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Crazy Enough: A Memoir

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Yes, Storm Large is her real name, though she’s been called many things. As a performer, the majority of descriptions have led with “Amazon,” “powerhouse,” “a six-foot Vargas pinup come to life.” Playboy called her a “punk goddess.” You’d never know she used to be called “Little S”—the mini-me to her beautiful and troubled mother, Suzi. Little S spent most of her childhood Yes, Storm Large is her real name, though she’s been called many things. As a performer, the majority of descriptions have led with “Amazon,” “powerhouse,” “a six-foot Vargas pinup come to life.” Playboy called her a “punk goddess.” You’d never know she used to be called “Little S”—the mini-me to her beautiful and troubled mother, Suzi. Little S spent most of her childhood visiting her mother in mental institutions and psych wards. Suzi’s diagnosis changed with almost every doctor’s visit, ranging from schizophrenia to bipolar disorder to multiple personality disorder to depression. One day, nine-year-old Little S jokingly asked one of her mother’s doctors, “I’m not going to be crazy like that, right?” To which he replied, “Well, yes. It’s hereditary. You absolutely will end up like your mother. But not until your twenties.” Storm’s story of growing up with a mental time bomb hanging over her veers from frightening to inspiring, sometimes all in one sentence. But her strength, charisma, and raw musical talent gave her the will to overcome it all. Crazy Enough is a love song to the twisted, flawed parts in all of us.


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Yes, Storm Large is her real name, though she’s been called many things. As a performer, the majority of descriptions have led with “Amazon,” “powerhouse,” “a six-foot Vargas pinup come to life.” Playboy called her a “punk goddess.” You’d never know she used to be called “Little S”—the mini-me to her beautiful and troubled mother, Suzi. Little S spent most of her childhood Yes, Storm Large is her real name, though she’s been called many things. As a performer, the majority of descriptions have led with “Amazon,” “powerhouse,” “a six-foot Vargas pinup come to life.” Playboy called her a “punk goddess.” You’d never know she used to be called “Little S”—the mini-me to her beautiful and troubled mother, Suzi. Little S spent most of her childhood visiting her mother in mental institutions and psych wards. Suzi’s diagnosis changed with almost every doctor’s visit, ranging from schizophrenia to bipolar disorder to multiple personality disorder to depression. One day, nine-year-old Little S jokingly asked one of her mother’s doctors, “I’m not going to be crazy like that, right?” To which he replied, “Well, yes. It’s hereditary. You absolutely will end up like your mother. But not until your twenties.” Storm’s story of growing up with a mental time bomb hanging over her veers from frightening to inspiring, sometimes all in one sentence. But her strength, charisma, and raw musical talent gave her the will to overcome it all. Crazy Enough is a love song to the twisted, flawed parts in all of us.

30 review for Crazy Enough: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Wight

    I picked this book up on a whim at St. Vinny's the other day. Previously, I had never heard the name Storm Large, and now I'm wondering where she has been all my life! I was initially attracted to this book simply because of the cover: oooh, another weird girl memoir! I am an absolute sucker for girls with attitude... and she delivers. What glued me to this book is the way in which somehow, Storm and I are not all that different but also complete opposite people. I grew up to be a 6'2" chubby ou I picked this book up on a whim at St. Vinny's the other day. Previously, I had never heard the name Storm Large, and now I'm wondering where she has been all my life! I was initially attracted to this book simply because of the cover: oooh, another weird girl memoir! I am an absolute sucker for girls with attitude... and she delivers. What glued me to this book is the way in which somehow, Storm and I are not all that different but also complete opposite people. I grew up to be a 6'2" chubby outcast in a similarly dysfunctional, lower-middle class family, and was constantly worried that I was gonna turn out batshit crazy like my mom. But unlike Storm, I am still trying to find my voice, and I'd like to say that this book is definitely inspiring for me on that note. Storm seamlessly takes us on a journey from her sex addiction to drug addiction, dirty crust punk and bonafied rockstar. She provides for us one of the most tragically beautiful descriptions of a heroin withdrawal I have ever read, and recounting her time in New York only kind of makes me want to go to a sleazy punk rock dive bar and go home with a brand new stranger myself. Storm Large is larger than life itself. Fellow weirdos and suburban Harvard alumni alike need to read this.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    Here is the child-friendly synopsis: Auntie Stormy was a big loud silly pants who did some highly goofy and not smart things, but is now, mostly, a nice person. The end. —"Thank You," p.265And since Storm Large is not child-friendly, least of all to herself... here, from slightly earlier in Crazy Enough, is the synopsis for the rest of us:The photographer told me, "Storm, you are so beautiful, your skin, your body, your mouth; the thing is, you kinda make our dicks look small." —p.244Storm Large d Here is the child-friendly synopsis: Auntie Stormy was a big loud silly pants who did some highly goofy and not smart things, but is now, mostly, a nice person. The end. —"Thank You," p.265And since Storm Large is not child-friendly, least of all to herself... here, from slightly earlier in Crazy Enough, is the synopsis for the rest of us:The photographer told me, "Storm, you are so beautiful, your skin, your body, your mouth; the thing is, you kinda make our dicks look small." —p.244Storm Large does not hold back. Anything. Well, hardly anything. Every chapter—every page, it often seems—of this memoir holds another astonishing and usually disturbing revelation about her—yes, stormy, and larger-than-life—childhood, adolescence and adulthood. This book is amazing, not so much for Large's prose style, which is plainspoken and colloquial—one might even say pedestrian—but for the life it relates. From a dinner laced with dishwasher powder to black tar heroin in San Francisco... it's amazing that she survived to tell these things to us. It doesn't hurt that she's an enormously talented singer and songwriter—but plenty of other talents have been unable to pull themselves together well enough to survive, let alone to write their own tell-all memoirs. Large has actually made a life for herself, right here in my own beloved Portland, Oregon, a life which is successful by just about any metric. How successful? Well, her own website says, as of January 2014: "Read the latest. It is all good." And indeed it is. Sold-out concerts, television and stage appearances, and performances with artists as diverse as (according to her Wikipedia page) Rufus Wainwright, George Clinton and Animotion, are just a few of her public achievements. And then there's Crazy Enough, which is also good. It's not always easy to read without flinching, mind you, but it's good. As she herself says in her Disclaimer at the beginning of the book (and I'm not sure what it says that I'm ending with her beginning, as I began with her ending),{...}I could have gotten a few things twisted around. But I do know for sure that I live at the end. —p.vThat's something you'll want to hold onto as you read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Exactly what I needed right now. Somewhat shamefully, my only experience with Storm as a Portlander for 17 years was when she sang on a booze cruise at a friend's Christmas party. But she sang The Star Spangled Banner, to the music of Pusher Man, in a Jessica Rabbit dress. So, really, I've always thought she fuckin' rocked. Great story. I love a tale of someone who's always up for it, whatever it happens to be. Exactly what I needed right now. Somewhat shamefully, my only experience with Storm as a Portlander for 17 years was when she sang on a booze cruise at a friend's Christmas party. But she sang The Star Spangled Banner, to the music of Pusher Man, in a Jessica Rabbit dress. So, really, I've always thought she fuckin' rocked. Great story. I love a tale of someone who's always up for it, whatever it happens to be.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Bell

    I became a Storm fan this weekend. As I was finishing the book, I listened to her interview Betty Levette at Wordstock and sing at Livewire. What a woman. Imagine if Mitt opened up his "binder" and found Storm Large. :) I became a Storm fan this weekend. As I was finishing the book, I listened to her interview Betty Levette at Wordstock and sing at Livewire. What a woman. Imagine if Mitt opened up his "binder" and found Storm Large. :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    http://mariesbookgarden.blogspot.com/... I am a polar opposite of Storm Large. I had a happy childhood with two stable, loving parents who were always there for me. I am happily married with three children and have never been promiscous or used drugs. Yet I love Storm Large, as you can see by the multiple posts about her on my main blog. After seeing Storm's show, "Crazy Enough," twice at Portland Center Stage and purchasing the show CD, as soon as I read she was writing a book I put it on hold a http://mariesbookgarden.blogspot.com/... I am a polar opposite of Storm Large. I had a happy childhood with two stable, loving parents who were always there for me. I am happily married with three children and have never been promiscous or used drugs. Yet I love Storm Large, as you can see by the multiple posts about her on my main blog. After seeing Storm's show, "Crazy Enough," twice at Portland Center Stage and purchasing the show CD, as soon as I read she was writing a book I put it on hold at the library. I've been waiting for several months to get my hands on it. As I expected, the book delivered. Storm was able to go into deeper detail about her crazy childhood and young adulthood. Raw, honest, and full of profanity and crazy-making shit, she lays it all bare for her readers. Sex addict, drug addict, and now a performing addict, she knows all too well how larger than life and wild she is. It's part of her act. The world is a better place because she can use her wildness as art and be addicted to music and performing instead of the unhealthier habits. Much of the content was covered in her one-woman show, but she's able to go into more detail here. If you have a strong stomach and are not easily offended, read this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    I already knew Large was a knock-your-socks-off vocalist (I was motivated to read her memoir after hearing her front for Pink Martini). I had only a vague awareness of her fame as an oversexed, raunchy, reality-TV star with a cult following in her adopted hometown of Pdx. I did not know that she also possesses great writing chops, which are quite evident in her guilt- and anger-tinged tale of growing up in a house with a (literally) crazy mom and a doctor's prognosis that the same mental health I already knew Large was a knock-your-socks-off vocalist (I was motivated to read her memoir after hearing her front for Pink Martini). I had only a vague awareness of her fame as an oversexed, raunchy, reality-TV star with a cult following in her adopted hometown of Pdx. I did not know that she also possesses great writing chops, which are quite evident in her guilt- and anger-tinged tale of growing up in a house with a (literally) crazy mom and a doctor's prognosis that the same mental health fate awaited her. Much more than a story laced with vulgarity, this memoir is touching, coarse, funny...and honest.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Sadai

    I love stories about strong survivors! Storm's life has been far from easy, but her experiences created the vibrant, warrior woman she is today. Her journey was fascinating, her writing was compelling and I'm happy to give it 5 stars even though she disses my hometown of Windsor, Ontario. I love stories about strong survivors! Storm's life has been far from easy, but her experiences created the vibrant, warrior woman she is today. Her journey was fascinating, her writing was compelling and I'm happy to give it 5 stars even though she disses my hometown of Windsor, Ontario.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jolene

    I enjoyed the second half of this book, which focuses on Storm's adulthood, much more than the first half of the book, which deals with her childhood. In the first half, she talks about being a hypersexual child and feeling very sensitive--maybe too sensitive--and wayward. As bad as things get for Storm and her family, Storm doesn't wallow in self-pity. While she deals with many sad and painful things in her book, she manages to stay open and engaging--a huge accomplishment. I would not recommen I enjoyed the second half of this book, which focuses on Storm's adulthood, much more than the first half of the book, which deals with her childhood. In the first half, she talks about being a hypersexual child and feeling very sensitive--maybe too sensitive--and wayward. As bad as things get for Storm and her family, Storm doesn't wallow in self-pity. While she deals with many sad and painful things in her book, she manages to stay open and engaging--a huge accomplishment. I would not recommend that children read this book. But I think therapists, social workers, and those with family members who have mental illness (especially parents with mental illness)/addictions (friends/children) may take a lot away from Storm's story. She was very brave to publish this book. I missed her TV appearance, but now I am curious. (I would have liked this book more if there were fewer sexual dalliances, esp. amongst children and in public, but that was a central theme of the book.) *** Storm is performing at Le Poisson Rouge in NYC this Thursday. She is a really talented singer (though some of her songs are outrageous-it figures). I am thinking of going to see whether she'll sign the proof I read. UPDATE: http://www.elle.com/Pop-Culture/Movie...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I lovelovelove Storm Large and listen to "Ladylike" when I want/need to feel particularly badass. I feel lucky to have seen her in several different settings: a surprise guest on Live Wire singing "Puff the Magic Dragon" with Peter of Peter, Paul and Mary; in Cabaret, in her one-woman show, blowing the doors off a small venue with The Balls. and singing with Pink Martini(and if she can get through those shows without dropping the F-bomb, there is hope for me). After seeing her one-woman show,I wa I lovelovelove Storm Large and listen to "Ladylike" when I want/need to feel particularly badass. I feel lucky to have seen her in several different settings: a surprise guest on Live Wire singing "Puff the Magic Dragon" with Peter of Peter, Paul and Mary; in Cabaret, in her one-woman show, blowing the doors off a small venue with The Balls. and singing with Pink Martini(and if she can get through those shows without dropping the F-bomb, there is hope for me). After seeing her one-woman show,I was familiar with much of the territory covered in the book. I was surprised how much my childhood and relationship with my mother was like hers and felt comforted that it was hard for her to forgive herself for cutting herself loose at times as I have. One (or two) of the stories of trainwreck of her mother's life could have been edited out. I am glad there wasn't an exhaustive retelling of her reality show experience. I was saddened to hear this amazing, beautiful, curvy woman got hit on the most when she was anorexic and bone-thin. And I must dock a star for not spelling Mötley Crüe correctly. I did love that there were "good" guys and "bad" guys of both genders. We are almost the same age and I look forward to seeing how Storm takes on 50, 60, 70....lead the way!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maija

    I actually liked this more than I expected. My mom grew up with a mother who was in & out of mental hospitals through her childhood & adult life, and so I related to how it is challenging for children to understand & how they have to survive on their own(and it has made me sympathetic to things my mom does that sometimes drives me crazy). My mom didn't become a rock star or go through heroin addiction, so not exactly the same. I've actually never seen Storm Large perform, despite the fact she is I actually liked this more than I expected. My mom grew up with a mother who was in & out of mental hospitals through her childhood & adult life, and so I related to how it is challenging for children to understand & how they have to survive on their own(and it has made me sympathetic to things my mom does that sometimes drives me crazy). My mom didn't become a rock star or go through heroin addiction, so not exactly the same. I've actually never seen Storm Large perform, despite the fact she is a Portland star. I have bumped into her at events and she definitely possesses that "it" factor - tall(at least 6') and blonde and beautiful. This book gave me insight into her own self-esteem issues and how she resisted becoming a musician for much of her early life. It was a little trashy/shocking at times, but it was definitely one of those books you can devour quickly. Fun read overall.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Having seen Storm perform live several times, including in her one-woman show, reading Crazy Enough felt like I imagine a long conversation with her would be: Fast paced, colorful, profane, funny and sad. I read this memoir at the same time I was listening on CD to Wild, a book I read last year. Interesting that both of these Portland-based artists experienced great suffering because of their mothers -- Cheryl because her mother died and Storm because her mother lived - and both coped with those Having seen Storm perform live several times, including in her one-woman show, reading Crazy Enough felt like I imagine a long conversation with her would be: Fast paced, colorful, profane, funny and sad. I read this memoir at the same time I was listening on CD to Wild, a book I read last year. Interesting that both of these Portland-based artists experienced great suffering because of their mothers -- Cheryl because her mother died and Storm because her mother lived - and both coped with those realities in part with sex and drugs (heroin). In Storm's case, of course, she added rock 'n roll. Talk about shock and awe! Storm doesn't have Cheryl Strayed's literary gifts but she knows how to tell a great story and, as on stage, she doesn't hold anything back.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I know, I know. This is some super indulgent reading, which I kind of needed. It's an unequivocal case of schadenfreude. It was entertaining to say the least and a reminder that as crazy as I may think my parents might be, the grass is more often trampled on the other side. I am a total sucker for memoirs involving mental illness, drugs and general indecency. I know, I know. This is some super indulgent reading, which I kind of needed. It's an unequivocal case of schadenfreude. It was entertaining to say the least and a reminder that as crazy as I may think my parents might be, the grass is more often trampled on the other side. I am a total sucker for memoirs involving mental illness, drugs and general indecency.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ioana Mirescu

    Amazing and shocking book!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura Shea-clark

    In preparation for playing trumpet with Santa Cruz Symphony I wanted to find out more about our guest artist, vocalist Storm Large. I watched several videos that showed her as a rock/pop/indie singer, and I learned that she had been on the TV show, “Rock Star: Supernova.” I started to form a picture of who I thought she was, but then I found an interview she did with Rosie O’Donnell. She grew up with a mother who was in and out of mental institutions. As a child she asked her mother’s doctor if In preparation for playing trumpet with Santa Cruz Symphony I wanted to find out more about our guest artist, vocalist Storm Large. I watched several videos that showed her as a rock/pop/indie singer, and I learned that she had been on the TV show, “Rock Star: Supernova.” I started to form a picture of who I thought she was, but then I found an interview she did with Rosie O’Donnell. She grew up with a mother who was in and out of mental institutions. As a child she asked her mother’s doctor if she too would be mentally ill, and she was told that yes it’s hereditary and it will likely happen in her twenties. This deeply affected her and drew her into a life of sex, drugs, and rock and roll. As an adult she began to take stock of her life and ended up doing a one-woman show largely about her mother. The book is a memoir of her challenging life experiences. The title of it is the answer she gave to someone who asked if she was going to see a therapist, and she said no, that she was just “crazy enough” to be creative and driven. She is remarkably articulate and resilient.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cydney

    Okay. Just finished the first page and I love it already. I'm in the mood for no holds barred humor telling it like it is. "Right around Halloween, a big chilly sog plops its fat ass over the Pacific Northwest and stays parked until Independence Day." If you live here you can relate. I'm relating. After finishing, I'm impressed with her willingness to be an "open book" with every aspect of her life and introspection. Raw? In your face? Humorous? Hyper-emotional? Hugely seeking her own audience? Y Okay. Just finished the first page and I love it already. I'm in the mood for no holds barred humor telling it like it is. "Right around Halloween, a big chilly sog plops its fat ass over the Pacific Northwest and stays parked until Independence Day." If you live here you can relate. I'm relating. After finishing, I'm impressed with her willingness to be an "open book" with every aspect of her life and introspection. Raw? In your face? Humorous? Hyper-emotional? Hugely seeking her own audience? Yup. But she takes responsibility and holds herself accountable for her own life and actions also while questing for answers from her past. Human? Way yes. My life is nothing like hers. But I can take a page from what she has learned about herself and being true to her process and move forward more fully into my own life looking fear face on be doing it anyway. Yup. Eleanor Roosevelt said, "do one thing every day that scares you." Whoo hoo! What a ride!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Don

    I just love her perspective and attitude, and she brings it. I was lucky enough to see her live stage show of the same name in Portland, so was interested in seeing how she fleshed out in a book what couldn't be contained in an evening with songs. There's lots more detail about her history with her mentally ill mother, but it was the stuff about her father especially, and all he went through with his kids, that was heartbreaking. The kinds of emotions she describes about her relationship to her I just love her perspective and attitude, and she brings it. I was lucky enough to see her live stage show of the same name in Portland, so was interested in seeing how she fleshed out in a book what couldn't be contained in an evening with songs. There's lots more detail about her history with her mentally ill mother, but it was the stuff about her father especially, and all he went through with his kids, that was heartbreaking. The kinds of emotions she describes about her relationship to her mother - the love-hate, the exasperation at the button-pushing, and the regrets - are all very genuine. Yeah, there are grammatical issues and some typos. But having seen the stage show and a few YouTube video interviews, her voice is captured nicely. It read like a book on tape playing in my head.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul Warner

    I knew Storm Large was a beautiful singer, but I didn't realize she was such an incredible writer too until I purchased her memoir "Crazy Enough" at a symphony concert in Portland. She was kind enough to sign it for my wife and I and get a photo with us. I started reading it that night and found myself very impressed by her words and descriptions, and very caught up in the emotional roller coaster of her life and the struggles with her mother's mental health. Having read and adored all of Carrie I knew Storm Large was a beautiful singer, but I didn't realize she was such an incredible writer too until I purchased her memoir "Crazy Enough" at a symphony concert in Portland. She was kind enough to sign it for my wife and I and get a photo with us. I started reading it that night and found myself very impressed by her words and descriptions, and very caught up in the emotional roller coaster of her life and the struggles with her mother's mental health. Having read and adored all of Carrie Fisher's writing, I was reminded of that style and open vulnerability to just put it all out there and honestly share the experiences. I definitely recommend this book to her fans and to anyone who likes real, raw, well-written prose that will move you.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    I have enormous respect for Storm Large. I think what she has overcome and her attitude toward life is admirable. I didn't enjoy this book as much as I thought. It was nice to have a little more insight into her background, but her show Crazy is fantastic. I think her public performance of her life was well done so found myself making references to it often while reading the book. I have enormous respect for Storm Large. I think what she has overcome and her attitude toward life is admirable. I didn't enjoy this book as much as I thought. It was nice to have a little more insight into her background, but her show Crazy is fantastic. I think her public performance of her life was well done so found myself making references to it often while reading the book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    ReadsinBed

    Loved this. Not *quite* as engaging as her one-woman show, but fantastic nonetheless. I love that she pulls no punches and does not seem to spin anything to put herself in a better light. It felt honest and was alternately funny, scary, sad, and fascinating.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lara Lillibridge

    I wanted to like this memoir, but it was one that I gave up on. Now, it is certainly possible that it was "too close to home" for me. I bought this book because I have a bipolar mother and so does the narrator, though her mother's illness was very different from my own mother's. It certainly could be my issues, and another reader might love it. I just didn't care for the conversational, casual voice. The best way I can describe it is "in your face" if that makes any sense. I don't know if there' I wanted to like this memoir, but it was one that I gave up on. Now, it is certainly possible that it was "too close to home" for me. I bought this book because I have a bipolar mother and so does the narrator, though her mother's illness was very different from my own mother's. It certainly could be my issues, and another reader might love it. I just didn't care for the conversational, casual voice. The best way I can describe it is "in your face" if that makes any sense. I don't know if there's such a thing as pop-memoir (like pop-fiction) but if there is, I would categorize it as such, but again, I didn't make it to the end. I don't think that is necessarily a bad thing, either, as it opens up the genre to a wider audience. I think there is certainly an audience for this book. She is incredibly honest in the memoir about some very painful experiences, and she is as hard on herself as on other characters—she never tries to make herself look innocent. Other readers might really connect with the tone of voice. Its casualness doesn't crumble into poorly written sentences, and I'm sure its conversational style could evoke a feeling of intimacy with the right reader—it just wasn't for me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie_Potatie

    Story Time: I used to work for a large department mall as part of the centre management. We had a marketing deal with the local theater who would occasionally give us tickets to events. One year the tickets were to Storm Large. I was gifted these through work and took my husband. At the time neither of us had heard of Storm, and neither of us were really convinced it would be our type of show, but we wanted to support the theater and thus went. To this day it was the best performance my husband Story Time: I used to work for a large department mall as part of the centre management. We had a marketing deal with the local theater who would occasionally give us tickets to events. One year the tickets were to Storm Large. I was gifted these through work and took my husband. At the time neither of us had heard of Storm, and neither of us were really convinced it would be our type of show, but we wanted to support the theater and thus went. To this day it was the best performance my husband and I have ever attended AND we still quote lines, sing songs and laugh at the amazing stories we heard. If you ever get a chance to see Storm Large live, I would recommend it whole heatedly. Now for the book: when I started reading this book I thought it would make me cry. While it did make me sad, I didn't get as far a crying. This book ultimately made me mad. The thing is Suzi and my Mother could almost be the same person. It was heart breaking to hear of other people going through what I went through. And it was enlightening to read about these things from another perspective. And on top of that Storm was a fighter who took on ever obstacle head on and came out the other side singing. I envy her strength, courage and ability to say "Fuck Off". This book is a 5/5.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicolette Froelicher

    I could read this book over and over again! I Love the woman! Love Storm!! I want to be her when I grow up lol. She is such a sweet kind person and a bad ass. I am a huge fan of hers and will always be and love seeing and meeting her whenever she visits the Del E. Webb Center for the performing arts. wish I could have been back stage last time she was in town because I could have heard more about her stories that my husband got to hear as they set up for her to perform. Love her voice and her bo I could read this book over and over again! I Love the woman! Love Storm!! I want to be her when I grow up lol. She is such a sweet kind person and a bad ass. I am a huge fan of hers and will always be and love seeing and meeting her whenever she visits the Del E. Webb Center for the performing arts. wish I could have been back stage last time she was in town because I could have heard more about her stories that my husband got to hear as they set up for her to perform. Love her voice and her book!!! I told my mother she should read her book because her story is very similar to my moms family life when she was a kid.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Staci Fenn

    I do not think you even need to know who Storm Large is to really appreciate and enjoy this book (I myself knew her vaguely from Rock Star and just recently saw 1 concert before reading it). It’s not like any other autobiography I have ever read. She is brutally candid (brutally) about her experiences, especially in terms of mental illness and its impact on families. It’s funny, tragic, and everything in between. It also is honest and very straightforward about life in general. I just so happene I do not think you even need to know who Storm Large is to really appreciate and enjoy this book (I myself knew her vaguely from Rock Star and just recently saw 1 concert before reading it). It’s not like any other autobiography I have ever read. She is brutally candid (brutally) about her experiences, especially in terms of mental illness and its impact on families. It’s funny, tragic, and everything in between. It also is honest and very straightforward about life in general. I just so happened to have read another “best selling” autobiography right before this one, and this blew that one AWAY!!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    I first heard Storm Large perform on Rockstar Supernova and was so impressed by her voice. I saw her again on America’s Got Talent which I watched just to see her. I had heard a bit of her story over the years but this book showcased her journey. I knew she had issues with her mother but had no idea of the extent of her mother’s mental illness. This book is a no holds barred account of a hard lived life and the struggle to be more. To see her perform, even if just on TV is magical. She owns the I first heard Storm Large perform on Rockstar Supernova and was so impressed by her voice. I saw her again on America’s Got Talent which I watched just to see her. I had heard a bit of her story over the years but this book showcased her journey. I knew she had issues with her mother but had no idea of the extent of her mother’s mental illness. This book is a no holds barred account of a hard lived life and the struggle to be more. To see her perform, even if just on TV is magical. She owns the stage. After finishing this book, I am going to YouTube to watch the videos I know will surely be there.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mehmet

    In her music, in her stage presence, and in her writing, Storm has a way of making you feel that you're one of her inner circle. From the weekly Storm & The Balls shows at Dante's to the musical to the holiday ordeals at Alberta Rose, Aladdin, and in Seattle, I think her die-hard fans are people who feel that connection (not to mention her incredibly expressive singing). This book was another thing that really touched me and made me feel like I was transported to her world, her consciousness, fo In her music, in her stage presence, and in her writing, Storm has a way of making you feel that you're one of her inner circle. From the weekly Storm & The Balls shows at Dante's to the musical to the holiday ordeals at Alberta Rose, Aladdin, and in Seattle, I think her die-hard fans are people who feel that connection (not to mention her incredibly expressive singing). This book was another thing that really touched me and made me feel like I was transported to her world, her consciousness, for a little while.

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Min

    I rarely read an contemporary autobiography, but I am glad I read this one. She is my favorite performer and I will still go out to concerts to see this beautiful woman perform. What a backstory....yikes. I am glad she didn't self destruct and channeled all that passion into her act. NO ONE puts as much emotion into their singing as Storm Large does. I'm a big fan, a Los Angeles based Storm Chaser! I rarely read an contemporary autobiography, but I am glad I read this one. She is my favorite performer and I will still go out to concerts to see this beautiful woman perform. What a backstory....yikes. I am glad she didn't self destruct and channeled all that passion into her act. NO ONE puts as much emotion into their singing as Storm Large does. I'm a big fan, a Los Angeles based Storm Chaser!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessyka Russell

    I wish you could give half stars -- I give this 3.5. I had never heard of Storm Large before I got this book from a library book sale. I was, at the time, collecting memoirs about mental illness due to being in a masters program for counseling. This book does talk about mental illness, addiction, hypersexuality, and grief, however it is so much more than this. I searched for Storm on Spotify while reading and found a new artist to follow.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Franklyn

    This raw and honest memoir is a great mix of entertainment and powerful introspection. Storm Large has spent her wild life with a deep seated fear she will turn out like her mother, who was institutionalized many times for mental illness. Then there's her sex addiction. Definitely not a book for kids or teens. Overall, I recommend this quick read to those who like to read about the wilder side of life and are interested in mental illness. This raw and honest memoir is a great mix of entertainment and powerful introspection. Storm Large has spent her wild life with a deep seated fear she will turn out like her mother, who was institutionalized many times for mental illness. Then there's her sex addiction. Definitely not a book for kids or teens. Overall, I recommend this quick read to those who like to read about the wilder side of life and are interested in mental illness.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    *initial thoughts* While this is a very honest memoir, which I appreciate, you can tell its influence from a one-woman show. While it's mostly chronological, there's some skipping around that made it lose its narrative feel, which I personally prefer in memoirs. It's more like a series of skits than a narrative memoir. One thing in particular I wondered was when/how Storm was diagnosed with Bipolar. Early in the book it's mentioned some of her childhood behavior were early symptoms of Bipolar but *initial thoughts* While this is a very honest memoir, which I appreciate, you can tell its influence from a one-woman show. While it's mostly chronological, there's some skipping around that made it lose its narrative feel, which I personally prefer in memoirs. It's more like a series of skits than a narrative memoir. One thing in particular I wondered was when/how Storm was diagnosed with Bipolar. Early in the book it's mentioned some of her childhood behavior were early symptoms of Bipolar but then it's never discussed how/when it was diagnosed. Was it ever diagnosed or did Storm self-diagnose? While I appreciated the exploration of her mother and how not wanting to be her mother impacted her, I wanted to see more exploration of Storm's own mental state. It sometimes felt that the growth was skipped over, while the lows were dwelt upon. For instance, we see a lot of Storm's time on heroin but not much of her pulling herself out of addiction.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I really liked the way the author told her story of searching for love and acceptance from a mother whose mental health issues could never satisfy her children. Storm Large also shows her strength, flaws, tenacity, desire, intelligence, addictions, all in an unapologetic manner. I just saw her perform recently and I'm impressed! I really liked the way the author told her story of searching for love and acceptance from a mother whose mental health issues could never satisfy her children. Storm Large also shows her strength, flaws, tenacity, desire, intelligence, addictions, all in an unapologetic manner. I just saw her perform recently and I'm impressed!

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