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The Plot Thickens: 8 Ways to Bring Fiction to Life

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As a literary agent, Noah Lukeman hears thousands of book pitches a year. Often the stories sound great in concept, but never live up to their potential on the page. Lukeman shows beginning and advanced writers how to implement the fundamentals of successful plot development, such as character building and heightened suspense and conflict. Writers will find it impossible t As a literary agent, Noah Lukeman hears thousands of book pitches a year. Often the stories sound great in concept, but never live up to their potential on the page. Lukeman shows beginning and advanced writers how to implement the fundamentals of successful plot development, such as character building and heightened suspense and conflict. Writers will find it impossible to walk away from this invaluable guide---a veritable fiction-writing workshop---without boundless new ideas.


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As a literary agent, Noah Lukeman hears thousands of book pitches a year. Often the stories sound great in concept, but never live up to their potential on the page. Lukeman shows beginning and advanced writers how to implement the fundamentals of successful plot development, such as character building and heightened suspense and conflict. Writers will find it impossible t As a literary agent, Noah Lukeman hears thousands of book pitches a year. Often the stories sound great in concept, but never live up to their potential on the page. Lukeman shows beginning and advanced writers how to implement the fundamentals of successful plot development, such as character building and heightened suspense and conflict. Writers will find it impossible to walk away from this invaluable guide---a veritable fiction-writing workshop---without boundless new ideas.

30 review for The Plot Thickens: 8 Ways to Bring Fiction to Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Greendale

    The Plot Thickens is a quick and comprehensive read that makes simple suggestions for improving one's written work. Stories are necessary. Like food or water, stories have always been of supreme importance to the human race. They speak to us on a primal level, and they fill a need. Life can seem aimless, structureless, unjust, without resolution. Stories are the antidote to life: they offer purpose, structure, justice, resolution- not to mention romance, suspense, conflict, adventure. They offer The Plot Thickens is a quick and comprehensive read that makes simple suggestions for improving one's written work. Stories are necessary. Like food or water, stories have always been of supreme importance to the human race. They speak to us on a primal level, and they fill a need. Life can seem aimless, structureless, unjust, without resolution. Stories are the antidote to life: they offer purpose, structure, justice, resolution- not to mention romance, suspense, conflict, adventure. They offer meaning. If our lives cannot always have it, our stories can. The book is divided into eight chapters, and each chapter explores one of the following topics: the outer life of characters, the inner life of characters, characterization, the journey, suspense, conflict, context, and transcendency. Each chapter briefly explains one of the aforementioned topics, then provides several examples that are easily understood and digested. The author then presents a rapid fire array of applicable questions to push writers toward examining their own work-in-progress to discover where improvements can be made. Chapters conclude with pertinent exercises. The author sometimes relies on well-known books for his examples, but in many instances he makes reference to popular television or movies, making his examples accessible to a broader audience. I [reference films] because my chief concern is illustrating (sometimes abstract) points, and by referencing films there is a greater chance that more readers will recognize the reference. I also reference films because film is a medium that has devoted itself to plot, and I would be remiss to ignore them. The Plot Thickens earns its rightful place in the collection of books owned by any published or aspiring author.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Judy Croome

    With an unusual approach to plotting, Lukeman uses a holistic, rather than a didactic, method. There is plenty of instruction and practical examples, as well as exercises, in the book, so it is a "teaching" book, but what Lukeman achieves is more than just teaching a reader "how to plot." Although this book is mainly about plot, it's doesn't take a step-by-step approach to plotting. Rather, one gains a sense of how the elements of a novel are all connected and multi-layered. Characterisation dri With an unusual approach to plotting, Lukeman uses a holistic, rather than a didactic, method. There is plenty of instruction and practical examples, as well as exercises, in the book, so it is a "teaching" book, but what Lukeman achieves is more than just teaching a reader "how to plot." Although this book is mainly about plot, it's doesn't take a step-by-step approach to plotting. Rather, one gains a sense of how the elements of a novel are all connected and multi-layered. Characterisation drives plot; but plot deepens character. Each chapter does deal with a specific element to strengthen plot, but ultimately what Lukeman conveys is that to achieve a work that goes beyond the norm - to write a transcendent book - one needs to understand that writing a novel is more than just technique. The final chapter "Transcendency" reflects on what differentiates a great book from a good book and is a salutary lesson writing, not from the intellect, but from the soul. Lukeman says:"... it will entail putting yourself on the line ... passion is magnetic. Writing from a place of truth and love, you can never go wrong ...[there is] a difference between a writer who writes because he wants to and one who writes because he has to... the transcendent work is the work you know is the best you can offer." As inspiring as Lukeman's The First Five Pages: A Writer's Guide To Staying Out of the Rejection Pile

  3. 4 out of 5

    Josette

    I'd heard good things about this book, but I preferred "The First Five Pages." (Updated, because my former review seemed awfully harsh and unnecessary.) I'd heard good things about this book, but I preferred "The First Five Pages." (Updated, because my former review seemed awfully harsh and unnecessary.)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Francesca

    This book is a barrage of questions to think about when writing characters. Some are useful, but overall their point of view betrays a conventional and gender-biased approach to characters and plots. For example, the author asks questions of female characters that he doesn’t ask of male characters. From the beginning, the author focuses on female bodies: “Let’s say the murderer is a woman. Some other questions might arise: Does she have large or small breasts? Her waist? Hips? Legs?” He doesn’t This book is a barrage of questions to think about when writing characters. Some are useful, but overall their point of view betrays a conventional and gender-biased approach to characters and plots. For example, the author asks questions of female characters that he doesn’t ask of male characters. From the beginning, the author focuses on female bodies: “Let’s say the murderer is a woman. Some other questions might arise: Does she have large or small breasts? Her waist? Hips? Legs?” He doesn’t also say, “Let’s say the murderer is a man. Does he have a large or small package? His chest? Hips? Legs?” And when he asks, “Are her clothes revealing?” he doesn’t also ask, “Are his clothes revealing?” Or, for the non-binary, “Are their clothes revealing?” Again and again, the centrality of straight, male characters is assumed. For example, “Let’s take a scene where a man and his wife are having lunch.” It’s implied that a straight man is the protagonist, just as a straight woman would be the assumed protagonist if he had also written, “Let’s take a scene where a woman and her husband are having lunch.” He often describes women as “girls,” as in, “A poor girl marrying a rich man....” No, he's not describing the custom of child brides. “A poor woman marrying a rich man...” would’ve been more accurate. Again and again, the author makes cultural assumptions—the main character is male, has a nine-to-five job, has a boss, is middle class, is straight, is married—that give the whole book an oppressive conventionality—not something I want in a book that’s supposed to be about creativity!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Biancotti

    I gave this book 3 stars because it's thought-provoking in a lot of ways & provides some comprehensive lists for working through your characters. But I also found it irritating, & toyed with giving it 2 stars. I think because a) the tone is aggressive, b) the examples are incomplete & feel kinda random (& are often examples of movies rather than books). I figure the best thing we could've asked Lukeman to do for this book would've been to provide an example for EVERY point he made ;), c) I hated I gave this book 3 stars because it's thought-provoking in a lot of ways & provides some comprehensive lists for working through your characters. But I also found it irritating, & toyed with giving it 2 stars. I think because a) the tone is aggressive, b) the examples are incomplete & feel kinda random (& are often examples of movies rather than books). I figure the best thing we could've asked Lukeman to do for this book would've been to provide an example for EVERY point he made ;), c) I hated the use of masculine pronouns except for 'feminine-specific' examples, like when a character goes into a shoe store or, in a police line-up, when you apparently want to know her breast & waist size. Also, d) I often felt like the advice was good - like, 'ramp up the suspense' - but the exercises didn't give a lot of particularities on HOW. For example, page 144: " go through your list of suspenseful scenes, and ask yourself how you can prolong each of these. As an exercise, take a suspenseful scene and make it twice the length, stretching out the suspenseful moment." Still, like I said, it made me think harder about my characters and the implications of my characters.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    Useful more as a practical guide to constructing a plot, rather than a literary analysis of what makes a good/popular plot. I rather disliked Lukeman's marginalization of "fairy tales, children's stories, and bible lessons" as being formulaic agendas and therefore worthless in the realm of "creative writing." What does he think the fantasy genre really is? But perhaps that was simply a poorly written little paragraph. Great for writers who are brainstorming, stuck in writer's block, or re-thinking Useful more as a practical guide to constructing a plot, rather than a literary analysis of what makes a good/popular plot. I rather disliked Lukeman's marginalization of "fairy tales, children's stories, and bible lessons" as being formulaic agendas and therefore worthless in the realm of "creative writing." What does he think the fantasy genre really is? But perhaps that was simply a poorly written little paragraph. Great for writers who are brainstorming, stuck in writer's block, or re-thinking their plot structure, but rather useless otherwise.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erika Agnew

    This book is very helpful for expanding your big picture thinking about your characters, your meanings and your plot. The exercises help see more details and things you might have missed or lead to new ideas. It can be overwhelming everything that needs to be considered when creating characters then creating suspense, conflict, context and then how to amp it up. The book is a lot of food for thought but it's organized my planning, given me structure and respect for the process. This book is very helpful for expanding your big picture thinking about your characters, your meanings and your plot. The exercises help see more details and things you might have missed or lead to new ideas. It can be overwhelming everything that needs to be considered when creating characters then creating suspense, conflict, context and then how to amp it up. The book is a lot of food for thought but it's organized my planning, given me structure and respect for the process.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    DNF: I often read books about how to write/ analyze fiction because I find them fascinating. I’m not a writer nor I want to become one, I just really enjoy reading about the inner workings of writing. This book was way too much for me in that sense. The author, a literary agent himself, gives tips for aspiring writers on how to explore and enhance the development of their plots and characters, such as knowing the exact length of the nail on their right hand’s pinky. LOL. It was too detailed to b DNF: I often read books about how to write/ analyze fiction because I find them fascinating. I’m not a writer nor I want to become one, I just really enjoy reading about the inner workings of writing. This book was way too much for me in that sense. The author, a literary agent himself, gives tips for aspiring writers on how to explore and enhance the development of their plots and characters, such as knowing the exact length of the nail on their right hand’s pinky. LOL. It was too detailed to be a enjoyable read -per moi-, as I’m not looking for ways to know the medical history and/ or type of the dog my non-existing characters from my already dead novel would have. Lol.

  9. 5 out of 5

    J.C. Ahmed

    I only got this because the audiobook was free on Google Play Books. I would have been disappointed if I'd paid for it. Not because I thought it was bad. There's a lot of helpful information. But the author provided comprehensive lists that got tiring after while. For example, rather than giving examples of the kinds of questions authors should ask when creating characters, he lists out dozens of examples. I kept thinking, "Ok, got it. Move on." Some books give so few examples, it's not enough t I only got this because the audiobook was free on Google Play Books. I would have been disappointed if I'd paid for it. Not because I thought it was bad. There's a lot of helpful information. But the author provided comprehensive lists that got tiring after while. For example, rather than giving examples of the kinds of questions authors should ask when creating characters, he lists out dozens of examples. I kept thinking, "Ok, got it. Move on." Some books give so few examples, it's not enough to fully grasp a concept. This book went in the opposite direction providing so many it was overwhelming. I felt like I was drowning in so much information I didn't know how to apply it to my own work. Some people might find this helpful though. I was also confused about his point that writers shouldn't write with an agenda, referring to it as propaganda and saying moralizing is best left to fairy tales. Many books that have stood the test of time like Uncle Tom's Cabin, To Kill a Mockingbird, A Christmas Carol, 1984 and The Jungle were written with an agenda in mind. Maybe I misunderstood what he was trying to say. If he really said what I think he said, I think it's very questionable advice.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jen Grogan

    Some good insights, some bits that I found rather dull and obvious. I might have rated it higher had the extensive questionnaire on character development not been gendered in such a frustrating way. The author defaulted to the male pronoun except for questions that he believed focused primarily on female characters, leading to the strange discovery that male characters don't have waists, hips, legs, fingernails, or the potential to be naturally beautiful. Direct quote: "Let's say the murderer is Some good insights, some bits that I found rather dull and obvious. I might have rated it higher had the extensive questionnaire on character development not been gendered in such a frustrating way. The author defaulted to the male pronoun except for questions that he believed focused primarily on female characters, leading to the strange discovery that male characters don't have waists, hips, legs, fingernails, or the potential to be naturally beautiful. Direct quote: "Let's say the murderer is a woman. Some other questions might arise: Does she have large or small breasts?" Naturally. I know that's always my first question when I come across a murderer who happens to be female.

  11. 4 out of 5

    James Piper

    I found little of this book of use. It was mostly about building characters. From Aristole, character is plot and plot is character, yet I don't think he proved that point. Finally, another book about writing fiction where many of the examples cited come from films and not novels, not written narratives. I found little of this book of use. It was mostly about building characters. From Aristole, character is plot and plot is character, yet I don't think he proved that point. Finally, another book about writing fiction where many of the examples cited come from films and not novels, not written narratives.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    I lost desire to read this after the author explained, in two separate sections, how gender equity was inconvenient for him. I leafed through the book and didn't spot any ideas I hadn't seen elsewhere. I lost desire to read this after the author explained, in two separate sections, how gender equity was inconvenient for him. I leafed through the book and didn't spot any ideas I hadn't seen elsewhere.

  13. 5 out of 5

    London Mabel

    As others have said, the first few chapters are a bit too "list-ee" to be useful. And not all writers agree you need to know your characters to the degree he's suggesting. And given his talent is as an agent, not as a writer, I had trouble seeing him as an authority on that end of things (the stuff that doesn't make it to the page.) But after that he has lots of useful ideas. If you're looking to generate ideas for increasing suspense, conflict, etc., then you'll probably get something out of it. As others have said, the first few chapters are a bit too "list-ee" to be useful. And not all writers agree you need to know your characters to the degree he's suggesting. And given his talent is as an agent, not as a writer, I had trouble seeing him as an authority on that end of things (the stuff that doesn't make it to the page.) But after that he has lots of useful ideas. If you're looking to generate ideas for increasing suspense, conflict, etc., then you'll probably get something out of it. I found sometimes he lacked examples, though. For example in describing multidimensional characters, he talked about how difficult it is to achieve and gave examples of successful one-dimentional characters, without giving successful examples of multi. (He gave one example, Serpico, but didn't say why/how.) As I took notes I was often just taking a moment to come up with my own.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

    There are some helpful ideas within this volume about writing. Most of the writing has been found in other sources in more valuable descriptions. If you love having and obtaining works about writing (like I do) this is worth owning. The first three chapters are primarily a series of questions that might be valuable for reference. I'd recommend a solid readthrough and annotation to take notes from the helpful ideas that can be gleaned from the work so five years later you don't have to read again There are some helpful ideas within this volume about writing. Most of the writing has been found in other sources in more valuable descriptions. If you love having and obtaining works about writing (like I do) this is worth owning. The first three chapters are primarily a series of questions that might be valuable for reference. I'd recommend a solid readthrough and annotation to take notes from the helpful ideas that can be gleaned from the work so five years later you don't have to read again because ultimately the work is boring and top-layer of information.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amber Morrell

    Another reader wrote a fantastic review of this book that accurately sums up all of my thoughts here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... But, I do want to add my own comments to reiterate and highlight exactly how I feel. The author, at the beginning, and at least one other time within the text, warns his readers that he will be only using masculine pronouns for the sake of simplicity. Which, fine. Whatever. Not a big deal. But the multiple disclaimers about only using masculine pronouns fe Another reader wrote a fantastic review of this book that accurately sums up all of my thoughts here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... But, I do want to add my own comments to reiterate and highlight exactly how I feel. The author, at the beginning, and at least one other time within the text, warns his readers that he will be only using masculine pronouns for the sake of simplicity. Which, fine. Whatever. Not a big deal. But the multiple disclaimers about only using masculine pronouns felt subtly sexist when he switched to feminine pronouns for things, as the other reviewer pointed out, breast and waist size. Why make such a disclaimer if you are going to break it? And, if you're going to break it, why be so focused on womens' bodies? Completely unnecessary. I also took umbrage with his statement at the end that fiction cannot be both "emotional" AND "transcendent." Some of English literature's greatest works were both, and in fact an entire genre ("sentimental literature") employed both emotional tension and depth of theme. So, yes--useful advice, but needlessly bogged down by condescension.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shilo Quetchenbach

    Some good ideas, a few good exercises, but much longer than it needed to be. Also a tendency to ramble. A lot of the ideas/points feel like he's stating the obvious - but then sometimes that's useful. Some were actually very useful and made me stop and think. If it were cut to the size of Strunk & White's Elements of Style, and written in more bulleted list form - instead of rambling all over the place with overly long examples - it would be more compelling / useful. UPDATE: after re-reading my n Some good ideas, a few good exercises, but much longer than it needed to be. Also a tendency to ramble. A lot of the ideas/points feel like he's stating the obvious - but then sometimes that's useful. Some were actually very useful and made me stop and think. If it were cut to the size of Strunk & White's Elements of Style, and written in more bulleted list form - instead of rambling all over the place with overly long examples - it would be more compelling / useful. UPDATE: after re-reading my notes, I am forced to conclude that I was a bit harsh. Upgrading to 4 stars, on merits of there being a lot more useful information than I realized at first. It could still be condensed - my original opinion was lower at least in part because of the necessity of slogging through the overly wordy and lengthy examples to get at the good bits.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    An outstanding idea-maker! I liked all his characterization processes, and I will be keeping it by my desk for a long time to come. I didn't really like a lot of his references to movies, partly because I hadn't seen a lot of them, but also because, although it's a good way to illustrate a concept, writing a book and making a movie are totally different. I know from experience! However, that was the only thing I didn't like about this book, and already, as it says in the introduction, I've " com An outstanding idea-maker! I liked all his characterization processes, and I will be keeping it by my desk for a long time to come. I didn't really like a lot of his references to movies, partly because I hadn't seen a lot of them, but also because, although it's a good way to illustrate a concept, writing a book and making a movie are totally different. I know from experience! However, that was the only thing I didn't like about this book, and already, as it says in the introduction, I've " come away armed with a host of new ideas" !

  18. 4 out of 5

    Erik Akre

    I came away from this book feeling confident enough to try writing a novel, and this is the highest praise I can give. With this book as a reference, I feel comfortable plotting out the arc of events and the journeys of my characters. (Lukeman's treatment of the concept of "character" is invaluable, even if it seems apart from "plot." Turns out it's not...) This book is full of tools, and it generates so many specific ideas for one's own writing! Noah Lukeman strikes an inspirational balance betw I came away from this book feeling confident enough to try writing a novel, and this is the highest praise I can give. With this book as a reference, I feel comfortable plotting out the arc of events and the journeys of my characters. (Lukeman's treatment of the concept of "character" is invaluable, even if it seems apart from "plot." Turns out it's not...) This book is full of tools, and it generates so many specific ideas for one's own writing! Noah Lukeman strikes an inspirational balance between the cheerleader and the hardass. Implicit throughout book is the idea that writers can improve their craft, and even that anyone can write well, given proper support, instruction, and practice. At the same time, he makes demands on his writer-reader: He insists on guidelines and structure, although within these there is infinite room for creative expression and improvisation. By providing structured ideas and guidelines, he inspires the writer to work within them. This balance between "you can do it" and "here is a huge list of things to consider" makes for an exciting read, if you want to write fiction, or if you need good fuel to continue. As much as Lukeman exhaustively explains the elements of plot, and how to employ them, he also inspires ideas in the writer as he goes. As I read, I scribbled down pages of new ideas for my own work, and now I've got half-a-notebook's worth as fuel to get started. The ideas that came to me as I read were the best part of the experience. Part of his brilliance is illustrating his points with examples from everyday life, using his ideas to turn mundane situations into exciting stories. Almost every point is also illustrated with an example from the world of film, and if you are a film buff, you'll get all the more from this book. All I really need to say is: If you want inspiration and direction as a writer of short stories, novels, or film--especially where the arc and movement of plot and events is concerned--you should buy this book, read it, and keep it around as reference. It's written by a successful career agent and editor who appreciates and respects the ambition and passion of writers at all levels of experience.

  19. 5 out of 5

    R.C.

    The first half of this book is boring. It's mostly lists of things to think about when building characters, from background to physical appearance and mannerisms. If you need that type of help fleshing out a character, ok, but it was a damn slow beginning to a book titled "ways to bring fiction to life". And then one of the few times the author switches from a generic-character-"he" to contemplation of a woman as a character, and the very first thing he suggests you think about is "are her breas The first half of this book is boring. It's mostly lists of things to think about when building characters, from background to physical appearance and mannerisms. If you need that type of help fleshing out a character, ok, but it was a damn slow beginning to a book titled "ways to bring fiction to life". And then one of the few times the author switches from a generic-character-"he" to contemplation of a woman as a character, and the very first thing he suggests you think about is "are her breasts large or small?". I rolled my eyes so hard I hurt something and dropped the book literally on the floor right then and there. I picked it up later, skipped through the rest of the stuff on character design, and it got good enough to finish. Particularly the chapters on plotting, context, and suspense had some useful reminders and tips. But really this book didn't earn a spot on my shelf: I took less than a page of notes and tossed it on the donate pile.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tali Zarate

    I chose to read my third Lukeman book of the semester because the other two were incredibly helpful, really two of the best books on writing I’ve encountered. This one was not so great. It read like a grocery list of plot questions, and most of the information seemed hackneyed. Toward the end, however, he did discuss how detrimental it is to write with an agenda, something I’ve been considering for my graduate presentation. “When someone writes with an agenda . . . the work will be stale, flat, I chose to read my third Lukeman book of the semester because the other two were incredibly helpful, really two of the best books on writing I’ve encountered. This one was not so great. It read like a grocery list of plot questions, and most of the information seemed hackneyed. Toward the end, however, he did discuss how detrimental it is to write with an agenda, something I’ve been considering for my graduate presentation. “When someone writes with an agenda . . . the work will be stale, flat, the characters won’t come alive. This is because the writer . . . is imposing his vision on the work, instead of letting the vision grow organically from it . . . [he] is doing little more than proving a point” (197).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Candice Roma

    A great book about plot that's all about how to create dynamic characters and conflict and suspense through their interactions. This definitely reaffirmed so many of my beliefs about character being key and wanting my writing to character driven rather than plot driven. The exercises aren't really something I would envision anyone actually doing, but they illuminate essential things to keep in mind when writing. A great book about plot that's all about how to create dynamic characters and conflict and suspense through their interactions. This definitely reaffirmed so many of my beliefs about character being key and wanting my writing to character driven rather than plot driven. The exercises aren't really something I would envision anyone actually doing, but they illuminate essential things to keep in mind when writing.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Clifford

    Despite the clever title, this book isn't solely about plot, because everything in fiction is related. Plot, or story, derives from characterization, so the book spends three chapters on character alone. A lot of genre writers would do well to study those chapters to find more depth for their characters. The rest of the book describes tips for building suspense, understanding conflict (without which plots are weak tea), etc. It's a pretty good summary of how to "bring fiction to life." Despite the clever title, this book isn't solely about plot, because everything in fiction is related. Plot, or story, derives from characterization, so the book spends three chapters on character alone. A lot of genre writers would do well to study those chapters to find more depth for their characters. The rest of the book describes tips for building suspense, understanding conflict (without which plots are weak tea), etc. It's a pretty good summary of how to "bring fiction to life."

  23. 4 out of 5

    A. M. Kimber

    I really enjoyed this book. I listened to the audiobook and half way through went out and bought the book to highlight those diamond-in-the-rough parts. If you have a hard time with characterization, never feeling like you know your character well enough, I think this book will help; it’s helped me so much and I’ve only done two of the exercises (so far) and already think I know my MC better. A must read :)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    There is no doubt that Noah Lukeman knows his Writing. I wish I would have a photographic memory to remember all the goodies given in this book. It is an interesting read even if you are not a writer; it tells you what what makes a book enjoyable, readable, memorable. But of course, it's a treasure chest for someone who is trying his hand (mind) on writing. There is no doubt that Noah Lukeman knows his Writing. I wish I would have a photographic memory to remember all the goodies given in this book. It is an interesting read even if you are not a writer; it tells you what what makes a book enjoyable, readable, memorable. But of course, it's a treasure chest for someone who is trying his hand (mind) on writing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    A checklist of a book - better for reference than reading. In his final chapter he does strike a note more clearly than Stephen King's "edit with the door open" section of On Writing. This compiles a lot of what I have heard and read before in a well put and ordered manner. A checklist of a book - better for reference than reading. In his final chapter he does strike a note more clearly than Stephen King's "edit with the door open" section of On Writing. This compiles a lot of what I have heard and read before in a well put and ordered manner.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Helfren Filex

    The creation of a story based on characters are a very highly complex task. To know a character means to decipher his action, how events unfold, his background and his belief. How does he treat others and how does he interpret events are the principal writing core into a very successful novel. The book is literally a gold mine on how to write a character. Very good read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lars Billbäck

    "Lists of stuff to think about regarding writing" is my main remaining impression of this book - fairly useful if not revolutionary advise. Give it a go if you're feeling stuck in your own writing, it's likely more constructive than not. "Lists of stuff to think about regarding writing" is my main remaining impression of this book - fairly useful if not revolutionary advise. Give it a go if you're feeling stuck in your own writing, it's likely more constructive than not.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Airaology

    Borrowed from the library but am tempted to buy my own copy. Each chapter is useful

  29. 4 out of 5

    John Bond

    Some good tips. Quick and easy read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Morgan

    This is a very dense read. There is a mountain of useful information, but it errs on the dry side. Take your time trying to digest this one!

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