Hot Best Seller

The Body of Poetry: Essays on Women, Form, and the Poetic Self

Availability: Ready to download

The Body of Poetry collects essays, reviews, and memoir by Annie Finch, one of the brightest poet-critics of her generation. Finch's germinal work on the art of verse has earned her the admiration of a wide range of poets, from new formalists to hip-hop writers. And her ongoing commitment to women's poetry has brought Finch a substantial following as a "postmodern poetess" The Body of Poetry collects essays, reviews, and memoir by Annie Finch, one of the brightest poet-critics of her generation. Finch's germinal work on the art of verse has earned her the admiration of a wide range of poets, from new formalists to hip-hop writers. And her ongoing commitment to women's poetry has brought Finch a substantial following as a "postmodern poetess" whose critical writing embraces the past while establishing bold new traditions. The Body of Poetry includes essays on metrical diversity, poetry and music, the place of women poets in the canon, and on poets Emily Dickinson, Phillis Wheatley, Sara Teasdale, Audre Lorde, Marilyn Hacker, and John Peck, among other topics. In Annie Finch's own words, these essays were all written with one aim: "to build a safe space for my own poetry. . . . [I]n the attempt, they will also have helped to nourish a new kind of American poetics, one that will prove increasingly open to poetry's heart." Poet, translator, and critic Annie Finch is director of the Stonecoast low-residency MFA program at the University of Southern Maine. She is co-editor, with Kathrine Varnes, of An Exaltation of Forms: Contemporary Poets Celebrate the Diversity of Their Art, and author of The Ghost of Meter: Culture and Prosody in American Free Verse, Eve, and Calendars. She is the winner of the eleventh annual Robert Fitzgerald Prosody Award for scholars who have made a lasting contribution to the art and science of versification.


Compare

The Body of Poetry collects essays, reviews, and memoir by Annie Finch, one of the brightest poet-critics of her generation. Finch's germinal work on the art of verse has earned her the admiration of a wide range of poets, from new formalists to hip-hop writers. And her ongoing commitment to women's poetry has brought Finch a substantial following as a "postmodern poetess" The Body of Poetry collects essays, reviews, and memoir by Annie Finch, one of the brightest poet-critics of her generation. Finch's germinal work on the art of verse has earned her the admiration of a wide range of poets, from new formalists to hip-hop writers. And her ongoing commitment to women's poetry has brought Finch a substantial following as a "postmodern poetess" whose critical writing embraces the past while establishing bold new traditions. The Body of Poetry includes essays on metrical diversity, poetry and music, the place of women poets in the canon, and on poets Emily Dickinson, Phillis Wheatley, Sara Teasdale, Audre Lorde, Marilyn Hacker, and John Peck, among other topics. In Annie Finch's own words, these essays were all written with one aim: "to build a safe space for my own poetry. . . . [I]n the attempt, they will also have helped to nourish a new kind of American poetics, one that will prove increasingly open to poetry's heart." Poet, translator, and critic Annie Finch is director of the Stonecoast low-residency MFA program at the University of Southern Maine. She is co-editor, with Kathrine Varnes, of An Exaltation of Forms: Contemporary Poets Celebrate the Diversity of Their Art, and author of The Ghost of Meter: Culture and Prosody in American Free Verse, Eve, and Calendars. She is the winner of the eleventh annual Robert Fitzgerald Prosody Award for scholars who have made a lasting contribution to the art and science of versification.

39 review for The Body of Poetry: Essays on Women, Form, and the Poetic Self

  1. 5 out of 5

    Donna Cowan

    I loved this book! I read an excerpt of her essay "How to Create a Poetic Tradition" online and was hooked. This book contains that essay and many more. "The Body of Poetry" has a premise that will fascinate both genders: that "the poem's body has come to be despised by literary culture." Her short essay (or rather, almost a checklist) "Omniformalism: A Manifesto," is something every poet should read (and probably post above his/her desk). In it, she suggests that every poem should have physical I loved this book! I read an excerpt of her essay "How to Create a Poetic Tradition" online and was hooked. This book contains that essay and many more. "The Body of Poetry" has a premise that will fascinate both genders: that "the poem's body has come to be despised by literary culture." Her short essay (or rather, almost a checklist) "Omniformalism: A Manifesto," is something every poet should read (and probably post above his/her desk). In it, she suggests that every poem should have physicality, permeability, structure, kinship, continuity, and mystery, and explains these beautifully. As Finch is an accomplished poet, this is some of the most beautiful literary criticism you'll ever read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lynnell

    An enormously useful and wise collection of practical criticism that, over the course of the book, suggests a persuasive and well-considered thesis about how the metrical code, sometimes "ghost", inhabits and drives a poem. Her primary examples and explications are from her own and other women's poetry (including a really wonderful essay on Maxine Kumin's "Looking for Luck"), hence the title, but her aesthetic generally sets the definition of most free verse poetry in relief in clarifying ways. I An enormously useful and wise collection of practical criticism that, over the course of the book, suggests a persuasive and well-considered thesis about how the metrical code, sometimes "ghost", inhabits and drives a poem. Her primary examples and explications are from her own and other women's poetry (including a really wonderful essay on Maxine Kumin's "Looking for Luck"), hence the title, but her aesthetic generally sets the definition of most free verse poetry in relief in clarifying ways. I do not know Finch's poetry, but am encouraged to seek it out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    This is a fabulous book that explores neglected avenues our poetic history as well as the subject of prosody, which I don't think I really understood until I read this book. Finch approaches her subjects with genuine intellectual curiosity and an open mind--two characteristics often absent in contemporary criticism. This is a fabulous book that explores neglected avenues our poetic history as well as the subject of prosody, which I don't think I really understood until I read this book. Finch approaches her subjects with genuine intellectual curiosity and an open mind--two characteristics often absent in contemporary criticism.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lesley Wheeler

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara Ryan

  6. 4 out of 5

    Readtolive

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Cleary

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leucosia

  9. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Schweig

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ali

  12. 5 out of 5

    Larissa Shmailo

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura Wiseman

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Chandler

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alison Hedlund

    A seminal book on poetics, essential to contemporary poets.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  17. 5 out of 5

    Allison HedgeCoke

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aricka Foreman

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jilly

  20. 5 out of 5

    O.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ann Michael

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tara Betts

  23. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeannine

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sara Kearns

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elena Karina

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  29. 5 out of 5

    Juliet

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stef

  31. 4 out of 5

    Steve Owen

  32. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  33. 5 out of 5

    Dana Miranda

  34. 4 out of 5

    Jocelyn

  35. 4 out of 5

    Moira Russell

  36. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  37. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

  38. 5 out of 5

    Holly Woodward

  39. 5 out of 5

    Bridget (awesome spark)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...