Hot Best Seller

Terry Pratchett: The Spirit of Fantasy

Availability: Ready to download

The extraordinary life story of one of the most beloved writers in the world, including his courageous battle with Alzheimers With worldwide sales of more than 65 million copies in 37 languages, Terry Pratchett's novels are eagerly awaited by his legions of fans year after year. Featuring an in-depth look at the man and his work, as well as on-screen adaptations and a coll The extraordinary life story of one of the most beloved writers in the world, including his courageous battle with Alzheimers With worldwide sales of more than 65 million copies in 37 languages, Terry Pratchett's novels are eagerly awaited by his legions of fans year after year. Featuring an in-depth look at the man and his work, as well as on-screen adaptations and a collector's guide, this is essential reading for any fan. His first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, was released in 1983 and ever since then the series, with its whimsical heroes and fiendish foes, has delighted both young and old alike. In 2007 Pratchett announced that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. He has courageously faced the disease head-on, equaling the determination of his characters in his vivid and satirical novels. This book examines his extraordinary life, showcased against the backdrop of more than 40 years of irreverent artistic achievements. For devoted fans it features appendices of more than 60 pages listing Pratchett's works on screen and at the theatre, a complete UK bibliography and collector's guide, and a note about cats.


Compare

The extraordinary life story of one of the most beloved writers in the world, including his courageous battle with Alzheimers With worldwide sales of more than 65 million copies in 37 languages, Terry Pratchett's novels are eagerly awaited by his legions of fans year after year. Featuring an in-depth look at the man and his work, as well as on-screen adaptations and a coll The extraordinary life story of one of the most beloved writers in the world, including his courageous battle with Alzheimers With worldwide sales of more than 65 million copies in 37 languages, Terry Pratchett's novels are eagerly awaited by his legions of fans year after year. Featuring an in-depth look at the man and his work, as well as on-screen adaptations and a collector's guide, this is essential reading for any fan. His first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, was released in 1983 and ever since then the series, with its whimsical heroes and fiendish foes, has delighted both young and old alike. In 2007 Pratchett announced that he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. He has courageously faced the disease head-on, equaling the determination of his characters in his vivid and satirical novels. This book examines his extraordinary life, showcased against the backdrop of more than 40 years of irreverent artistic achievements. For devoted fans it features appendices of more than 60 pages listing Pratchett's works on screen and at the theatre, a complete UK bibliography and collector's guide, and a note about cats.

30 review for Terry Pratchett: The Spirit of Fantasy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Woolfardis

    Obviously only bought because it is related to Terry Pratchett, but apart from his name being on the cover, I really don't see how this is all that PTerry at all. I added another star purely because I learnt some things about PTerry and his Discworld series (and a couple other books) that I didn't know previously and probably would not have ever learnt about as it seemed quite niche at times. However, the book seemed to be mostly the author trying to high-key flex about his knowledge and opinions Obviously only bought because it is related to Terry Pratchett, but apart from his name being on the cover, I really don't see how this is all that PTerry at all. I added another star purely because I learnt some things about PTerry and his Discworld series (and a couple other books) that I didn't know previously and probably would not have ever learnt about as it seemed quite niche at times. However, the book seemed to be mostly the author trying to high-key flex about his knowledge and opinions on the Discworld. Sometimes it was quite interesting, but even then his annoying turn of phrase or manner of explanation really were off-putting; it read like a journalism article padded out to fit a publishing word count. From the title of the book, one would expect perhaps a bit more about PTerry himself, his earlier life and career or even just some of the wonderful, clever and kind things he's ever said. As a Terry Pratchett collector, I can say safely that this book is not one that you need to own to have a complete or even incomplete collection.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Interesting how many negative reviews of this book there are. I'll confess to not reading it in its entirety: the complaining, self-interested foreword with weird value judgements about people who own Kindles and so on got on my nerves. Which is one of my hobby-horses, as you probably all know: forget the fact that I have a Kindle, the reason any of my family originally had an ereader was so that Mum could still read, since she has macular degeneration and most books have too small print. (She ca Interesting how many negative reviews of this book there are. I'll confess to not reading it in its entirety: the complaining, self-interested foreword with weird value judgements about people who own Kindles and so on got on my nerves. Which is one of my hobby-horses, as you probably all know: forget the fact that I have a Kindle, the reason any of my family originally had an ereader was so that Mum could still read, since she has macular degeneration and most books have too small print. (She can't use Goodreads, either, because of the colour scheme and serif fonts, but no one can seem to persuade the PTB to care.) So I confess to putting this book right down after that rambling, seemingly irrelevant foreword. And the other reviews and ratings suggest I was right to.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    "There comes a time when there is only so much that can be said about a specific fantasy world, because too much explanation becomes tedious and take away some of the mystery." - Craig Cabell, seemingly describing his own book. Cabell makes some incredibly tenuous links between Pratchett's works and has many an opinion about the meanings in Pratchett's life and works (I feel dubious about whether he has confirmed any of this with Pratchett). He also spends the first half of the book getting hung "There comes a time when there is only so much that can be said about a specific fantasy world, because too much explanation becomes tedious and take away some of the mystery." - Craig Cabell, seemingly describing his own book. Cabell makes some incredibly tenuous links between Pratchett's works and has many an opinion about the meanings in Pratchett's life and works (I feel dubious about whether he has confirmed any of this with Pratchett). He also spends the first half of the book getting hung up about the difference between the fantasy and sci fi genres. a) who cares what the difference is and b) how is that relevant to a book about Terry Pratchett?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Holly Leighfield

    Has a small amount of information about Terry Pratchett. Has an even smaller amount of Terry Pratchett's perspective or comments on his own work and when that subject arises it is mainly so that Mr. Cabell can tell us that his opinion trumps the author that he's writing about. Found it to be a smug and ill informed read. Will not be reading it again. Has a small amount of information about Terry Pratchett. Has an even smaller amount of Terry Pratchett's perspective or comments on his own work and when that subject arises it is mainly so that Mr. Cabell can tell us that his opinion trumps the author that he's writing about. Found it to be a smug and ill informed read. Will not be reading it again.

  5. 5 out of 5

    J.S. Watts

    This is a book in pursuit of an identity. It is really struggling to work out what it is. At times it reads a bit like a biography - there is Terry Pratchett the early years, but then the biography largely peters out. Then there are various attempts at critical analysis of Practhett's works, but only some of them and only those the author really likes. Moreover, the analysis is largely opinionated journalism, rather than real critical analysis and the few genuine insights get lost in the sub-A le This is a book in pursuit of an identity. It is really struggling to work out what it is. At times it reads a bit like a biography - there is Terry Pratchett the early years, but then the biography largely peters out. Then there are various attempts at critical analysis of Practhett's works, but only some of them and only those the author really likes. Moreover, the analysis is largely opinionated journalism, rather than real critical analysis and the few genuine insights get lost in the sub-A level standard attempts at literary criticism. The author also attempts to trace the history of fantasy v science fiction, presumably in an attempt to assert Pratchett's place in the canon of the great and influential, but constant referencing to every other significant SF or fantasy book takes over and tries to become a book in its own right (and I am really not going to mention the constant references to Doctor Who, the T.V. series. Oh dear, I just did, but then again so did Craig Cabell, at length, time and time again, and so on). At the end of the book, and it is a book of several endings, there are some interesting chapters on Pratchett's Alzheimers, his support of good causes such as Orangutans and assisted death. These were actually quite good, but didn't fit with the rest of the book, except perhaps the biography section which had petered out many chapters before. There is also a stray chapter on cats, looking for a home, because Pratchett wrote the entertaining "The Unadulterated Cat" with Gray Joliffe. Apparently Terry likes cats. Oh good. For fans, and Craig Cabell clearly is one, there are lists of Pratchett books and films and a further reading list, should you want to pursue the evolution of SF v fantasy theme. The book is extremely repetitive (did I mention Dr Who?)and full of quotations, many of them from writers other than Pratchett, including Dickens. I am therefore going to end on a quotation from Craig Cabell himself. It comes in the end note to the book: "I've written several books now about a writer and his works, but this was the first about a writer and his key works. In that respect it became a very self-indulgent book". Very true, Mr Cabell. Very true.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alison Smith

    Much ado about nothing - although the Appendices were very comprehensive & no doubt the die-hard Discworld fans will love this book. I'd like to have heard more about Pratchett's life as an author, more biographical details. Much ado about nothing - although the Appendices were very comprehensive & no doubt the die-hard Discworld fans will love this book. I'd like to have heard more about Pratchett's life as an author, more biographical details.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Traves

    I only gave this one star because I couldn't give a zero. Badly written, with no insight. It's a shame as I think there's a good book to be written. Don't waste your time. I kept r reading in the hope it would get better. It didn't. I only gave this one star because I couldn't give a zero. Badly written, with no insight. It's a shame as I think there's a good book to be written. Don't waste your time. I kept r reading in the hope it would get better. It didn't.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jáchym

    As much as I'd love to, I can't recommend this book. Mr. Cabell is weirdly focused on whether this and that book is collecteble, and his mentions that at this point Pratchett's books weren't making that much money, or how great a financial decision it was to write some Discworld books. His tone is sometimes very condescending and his own subjective views are presented as objective facts - despite being incorrect from a factual point of view on several instances. I expected a book written with lo As much as I'd love to, I can't recommend this book. Mr. Cabell is weirdly focused on whether this and that book is collecteble, and his mentions that at this point Pratchett's books weren't making that much money, or how great a financial decision it was to write some Discworld books. His tone is sometimes very condescending and his own subjective views are presented as objective facts - despite being incorrect from a factual point of view on several instances. I expected a book written with love for the great man, and some insight into Pratchett's works. Instead I got a condescending but shallow retelling of things I already knew. I'm really sorry to say this, but it was a disappointing read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    OonaReads

    1.5 stars

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

    I was looking for an easy to read book that would include some pointers to good Terry Pratchett books I haven't read and I guess I did get that. But this is a very light book and I'm glad I borrowed it from the library, rather than bought it. It is very nicely produced, but the content is a strange mixture of information, including regular references to other books by the author, about Doctor Who and the X-files for example. The photographs are all recent and, I guess bought from a picture agency I was looking for an easy to read book that would include some pointers to good Terry Pratchett books I haven't read and I guess I did get that. But this is a very light book and I'm glad I borrowed it from the library, rather than bought it. It is very nicely produced, but the content is a strange mixture of information, including regular references to other books by the author, about Doctor Who and the X-files for example. The photographs are all recent and, I guess bought from a picture agency, when I think readers would like to see photos of our hero at very stages of his life. There are also detailed chapters near the end for book collectors and those interested in tv and movie versions of Terry Pratchett's work which, while interesting, feature incredible detailed and lengthy production credits that could easily be found online. I will take up the author's suggestion to explore the Johnny Maxwell trilogy further, but I would not recommend that anyone buy this - unless you worked on one of those tv series and would like to see your name in print!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    I did like the way Crag liked "The Colour of Magic". It seems to be fashionable to despise Pratchett's early works, but I remember how they had me in stitches back then. I disagree with his implication that "Colour of Magic" was the best Pratchett film, however, as I didn't think it was nearly as good as "Hogfather" or "Going Postal". The list of books at the end seems a total waste of space purely for the benefit of book collectors - fancy buying a book simply as an investment! What a waste. So I did like the way Crag liked "The Colour of Magic". It seems to be fashionable to despise Pratchett's early works, but I remember how they had me in stitches back then. I disagree with his implication that "Colour of Magic" was the best Pratchett film, however, as I didn't think it was nearly as good as "Hogfather" or "Going Postal". The list of books at the end seems a total waste of space purely for the benefit of book collectors - fancy buying a book simply as an investment! What a waste. Some of what Mr Cabell has to say is interesting, but it does seem mainly about Craig Cabell than about Terry Pratchett. I loved the list of "further reading" at the end -- basically a list of my favourite books, and the three I haven't read, I am definitely going to find.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Lum

    A huge disappointment. Though it conforms more or less to the basic tenants of a biography, it's largely the author's own views of what PTerry's work reflects, blah blah blah, blah blah blah. What little analysis exists is extremely brief and not very well supported. For a book about Terry, it's simply quite odd how much of it seems rather to be about Craig. There is also a hell of a lot of quoting lines in lieu of actually saying anything. A huge disappointment. Though it conforms more or less to the basic tenants of a biography, it's largely the author's own views of what PTerry's work reflects, blah blah blah, blah blah blah. What little analysis exists is extremely brief and not very well supported. For a book about Terry, it's simply quite odd how much of it seems rather to be about Craig. There is also a hell of a lot of quoting lines in lieu of actually saying anything.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Keep your money. This will sound unkind but Craig Cabell has no sense of humour. One of his previous books is entitled "Snipers: profiles of the world's deadliest killers" - to me that screams humourless pillock. He is singularly unqualified for the task at hand. Its also very obvious he has never personally interviewed Terry Pratchett. I'd give this half a star at best Keep your money. This will sound unkind but Craig Cabell has no sense of humour. One of his previous books is entitled "Snipers: profiles of the world's deadliest killers" - to me that screams humourless pillock. He is singularly unqualified for the task at hand. Its also very obvious he has never personally interviewed Terry Pratchett. I'd give this half a star at best

  14. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    Avoid at all costs. Typically I tend not to read biographies where the writer has no immediate connection to the subject but stupidly I made an exception here. The primary problem is that the author keeps injecting his own views and interests into the book and this happens right from the start when he launches into a tirade in the 2nd introduction about the differences between sci-fi and fantasy! The fact that there's 2 introductions should be a warning sign.. It's a common problem with career bio Avoid at all costs. Typically I tend not to read biographies where the writer has no immediate connection to the subject but stupidly I made an exception here. The primary problem is that the author keeps injecting his own views and interests into the book and this happens right from the start when he launches into a tirade in the 2nd introduction about the differences between sci-fi and fantasy! The fact that there's 2 introductions should be a warning sign.. It's a common problem with career biographers where they have a passing understanding of the subject but can only really contextualise it in comparison with other topics they've worked on. In this book it manifests in part as a heap of random quotes from Pratchett's work (clunky but sometimes relevant) and a tonne of quotes from other authors which not only feel out of place but constantly detract from what little flow and pacing exists. In fact the entire book is a random jumble of thoughts about a few topics tenuously linked with moments from Pratchett's career. At the start of the book there's some background about how Sir Terry started his career but that soon devolves to rants and tangents. An overly detailed bibliography and filmography fill out the final pages but aside from these and the myriad quotes, there's very little content here and most of that consists of the author's own opinions. The fact that it is so short is a mercy but still I can't recommend this for even die hard fans as there really is very little of value in this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebecka O'Malley

    For the most part, I really enjoyed this book. I learned a lot of things about Terry that I didn’t already know. I won’t go into detail there, to avoid spoilers. I will say that Terry is my favourite modern author, so I read this book exactly for this purpose. I feel like at some points in the book the author presumed a lot of Terry that he couldn’t possibly have known. There were sections where he would state what Terry said about one of his works, or influences, and then the author would argue For the most part, I really enjoyed this book. I learned a lot of things about Terry that I didn’t already know. I won’t go into detail there, to avoid spoilers. I will say that Terry is my favourite modern author, so I read this book exactly for this purpose. I feel like at some points in the book the author presumed a lot of Terry that he couldn’t possibly have known. There were sections where he would state what Terry said about one of his works, or influences, and then the author would argue that he wasn’t correct in his statement, which felt strange. However, this did provide some interesting insights into the author and the subject, and a unique take on him. This book provided a brief glimpse into Terry, his life, and works, that couldn’t afford to go into too much detail. There were some elements explored more deeply than others (the role of teenhood and growing up, for example), and much emphasis is placed on Terry’s early works. There were repetitive moments in this book that felt a tad unnecessary, though it didn’t hamper my enjoyment in any significant way. I did finish this book feeling satisfied, though I would have liked to be able to dig into Terry deeper in this book. The book is also very outdated, having been written in 2011. This is obviously through no fault of the author, but if you want a complete screenshot of Terry’s life (who died in 2015), then this book won’t be for you. However, if you are a fan of Terry Pratchett, the Discworld, or any of his other works, this book is still worth the read. 3.5/5

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    This was written quite some time ago and before Terry's passing so there is quite a chunk of information missing. The first part of the book talking about the origins went into a bit more detail with some of the lesser books hardly receiving anything - The unadulterated cat probably got about 25 words right at the end of the book -admittedly this is not the usual Pratchett type book though. The book was fairly interesting but towards the end I almost felt like abandoning it - but I had read this f This was written quite some time ago and before Terry's passing so there is quite a chunk of information missing. The first part of the book talking about the origins went into a bit more detail with some of the lesser books hardly receiving anything - The unadulterated cat probably got about 25 words right at the end of the book -admittedly this is not the usual Pratchett type book though. The book was fairly interesting but towards the end I almost felt like abandoning it - but I had read this far so continued on.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adelina

    If you think this book is about Sir Pratchett, well... it is not. And I was kind of expecting it to be, because of the name and picture on the cover. However, this turned out to be some sort of literary analysis of his works and earlier life trough the author's understanding and I frankly confess it was boring as hell. I do not want to read what Pratchett wanted to say or could have wanted to say or what the book is possibly about, I know that - I've read them. I only finished it in a quick read If you think this book is about Sir Pratchett, well... it is not. And I was kind of expecting it to be, because of the name and picture on the cover. However, this turned out to be some sort of literary analysis of his works and earlier life trough the author's understanding and I frankly confess it was boring as hell. I do not want to read what Pratchett wanted to say or could have wanted to say or what the book is possibly about, I know that - I've read them. I only finished it in a quick read trough by diagonal because I hate leaving books unread, but I don't recommend.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vladislav

    I would say that the book does not deliver what is promised in the description. Most of all it does not show much research and systematisation of themes that Pratchett has written about. It still had some value as a biography and some value in highlighting less well known Pratchett's books. It also provides some insight about how Pratchett's works evolved, but very little in comparison to some off-topic rant about how bookstores place books on their shelves. I would say that the book does not deliver what is promised in the description. Most of all it does not show much research and systematisation of themes that Pratchett has written about. It still had some value as a biography and some value in highlighting less well known Pratchett's books. It also provides some insight about how Pratchett's works evolved, but very little in comparison to some off-topic rant about how bookstores place books on their shelves.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Bit disappointed with this. I had imagined it was going to be a biography of Terry Pratchett and that I would gain more insight into the man. There was a couple of chapters briefly describing his earlier life but the remainder of the book was more an analysis of his work based mostly on the author Craig Cabell's personal opinions. Bit disappointed with this. I had imagined it was going to be a biography of Terry Pratchett and that I would gain more insight into the man. There was a couple of chapters briefly describing his earlier life but the remainder of the book was more an analysis of his work based mostly on the author Craig Cabell's personal opinions.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    This is not a biography of Pratchett. You get significantly more information on his life from Wikipedia's page. It's also not a comprehensive study of his work. It is a very long high school term paper, which I would only give a C. Not worthy of Sir Terry. This is not a biography of Pratchett. You get significantly more information on his life from Wikipedia's page. It's also not a comprehensive study of his work. It is a very long high school term paper, which I would only give a C. Not worthy of Sir Terry.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anna Kowalczyk

    Good biography, but different than others. This is very untypical biography, something like a psychology study of Pratchett. I think that is worth to read, expecialy if You are fan of Pratchett's books. Good biography, but different than others. This is very untypical biography, something like a psychology study of Pratchett. I think that is worth to read, expecialy if You are fan of Pratchett's books.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Really enjoyed this book. A brief journey through the highs and lows of the discworld and a bit of background information about Terry Pratchett and his life behind the scenes. All in all a wonderful tribute to a very talented man who made his magical stories come to life. R.I.P sir Terry

  23. 5 out of 5

    Erin W

    I don't believe I could write a review scathing enough for this book. My time would have been much better spent reading any one of Pratchett's books instead. I don't believe I could write a review scathing enough for this book. My time would have been much better spent reading any one of Pratchett's books instead.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Walker

    I hoped this book would be informative... sadly I didn’t gain a great deal of information from it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Jerome

    A wonderful biography about one of my favorite fantasy writers.

  26. 4 out of 5

    molly sperry

    more or less sparknotes on all of his works

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cosmonautbullfrog

    I deeply enjoy Terry Pratchett's books and when I saw this at the library I couldn't help but to check it out. The problem is that this book only seems to be partially finished. It has a good foundation but is lacking in flow. Cabell has so much information at hand but not much of an idea of how to use it. It resembles an essay or a book report a student would write. I deeply enjoy Terry Pratchett's books and when I saw this at the library I couldn't help but to check it out. The problem is that this book only seems to be partially finished. It has a good foundation but is lacking in flow. Cabell has so much information at hand but not much of an idea of how to use it. It resembles an essay or a book report a student would write.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    My mum gave me this book after she was having a clear out, knowing that I loved Terry Pratchett books like her. Admittedly it took me a while to actually pick it up because often I find books about writers incredibly dull and I often think that these biographies of famous writers are written by people purely trying to make money. Surprisingly I found this not to be the case. I enjoyed reading most of it. Cabell, who stated that he was indeed a fan of Sir Terry's work, was focused more on the the My mum gave me this book after she was having a clear out, knowing that I loved Terry Pratchett books like her. Admittedly it took me a while to actually pick it up because often I find books about writers incredibly dull and I often think that these biographies of famous writers are written by people purely trying to make money. Surprisingly I found this not to be the case. I enjoyed reading most of it. Cabell, who stated that he was indeed a fan of Sir Terry's work, was focused more on the themes and Sir Terry's ideas and views shown in his work and was basically a critical analysis of his works. It was interesting and thought provoking. It's simply written and can easily be read in one sitting, if so desired. However, there were some aspects which irritated me and had it not been for them, I would have given the book a higher rating. He would quote from other writers at some what random points which did not further back points up. It felt like he was just throwing quotes in to show that he was well read. He would also go on to rants which did not add to the book. At one point he ranted about teenagers and as a young reader I found this incredibly annoying and nearly threw the book at the wall (which is something I'm not often prone to). All in all I would suggest that you read this if you want to and form your own opinions on it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    This is a marvellous little book about one of our truly great British authors, Terry Pratchett. There are great quotes from the man himself and small insights into his life, the book concentrates mainly on his works, particularly his famous Discworld series. Craig Cabel has approached the book in a very sympathetic tone, you can tell he is a man who greatly admires Pratchett and his work. Later chapters tackle Pratchett’s struggles with a rare form of Alzheimer’s disease and his inevitable confr This is a marvellous little book about one of our truly great British authors, Terry Pratchett. There are great quotes from the man himself and small insights into his life, the book concentrates mainly on his works, particularly his famous Discworld series. Craig Cabel has approached the book in a very sympathetic tone, you can tell he is a man who greatly admires Pratchett and his work. Later chapters tackle Pratchett’s struggles with a rare form of Alzheimer’s disease and his inevitable confrontation with his own mortality. It is very poignant and sad at times, indeed I had tears in my eyes at certain parts of the book. The sadness that underlies such a great man’s life is well conveyed, rather than dwelling on these themes, the Discworld series is thoroughly covered and you can see the author is an avid collector of Terry Pratchett’s work. There is a detailed list of the many valuable editions of Discworld novels and other pieces he has written, in the appendix. When you read about some of the themes in Discworld you start to realise that much of it is slightly prophetic of what has happened to Pratchett, with regards his health. Though not the most comprehensive biography ever written, it does remind you of the absolute magic of one the greatest authors of our time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    Although there was some interesting information in this book, a lot of it was the author's irrelevant(and sometimes fairly offensive) opinions on things. In a way it was good that he didn't just blindly worship the books, however he had a lot of criticisms that I felt were unfair, and seemed to think he was more qualified to make judgements about Pratchett's books than Sir Terry himself. This made the author come across as smug and overbearing - though he clearly had a passion for Discworld as e Although there was some interesting information in this book, a lot of it was the author's irrelevant(and sometimes fairly offensive) opinions on things. In a way it was good that he didn't just blindly worship the books, however he had a lot of criticisms that I felt were unfair, and seemed to think he was more qualified to make judgements about Pratchett's books than Sir Terry himself. This made the author come across as smug and overbearing - though he clearly had a passion for Discworld as evidenced (repeatedly) by his large collection. The book didn't seem to have a point even though the author kept insisting it did. He was supposed to be "analysing key texts" in Pratchett's work but I personally didn't agree with most of his choices and wished he could've written more about the later Discworld books. He also kept going off on tangents about genre definitions and other books/TV shows that didn't seem to link in to the subject matter that well. I thought at least the Bibliography at the back would be useful, but on closer inspection it was missing a couple of Discworld books that I personally own. Terry Pratchett said at Cheltenham Lit Fest that he is planning to write his own autobiography, and I think it is worth waiting for that one.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...