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Pebbles to Computers: The Thread

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Using an exciting synthesis of text and pictures, photographer Hans Blohm and scientist Stafford Beers present a graphic exploration of the connections between prehistoric and antique technologies and those of our modern world. In this inventive book, a Byzantine sun-dial and a modern satellite signal receiver are among the many images that have been chosen to show the 'thr Using an exciting synthesis of text and pictures, photographer Hans Blohm and scientist Stafford Beers present a graphic exploration of the connections between prehistoric and antique technologies and those of our modern world. In this inventive book, a Byzantine sun-dial and a modern satellite signal receiver are among the many images that have been chosen to show the 'thread' connecting our efforts down the ages to use and record information. The story of computation emerges as the central theme. By tracing its development from the earliest use of pebbles through the abacus, the slide rule and finally to the most sophisticated modern circuits, the authors present a convincing argument that 'high tech' does indeed go back to the dawn of time. Blohm and Beers have travelled from Stonehenge to the Pyramid of the Sun in Mexico, marvelled over Leonardo's inventions in Milan and examined Leibniz's calculator in Hanover in their search for evidence of the patterns of human invention. They isolate some critical issues in the development of technology, such as the reproduction of written language, and cover many of the outstanding names: Archimedes, Caxton, Pascal, Babbage and Turing among others. With an introduction by renowned zoologist David Suzuki, Pebbles to Computers is a remarkable testament to the depth and richness of humanity's technological achievements.


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Using an exciting synthesis of text and pictures, photographer Hans Blohm and scientist Stafford Beers present a graphic exploration of the connections between prehistoric and antique technologies and those of our modern world. In this inventive book, a Byzantine sun-dial and a modern satellite signal receiver are among the many images that have been chosen to show the 'thr Using an exciting synthesis of text and pictures, photographer Hans Blohm and scientist Stafford Beers present a graphic exploration of the connections between prehistoric and antique technologies and those of our modern world. In this inventive book, a Byzantine sun-dial and a modern satellite signal receiver are among the many images that have been chosen to show the 'thread' connecting our efforts down the ages to use and record information. The story of computation emerges as the central theme. By tracing its development from the earliest use of pebbles through the abacus, the slide rule and finally to the most sophisticated modern circuits, the authors present a convincing argument that 'high tech' does indeed go back to the dawn of time. Blohm and Beers have travelled from Stonehenge to the Pyramid of the Sun in Mexico, marvelled over Leonardo's inventions in Milan and examined Leibniz's calculator in Hanover in their search for evidence of the patterns of human invention. They isolate some critical issues in the development of technology, such as the reproduction of written language, and cover many of the outstanding names: Archimedes, Caxton, Pascal, Babbage and Turing among others. With an introduction by renowned zoologist David Suzuki, Pebbles to Computers is a remarkable testament to the depth and richness of humanity's technological achievements.

30 review for Pebbles to Computers: The Thread

  1. 4 out of 5

    Joe Raimondo

    Thoughtful meditation on systems and design.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bricoleur (David) Soul

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

  4. 5 out of 5

    James F

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adler

  6. 4 out of 5

    anthony

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dmitry Josan

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christine Tran

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gary Fixler

  10. 4 out of 5

    Juan Mauricio

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adel Tunisi

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben Deane

  13. 4 out of 5

    Blake

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Conneely

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aditya

  16. 5 out of 5

    MerelyBlink

  17. 5 out of 5

    eternal

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dhamma K

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kali

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sharifa

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bahnsteigkante

  23. 4 out of 5

    Heath Timpe

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sad Recluse

  25. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  26. 5 out of 5

    Walid

  27. 4 out of 5

    John

  28. 4 out of 5

    CaveatEmptor

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Quiquero

  30. 4 out of 5

    Conail Stewart

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