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1000 Poems from the Manyōshū

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Dating from the 8th century and earlier, the Manyoshu is the oldest Japanese poetry anthology; it is also widely considered to be the best. The 1,000 poems (out of a total of more than 4,500) in this famous selection were chosen by a distinguished scholarly committee based on their poetic excellence, their role in revealing the Japanese national spirit and character, and t Dating from the 8th century and earlier, the Manyoshu is the oldest Japanese poetry anthology; it is also widely considered to be the best. The 1,000 poems (out of a total of more than 4,500) in this famous selection were chosen by a distinguished scholarly committee based on their poetic excellence, their role in revealing the Japanese national spirit and character, and their cultural and historical significance. The acclaimed translations artfully preserve the simplicity and direct quality of the originals, and encompass an enormous range of human emotions and experiences. Text is in English only


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Dating from the 8th century and earlier, the Manyoshu is the oldest Japanese poetry anthology; it is also widely considered to be the best. The 1,000 poems (out of a total of more than 4,500) in this famous selection were chosen by a distinguished scholarly committee based on their poetic excellence, their role in revealing the Japanese national spirit and character, and t Dating from the 8th century and earlier, the Manyoshu is the oldest Japanese poetry anthology; it is also widely considered to be the best. The 1,000 poems (out of a total of more than 4,500) in this famous selection were chosen by a distinguished scholarly committee based on their poetic excellence, their role in revealing the Japanese national spirit and character, and their cultural and historical significance. The acclaimed translations artfully preserve the simplicity and direct quality of the originals, and encompass an enormous range of human emotions and experiences. Text is in English only

30 review for 1000 Poems from the Manyōshū

  1. 5 out of 5

    Eadweard

    Poems from a land not as easily recognizeable as the Japan we now know and are used to. Before all the cliche / stereotypical things we now associate it with (samurai, geisha, etc). A Japan beginning to expand outwards from central Honshu, still not master of the island, full of 'barbarian' Emishi and unconquered lands to the east. PRE-ŌMI AND ŌMI PERIODS (Empress Iwa-no-himé) (Longing for the Emperor Nintoku) Since you, my Lord, were gone, Many long, long days have passed. Should I now come to mee Poems from a land not as easily recognizeable as the Japan we now know and are used to. Before all the cliche / stereotypical things we now associate it with (samurai, geisha, etc). A Japan beginning to expand outwards from central Honshu, still not master of the island, full of 'barbarian' Emishi and unconquered lands to the east. PRE-ŌMI AND ŌMI PERIODS (Empress Iwa-no-himé) (Longing for the Emperor Nintoku) Since you, my Lord, were gone, Many long, long days have passed. Should I now come to meet you And seek you beyond the mountains, Or still await you—await you ever? Rather would I lay me down On a steep hill’s side, And, with a rock for pillow, die, Than live thus, my Lord, With longing so deep for you. Yes, I will live on And wait for you, Even till falls On my long black waving hair The hoar frost of age. How shall my yearning ever cease— Fade somewhere away, As does the mist of morning Shimmering across the autumn field Over the ripening grain? -- (Prince Shōtoku) (On seeing a man dead on Mount Tatsuta during his trip to the Well of Takahara.) Had he been at home, he would have slept Upon his wife’s dear arm; Here he lies dead, unhappy man, On his journey, grass for pillow. -- (Princess Nukada) (Yearning for the Emperor Tenji.) While, waiting for you, My heart is filled with longing, The autumn wind blows— As if it were you— Swaying the bamboo blinds of my door. -- (A Lady of the Court) (On the occasion of the death of the Emperor, Tenji.) Mortal creature as I am, Whom the gods suffer not on high, Wide sundered, Each morning I lament my Lord; Far divided, I long and languish after my Lord. Oh, were he a jewel That I might put about my arm and cherish! Oh, were he a garment That I might wear and not put off! The Lord whom I love so, I saw but last night—in dream. ---- ASUKA AND FUJIWARA PERIODS (Prince Ōtsu and Lady Ishikawa) Waiting for you, In the dripping dew of the hill I stood,—weary and wet With the dripping dew of the hill.(By the Prince) Would I had been, beloved, The dripping dew of the hill, That wetted you While for me you waited.— (By the Lady) -- Since I left the loving hands of my mother, Never once have I known Such helplessness in my heart! -- Strong man as I am, Who force my way even through the rocks, In love I rue in misery -- The great earth itself Might be exhausted by digging, But of love alone in this world Could we never reach the end! -- If the thunder rolls for a while And the sky is clouded, bringing rain, Then you will stay beside me. Even when no thunder sounds And no rain falls, if you but ask me, Then I will stay beside you. ---- NARA PERIOD (Prince Hozumi) That rascal love I have put away at home, Locked in a coffer— Here he comes, pouncing on me. -- (Prince Ichihara) (Composed at a banquet, wishing his father, Prince Aki, a long life.) The flowering herbs of spring Fade all too soon. Be like a rock, Changeless ever, Noble father mine! -- (Princess Hirokawa) The sheaves of my love-thoughts Would fill seven carts— Carts huge and heavy-wheeled. Such a burden I bear Of my own choice. -- (Lady Kasa) (To Ōtomo Yakamochi) the loneliness of my heart I feel as if I should perish Like the pale dew-drop Upon the grass of my garden In the gathering shades of twilight. - If it were death to love, I should have died— And died again One thousand times over. -- (Fujiwara, Hirotsugu and a Young Lady Poem sent with cherry-flowers to a young lady by Fujiwara Hirotsugu.) Slight not these flowers! Each single petal contains A hundred words of mine (Reply by the young lady) Were these flowers broken off, Unable to hold in each petal A hundred words of yours? -- Rather than that I should thus pine for you, Would I had been transmuted Into a tree or a stone, Nevermore to feel the pangs of love. -- I know well this body of mine Is insubstantial as foam; Even so, how I wish For a life of a thousand years! -- Though vanishing like a bubble, I live, praying that my life be long Like a rope of a thousand fathoms. -- (A Monk of the Gango-ji Temple) To what shall I liken this life? It is like a boat, Which, unmoored at morn, Drops out of sight And leaves no trace behind. -- (Ato Tobira, a Young Woman) Once—only once, I saw him in the light Of the sky-wandering moon; Now I see him in my dreams. -- When mist rises on the seashore Where you put in, Consider it the breathing Of my sighs at home. ---- PERIOD UNKNOWN Love is a torment Whenever we hide it. Why not lay it bare Like the moon that appears From behind the mountain ledge? -- The cloud clings To the high mountain peak— So would I cling to you, were I a cloud, And you, a mountain peak! -- If I leave you behind, I shall miss you: O that you were The grip of the birchwood bow I am taking with me! -- Let no rain fall to drench me through; I wear beneath my clothes— The keepsake of my loved one. -- When I take the koto, sobs break forth; Can it be that in its hollow space The spirit of my wife is hiding? -- Though your season is not over, Cherry-blossoms, do you fall Because the love is now at its height Of those who look on? -- My love-thoughts these days Come thick like the summer grass Which soon as cut and raked Grows wild again. -- Though men say An autumn night is long, It is all too brief For unloading my heart Of all its love. -- However long I wait for him, My lord does not come, When I look up to the plains of heaven, The night hours have advanced. Late at night, the storm beats, And the snow-flakes falling on my sleeves Are frozen while I wait and linger. Now never will he come to me, But I will meet my loved one later, As vine meets vine. So comforting my lonely heart, With my sleeves I sweep our bed, And as I cannot waking meet him, May I meet him in my dream, On this heavenly-perfect night! -- The lofty mountains and the seas, Being mountains, being seas, Both exist and are real. But frail as flowers are the lives of men, Passing phantoms of this world..

  2. 4 out of 5

    Florencia

    Every single thing leads to another book. Japan’s new era name has been announced: the Reiwa Era will begin on May 1st. Such name appears in the Man’yōshū, the oldest collection of Japanese poetry which dates back to the late 700s. I've read several comments on the new era name, but that's another matter. Now I have a book to find. April 1, 19 (Three days later) Found it. * Later on my blog. Every single thing leads to another book. Japan’s new era name has been announced: the Reiwa Era will begin on May 1st. Such name appears in the Man’yōshū, the oldest collection of Japanese poetry which dates back to the late 700s. I've read several comments on the new era name, but that's another matter. Now I have a book to find. April 1, 19 (Three days later) Found it. * Later on my blog.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eadweard

    By the Toko Mountain in Omi There flows the Isaya, River of Doubt. I doubt whether nowadays You, too, still think of me? ---- (Prince Otsu and Lady Ishikawa) Waiting for you, In the dripping dew of the hill I stood, -weary and wet With the dripping dew of the hill. - By the Prince Would I had been, beloved, The dripping dew of the hill, That wetted you While for me you waited. - By the Lady ---- Tonight the autumn moon shines The moon that shone a year ago, But my wife and I who watched it then together Ar By the Toko Mountain in Omi There flows the Isaya, River of Doubt. I doubt whether nowadays You, too, still think of me? ---- (Prince Otsu and Lady Ishikawa) Waiting for you, In the dripping dew of the hill I stood, -weary and wet With the dripping dew of the hill. - By the Prince Would I had been, beloved, The dripping dew of the hill, That wetted you While for me you waited. - By the Lady ---- Tonight the autumn moon shines The moon that shone a year ago, But my wife and I who watched it then together Are divided by ever-widening wastes of time. When leaving my love behind in the Hikite mountains Leaving her there in her grave, I walk down the mountain path, I feel not like one living. ---- (Lamenting his own fate as he was about to die in the land of Iwami) All unaware, it may be, That I lie in Kamo-yama, Pillowed on a rock, She is waiting now - my wife Waiting for my return. ---- The great earth itself Might be exhausted by digging, But of love alone in this world Could we never reach the end. ---- If the thunder rolls for a while And the sky is clouded, bringing rain, Then you will stay beside me. ---- Slight not these flowers! Each single petal contains A hundred words of mine. ---- How I waste and waste away With love forlorn I who have thought myself A strong man Rather than that I should thus pine for you, Would I had been transmuted Into a tree or a stone, Nevermore to feel the pangs of love. ---- (Suffering from old age and prolongedillness, and thinking of his children) So long as lasts the span of life, We wish for peace and comfort With no evil and no mourning, But life is hard and painful. As the common saying has it, Bitter salt is poured into the smarting wound, Or the burdened horse is packed with an upper load, Illness shakes my old body with pain All day long I breathe and grief And sigh throughout the night. For long years my illness lingers, I grieve and groan month after month, And though I would rather die, I cannot, and leave my children noisy like the flies of May. Whenever I watch them My heart burns within. And tossed this way and that, I weep aloud. ---- (On rain) Let no rain fall to drench me through; I wear beneath my clothes The keepsake of my loved one. ---- (On the koto) When I take the koto, sobs break forth; Can it be that in its hollow space The spirit of my wife is hiding? ---- (Referring to the grass) My love-thoughts these days Come thick like the summer grass Which soon as cut and raked Grows wild again ---- (Referring to night) Though men say An autumn night is long, It is all too brief For unloading my heart Of all its love ---- I will not comb my morning hair: Your loving arm, my pillow, Has lain under it

  4. 5 out of 5

    Akemi G.

    It seems some cultures take poetry more seriously than others. When the Japanese people learned the writing system from the Chinese, one of the first books they produced was this giant anthology of poems (4500+ poems). Authors vary from emperors and courtiers to anonymous ordinary people. (The other thing they did was to write down the history: The Kojiki: Records of Ancient Matters) I've read the whole thing in Japanese, and to this day, can recite some of them by heart. It gives me a great com It seems some cultures take poetry more seriously than others. When the Japanese people learned the writing system from the Chinese, one of the first books they produced was this giant anthology of poems (4500+ poems). Authors vary from emperors and courtiers to anonymous ordinary people. (The other thing they did was to write down the history: The Kojiki: Records of Ancient Matters) I've read the whole thing in Japanese, and to this day, can recite some of them by heart. It gives me a great comfort to know that there were people who felt the same way I do hundreds of years ago. By the way, I've also read some English poems, and while there are a few that are heartfelt and beautiful, most sound smart-ass to me. Perhaps the last part "to me" is critical; English is my second language, and if I've missed something, the fault is on me. But I can't help thinking that the popularity of foreign poems translated into English (not just Japanese, but think of Persian poems by Rumi, etc.) may be due to the boring nature of the old English poems. cf. While many poems in Manyoshu are made by anonymous folks, the main editor of the anthology is believed to be Otomo no Yakamochi, 8th century courtier/scholar/poet. (Being a good poet was an expected quality for all courtiers in his days.)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Coster

    By far the most 'difficult' to read. You miss out on the depth from the original's with the translation, the word play just can't be replicated, and it'd take a poet to 'redo' them properly. And while this is arguable in any translation, I point to Royall who did a superb job in the Tale of Heike in getting the word play and multi-tiered language out from the original and into the english. Of course, you can't quite do what he did with a 31 syllable poem, so, maybe it's hopeless... still I belie By far the most 'difficult' to read. You miss out on the depth from the original's with the translation, the word play just can't be replicated, and it'd take a poet to 'redo' them properly. And while this is arguable in any translation, I point to Royall who did a superb job in the Tale of Heike in getting the word play and multi-tiered language out from the original and into the english. Of course, you can't quite do what he did with a 31 syllable poem, so, maybe it's hopeless... still I believe it could be done better. So, not a great translation. But adding to that you are given 1000 poems between the unknown dark ages of japan and the Nara period. But they're all over, and there is very little background to each poem. Without the conveyance of the original and with very little history and with the near randomness of the material there was nothing to stand on. There was no story being developed (of course), but there was nothing to sink your teeth into. So, in respect to the book as presented, some pages I felt I was just reading and re-reading words -- bereft of all meaning. It is also, presented poorly. Any history or information was supplied by the original annotator c.a. 750 AD..... Anyways, a different translation, maybe with the original pre-heian period Japanese next to it for the sound and movement, and maybe with better context notes (as the Japanese language is nothing without context) this becomes readable.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caroline-not-getting-updates

    Beautiful poetry, much about love and nature. The date from about 750 to 850. But at the end are two heartbreaking longer poems about poverty and the death of a child: Dialog of the Destitute and untitled poem 904 by Yamanoue, with two equally touching envoys, or summary tanka. Instructive are multiple linked poems on the same topic--e.g. plum blossoms in spring--that highlight the differences among the poets; some are inspired, some derivative. I don't know any Japanese and can't comment on the Beautiful poetry, much about love and nature. The date from about 750 to 850. But at the end are two heartbreaking longer poems about poverty and the death of a child: Dialog of the Destitute and untitled poem 904 by Yamanoue, with two equally touching envoys, or summary tanka. Instructive are multiple linked poems on the same topic--e.g. plum blossoms in spring--that highlight the differences among the poets; some are inspired, some derivative. I don't know any Japanese and can't comment on the translation, but the resulting poems are well worth the time to read them slowly.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gwern

    Moved to gwern.net. Moved to gwern.net.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James Violand

    To those who love the simple beauty of Japanese poetry, avoid this book. This translation is so poor and uneven, it reads like Yoda speaks. Some poems are so poorly interpretted, that you become baffled. Then there follows an explanation of the poem! Shouldn't that be written as a prelude? Ridiculous. To those who love the simple beauty of Japanese poetry, avoid this book. This translation is so poor and uneven, it reads like Yoda speaks. Some poems are so poorly interpretted, that you become baffled. Then there follows an explanation of the poem! Shouldn't that be written as a prelude? Ridiculous.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    This little book of haiku has put me back on a poetic track I left 4 years ago. Simple poems of few words that open a vast world of feeling and thought. Single phrases so lovely addition can only mar them. It's a collection, but if you love haiku check it out. This little book of haiku has put me back on a poetic track I left 4 years ago. Simple poems of few words that open a vast world of feeling and thought. Single phrases so lovely addition can only mar them. It's a collection, but if you love haiku check it out.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Books on Asia

    Note: This is the English version 対訳 or parallel translation. The cover is similar, if not the same, as the above, but this version was published by Kodansha International, not Kodansha USA, so may differ slightly. I could not find this exact version on Goodreads. This book only includes 35 of the 4,500 or so poems in the Man'yōshū ("Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves") but they are important and well-known poems. Each tanka is rendered in Japanese kanji, romaji and English (translated by Ian Hid Note: This is the English version 対訳 or parallel translation. The cover is similar, if not the same, as the above, but this version was published by Kodansha International, not Kodansha USA, so may differ slightly. I could not find this exact version on Goodreads. This book only includes 35 of the 4,500 or so poems in the Man'yōshū ("Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves") but they are important and well-known poems. Each tanka is rendered in Japanese kanji, romaji and English (translated by Ian Hideo Levy), and is foll0wed by an explanation by Ōoka Makoto, author of 'Oriori no Uta' his long-running column in the Asahi Shinbun. The full-page color illustrations by kiri-e (paper cut-out) artist Miyata Masayuki serve not only to give insight to the poems, but to force the reader to slow down and consider each verse before moving on to the next entry. As for myself, I find poetry addicting, and as soon as I finish one, my eye is anticipating the next, so I appreciated this visual device to allow me to linger over the delicate meanings and the moods of each entry. This is a book you'll want to keep for re-reading and reference.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    My interest in early Japanese culture and literature began a few years ago after reading a fictional novel by Liza Dalby. What I loved in this piece of work was the attention paid to poetry. The Japanese used poetry as a normal way of communicating together, reflecting upon nature and the change of seasons to love and the yearning that can be a side-effect of it. So, upon finishing this fictional novel, I set out to discover more and in doing so, I discovered the Manyoshu. The Manyoshu is the old My interest in early Japanese culture and literature began a few years ago after reading a fictional novel by Liza Dalby. What I loved in this piece of work was the attention paid to poetry. The Japanese used poetry as a normal way of communicating together, reflecting upon nature and the change of seasons to love and the yearning that can be a side-effect of it. So, upon finishing this fictional novel, I set out to discover more and in doing so, I discovered the Manyoshu. The Manyoshu is the oldest poetry anthology of early Japan. The original consisted of 20 volummes, totaling in excess of 4,000 poems. This translation offers Western readers the chance to learn more about early Japanese culture by offering 1,000 of the poems. The selection, according to the preface of the anthology, was made by 3 factors:- 1. Their poetic excellence 2. Their role in revealing the Japanese national spirit and character 3. Their cultural and historical significance This anthology truely is a delight. There is a very good introduction, in case the reader wishes to learn more about the history behind the poems, plus there are very useful footnotes as and when required, however they do not get in the way of the poetry itself. The poems are then divided into 4 sections, each one being a different period. Personally, I have always preferred the shorter of the poems, as I think the way that the author is able to express such emotion through so few words is breathtaking. From this selection, one of my favourties is a beautiful love poem:- "Love is a torment Whenever we hide it. Why not lay it bare Like the moon that appears From behind the mountain ledge?" (p.273) To me, that is perfection. Simple yet the words shall haunt you and stay with you long after you close the covers. The best Japanese love poetry are often like this - filled with emotion despite the seemingly simplistic style, and often alluding to some part of nature as a way of expressing the sentiment. Culturally, this is because the Japanese were very superstitious regarding certain aspects of nature - for example, certain days were deemed to be auspicious (either good or bad) for travelling; the early Japanese court also had restricments of which officials could wear particular colours. The colours of their robes would even be dictated due to the changing of the seasons. Nature was an integral part of their life, and this comes across in the poetry of the time. This translation is a brilliant way to get into early Japanese culture and life. After dipping into it, and enjoying it, you may want to go off and look for the Kokinoshu, another early Japanese anthology.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    Elegant and more complex than the translation can easily provide, this is a fair introduction to the Manyoshu. One difficultly with a translation such as this is that context is oftentimes lost, as well as historical relevance. This makes the poems a challenge to appreciate at times, though you can sometimes see cleverness between the response poems. If one thing is taken away from this collection is that the people so readily and effortlessly connect nature and their emotional state. Sometimes Elegant and more complex than the translation can easily provide, this is a fair introduction to the Manyoshu. One difficultly with a translation such as this is that context is oftentimes lost, as well as historical relevance. This makes the poems a challenge to appreciate at times, though you can sometimes see cleverness between the response poems. If one thing is taken away from this collection is that the people so readily and effortlessly connect nature and their emotional state. Sometimes these are simple, other times they are subtle and require an understanding between shades of feelings. A good read, and important in the world literature sphere; I just wish there was more context.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aleksandra

    It was so fascinating to read all these poems knowing (vaguely) how Japan would've been at these times, or at least with the information that has been gathered from historical sources. It was (and still is) fascinating to know how ,despite the statuses and social norms Japan would've held at these times, especially with richer families, their way of thinking is so similiar to ours. The Ladies longing for their Lord to return home is so similiar to our longing of love, and even the poem about a h It was so fascinating to read all these poems knowing (vaguely) how Japan would've been at these times, or at least with the information that has been gathered from historical sources. It was (and still is) fascinating to know how ,despite the statuses and social norms Japan would've held at these times, especially with richer families, their way of thinking is so similiar to ours. The Ladies longing for their Lord to return home is so similiar to our longing of love, and even the poem about a hawk written by Otomo Yakamochi shows a strong relationship between human and animal that many hold today with their dogs, cats and other beings: family. Really pretty and cool book!! :PP

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mariam

    I hadn’t realized they were love poems and wasn’t interested in anything romantic. The introduction spoiled it more with all the information about illicit affairs and crossed lovers but still the poetry transported me to another country, season, time, from under tree to the shores of some foreign water and now I turn poetic myself because it did in some way move me. And that does count for much. So four stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    Not a long read but its really great to read older love poetry to remind one that love poetry doesn't need to always be flowery. One of the poems in the collection more or less translated to "Boy when you get home we gonna go at it" Not a long read but its really great to read older love poetry to remind one that love poetry doesn't need to always be flowery. One of the poems in the collection more or less translated to "Boy when you get home we gonna go at it"

  16. 4 out of 5

    Colin Myles

    a beautiful collection of the earliest written poems from Japan.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt Miles

    Loneliness, anxiety, loss, and insecurity all at least linger around the edges of these poems encompassing human relationships.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elise Harwell

    Everyone at home / feeling that my hair’s too long / tells me to bind it / But it’s as you saw it last / though now it’s a little tangled”

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    I've gotten through all the intro text and I'm into the actual poetry now. It's amazing that this poetry survived as long as it did and it really gives a window into Japan during that time period, but I must say that I would like to see a better english translation. It seems that the translation included in this book is from the 1940s and it feels a bit outdated. It was translated into a very english style, which, I believe, takes away from the fact that this is Japanese poetry written almost 14 I've gotten through all the intro text and I'm into the actual poetry now. It's amazing that this poetry survived as long as it did and it really gives a window into Japan during that time period, but I must say that I would like to see a better english translation. It seems that the translation included in this book is from the 1940s and it feels a bit outdated. It was translated into a very english style, which, I believe, takes away from the fact that this is Japanese poetry written almost 1400 years ago. One of the things that I love about the newer translations of Japanese poets such as Basho and Saigyo is how the translators try to keep the same translated feel of the poem similar to the feel it has in the original Japanese. Now, I understand how hard that is, but I really do appreciate it. Some of the recently translated poems of Basho are leagues better than the older translations from the early 20th century. Does anyone know of any recently translated Manyoshu poems?

  20. 4 out of 5

    D

    Great short poems. I wish it was coupled with the original Japanese text.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I've read these more in Japanese than in English, but these are overall very good translations. The Man'yōshū contains some of the most beautiful poetry in the world, in my opinion. It's a shame that it's not more well known outside of Japan. I've read these more in Japanese than in English, but these are overall very good translations. The Man'yōshū contains some of the most beautiful poetry in the world, in my opinion. It's a shame that it's not more well known outside of Japan.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Poems presented only in English; translation seems clunky (although perhaps literal) in many places. Other than that, this book has a lot of informative endnotes that I think would have worked better as footnotes or headers. There's also some lovely artwork that accompanies the poems. Poems presented only in English; translation seems clunky (although perhaps literal) in many places. Other than that, this book has a lot of informative endnotes that I think would have worked better as footnotes or headers. There's also some lovely artwork that accompanies the poems.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Like the companion volumes from Basho and Kawabata, this book is a wonderful treat. Great art, and deep commentary from Donald Keene helps one appreciate it all the more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chase

    I love reading the many interesting poems in here. they are challenging and fun. it is worth the struggle to parse them.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pmercado

    good poems are four right throughout the book

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rocia

    This book contains some of my favorite poems. It contains poems about nature, wisdom, love and life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anita

    I accidently touched the screen which said I was reading this book but I'm not. I was trying to say I was reading a book on Marc Chagall but I couldn't find the right one. Sorry. I accidently touched the screen which said I was reading this book but I'm not. I was trying to say I was reading a book on Marc Chagall but I couldn't find the right one. Sorry.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hartzog

    A nice collection of art and poems that flows nicely from one image to the next in a meandering way.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Willis

    Translations are not the greatest.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lulu

    oldest extant collection of Japanese poetry, the bulk of the collection representing the period between AD 600 and 759 Urashima Tarō

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