator Vajra Valmeyjar, whose diminutive (“Vaji”) conjures images of open-for-business mystical lady nether regions rather than a fearsome Amazonian warrior. D&D-based stories are challenging to tell even in the most skilled storytellers’ hands, because it’s a little bit like trying to tell someone about how great your fantasy football team did last weekend—unless you are in the same league, people would rather rip off their own fingernails than listen to you (or maybe that just happens when I tell people about my fantasy teams). When the writer and artist aren’t quite in that upper echelon of storytellers, however… I’d recommend this only for those old-school gamers in need of a heady dose of nostalgia, a drug that, I confess, has driven me more than once into the arms of a movie, book, or album whose associations with a far less complicated time in my life far exceeds the quality of its content. (Shut up—Nelson’s “After the Rain” is a great song, and, as everyone knows, I’ll happily extol the virtues of Saved by the Bell any day.) (To be fair, though, I’m kind of glad that period of time existed—sure, the quality may not have always been top notch and you might have had to read about a character who could just as easily have been named Clitty Clitorioso, but relative to the cynical, self-absorbed, ironic undercurrent that often pervades today’s pop art, the idealistic naiveté of a generation that believed in goodness and righteousness without hesitation, reservation, or any sense of self-consciousness seems pretty good right now, you know?) Let’s call it 2.5 stars rounded up because, mmmm…nostalgia.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dorin

    I guess I'm no longer impressed with D&D inspired heroic fantasy stories - the dialogue is painful to read at times, there's too much exposition in the dialogue, the characters are boring hair metal age rockers; but I guess it was something. The stories are silly, and there's no shame in the silliness, and I'm not sure if this is a good thing or a bad thing. I'll probably continue to read the other issues from the Humble Bundle, but I'm reluctant to searching for more material on this. I guess I'm no longer impressed with D&D inspired heroic fantasy stories - the dialogue is painful to read at times, there's too much exposition in the dialogue, the characters are boring hair metal age rockers; but I guess it was something. The stories are silly, and there's no shame in the silliness, and I'm not sure if this is a good thing or a bad thing. I'll probably continue to read the other issues from the Humble Bundle, but I'm reluctant to searching for more material on this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Frans Kempe

    I enjoyed the two stories. The first story is about a couple of heroes that defeats a evil wizard that want to release his kin to the world. It gives also a backround story to the main characters and Agrivar, who is a main hero in another comic, his drunkenness is being explained. The other story is a quest to help a ghost, a decent story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hector Ibarraran

    After reading the first few volumes of the Forgotten Realms classics, I went found this other series, which happens to be a part of the same universe. I picked it up because it reveals the origin of Agrivar, a Paladin, and also one of the main characters in the other series. That said, this one stands on its own. It consists of two story arcs. The first one is kinda serious, and even a little dark, but the second one is silly, and a bit stupid. That said, I enjoyed reading the first part of the After reading the first few volumes of the Forgotten Realms classics, I went found this other series, which happens to be a part of the same universe. I picked it up because it reveals the origin of Agrivar, a Paladin, and also one of the main characters in the other series. That said, this one stands on its own. It consists of two story arcs. The first one is kinda serious, and even a little dark, but the second one is silly, and a bit stupid. That said, I enjoyed reading the first part of the book and didn't completely hate the second one. I also liked the character and monster sheets at the end of every comic. I'm reading all these D&D comics out of nostalgia, and, so far, it has been worth it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This volume reprints the first 8 issues of the DC Comics D&D series from 1988, which to my knowledge is the first Dungeon and Dragons comic series published. It's a decent fantasy series set in the D&D universe, but you don't have to be a hardcore D&D fan to enjoy the series as I have limited D&D knowledge and still liked it. If anything, hardcore fans may wish this was a little deeper. The stories do include stats for new characters, monsters and locations for players who want to incorporate the This volume reprints the first 8 issues of the DC Comics D&D series from 1988, which to my knowledge is the first Dungeon and Dragons comic series published. It's a decent fantasy series set in the D&D universe, but you don't have to be a hardcore D&D fan to enjoy the series as I have limited D&D knowledge and still liked it. If anything, hardcore fans may wish this was a little deeper. The stories do include stats for new characters, monsters and locations for players who want to incorporate them into their game campaigns. This volume features an introductory story that brings the character together, as well as a story line where the bones of the greatest jester to ever live are being stolen for evil purposes and our heroes get involved to stop it. The art from Jan Duursema is good but it is standard 80s/90s DC style. Overall I liked this, but I wonder if it may be a little too much D&D for non-fans, and a little too less for the serious fans.

  6. 4 out of 5

    J.

    Some odd, and hence interesting, stories make this a standout from the usual fantasy books. But the dialogue is clunky and the art is only OK.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David

    I would venture to guess that this was the beginning of the D&D comics of old, because Agrivar's and Kyriani's origin stories begin here. I've already read the other set of Classics with Agrivar in it. Funnily enough, it doesn't explain why Agrivar only appeared in the first story arc - there are two story arcs in this volume. This comic series certainly did not age well at all. The first story arc tells how the party of five wound up together. Their names are... somewhat cringe-worthy in this da I would venture to guess that this was the beginning of the D&D comics of old, because Agrivar's and Kyriani's origin stories begin here. I've already read the other set of Classics with Agrivar in it. Funnily enough, it doesn't explain why Agrivar only appeared in the first story arc - there are two story arcs in this volume. This comic series certainly did not age well at all. The first story arc tells how the party of five wound up together. Their names are... somewhat cringe-worthy in this day and age, but probably very awesome back when I was a kid. It tells of their first adventure together, being guided along and protected by Selune (whose depiction and origin story was completely at odds with the 2nd and 3rd editions that I'm more familiar with) to recover an artifact belonging to her and defeating an old enemy of hers. The second story arc is where Agrivar just goes off on his own (and none of his former teammates even mentions him). It features another quite over-the-top and completely-ignoring-mechanics kind of adventure centered around the Musicians guild and jesters (of all things!) in Waterdeep. You can get a kick of nostalgia of how D&D was back in the first edition, but if you're looking for superb storytelling or great characterisation, you won't really find it here.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dwight

    When I first read these as they came out in comic form, I loved them. They weren't greatly representative of AD&D the game and relied too heavily on the setting but some of the stories were enthralling. I was always excited to acquire the next issue. Now, all these years later, it was time to revisit this comic so close to my heart. This graphic novel contains the first eight issues covering two plot lines. The first plot is amazing and stands the test of time while the second was a little over- When I first read these as they came out in comic form, I loved them. They weren't greatly representative of AD&D the game and relied too heavily on the setting but some of the stories were enthralling. I was always excited to acquire the next issue. Now, all these years later, it was time to revisit this comic so close to my heart. This graphic novel contains the first eight issues covering two plot lines. The first plot is amazing and stands the test of time while the second was a little over-the-top and less engaging. The artwork throughout is sensational and would be top notch even today but not all thwriting can say the same. The change of cast (adventuring party) from the first story to the second hurt it and whomever made that choice should have their hand slapped. Still, this volume is worth it for the first half. Enjoy!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    Not a lot to say on this one. It's ... fine. It comes before the Forgotten Realms classics, but I didn't have any problem following that comic without this one. (The only real connection is one character.) It's a pretty typical group of adventurers facing a pretty ordinary group of monsters. Though the second story arc does have a slightly bonkers aspect: sure, there's the search for a treasure and wererats--you know, the usual. But the story revolves around a group of jesters who are planning on Not a lot to say on this one. It's ... fine. It comes before the Forgotten Realms classics, but I didn't have any problem following that comic without this one. (The only real connection is one character.) It's a pretty typical group of adventurers facing a pretty ordinary group of monsters. Though the second story arc does have a slightly bonkers aspect: sure, there's the search for a treasure and wererats--you know, the usual. But the story revolves around a group of jesters who are planning on unleashing death on the city just to get a better position as an independent guild. It's pretty odd. The scene of them casting a spell by setting up a bunch of punchlines is not something that I've seen before in D&D.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Jellets

    Look … a dwarf in puffy pants riding a centaur! In the late 1980s, Dungeons & Dragons was reaching the height of its popularity, moving from a cult favorite role playing game to books, cartoons, and video games. Of course, with all these licensing opportunities on the table, it must have seemed a no-brainer to try comics as well and DC released about a half-dozen D&D inspired titles. Sadly, though I was a huge D&D fan back in the day, I don’t remember the comics capturing much of my attention, bu Look … a dwarf in puffy pants riding a centaur! In the late 1980s, Dungeons & Dragons was reaching the height of its popularity, moving from a cult favorite role playing game to books, cartoons, and video games. Of course, with all these licensing opportunities on the table, it must have seemed a no-brainer to try comics as well and DC released about a half-dozen D&D inspired titles. Sadly, though I was a huge D&D fan back in the day, I don’t remember the comics capturing much of my attention, but thanks to the swell folks at IDW (who now have the D&D license) and Humble Bundle, I was able to fill my iPad with a bunch of classic D&D tales and head back down that path of adventure (or really … the path of nostalgia … we’re not talking Game of Thrones-style plot twists here). Anyway, these aren’t half bad. Writers Fleisher and Mishkin weave a decent enough story for a monthly serial: a group of fantasy adventurers gather together to combat evil monsters, take on a few here-and-there quests, and seek the occasional bit of loot. While the plots are not wholly without inspiration – I love the idea of an evil guild of musicians – there are also not quite above average. Likewise, the art of a ‘very-early-in-her-career’ Jan Duursema (who will deliver a truly epic Star Wars: Legacy series about 25 years later) is good, but inconsistent. Flashes of excellence fall here and there, but this is obviously still a time when the artist is perfecting her craft. The monsters, for example, aren’t particularly inspired. Likewise, the character designs are hit-or-miss. The paladin Agrivar, for example, certainly has the requisite regal bearing for a holy knight, while on the other side of the coin, is the dwarf thief Onyx. The creators may have been trying to avoid the stereotypical dwarf attire – long beard, chain mail, helm and shield – but instead we get orange and green puffy pants and a brown skullcap with a red scrub brush atop it – unobtrusive attire for a burglar I’m sure! IDW does a nice job on the digital collection. The colors are particularly vibrant and, as a nice little bonus, the publisher included the original text pages from TSR scribe Jeff Grubb, which offers the D&D stats for all the comic book characters – just in case anybody is still actually playing third edition D&D and needs a puffy pants-suited dwarf NPC. The only real letdown are the double-page splashes; they are, unfortunately, cut into two separate pages. Bottom line … if you have never read a Dungeons & Dragons comic, my first recommendation would still be to try John Rogers’ utterly superb 2012 series Dungeons & Dragons: Shadowplague; it's still the best introduction to the genre in my opinion. But, if you are an old time fan and ready to reminisce a bit, Fleisher and Duursema’s Dungeons & Dragons Classics is not at all a bad choice for a lazy afternoon.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Edward Taylor

    Stories that made the 11-year-old me remember the terrible sessions we used to have where everything was something crazy (giant skeleton of a jester who tells bad jokes that kill people, etc.) and the cringe factor was high. We have a drunken paladin, a dwarven fighter-thief, and his centaur barbarian best friend who fights alongside an elven girl who is 1/4wood elf, 1/2 drow elf and all wizard (or was it sorcerer before they had them?) Oh well, throw in an escaped slave pit fighting woman who s Stories that made the 11-year-old me remember the terrible sessions we used to have where everything was something crazy (giant skeleton of a jester who tells bad jokes that kill people, etc.) and the cringe factor was high. We have a drunken paladin, a dwarven fighter-thief, and his centaur barbarian best friend who fights alongside an elven girl who is 1/4wood elf, 1/2 drow elf and all wizard (or was it sorcerer before they had them?) Oh well, throw in an escaped slave pit fighting woman who seems to be able to overcome any obstacle that is thrown at her and you have the most lobsided min-max party of twinks in the realms. 11-year-old Ed smiles. 42-year-old-Ed cringes. 4 out of 5 for this trip down memory lane (-1 star for making remember how bad some of these adventure were ala Stranger Things)

  12. 5 out of 5

    JJ

    This was a fun read, even better than I anticipated. The stories and artwork were very nicely done. The whole experience was very evocative of playing a homebrewed D&D adventure. The heroes and villains, the Waterdeep setting, the monsters, the magic, the plot, all elements of the tales gave me the deliciously nostalgic feeling of sitting around a table playing 2nd ed. and calculating THAC0. At the end of most of the issues were character sheets for the characters, stat sheets for the monsters, This was a fun read, even better than I anticipated. The stories and artwork were very nicely done. The whole experience was very evocative of playing a homebrewed D&D adventure. The heroes and villains, the Waterdeep setting, the monsters, the magic, the plot, all elements of the tales gave me the deliciously nostalgic feeling of sitting around a table playing 2nd ed. and calculating THAC0. At the end of most of the issues were character sheets for the characters, stat sheets for the monsters, or background text about Waterdeep or its guilds or some other story aspect. That was a neat touch. The four-part story (issues 5-8) "The Spirit of Myrrth" was particularly well-done, clever, inventive and funny. A volume I picked up for a quick, mildly entertaining diversion turned out to be more engaging than I thought it would be, a delightful surprise.

  13. 5 out of 5

    David

    This is the very beginnings of Dungeons and Dragons comics in the late 80s. It introduces a team of compelling characters, but they don't quite come into fruition yet. In fact, in some ways, this series is more notable for it's spin-offs such as Forgotten Realms and Spelljammer. Thus far, these characters also seem to work best when they cross over with those of the spin-offs. I think that the series did get better as it progressed. It harkens back to a great era of D and D. It also reveals the This is the very beginnings of Dungeons and Dragons comics in the late 80s. It introduces a team of compelling characters, but they don't quite come into fruition yet. In fact, in some ways, this series is more notable for it's spin-offs such as Forgotten Realms and Spelljammer. Thus far, these characters also seem to work best when they cross over with those of the spin-offs. I think that the series did get better as it progressed. It harkens back to a great era of D and D. It also reveals the jarring origins of some very significant characters, Priam Agrivar and Kyriani. The others remain to be more fully explored. While it would have needed a different time slot due to content, I do think that these comics would have made for a better D and D cartoon that the one that was produced.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Oron

    If I hadn't dabbed in D&D as a kid, this might be a different experience. The story feels old, not in a good way. the jokes are xtude and sometimes embarrassing, and some of the dialogue is unintentionally funny. But it's still nice for fans of the ganre. The first story was nice, the 2nd was too jump-the-shark-y for me I got load of these in a bundle, so every now and than I guess I'll pick one up. If I hadn't dabbed in D&D as a kid, this might be a different experience. The story feels old, not in a good way. the jokes are xtude and sometimes embarrassing, and some of the dialogue is unintentionally funny. But it's still nice for fans of the ganre. The first story was nice, the 2nd was too jump-the-shark-y for me I got load of these in a bundle, so every now and than I guess I'll pick one up.

  15. 5 out of 5

    O'Rety

    Story is as ridiculous as it gets and the art is clearly done by a professional with experience from other genres who maybe just learns (judging from the progression of later volumes) how to give fantasy a proper treatment. Fortunately, it only gets better. However, it's still "getting better from one star" getting better :) Story is as ridiculous as it gets and the art is clearly done by a professional with experience from other genres who maybe just learns (judging from the progression of later volumes) how to give fantasy a proper treatment. Fortunately, it only gets better. However, it's still "getting better from one star" getting better :)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Quinton Baran

    An enjoyable return to books that I read many years ago. The art is adequate and the story the same.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steen Ledet

    The first arc is great but the collection is marred by the silly and unnecessary second arc.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I think I prefer the Forgotten Realms Classics, but this is still highly entertaining and offers more context to the sequel series (which I unwittingly read first).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dylan Sharek

    I enjoyed it! The first story wss quite good. The second was pretty lame. Both have great art and are really representative of a special time in fantasy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeremiah

    Acquired through Humble Bundle as a digital download.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fizzgig76

    Reprints Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #1-8 (December 1988-July 1989). A group of adventurers made up of a dwarf named Onyx, a warrior named Vajra Valmeyjar, a centaur called Timoth Eyesbright, a half-elf named Cybriana, and a broken paladin named Agrivar find they must come together to defeat a danger to the kingdom in the form of Imgig Zu and his army. Plus, the ghost of a court jester might hold the secret to the killing joke. Written by Michael Fleisher and Dan Mishkin, Dungeons & Dragons Class Reprints Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #1-8 (December 1988-July 1989). A group of adventurers made up of a dwarf named Onyx, a warrior named Vajra Valmeyjar, a centaur called Timoth Eyesbright, a half-elf named Cybriana, and a broken paladin named Agrivar find they must come together to defeat a danger to the kingdom in the form of Imgig Zu and his army. Plus, the ghost of a court jester might hold the secret to the killing joke. Written by Michael Fleisher and Dan Mishkin, Dungeons & Dragons Classics—Volume 1 is a collection by IDW. The volume collects issues of DC Comics Advanced Dungeons & Dragons series from the ’80s before the license was won by IDW. Dungeons & Dragons was everywhere in the early ’80s and even as a kid I felt that this series missed the boat a bit. With the Dungeons & Dragons cartoon series already gone and followers of game fading a bit, it feels like this series should have been put out in 1983 instead of 1988. With a rather generic “fantasy” cast, the series is very generic itself…but that doesn’t mean it isn’t enjoyable. The plots of the comic are all over the place. There are two storylines. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #1-4 involve the forming of the “team” and the battle against Imgig Zu. The comic was running at the same time as Marvel’s Conan the Barbarian and feels much like Conan with more fantasy and creatures. Despite having a fun grouping of characters, it isn’t very practical as pointed out when the centaur can’t climb the mountain to help his friends…it feels very forced together at points in that aspect in a desperate grab for fantasy. The second storyline Advanced Dungeons & Dragons #5-8 has Vajra, the newly minted Kyriani (the former Cybriana), Onyx, Vajra, and Conner going after men trying to steal a joke that can kill. It is a little lighter (at points) and tries to get deeper with political factions fighting for the joke. I enjoy the first story more because it is less jokey (it is hard when it revolves around a joke), and though the second storyline reads easier. Advanced Dungeons & Dragons is what you’d expect from an ’80s fantasy series. If you take that in mind when reading it, you will enjoy it more. It is loaded with geeky characters, and you will feel like you are nerding out reading it. Grab your 4-sided die and your wizard’s cap and read away. The series is collected in four volumes.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Keith Irwin

    This is a collection of the old DC Advanced Dungeons and Dragons comic book series from the late 80s. Fundamentally, these series has to be viewed as an attempt to cash in on the popularity of D&D. Obviously, though, there's only so much that the comic can really capture the game since what makes the game fun is the ability to immerse yourself using your own characters and the comic must have its own characters which you don't control. So to overcome this, you'd really need a good set of charact This is a collection of the old DC Advanced Dungeons and Dragons comic book series from the late 80s. Fundamentally, these series has to be viewed as an attempt to cash in on the popularity of D&D. Obviously, though, there's only so much that the comic can really capture the game since what makes the game fun is the ability to immerse yourself using your own characters and the comic must have its own characters which you don't control. So to overcome this, you'd really need a good set of characters having adventures in a D&D world which are sufficiently interesting that it's not just a matter of "oh look, they used that spell: my character has that spell" or "oh look, they're fighting that sort of monster: we've fought one of those." And, honestly, I don't really think that this series delivers. In this volume especially the plots are kind of light, and honestly, the characters aren't very well developed. It's all about what you'd expect from a late 80s merchandising comic book. It's basically good light fun but with uneven to poor quality writing. The art is solid if not amazing. And I do have to compliment the artists for doing a good job of making the different characters look different. This is especially true of the female characters who clearly have different builds and body-types in a way that you don't always see in comics.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rook & Raven

    The stories presented in the first collection these "classic" comics were mediocre at best. The first, concerning a paladin, deserves a little better than a 3. The second story about a jester's ghost was pretty silly and terrible. Some characters overlap between the two, but what really stands out is the dialog. I would believe it if someone told me they were from an actual game session. They are that cheesy. If you like that sort of thing, this might be for you. I didn't hate it, and may read t The stories presented in the first collection these "classic" comics were mediocre at best. The first, concerning a paladin, deserves a little better than a 3. The second story about a jester's ghost was pretty silly and terrible. Some characters overlap between the two, but what really stands out is the dialog. I would believe it if someone told me they were from an actual game session. They are that cheesy. If you like that sort of thing, this might be for you. I didn't hate it, and may read the next as I have enjoyed Jeff Grubb's other work.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    The first story arc offers up an a nice set of characters with interesting connections and gives them a fine adventure [6/10]. The story arc about the jester is a little too silly, but continues to have good plot and characters, and is the first one that advances the idea that we might not be seeing stories about all of the adventurers all of the time [6/10].

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    It's not that these stories are bad, but they're about as cliched as one could imagine that a fantasy story could be. The characters aren't very interesting the plots are workmanlike and the dialogue is sometimes almost painful. I had better memories of these that the reality could not live up to. It's not that these stories are bad, but they're about as cliched as one could imagine that a fantasy story could be. The characters aren't very interesting the plots are workmanlike and the dialogue is sometimes almost painful. I had better memories of these that the reality could not live up to.

  26. 4 out of 5

    James Bowman

    Adequately entertaining fantasy adventure, though the ideas (like the magical revenge of a jester's guild) are better than the execution (which could use a dash more energy and fun). The inclusion of AD&D stats for stuff introduced in the comic is neat, though. And at least this helped launch the superior Forgotten Realms DC comics... (B) Adequately entertaining fantasy adventure, though the ideas (like the magical revenge of a jester's guild) are better than the execution (which could use a dash more energy and fun). The inclusion of AD&D stats for stuff introduced in the comic is neat, though. And at least this helped launch the superior Forgotten Realms DC comics... (B)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Larry Kenney

    I actually enjoyed this read quite a bit. And not because its good. Don't ever make that mistake! It was a nice campy read, filled with terrible cliched dialogue and even worse storylines. I loved every minute of it. I didn't rate it higher just so people didn't get too high of expectations. I actually enjoyed this read quite a bit. And not because its good. Don't ever make that mistake! It was a nice campy read, filled with terrible cliched dialogue and even worse storylines. I loved every minute of it. I didn't rate it higher just so people didn't get too high of expectations.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    typical graphic novel collection of comic books written a long long time ago. it was interesting (as a D&D4e player) reading about adventures taking place in the realm of AD&D.

  29. 4 out of 5

    James

    Reads very much like a cheap AD&D module...which could be great or terrible depending on your preference. The artwork was garish and the writing flat and scattered.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    this was painful to read. jesters? bad humor? it had it all. art was ok, but the characters were a joke.

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