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The Music of Razors

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In nineteenth-century Boston, a young doctor on the run from the law falls in with a British confidence artist. Together–and with dire consequences–they bring back to the light something meant to be forgotten. A world away in London, an absent father, haunted by the voice of a banished angel, presents his daughter with an impossible friend–a clockwork ballerina. For two cent In nineteenth-century Boston, a young doctor on the run from the law falls in with a British confidence artist. Together–and with dire consequences–they bring back to the light something meant to be forgotten. A world away in London, an absent father, haunted by the voice of a banished angel, presents his daughter with an impossible friend–a clockwork ballerina. For two centuries, a bullet-removal specialist has wielded instruments of angel bone in service to a forgotten power . . . and now he vows to find someone else to shoulder the burden, someone with a conscience of their own, a strong mind, and a broken will. For a hundred years he has searched for the perfect contender, and now he has found two: a brother and a sister. Walter and Hope. Either will do. Last night something stepped from little Walter’s closet and he never woke up. Now he travels the dark road between worlds, no longer entirely boy nor wholly beast, but with one goal in mind: to prevent his sister from suffering the same fate as he. Only the creature he has become can save Hope. But is it too late to save himself?


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In nineteenth-century Boston, a young doctor on the run from the law falls in with a British confidence artist. Together–and with dire consequences–they bring back to the light something meant to be forgotten. A world away in London, an absent father, haunted by the voice of a banished angel, presents his daughter with an impossible friend–a clockwork ballerina. For two cent In nineteenth-century Boston, a young doctor on the run from the law falls in with a British confidence artist. Together–and with dire consequences–they bring back to the light something meant to be forgotten. A world away in London, an absent father, haunted by the voice of a banished angel, presents his daughter with an impossible friend–a clockwork ballerina. For two centuries, a bullet-removal specialist has wielded instruments of angel bone in service to a forgotten power . . . and now he vows to find someone else to shoulder the burden, someone with a conscience of their own, a strong mind, and a broken will. For a hundred years he has searched for the perfect contender, and now he has found two: a brother and a sister. Walter and Hope. Either will do. Last night something stepped from little Walter’s closet and he never woke up. Now he travels the dark road between worlds, no longer entirely boy nor wholly beast, but with one goal in mind: to prevent his sister from suffering the same fate as he. Only the creature he has become can save Hope. But is it too late to save himself?

30 review for The Music of Razors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Okay, so I enjoyed reading this book. Kind of. The words and phrases and visuals are amazing, the story is interesting and extremely creative and I applaud the writer on his bravery in writing this novel as his first publication. All right, so here is the reason I gave it only three stars. Although I can appreciate writing in a overtly personal voice, as though the author were building a journal of thoughts that can only be traced together by himself, but to do this to an audience is a little li Okay, so I enjoyed reading this book. Kind of. The words and phrases and visuals are amazing, the story is interesting and extremely creative and I applaud the writer on his bravery in writing this novel as his first publication. All right, so here is the reason I gave it only three stars. Although I can appreciate writing in a overtly personal voice, as though the author were building a journal of thoughts that can only be traced together by himself, but to do this to an audience is a little like telling your reader that you are far more creative than they are and that they will never truly be on your level. The character profiles were hidden in fantasy, and kept having vague conversations that were trapped in the idea that the reader could assume what was going on inside the author's mind at all times (which I found NOT to be true). But I did enjoy the monsters and fairy-tale like qualities of the book, as well as the Fallen Angel imagery, so I did enjoy it overall.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I found this on list of recommended steam-punk, a genre I'm exploring. The beginning was quite intriguing but by the time we got to the (shudder) evil creatures who stole dirty socks, I was ready for the book to end. I'm not sure if it really degenerated into incoherence, or if I was just turning pages too fast to catch the plot. And what's with angel bones as a plot device, anyway? Recently read Danielle Trussoni's "Angelology" (as it has a Bulgaria hook) and there it was angel bones again as a I found this on list of recommended steam-punk, a genre I'm exploring. The beginning was quite intriguing but by the time we got to the (shudder) evil creatures who stole dirty socks, I was ready for the book to end. I'm not sure if it really degenerated into incoherence, or if I was just turning pages too fast to catch the plot. And what's with angel bones as a plot device, anyway? Recently read Danielle Trussoni's "Angelology" (as it has a Bulgaria hook) and there it was angel bones again as a key element. I think for the future I'm boycotting any book in which the quest for angel bones is featured. Still, there's some good writing, and clearly a vivid imagination at work. I suspect Rogers will write better books in the future.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

    This book was heartbreakingly beautiful. So much pain and sadness mixed with wonder, awe, jaw-dropping loyalty and stark, blinding true love. A novel written like it was entirely composed of prose and poetry, this is one of my favorite novels. Read it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Juushika

    A student of medicine meets a group of "exceptional" youths, intent on contacting a certain spirit through their seances; a doctor, running from the law, meets a mutilated man and a friend from his youth; a young boy, consumed by his own childhood monster, becomes his sister's monster to save her from a shadowed man that wants her to take his place, living an eternal life and wielding magical tools made from the bones of an angel. In this debut novel, Rogers unites these three stories into one A student of medicine meets a group of "exceptional" youths, intent on contacting a certain spirit through their seances; a doctor, running from the law, meets a mutilated man and a friend from his youth; a young boy, consumed by his own childhood monster, becomes his sister's monster to save her from a shadowed man that wants her to take his place, living an eternal life and wielding magical tools made from the bones of an angel. In this debut novel, Rogers unites these three stories into one narrative that traces tools of extraordinary power down to a young boy and girl from our own era as they discover and create their identities. Delicately plotted, heavily atmospheric is a way that is both magical and haunting, this is a readable, richly conceived story. Music of Razors is not without its faults—the mythos is arbitrary, and the ending is rushed and lacks the art of the rest of the book—but on the whole this is a promising debut novel and I recommend it, if with some caveats. The Music of Razors has two primary strengths: a delicate plot, and exceptional visuals. At first, the plot seems complex—too complex, certainly, for the book's length. But as it grows, it combines three stories, three timelines, into one coherent narrative. Rogers does this with skill, such as the independent introduction of each plotline naturally introduces all of the characters, making them both human and complete, and the combination of the plot lines is logical, uniting the storylines and simplifying the storytelling to manageable complexity without ever over-simplifying it. The plot shows careful planning and real artistry, and Rogers excels at both. The second strength are the images, and these are exceptional: exceptionally haunting, exceptionally pervasive, exceptionally conceived. The dim magical atmosphere and the unsettling, haunting images illustrate each aspect of the story but, to say it better, they do more: they draw the reader in and create the dense, mysterious landscape that he explores. Sometimes, these images are overdrawn or excessive, but on the whole they are the delight of the book. Fans of retold fairy tales, of authors such as Neil Gaiman, of dark fantasy will be drawn to and enjoy this text on the images, the atmosphere alone. For these strengths, the novel has failing as well: an arbitrary mythos, and an increasingly rushed and incoherent conclusion. The mythos that the story is based on—the bones of an angel, murdered by another angel, which were turned into tools of semi-divine power—does not reference back to any real mythology, and only obliquely connects to Christianity. It is seems arbitrary because it indeed is, and this fact weakens the supposed instinctual connection between the "extraordinary" students that draw together and removes the story from the religious and mythological plain that it claims to inhabit. However, even if the angel bones mythos is accepted at face value, its role in the book plays out in strange ways—at the beginning, it gradually leads the characters together and directs the key points of the plot; at the end, it directs every moment of the plot in actions that are little more than plot twists, and so are unjustified and unexplored and even strip away all intent and free will. This, combined with the increasingly fragmented narration of the book's last chapters, makes for an ending that feels both arbitrary and rushed. The book suffers for it: The plotting falters, as does the pacing and the storytelling itself; the skill of the book dissolves into a conclusion that feels hasty, unexplored, unsatisfying. (I should also note that the text could use some editing—both to remove the fragmentary passages at the conclusion, or at least to unify them with the rest of the text, and to correct a few accidental shifts from past into present tense.) I enjoyed this book, on the whole. I picked it up because of the Neil Gaiman blurb/recommendation, and was pleased to find an equivalent atmosphere—not a copy, not by a long shot, but rather an atmosphere and rich scheme of images that is equally enticing, dark, and atmospheric, and also magical but within our own mundane realm. Between this well-conceived atmosphere and the careful plot, The Music of Razors is an enjoyable read and a very strong first novel. I wish that the mythos had some sort of historical connection, and more than that I wish that the end of the book had shown the same care in plotting and in storytelling as is present in the rest. As a result, I do consider this a faulted book, and so I recommend with caveats: this is an atmospheric and enjoyable read, but it is far from perfect and feels a bit unfinished. I look forward to more from Cameron Rogers—I believe he does show great promise as an author

  5. 5 out of 5

    Justin Labelle

    Cameron Rogers' The Music of Razors is a memorable, unique book which contains several well crafted set pieces. Its many characters are flawed, three-dimensional and realistic, an impressive feat given that it is a story spanning eons, taking place on earth, the heavens and everything in between. Though it admittedly lags somewhat in the middle, the steampunk aesthetic and truly poetic prose overcome flaws in the narrative. Described in few words, it is both waking nightmare and a realistic dream Cameron Rogers' The Music of Razors is a memorable, unique book which contains several well crafted set pieces. Its many characters are flawed, three-dimensional and realistic, an impressive feat given that it is a story spanning eons, taking place on earth, the heavens and everything in between. Though it admittedly lags somewhat in the middle, the steampunk aesthetic and truly poetic prose overcome flaws in the narrative. Described in few words, it is both waking nightmare and a realistic dream. Some stand out lines: 'the one you would learn of is stricken from all records, Celestial and Earthly, by the Hand of God. It has no name, no form, no portfolio, no ritual, no place inside creation.' 60 'What was the span of one human life in the span of creation? Nothing. No great drama, no cause for anything.' 103 'the angel taught him a different understanding also. As a child sees shapes in clouds the angel made Dorian hear words in sounds, yes? All sound. Where you hear a bird, Dorian would notice a single note above all others, as he would with a stone tossed into a brook, or new shoes clicking as you walk. And many notes make words, sentences, orders.'120 'It is endings that are remember. Beginning, not so much. Endings are the thing. Romeo dies. Rome burns. The Devil falls.' 122 'In the brightening room those instruments glowed like only hope and moonlight can' 123 'It was the same old story, each time something like him met people like that. Never any questions, just call a priest and reach for a gun' 149 'He did no exist within man's law for the world. But sometimes, when people forgot the law, he could still reach into their lives, their world, and remind them why they once feared the dark. Sometimes' 149 'The person with the most power in a relationship is the person who cares least' 212 'If everything wasn't meaningless, then nothing was. Then everything that ever happened anywhere had to be laden with meaning' 273

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Not my usual reading fare, but I'll give it a try. Getting tired of young adult fare, expand my horizons a little. **Update** Hmmmmm....let's see....well. Some reviews about this were about nice prose, beautiful descriptions. Well, look at me. I can string 7 beautiful words together: Lily pasture clouds descend fluffy pillow evergreen. Wow! I can write like Cameron Rogers!! Beautiful prose which makes NO SENSE WHATSOEVER! Ah, the first 3/4 was a head scratcher. I can't say that I totally dislike s Not my usual reading fare, but I'll give it a try. Getting tired of young adult fare, expand my horizons a little. **Update** Hmmmmm....let's see....well. Some reviews about this were about nice prose, beautiful descriptions. Well, look at me. I can string 7 beautiful words together: Lily pasture clouds descend fluffy pillow evergreen. Wow! I can write like Cameron Rogers!! Beautiful prose which makes NO SENSE WHATSOEVER! Ah, the first 3/4 was a head scratcher. I can't say that I totally dislike sci-fi, or fantasy, but it has to be slightly understandable to be readable. Seriously, you have NO IDEA what this guy is talking about through most of the book. I can't tell if this is just some long metaphor for a useless, futile life or what. On the one hand, I hate it when authors feel the need to spell out everything because they don't trust you as the reader to get it. But I equally hate it when authors are so random and artsy that they don't give you ANY CLUE as to what anything means or why. It's supposed to be about a fallen angel. That is why I was interested in reading this. In a very roundabout way, I suppose it is. But then again, 95% of what happens in no way lets you know what is really going on. Or why. Or why you should care.

  7. 4 out of 5

    neko cam

    It was just so very, very all over the place. The CONSTANTLY changing perspective was flat-out annoying; it meant that I'd spend a sentence or two of each and every new section with absolutely no idea what was going on. Hell, the perspective jumped between first, second, and third all within the same paragraph sometimes. While some of the description was wonderfully illustrative, the majority of it was so convoluted and/or vague as to force me to re-read whole passages to try and garner even a se It was just so very, very all over the place. The CONSTANTLY changing perspective was flat-out annoying; it meant that I'd spend a sentence or two of each and every new section with absolutely no idea what was going on. Hell, the perspective jumped between first, second, and third all within the same paragraph sometimes. While some of the description was wonderfully illustrative, the majority of it was so convoluted and/or vague as to force me to re-read whole passages to try and garner even a semblance of the goings on. By the end of the novel I was so tired of doing this that I'd just push forward when this occurred. I lost count of how many times various characters behaved in unrealistically stupid ways, though I won't explicitly discuss them for fear of spoilers. At the start of the novel I thought 'Oh, okay, so the narrative is jumping around a bit? Starting several threads? That's cool, I'll roll with it', and around the half-way mark I thought things were *starting* to come together and make retrospective sense, but HOT DAMN was that wrong. The end was so messy that I just threw my hands up, exclaimed "FUCK IT!" and powered through it for the sake of completion.

  8. 4 out of 5

    John Rennie

    I love books that reveal their story only a bit at a time, hinting at deep mysteries as they go, and I loved the first half of this book. We get partial stories of a mysterious 73rd fallen angel, who committed a crime so grave that even God has wiped his own memory of that angel to deny him existence. I think the book does this very well. I found myself avidly reading fascinated to find out what was really going on. However the second half of the book lost its way a bit. It's fine for a plot to b I love books that reveal their story only a bit at a time, hinting at deep mysteries as they go, and I loved the first half of this book. We get partial stories of a mysterious 73rd fallen angel, who committed a crime so grave that even God has wiped his own memory of that angel to deny him existence. I think the book does this very well. I found myself avidly reading fascinated to find out what was really going on. However the second half of the book lost its way a bit. It's fine for a plot to be incoherent at first if the author is going to eventually bring it all together and reveal that the apparent incoherence was just down to the reader's partial knowledge. But in this book that never happened. The plot stayed rather incoherent and had some too obvious inconsistencies. I still enjoyed the book, and I recommend it if you like this sort of slightly mystical story, the second half dragged the score down from 5 to 4 stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Miramira Endevall

    I got this book from BookBub solely because of a blurb by Neil Gaiman. The thing is, I don't really share reading interests with most of my favorite authors, but for some reason Gaiman's recommendations have always been golden for me. So there you go - author blurbs really do work! Which is good, because the jacket description is terrible. Advice for everyone to whom I send a copy of this book: Do. Not. Read. The. Jacket. Before. Reading. This. Book. That said - read this freaking book. While dark I got this book from BookBub solely because of a blurb by Neil Gaiman. The thing is, I don't really share reading interests with most of my favorite authors, but for some reason Gaiman's recommendations have always been golden for me. So there you go - author blurbs really do work! Which is good, because the jacket description is terrible. Advice for everyone to whom I send a copy of this book: Do. Not. Read. The. Jacket. Before. Reading. This. Book. That said - read this freaking book. While dark and sometimes slightly confusing (I agree with some of the commenters that sometimes the shifting perspectives don't segue well), the story is fascinating and the resolution just lovely. In some ways, I can't believe I'm giving four and five stars to so many books lately, but DAMN I've read some amazing stuff in the past couple of months. :-)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

    The Music of Razors reminded me of Donnie Darko, The Gates, and The Book of Lost Things. If you liked any of those, I'd wager you're going to love this book. It has a very disjointed, rambly feel. There is the quality of dreamy unreality and vagueness which sometimes irks my last nerve, but I think it works here. There's something a little off about the work though that makes it not quite all-the-way "there" for me. Unfortunately I'm having trouble determining why I have that feeling. The writing The Music of Razors reminded me of Donnie Darko, The Gates, and The Book of Lost Things. If you liked any of those, I'd wager you're going to love this book. It has a very disjointed, rambly feel. There is the quality of dreamy unreality and vagueness which sometimes irks my last nerve, but I think it works here. There's something a little off about the work though that makes it not quite all-the-way "there" for me. Unfortunately I'm having trouble determining why I have that feeling. The writing was pretty. The fantasy elements were exciting. The characters were interesting and believable. I enjoyed reading it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Scatterbug

    this is a book that requires multiple readings. going to start my fourth soon. it is initially confusing and rambling, and maybe it's my own fault it didn't all make sense in the first read (or even the second), but... the prose is amazing. the imagery is amazing. the story, once i got it, is amazing. this is a beautiful, powerful book. it left me in tears in the first 10 pages, and had me sobbing in the last ten. this is a book that requires multiple readings. going to start my fourth soon. it is initially confusing and rambling, and maybe it's my own fault it didn't all make sense in the first read (or even the second), but... the prose is amazing. the imagery is amazing. the story, once i got it, is amazing. this is a beautiful, powerful book. it left me in tears in the first 10 pages, and had me sobbing in the last ten.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jay Kristoff

    READ THIS BOOK

  13. 4 out of 5

    Garron

    Neil Gaiman graces the cover of this book stating, “A nightmarishly imaginative debut from a writer of real assurance and vision. Cameron Rogers is going to go places.” Gaiman was correct about the imaginative foundation that this novel was based upon. This book tells a beautiful story that intricately weaves multiple of fascinating characters-- humans, demons, and more--together into one finite story. Rogers’s approach to language is beautiful and extremely lovely to read. However, it is almost Neil Gaiman graces the cover of this book stating, “A nightmarishly imaginative debut from a writer of real assurance and vision. Cameron Rogers is going to go places.” Gaiman was correct about the imaginative foundation that this novel was based upon. This book tells a beautiful story that intricately weaves multiple of fascinating characters-- humans, demons, and more--together into one finite story. Rogers’s approach to language is beautiful and extremely lovely to read. However, it is almost as if the author was growing in their skill set as the plot pushed forward. I found the first half hard to follow with jarring splits that were not easy to reconcile, whereas in the last half of the novel the changes in characters and locations ran smoothly and complemented one another in a way that the first half does not. It did take about 100 pages, out of the 314, for me to finally fall in love with Walter and his counterparts, but once I did, I found myself entranced with all of them. I give this book a 3/5 rating. If it wasn’t for the jarring in the first half, it would have placed much higher. Do I suggest this book: yes. It is a rewarding read for anyone who likes fantasy, especially Gaiman. And, even with its rough start, the books is more than worth the read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nelson Noven

    The beginning was fantastic, but I got lost halfway through and had to put it down. I haven't given the book away because I keep thinking I will go back to it someday, so it hasn't totally left my brainspace after all these years, which I guess is a good thing. The beginning was fantastic, but I got lost halfway through and had to put it down. I haven't given the book away because I keep thinking I will go back to it someday, so it hasn't totally left my brainspace after all these years, which I guess is a good thing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jim Kratzok

    Interesting! I liked the story quite a bit, but the ending left me a bit cold. Maybe I should re-read the last chapter but until then I was thoroughly enjoying the book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    CJ Southworth

    Overall a very good read, but the ending seemed to lack real resolution.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    From the prologue: "While riding his bike that afternoon, Walter had turned a corner very fast, and almost slid beneath the wheels of a passing milk truck. That was the moment Walter first realized that he could die. And this was the night the closet door first opened. That's not to say the closet door had never been opened before, but it is to say that it was the first time it had opened by itself." (page 6) There is in fact a very real monster inside Walter's closet. But the man in the long bla From the prologue: "While riding his bike that afternoon, Walter had turned a corner very fast, and almost slid beneath the wheels of a passing milk truck. That was the moment Walter first realized that he could die. And this was the night the closet door first opened. That's not to say the closet door had never been opened before, but it is to say that it was the first time it had opened by itself." (page 6) There is in fact a very real monster inside Walter's closet. But the man in the long black coat assures Walter that one can make monsters go away. Tell it to go away... and it will. But the man in the long black coat is not to be trusted. Taking his advice sets Walter on course to grow up faster than any child should have to, and to face the evil in this world and beyond head on to right a snowball of wrongs that began with only two words: "Go. Away." I initially checked out the Kindle sample of this book to see what it was all about. I read the first few paragraphs and the writing just hooked me. It's an unbelievably imaginative, yet dark and cautionary tale about the war between good and evil waged over the course of millennia. We are like pieces in a chess game who cannot see the big picture beyond the square we occupy. This book was a whole new take on the monster under the bed and what the unseen world around us could be like. I can't emphasize enough how much imagination is behind this book. At times, it can get a little confusing, but then again, I think it lends itself to interpretation in that way, and adds to the surreality of the story. Readers of gothic fiction and dark fantasy, do not miss this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Picked up on a whim. See, it's the angel's wings on the book cover that did it. Then I realized - oh. Fallen angels. And then - oh, another Melbourne author, with a K.J. Bishop quote on the back. There are certain aspects of the story I loved, namely centered around Henry, and I think there are some lovely aspects to the novel overall - but I can't help feeling as if incoherency replaced surrealism here and there. This leaves the same taste at the back of my mouth that the overrated Donnie Darko Picked up on a whim. See, it's the angel's wings on the book cover that did it. Then I realized - oh. Fallen angels. And then - oh, another Melbourne author, with a K.J. Bishop quote on the back. There are certain aspects of the story I loved, namely centered around Henry, and I think there are some lovely aspects to the novel overall - but I can't help feeling as if incoherency replaced surrealism here and there. This leaves the same taste at the back of my mouth that the overrated Donnie Darko did - the imagery and mood is sharp and clear when it needs to be, but the plot is a cloudy, confused mess, and maybe not as clever as it would like to think it is. That said, I still found most of it quite beautiful. I was reminded of a less abrasive Clive Barker (ugh) at times, and a less indulgent Neil Gaiman. It makes perfect sense to me why a K.J. Bishop quote is featured on the jacket. I'd recommend it. It's a quick read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Been reading this with Kelmy (my 13-year-old). It's pretty dark so far and so he loves it. About halfway in I could take it or leave it. Well those are hours of my life I'll never get back. A little too surreal for me. I thought it might end up being something like Vellum: The Book of All Hours but in the end it just really didn't go anywhere. It seemed to be about a very big struggle between angels and god and humans, but then it focused on a really small scale where nothing was resolved at the Been reading this with Kelmy (my 13-year-old). It's pretty dark so far and so he loves it. About halfway in I could take it or leave it. Well those are hours of my life I'll never get back. A little too surreal for me. I thought it might end up being something like Vellum: The Book of All Hours but in the end it just really didn't go anywhere. It seemed to be about a very big struggle between angels and god and humans, but then it focused on a really small scale where nothing was resolved at the end. As we got about 30 pages from the end I expected some really "big" events to happen and they did but they happened to really "small" people (even though they were the main characters) so it really didn't seem finished.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elia

    For the first hundred pages expect to have no idea what's going on. As soon as you begin to understand a storyline it seemingly gets dropped for something completely different (contemporary child's nightmare, medical students occult activities in the 19th century, an English ragamuffin's "imaginary" friend, a high school girls' battles at home and school). These all turn out to be one (semi)coherent story that gets ever more dark and fascinating as the book goes on. By the end I was hopelessly a For the first hundred pages expect to have no idea what's going on. As soon as you begin to understand a storyline it seemingly gets dropped for something completely different (contemporary child's nightmare, medical students occult activities in the 19th century, an English ragamuffin's "imaginary" friend, a high school girls' battles at home and school). These all turn out to be one (semi)coherent story that gets ever more dark and fascinating as the book goes on. By the end I was hopelessly absorbed and hanging on tenuously to the plot, and in the last few pages lost everything I thought I had figured out. But in a good way. In a way that made me want to immediately reread the entire thing to see if I would get it the second time around.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Picked up at the library on a whim, this was one of the most fascinating novels I've recently come across. It is wonderfully bizarre, full of potential, yet fails to manage to keep up with its aspirations. The spirit of the novel reminds me strongly of Neil Gaiman, very near his brand of story and his style, perhaps an emulation. Regardless, it ends up feeling like an emulation that can't reach the same magic. The plot is terribly complex and relayed in an often confusing narrative of shifting p Picked up at the library on a whim, this was one of the most fascinating novels I've recently come across. It is wonderfully bizarre, full of potential, yet fails to manage to keep up with its aspirations. The spirit of the novel reminds me strongly of Neil Gaiman, very near his brand of story and his style, perhaps an emulation. Regardless, it ends up feeling like an emulation that can't reach the same magic. The plot is terribly complex and relayed in an often confusing narrative of shifting points of views, with many details kept from the reader to maintain a feeling of on-edge uncertainty that never becomes absolutely clear and coherent. I'd be eager to see what Rogers' talent is able to produce in the future, this showed a lot of exciting potential despite not completely working.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ungelic_is_us

    I. What. What. What was this book? So. I'm going to give this 3.5 stars. It was really interesting, kind of all over the place, with some fascinating ideas. In the long run, I don't think the execution quite held together for me. That said, there's some remarkable writing in there. It reminded me a bit of Gaiman (thematically,) a bit of Caitlin Kiernan (especially in execution--the writing managed to be difficult to follow and intensely evocative at the same time,) and a bit of Charles de Lint wh I. What. What. What was this book? So. I'm going to give this 3.5 stars. It was really interesting, kind of all over the place, with some fascinating ideas. In the long run, I don't think the execution quite held together for me. That said, there's some remarkable writing in there. It reminded me a bit of Gaiman (thematically,) a bit of Caitlin Kiernan (especially in execution--the writing managed to be difficult to follow and intensely evocative at the same time,) and a bit of Charles de Lint when he's writing horror. If you like those authors, you will probably find this book quite interesting.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lhizz Browne

    I really loved this book, and I don't know why it's taken me so long to read it. It's somewhere between horror and urban fantasy. The darkly beautiful imagery and descriptions made me think of Caitlin R Kiernan's writing and I was hooked all the way through. The story seemed a little convoluted in parts, I think maybe it was over-ambitious but it succeeded more than it failed. It's very accomplished for a debut, and it's a book I'll definitely have to read again to pick up on the things I missed I really loved this book, and I don't know why it's taken me so long to read it. It's somewhere between horror and urban fantasy. The darkly beautiful imagery and descriptions made me think of Caitlin R Kiernan's writing and I was hooked all the way through. The story seemed a little convoluted in parts, I think maybe it was over-ambitious but it succeeded more than it failed. It's very accomplished for a debut, and it's a book I'll definitely have to read again to pick up on the things I missed first time around.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Now this book is a bit odd and dark. It starts out with a boy who is haunted by his "Closet Monster" When he confronts his parents about it they tell him its nothing leaving him to confront the creature on his own. He finally tells the creature to leave him alone. As the creature leaves the boy notices sadness in the monsters eyes and it leaves. Later that night he is visited by a man in a dark coat with shining stars in the inside! and thats just the first chapter the rest is for you to find ou Now this book is a bit odd and dark. It starts out with a boy who is haunted by his "Closet Monster" When he confronts his parents about it they tell him its nothing leaving him to confront the creature on his own. He finally tells the creature to leave him alone. As the creature leaves the boy notices sadness in the monsters eyes and it leaves. Later that night he is visited by a man in a dark coat with shining stars in the inside! and thats just the first chapter the rest is for you to find out on your own a must read for those who love odd little stories

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I was reminded of Neil Gaiman's prose a little bit. A teanaged girl goes into her exboyfriends room: "It smelled of Boy. It smelled of warm skin and socks." Here's another quote. Behind an iron fence an old lady watered a brown garden of tortured, flowerless plants begging for a quick death while her toy-sized dog looked up as if to ask what the hell kind of sick game she thought she was playing. It's a story about the quest for power and what it does to people. And what odd and wonderful and terri I was reminded of Neil Gaiman's prose a little bit. A teanaged girl goes into her exboyfriends room: "It smelled of Boy. It smelled of warm skin and socks." Here's another quote. Behind an iron fence an old lady watered a brown garden of tortured, flowerless plants begging for a quick death while her toy-sized dog looked up as if to ask what the hell kind of sick game she thought she was playing. It's a story about the quest for power and what it does to people. And what odd and wonderful and terrible things they do along the way.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kaite Stover

    Loved this book. The writing is elegant, sharp and fresh. The story is intriguing, albeit a tad confusing, as it completely changes from chapter to chapter to start with. A truly dedicated reader would have to stick with this book that holds a narrative that is not quite linear, but absorbing nonetheless. I was so reminded of Neil Gaiman's works as I read it. Edgier, though. Loved this book. The writing is elegant, sharp and fresh. The story is intriguing, albeit a tad confusing, as it completely changes from chapter to chapter to start with. A truly dedicated reader would have to stick with this book that holds a narrative that is not quite linear, but absorbing nonetheless. I was so reminded of Neil Gaiman's works as I read it. Edgier, though.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eb0

    Some nice modern-fantasy ideas and some very creepy and disturbing scenes. But the storytelling is self-consciously oblique and its disparate parts never gel into a cohesive narrative. I'm sure to some its lifelike shapelessness will be part of its charm. A lot to like here, but I prefer a little more structure. Some nice modern-fantasy ideas and some very creepy and disturbing scenes. But the storytelling is self-consciously oblique and its disparate parts never gel into a cohesive narrative. I'm sure to some its lifelike shapelessness will be part of its charm. A lot to like here, but I prefer a little more structure.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Komal

    A beautiful but mind-numbing book that floods you with macabre images and leaves you with an odd feeling that something isn't quite making any sense. I am still unsure as to whether this is a good book or not and whether or not it means anything. Try reading it for yourself. It's certainly not like any other I've read. A beautiful but mind-numbing book that floods you with macabre images and leaves you with an odd feeling that something isn't quite making any sense. I am still unsure as to whether this is a good book or not and whether or not it means anything. Try reading it for yourself. It's certainly not like any other I've read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I still don't know how this thing ended, towards the last 20 pages or so I got lost (not for the first time with this book). I'll have to go back and re-read the ending to really get what's going on. Very creative story, with lots of dark, disturbing, and sometimes beautiful imagery. I wanted to know what would happen, so I kept reading. I still don't know how this thing ended, towards the last 20 pages or so I got lost (not for the first time with this book). I'll have to go back and re-read the ending to really get what's going on. Very creative story, with lots of dark, disturbing, and sometimes beautiful imagery. I wanted to know what would happen, so I kept reading.

  30. 5 out of 5

    April

    I read the Australian edition and freaking loved it. The characters are well-drawn, the story is engrossing, sometimes frightening, sometimes heartbreaking. Just a wonderful read. The American edition has some more background, and I'm looking forward to finding out what was added. I read the Australian edition and freaking loved it. The characters are well-drawn, the story is engrossing, sometimes frightening, sometimes heartbreaking. Just a wonderful read. The American edition has some more background, and I'm looking forward to finding out what was added.

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