Hot Best Seller

Silent Honor (Limited Edition)

Availability: Ready to download

This cloth-bound special edition of Danielle Steel’s Silent Honor is enhanced with gold leaf, comes with a special slip case, and is signed by the author. In her 38th bestselling novel, Danielle Steel creates a powerful, moving portrayal of families divided, lives shattered and a nation torn apart by prejudice during a shameful episode in recent American history. A man ahead This cloth-bound special edition of Danielle Steel’s Silent Honor is enhanced with gold leaf, comes with a special slip case, and is signed by the author. In her 38th bestselling novel, Danielle Steel creates a powerful, moving portrayal of families divided, lives shattered and a nation torn apart by prejudice during a shameful episode in recent American history. A man ahead of his time, Japanese college professor Masao Takashimaya of Kyoto had a passion for modern ideas that was as strong as his wife's belief in ancient traditions. It was the early 1920s and Masao had dreams for the future--and a fascination with the politics and opportunities of a world that was changing every day. Twenty years later, his eighteen-year-old daughter Hiroko, torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, boarded the SS Nagoya Mare to come to California for an education and to make her father proud. It was August 1941. From the ship, she went directly to the Palo Alto home of her uncle, Takeo, and his family. To Hiroko, California was a different world--a world of barbeques, station wagons and college. Her cousins in California had become more American than Japanese. And much to Hiroko's surprise, Peter Jenkins, her uncle's assistant at Stanford, became an unexpected link between her old world and her new. But in spite of him, and all her promises to her father, Hiroko longs to go home. At college in Berkeley, her world is rapidly and unexpectedly filled with prejudice and fear. On December 7, Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese. Within hours, war is declared and suddenly Hiroko has become an enemy in a foreign land. Terrified, begging to go home, she is nonetheless ordered by her father to stay. He is positive she will be safer in California than at home, and for a brief time she is--until her entire world caves in. On February 19, Executive Order 9066 is signed by President Roosevelt, giving the military the power to remove the Japanese from their communities at will. Takeo and his family are given ten days to sell their home, give up their jobs, and report to a relocation center, along with thousands of other Japanese and Japanese Americans, to face their destinies there. Families are divided, people are forced to abandon their homes, their businesses, their freedom, and their lives. Hiroko and her uncle's family go first to Tanforan, and from there to the detention center at Tule Lake. This extraordinary novel tells what happened to them there, creating a portrait of human tragedy and strength, divided loyalties and love. It tells of Americans who were treated as foreigners in their own land. And it tells Hiroko's story, and that of her American family, as they fight to stay alive amid the drama of life and death in the camp at Tule Lake. With clear, powerful prose, Danielle Steel portrays not only the human cost of that terrible time in history, but also the remarkable courage of a people whose honor and dignity transcended the chaos that surrounded them. Set against a vivid backdrop of war and change, her thirty-eighth bestselling novel is both living history and outstanding fiction, revealing the stark truth about the betrayal of Americans by their own government...and the triumph of a woman caught between cultures and determined to survive.


Compare

This cloth-bound special edition of Danielle Steel’s Silent Honor is enhanced with gold leaf, comes with a special slip case, and is signed by the author. In her 38th bestselling novel, Danielle Steel creates a powerful, moving portrayal of families divided, lives shattered and a nation torn apart by prejudice during a shameful episode in recent American history. A man ahead This cloth-bound special edition of Danielle Steel’s Silent Honor is enhanced with gold leaf, comes with a special slip case, and is signed by the author. In her 38th bestselling novel, Danielle Steel creates a powerful, moving portrayal of families divided, lives shattered and a nation torn apart by prejudice during a shameful episode in recent American history. A man ahead of his time, Japanese college professor Masao Takashimaya of Kyoto had a passion for modern ideas that was as strong as his wife's belief in ancient traditions. It was the early 1920s and Masao had dreams for the future--and a fascination with the politics and opportunities of a world that was changing every day. Twenty years later, his eighteen-year-old daughter Hiroko, torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, boarded the SS Nagoya Mare to come to California for an education and to make her father proud. It was August 1941. From the ship, she went directly to the Palo Alto home of her uncle, Takeo, and his family. To Hiroko, California was a different world--a world of barbeques, station wagons and college. Her cousins in California had become more American than Japanese. And much to Hiroko's surprise, Peter Jenkins, her uncle's assistant at Stanford, became an unexpected link between her old world and her new. But in spite of him, and all her promises to her father, Hiroko longs to go home. At college in Berkeley, her world is rapidly and unexpectedly filled with prejudice and fear. On December 7, Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese. Within hours, war is declared and suddenly Hiroko has become an enemy in a foreign land. Terrified, begging to go home, she is nonetheless ordered by her father to stay. He is positive she will be safer in California than at home, and for a brief time she is--until her entire world caves in. On February 19, Executive Order 9066 is signed by President Roosevelt, giving the military the power to remove the Japanese from their communities at will. Takeo and his family are given ten days to sell their home, give up their jobs, and report to a relocation center, along with thousands of other Japanese and Japanese Americans, to face their destinies there. Families are divided, people are forced to abandon their homes, their businesses, their freedom, and their lives. Hiroko and her uncle's family go first to Tanforan, and from there to the detention center at Tule Lake. This extraordinary novel tells what happened to them there, creating a portrait of human tragedy and strength, divided loyalties and love. It tells of Americans who were treated as foreigners in their own land. And it tells Hiroko's story, and that of her American family, as they fight to stay alive amid the drama of life and death in the camp at Tule Lake. With clear, powerful prose, Danielle Steel portrays not only the human cost of that terrible time in history, but also the remarkable courage of a people whose honor and dignity transcended the chaos that surrounded them. Set against a vivid backdrop of war and change, her thirty-eighth bestselling novel is both living history and outstanding fiction, revealing the stark truth about the betrayal of Americans by their own government...and the triumph of a woman caught between cultures and determined to survive.

30 review for Silent Honor (Limited Edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kerry

    Heartbreaking truth about what really happened with a fictional love story intertwined. I love her books with real historical events in them.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    An amazing historical-fiction that I couldn't put down. Set during WWII from the perspective of a Japanese girl who had come to the US to study when the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor and the hardships and discrimination her family and other Japanese-Americans went through at the time. The culture, historical events, and love story that unfold filled me with such emotion reading through this often sad but also BEAUTIFUL story. An amazing historical-fiction that I couldn't put down. Set during WWII from the perspective of a Japanese girl who had come to the US to study when the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor and the hardships and discrimination her family and other Japanese-Americans went through at the time. The culture, historical events, and love story that unfold filled me with such emotion reading through this often sad but also BEAUTIFUL story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    saïd

    I have a lot of respect for Danielle Steel. My favourite picture of her isn't even a picture of her, it's a picture of her desk— Has anything ever been more baller than this? She's published around 190 books, which is fucking awesome. I don't know anything about Danielle Steel as a person but she fuckin' rules. Here are some things I liked about this novel, first of all: I really liked how Steel wrote the racial tension and prejudice against Asian-Americans (and Asians in general) during WWII. I r I have a lot of respect for Danielle Steel. My favourite picture of her isn't even a picture of her, it's a picture of her desk— Has anything ever been more baller than this? She's published around 190 books, which is fucking awesome. I don't know anything about Danielle Steel as a person but she fuckin' rules. Here are some things I liked about this novel, first of all: I really liked how Steel wrote the racial tension and prejudice against Asian-Americans (and Asians in general) during WWII. I really liked how Steel had evidently done her research. I really liked how Steel wove in the events of the time period and how they would have more or less realistically affected the characters, particularly the protagonist, who is Japanese. I really liked how Steel gave her Japanese protagonist an actual Japanese name, even though the kanji* aren't mentioned. Here are some things I did not like about this novel. A super-quick rundown of the plot: Hiroko is a 19-year-old Japanese student sent abroad to study at university in California, USA for a year, where she'll live with her uncle (a professor) and cousins, who have mostly assimilated. She meets her uncle's assistant at Stanford, Peter Jenkins, in his late 20s, and the two are drawn to each other. But then the events of Pearl Harbor happen, and the two of them (well, mostly Hiroko) face various difficulties threatening their relationship and even their lives. Hiroko is an almost-perfect stereotype of the submissive Oriental woman. She's constantly bowing and lowering her eyes and speaking softly, using the -san suffix and wearing a kimono or schoolgirl outfit. Okay; fine. This book was published in 1996. It's a romance novel. It's not really supposed to be the most accurate thing ever. I get it. But I was still bothered by it. Peter, her decade-older white boyfriend, is a step up from Pinkerton, to be sure, but it's only a step. Throughout the course of the novel, Hiroko suffers multiple humiliating and degrading instances of discrimination and racism, losing her housing, material possessions, and (certainly) dignity. You're aware, I'm sure, of how Japanese-Americans were put in internment camps after Pearl Harbor. Hiroko wants to return home to Japan to be with her family, but her father convinces her that she'll be safer staying in America—which she is, given that, within a few years, her entire family will be literally obliterated with the bombings of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Just to be clear, I don't give a shit that Danielle Steel is white. I don't even care that she's not Japanese. It'll be a cold day in hell before I advocate for genuine censorship or segregation of this type. What I do care about, however, is how disgustingly disrespectful this story is—despite its framing as romantic. After the bombing of Hiroshima, when Hiroko's entire family is killed, how does Peter comfort her? He takes her to a muddy field and they have sex. Hiroko does eventually return to Japan, although I can't imagine her future will be bright. She's 19 when she leaves home, and 22 when she returns after the war has nominally ended. Peter is then around 30, I believe. And for the record, I don't care about age gaps in fiction (or real life as long as everything in consensual). I do think it's a bit scummy for someone in a position of power, a white man who's almost a decade older, to sleep with a confused and grieving teenager. I actually think that's pretty fucked up, to be honest. *The hiragana (ひろこ) is easy, but there are multiple possible kanji combinations (裕子, 浩子, 紘子, 寛子), all of which mean roughly the same thing: abundant, prosperous, vast or expansive, generous + child (i.e., "child who will bring abundance").

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    I was never an actual fan of Danielle Steel. I only read 3 of her books before Silent Honour and was not particularly super impressed. However, I stumbled upon this book during a book sale and because it fell under the label of historical fiction thought I'd give it a go. Now that I have finished it, I can say that I'm glad I did so. At first, I was kind of sceptic about it. The diction seemed kind of juvenile especially when compared to the witty diction used by John Grogan in Marley and Me, my I was never an actual fan of Danielle Steel. I only read 3 of her books before Silent Honour and was not particularly super impressed. However, I stumbled upon this book during a book sale and because it fell under the label of historical fiction thought I'd give it a go. Now that I have finished it, I can say that I'm glad I did so. At first, I was kind of sceptic about it. The diction seemed kind of juvenile especially when compared to the witty diction used by John Grogan in Marley and Me, my previous read. However, as I immersed myself into the story, I found the diction very comfortable and flowing to read, and I would have finished it sooner hadn't I enjoyed the story so much that I did not want it to end (I willingly dragged the story myself :P) I love how Steel tackled the themes of love, rejection and racism in the story and although the story's period is too contemporary for my taste, I was really into it. It was interesting to get a different side of Pearl Harbor's story and I thoroughly enjoyed the insights, Steel gave into the Japanese world. I found myself emphatising greatly with the character especially with Hiroko and even shed a few tears at some of the poignant moments. All in all, I really enjoyed the book and will definitely add any of Danielle Steel's historical fiction to my growing to-be-read list anytime soon.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Nothing like a good, vintage Danielle Steel. Her contemporary writing is almost nothing like her old novels; so if you're going to start with Danielle Steel, start with her older titles. I remember this being one of my favorites when I was on my Danielle Steel kick (my favorite being Wanderlust). I wanted to see if this held up as it did in my 15 year old mind. Spoiler, it didn't. However, it reminded me why Danielle Steel is so popular and why her books sell. They're just great escape reads, and s Nothing like a good, vintage Danielle Steel. Her contemporary writing is almost nothing like her old novels; so if you're going to start with Danielle Steel, start with her older titles. I remember this being one of my favorites when I was on my Danielle Steel kick (my favorite being Wanderlust). I wanted to see if this held up as it did in my 15 year old mind. Spoiler, it didn't. However, it reminded me why Danielle Steel is so popular and why her books sell. They're just great escape reads, and she does a damn good job at getting to the point. Her writing may be formulaic, but there's something comforting in that fact. You know exactly what you're getting. It's like coming home to a warm hug; consistent and comforting. I hesitate to call her books brain candy, but they really don't require a lot of philosophical thinking to get through. After a long, hard day at work sometimes we just want a little fluff. And Danielle Steel is the undisputed Queen of Fluff and Romance.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tara Chevrestt

    Does anybody remember the tv show that was popular in the 1970s called All In The Family? If so, you will remember Archie Bunker's wife, Edith. Take Edith and put her in a kimono and you have the heroine of this book, Hiroko. A more submissive, puppy eyed female you will be hard pressed to find. I read a good hundred pages and then some and grew so sick of all the bowing and the eye lowering. I couldn't take anymore. Strong woman, my arse! I know it was customary for Japanese women to behave thi Does anybody remember the tv show that was popular in the 1970s called All In The Family? If so, you will remember Archie Bunker's wife, Edith. Take Edith and put her in a kimono and you have the heroine of this book, Hiroko. A more submissive, puppy eyed female you will be hard pressed to find. I read a good hundred pages and then some and grew so sick of all the bowing and the eye lowering. I couldn't take anymore. Strong woman, my arse! I know it was customary for Japanese women to behave this way in those times, but must we be reminded of it every other sentence? I did, however, like how Steel manages to convey the prejudice and racial tension in California during World War 2 tho. She seems to be historically accurate as well. Pretty impressive for a romance writer. To summarize the plot for you: Hiroko's parents send her from the only home she has ever known in Japan to San Francisco to attend college for a year. She meets a white man that is enamored with her submissive ways and of course, he wants her. But after Pearl Harbor, the American Japanese have major obstacles for face on top of the restrictions placed on Japanese/Caucasian relationships. Had there been less bowing, a lot less eye lowering, and more spunk in the heroine, I would have actually liked it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carol Denise Mitchell

    Wow! I read a lot of Danielle Steele and at first I liked the book. But then the story digressed. Hiroko seemed like the stereotypical Japanese girl who was bound by tradition with all of the bowing and placement of "san" after peoples names. This star character did not have a mind of her own. She's the first Steele character that I hated. It saddened me that the author had Peter having so much sex with Hiroko out in a muddy, dirt field right after Hiroshima. Peter, a white man to me was extremel Wow! I read a lot of Danielle Steele and at first I liked the book. But then the story digressed. Hiroko seemed like the stereotypical Japanese girl who was bound by tradition with all of the bowing and placement of "san" after peoples names. This star character did not have a mind of her own. She's the first Steele character that I hated. It saddened me that the author had Peter having so much sex with Hiroko out in a muddy, dirt field right after Hiroshima. Peter, a white man to me was extremely disrespectful to want to have wanton sex with a 19 year old; (he was in his late 20's.) right after she had been discriminated against at St. Andrews; she lost her home, dignity and material possessions. Had this been one of Danielle Steele's white characters they would have been impugned by having sex in such a heinous living environment. At the end when Hiroko goes home and finds her family have been bombed; I was hoping the last person she'd see was Peter; and, of course there he was. Not a good book. Liked the first few pages and then hated it after that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Curtis

    Silent Honor tells the story of separated families and shattered lives set against one of the most morally reprehensible events in U.S. history:, It's truly disgusting how americans treat people. Here's the highpoints of this book : I loved Hiroko, she starts the book as a PAINFULLY shy young girl and by the end by end of the book, she's so brave and I really was in awe of Hiroko. Silent Honor tells the story of separated families and shattered lives set against one of the most morally reprehensible events in U.S. history:, It's truly disgusting how americans treat people. Here's the highpoints of this book : I loved Hiroko, she starts the book as a PAINFULLY shy young girl and by the end by end of the book, she's so brave and I really was in awe of Hiroko.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shay

    3.5 stars nicely written just wanted more,feel like it ended too quick

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I have not read a Danielle Steel book in well over 25 years. I just outgrew her, or so I thought. At book club we read Nisei Daughter by Monica Itoi Sone which was a non-fiction story of one women's life being Japanese in Seattle and going into an internment camp. Danielle Steel's book Silent Honor was brought up as well-written fictional story about the same subject. I thought this book was very well crafted and I became so attached to all of the characters. I will now look into what else Danie I have not read a Danielle Steel book in well over 25 years. I just outgrew her, or so I thought. At book club we read Nisei Daughter by Monica Itoi Sone which was a non-fiction story of one women's life being Japanese in Seattle and going into an internment camp. Danielle Steel's book Silent Honor was brought up as well-written fictional story about the same subject. I thought this book was very well crafted and I became so attached to all of the characters. I will now look into what else Danielle Steel has written over the past few years.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Davis

    I lreally liked this book. I thought Danielle Steel only wrote romance so I was suprised by how much I enjoyed it and how little romance was in it. Even less than the Breaking Dawn in the Ywilight Series! The storries of what so many Japanese and some not went through during WW2 in America is heartbreakingly true. Her research was amazing, and acurate. I learned a few things my self, and can only hope history doesn't repeat itself when it comes to what so many went through at that time. I lreally liked this book. I thought Danielle Steel only wrote romance so I was suprised by how much I enjoyed it and how little romance was in it. Even less than the Breaking Dawn in the Ywilight Series! The storries of what so many Japanese and some not went through during WW2 in America is heartbreakingly true. Her research was amazing, and acurate. I learned a few things my self, and can only hope history doesn't repeat itself when it comes to what so many went through at that time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I read this book years ago. I forgot completely about it until I read "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter an Sweet." (Now that was a good story.) Wasn't as I remembered. I was kind of disappointed in it. Her research was good though. Making it okay. I read this book years ago. I forgot completely about it until I read "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter an Sweet." (Now that was a good story.) Wasn't as I remembered. I was kind of disappointed in it. Her research was good though. Making it okay.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Yes.. finally! I remember more about this one as I look back on older reads. A historical fiction around World War Two where an independent and feisty Japanese woman falls in love with an American man which presents problems. A different type of DS, which was refreshing at the time.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chelsie

    Throughout all of my schooling (I am now a junior in college) I have never learned about the horrors the Asian people in America faced during WWII. My mom recommended me this book, and I am glad I read it. It was a hard story to read, one about people suffering something that today seems unimaginable, but I couldn't help but keep turning the pages to find out what happened to Hiroko and her family. Nothing about WWII is ever easy to read, but this novel takes you from the perfectly normal live Throughout all of my schooling (I am now a junior in college) I have never learned about the horrors the Asian people in America faced during WWII. My mom recommended me this book, and I am glad I read it. It was a hard story to read, one about people suffering something that today seems unimaginable, but I couldn't help but keep turning the pages to find out what happened to Hiroko and her family. Nothing about WWII is ever easy to read, but this novel takes you from the perfectly normal lives of Hiroko and the family of her father that she comes to visit in America, while she goes to college there. She gets stuck in the states after Pearl Harbor, and it takes the reader through the journey she goes through of falling in love, having everyone she loved be threatened strongly, moving to camps without knowledge of why or for how long, and for how unlucky she still might be when and if the time comes for her to once again be free. This novel is an insight into the pain that those before us faced during WWII, and how it changed the world forever. It is a story of loyalty, love, tradition, heartbreak, hope, and more. I strongly recommend this to anyone who wants to read a historical fiction novel about WWII, but from the perspective of an Asian who deals with what America threw at them, something that should be talked about more often. Synopsis (view spoiler)[ Hiroko is a young girl of eighteen who was born to two parents deeply in love. She was born into tradition of her mother, though her father was a very modern man. He had decided when she was young that she would go to college in America, at least for a year. Now the time has finally come. Unwillingly to dishonor or displease her father, she says goodbye to her brother, Yuji, and her traditional mother who taught her everything she knows of the way of life in Japan, and heads to America for school at a girls school in California, near where her father's brother lives, whom she will be visiting. After arriving in America, she meets her uncle Tak, his wife Reiko and their children Ken, Sally, and Tami. She soon meets Tak's assistant at Stanford, the university where he heads the department. His name is Peter, and he is fascinated by Hiroko and the traditions and respect for her country she exudes. They soon fall deeply in love, but it comes with horrible timing. While away at school, Japan bombs Pearl Harbor, effectively changing her, and her family's, lives forever. Soon after, Hiroko is moved to an attic space in her dorm, where she stays alone and in the cold. After a horrible incident against her by the other girls in the school, she is asked to leave. The last thing she hears from her father is that he wants her to stay in America until the war is over, and hopefully resume school. While back at the home with her cousins, she becomes close with Tami and Ken, and of course Peter. who she loves deeply, but who is dangerous to love-interracial marriage between a white man and an Asian woman is still unallowed legally in California. Before they have a chance to truly explore their deep love for each other, the order comes for the people of Palo Alto, where they live, must sell or give away everything they own in nine days and go to a center. Peter visits her every day while they are at this center, where their entire family is forced to sleep and stay in a horse stall-which hasn't even been cleaned out for them. They take long walks together, uncertain of the future, and have a Buddhist priest who they find at the camp perform a legally unofficial wedding ceremony-but for Hiroko, it is in every way binding. They spend as much time together as they can before Peter has to leave, he's been drafted into the army. They do not know if they will ever see each other again, or if any of the family will see each other again. Awhile after Peter goes into battle, the family is told that they will be splitting up. Reiko and the children will go to one camp, while Tak-a political science professor, has been determined to be "higher risk" and will go to a separate facility-they aren't allowed to know where. Even more "dangerous" Hiroko will go to an even more secure facility. Once at the camp which is truly a prison, Hiroko is interrogated for months before she is determined to be safe, and not a threat to the country even though she is a Japanese citizen. She is reassigned to another camp, where she is assigned to live with what she thinks are strangers. She soon realizes she has been reunited with Reiko, Ken, Sally, and Tami. She begins to help Reiko work at the infirmary, trying to save as many people possible from the horrible diseases and meningitis that have struck them with so many living in such close quarters. There is an illusion to freedom here, but it is small. Soon Tak arrives to live with them as well. After saving a young girl whom she worked over for days, Hiroko collapses to the astonishment of all around her. After examining her, the doctor discovers that she is six months pregnant with Peter's child, and has been binding as they did in the old traditions of Japan. It almost killed her and her baby, but though the labor is difficult-much like her mothers before her, she gives birth to a healthy baby boy names Toyo. She barely keeps up with Peter as he goes across Europe fighting in WWII. Eventually, Ken decides to join the army-he knows it is the only way he can get out of the camp. Sally is angry with Hiroko for befriending a man named Tad in the infirmary, and she is being very difficult. Soon, news reaches them that Hiroko's brother, Yuji passed away. She is told of the news as her son and herself are recovering from meningitis-of which they both were very close to death. Word reaches them then, that Ken has also been killed in the line of duty. The news of this breaks the heart of Tak so deeply, that he gets very ill. In less than three years he has seen his entire life he built with his wife for eighteen years be destroyed. His home, his dog, his items, all of them are gone. His assistant Peter, who he really did like and trust has been in the war, he knows nothing of his brother and his wife, but knows his son is dead. He hadn't been able to protect his family from the atrocity of the dysentery of the camps, of the poor living conditions and straw sacks used as mattresses. With the loss of his son Ken, Tak passes away from a broken heart. Reiko has no choice but to continue for her children, and for Hiroko and Toyo. Word eventually reaches them that FDR has signed an order that states that they are now free, they are free to go wherever they want to. But they have nowhere to return. Their house is now owned by other people, their dog with another family. Peter is gone and has no idea that he has a son. Two of them that they began with the war have died, and not only must they leave the camp but they must leave Tak's body with it. Reiko decides to take herself and her children to New Jersey, where she has relatives. Hiroko decides to go back to San Fransisco, though she has not heard from Peter in several months. Tad, who had fallen in love with her after saving her son's life in the infirmary, accepted her undying love for Peter and fell deeply in love with Sally, and joins them in Jersey. After arriving in San Fransisco, Hiroko works as a maid until the war is over, where she will return to Japan to see her parents. The news finally comes, the war has ended. The world is in disrepair, but nobody yells nasty slurs at her anymore. She takes her son and they head to Japan, to find her parents. Upon arriving back in Japan, after over four years away, she learns that her parents were both killed by a bomb from America. She is heartbroken. She also learned while working as a maid that Peter is missing in action-presumed dead. Will Peter ever get to come home and see his son, or is he truly gone forever? Will Hiroko truly have to survive without any of her loved ones? (hide spoiler)]

  15. 4 out of 5

    Yugadi

    This is just my second Steel book and i wonder why don't I pick up more of em. She is one the most renowned contemporary authors and i can see why. Her writing captivates you and you find yourself reading even though nothing much is happening. Hiroko was a very different protagonist for me. A Japanese woman in 1940s, painfully shy, caring about her family's honour more than herself? That's something you don't come across these days. Her character developed a lot. The bravery she shows in the las This is just my second Steel book and i wonder why don't I pick up more of em. She is one the most renowned contemporary authors and i can see why. Her writing captivates you and you find yourself reading even though nothing much is happening. Hiroko was a very different protagonist for me. A Japanese woman in 1940s, painfully shy, caring about her family's honour more than herself? That's something you don't come across these days. Her character developed a lot. The bravery she shows in the last few pages is admirable.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Not a happy book but it was a good study in history.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dianne McMahan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A Human Tragedy and America's Great Shame This is an extraordinary work of fiction from one of the World's great authors about the inescapable tragedy of America and how it took care of the Japanese and their familiesl,living in the U.S.during the War.(pun intended) They forced them from their homes,their careers,friends and the lives they had lived for yrs.and put them in encampments. Many of them were highly.paid professionals and offered much to American society. This work of fiction is about a A Human Tragedy and America's Great Shame This is an extraordinary work of fiction from one of the World's great authors about the inescapable tragedy of America and how it took care of the Japanese and their familiesl,living in the U.S.during the War.(pun intended) They forced them from their homes,their careers,friends and the lives they had lived for yrs.and put them in encampments. Many of them were highly.paid professionals and offered much to American society. This work of fiction is about a young woman of 18,who comes to America from Japan to attend a prestigious college for one yr. Her father wanted it so badly for her and had saved for this,his whole adult life. So,she goes to please her father and lives in California with her Aunt,Uncle and their three kids. She lives with her relatives for 5 months,before Japan bombs Pearl Harbor and then her life becomes a living nightmare. Her uncle is a College professor with a much younger associate,that she meets and develops feelings for and he for her. The relationship became intense very quickly and since he was an American,he wasn't interred and took over her uncle's job.He helped them get their lives in order and visited them at the camp daily. She becomes pregnant during the visits and unbeknownst to him,he goes into the Army,instead of continuing to teach. He is sent to Europe almost immediately and that's when everything starts to become undone even more. Between the Camps and the Beauracrats of the Army, they quickly lose touch and she never tells him about the pregnancy. Many horrific sicknesses befall the camps,many barely survive and there are deaths that take its toll on the family. You will want to read this book to see how things really shape up during their yrs.at the camps and what happens to the family, after the War. I have read hundreds of fiction and non-fiction books about WWII and this one ranks right up there at the very top. I really hated to finish it as it was a very,very good book !

  18. 4 out of 5

    girlgotnoidentity

    A story about a Japanese family and their struggles in life way back Second World War. This is a journey of a lifetime and survival after a big and devastating loss, how they cope and continue their life after all those things. Love comes in special package in this novel because it doesn’t show romantic love only but everlasting and immeasurable love to family and friends, this is a good read to everyone who still wanders about the typical people who experienced and live in times of war. I still A story about a Japanese family and their struggles in life way back Second World War. This is a journey of a lifetime and survival after a big and devastating loss, how they cope and continue their life after all those things. Love comes in special package in this novel because it doesn’t show romantic love only but everlasting and immeasurable love to family and friends, this is a good read to everyone who still wanders about the typical people who experienced and live in times of war. I still marvel how much bravery the characters the author put up in this novel, they have all this characteristics that you will eventually love and idolize because of how the author turns things out and their actions to each of them. This is not only a journey of a lifetime for the characters but a journey as well to the readers because in each new chapter is a new adventure that you surely will love to indulge into. Expect some unexpected characters to turn the plot into something warm and light-hearted, you’ll love how it goes by then. Expect some crying also in the last chapters of the novel, in there you’ll see the real emotions the characters shed from the rest of the story, it is a must wait part of the story, I’m telling you. The combination of love and loss, hope and war, suffering and freedom, are what makes this novel precious and very well-written.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    In Danielle Steel's Silent Honor, she told us a story from a Japanese-American's POV, right before one of the darkest days in our history: World War I. Professor Masso Takashimaya had strong dreams for the future in 1920s Japan. Twenty years later, his 18-year-old daughter Hiroko was torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, when she boarded a ship to come to California for an American education in August 1941. From there, she went to Palo Alto to her uncle's home, when she i In Danielle Steel's Silent Honor, she told us a story from a Japanese-American's POV, right before one of the darkest days in our history: World War I. Professor Masso Takashimaya had strong dreams for the future in 1920s Japan. Twenty years later, his 18-year-old daughter Hiroko was torn between her mother's traditions and her father's wishes, when she boarded a ship to come to California for an American education in August 1941. From there, she went to Palo Alto to her uncle's home, when she it was a whole new world for her, when her cousins became more American than Japanese. Peter Jenkins, her uncle's assistant at Stanford, became a link between both old and new worlds. While she longed to go home, Pearl Harbor struck that December, while her father told her to stay safe in California--later Japanese and Japanese-American families were forced to abandon home, quit their jobs and go to detention center. We watched all of these events from her eyes and from her American cousin's views too.

  20. 4 out of 5

    BreeAnn (She Just Loves Books)

    What I 😍Loved: Hiroko's determination throughout the book. How I 😯😥😘 Felt: The book is a love story, so I did feel the love, but the topic of internment camps tugged at my heart strings and had me feeling angry and protective for Hiroko. To Read 👍Or 👎 Not to Read: If you enjoy @writer.daniellesteel books this is a book for you. This would also be enjoyable if you liked books on WWII history or love stories. It's a great book! 👍 Hiroko moves to California to live with her American relatives at the r What I 😍Loved: Hiroko's determination throughout the book. How I 😯😥😘 Felt: The book is a love story, so I did feel the love, but the topic of internment camps tugged at my heart strings and had me feeling angry and protective for Hiroko. To Read 👍Or 👎 Not to Read: If you enjoy @writer.daniellesteel books this is a book for you. This would also be enjoyable if you liked books on WWII history or love stories. It's a great book! 👍 Hiroko moves to California to live with her American relatives at the request of her mother and father. She starts school at a women's college and falls for a professor. Then Pearl Harbor is attacked and Hiroko and her family are separated in internment camps. We follow her story of being imprisoned through this terrible time and how her love for her professor survives.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Farah

    It was so badly written I hated it, yet the story good enough to enjoy. So basically it was a very bumpy experience, going through badly described passages and unnecessary repetitions and cringe worthy plot twists and just every imaginable literary mistake ever. I do not feel it was a complete waste of time as it educated me on a well researched and novel side of the WW2. But I do wish it was better told. This was my first experience with Danielle Steel and I do not see myself looking for anything It was so badly written I hated it, yet the story good enough to enjoy. So basically it was a very bumpy experience, going through badly described passages and unnecessary repetitions and cringe worthy plot twists and just every imaginable literary mistake ever. I do not feel it was a complete waste of time as it educated me on a well researched and novel side of the WW2. But I do wish it was better told. This was my first experience with Danielle Steel and I do not see myself looking for anything by her in the near future.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Felicia

    Loved it! If you like any reads that have some references to "real events" particularly Pearl Harbor, this one is awesome! Loved it! If you like any reads that have some references to "real events" particularly Pearl Harbor, this one is awesome!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lita Lestianti

    I imagined how's life during world war because of this novel. The author described it successfully mixed with love story and career. How hard the life is at that time. I imagined how's life during world war because of this novel. The author described it successfully mixed with love story and career. How hard the life is at that time.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sue (booknbeachbag)

    Definitely one of the better Danielle Steel books that I've read. Definitely one of the better Danielle Steel books that I've read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    I went through a Danielle Steel phase in the mid-to-late 90's and bought a bunch of her books. I got bored with her writing (it can be so monotonous and repitive), so I let most of them sit on my book shelf for years. These days I mostly read Kindle books, but decided to read some books on my shelf before donating them to a book box. I've always been fascinated with Japanese customs, so I decided to try this one. **SEMI-SPOILER IF YOU DIDN'T READ THE BOOK JACKET** I didn't read the jacket, so I h I went through a Danielle Steel phase in the mid-to-late 90's and bought a bunch of her books. I got bored with her writing (it can be so monotonous and repitive), so I let most of them sit on my book shelf for years. These days I mostly read Kindle books, but decided to read some books on my shelf before donating them to a book box. I've always been fascinated with Japanese customs, so I decided to try this one. **SEMI-SPOILER IF YOU DIDN'T READ THE BOOK JACKET** I didn't read the jacket, so I had no idea that it took place during World War II and the Japanese internment camps. I knew a little about them, but I wasn't quite prepared for the sad events and humiliation. Given that Steel is a romance writer, and because of stories I've heard before, I know that even the true to history parts of it are sugar-coated for the romance reader. It was actually a very good, yet sad, story, and I feel like Steel did a good job explaining the treatment of Japanese Americans. It was a sad reminder of how poorly our country treated people who had lived here all of their lives, all because of their heritage. What I loved most (and least) about this story was how much Hiroko grows up through all of this. Her Japanese customs and sweet shyness made me smile and appreciate her way of life. To watch it slowly unravel and see her forced to become strong and grow up so quickly was both hard to read and and yet admirable. While Peter often referred to her as "little one," you certainly did not think of her that way after a little while in the internment camps. It was very clear how strong this tiny woman had become. I can't even imagine so much humiliation and loss like this family endured. They were disrespected, treated poorly, and left to fend for themselves. It was a little hard to read, but I kept hoping after every bad thing that there would be a happy ending. Honestly, it ended a little too abruptly to let it sink in. I wish there had been a little more to the story because there was so much loss that the one good thing that happened really didn't make it all better. This was a pretty good story, but I found myself thinking many times that I wish someone else had been writing it. While Steel can tell a story, it's just never really very exciting. All in all though, I would recommend this book to anyone interested in that time period. On the other hand, it was a reminder of American history that makes me a little ashamed of the USA.

  26. 4 out of 5

    The Hungry Mind

    *SILENT HONOUR* . Of all things in this world, tragedy is one of the greatest teachers and unifiers of people. And there is no greater tragedy inflicted on humankind than war. It is through a civilian's life during war that one can truly see the toll it takes on people and how while it parades behind the facade of being glorious and patriotic, a war can indeed leave scars that can never be erased and teach lessons that will never be forgotten. . The only daughter and the apple of her father's eye, Hi *SILENT HONOUR* . Of all things in this world, tragedy is one of the greatest teachers and unifiers of people. And there is no greater tragedy inflicted on humankind than war. It is through a civilian's life during war that one can truly see the toll it takes on people and how while it parades behind the facade of being glorious and patriotic, a war can indeed leave scars that can never be erased and teach lessons that will never be forgotten. . The only daughter and the apple of her father's eye, Hiroko Takashimaya is reluctantly sent to the United States to pursue further studies by a father who wants her to marvel at the wonders of the world, while she and her mother - both of old school thought - believe that Japan is the only place they ever need to be. . What started out as a 1 year study trip, turned out the be the journey of a life time for Hiroko and thousands of other Japanese immigrants in the USA, as the second world war raged on and the sudden attack on Pearl Harbour turned all Japanese people into enemies and 'illegal aliens' overnight - including Hiroko's cousins who has lived in America all their lives and were practically citizens. . Worried about their fate and scared for their lives, their worst nightmares come true when all people with Japanese ancestry were herded into internment camps with no destination or duration in mind. . It is this visit to America that forced Hiroko to bloom from the timid, young girl that she was in Japan to a fierce, independent lady who experienced all events life had to offer within the limited area of the camp. She discovered the love of her life, she saw community and brotherhood rise from the ashes of the war and she saw illness and loss of life like never before. With every crest of happiness came a trough of desolation and hopelessness. . It is through this heartrending yet heartwarming tale of love and loss, trust and betrayal, and strength and heartbreak that Danille Steel weaves a novel that will keep you turning the page and burning the midnight oil.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Forbes

    I really enjoyed this book, as I usually do enjoy most all of Danielle Steel's books. This one was quite a heartbreaker though, and about a subject I am really not too knowledgeable on, and that's how Americans treated Japanese after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, which, of course, led to the US entering WWII. This is a fiction novel, but as I read it, I realized that it was based, at least somewhat, on events that actually occurred. This is the story of a young Japanese woman, Hiroko Takashimaya, I really enjoyed this book, as I usually do enjoy most all of Danielle Steel's books. This one was quite a heartbreaker though, and about a subject I am really not too knowledgeable on, and that's how Americans treated Japanese after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, which, of course, led to the US entering WWII. This is a fiction novel, but as I read it, I realized that it was based, at least somewhat, on events that actually occurred. This is the story of a young Japanese woman, Hiroko Takashimaya, who is sent from Japan to California, by her parents, who wanted very much for her to experience American life, culture, by attending school for a year here. She was staying with her very American uncle and his family, even though her uncle had been born in Japan, he had moved to America many years earlier, and was raising his family here. While Hiroko is at school, Pearl Harbor is attacked by the Japanese and war breaks out, making it impossible for her to return to Japan when she had planned on. Things continue to get increasingly worse for anyone of Japanese decent, and eventually, all freedoms are stripped from them, they are forced to leave almost everything behind, and are sent to relocation centers, which were really internment camps, where the living conditions were horrible, meager food and medical supplies, and many suffered, got sick, and yes, some even died. I had so many different emotions running through me while reading this, but the one thing I kept thinking was how could people be so cruel to each other? I guess when things on such a grand scale happen, emotions get jumbled, and yes, hateful, cruel things happen. Danielle Steel did such an excellent job of describing all the things that Hiroko experienced, so much heartbreak for such a young woman, I was totally caught up in it and the pages kept turning for me! Five star read for me!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    As a child, I fondly remember spending time with my maternal grandmother. Whether it was for a holiday, an afternoon, or an entire week, I would always enjoy the time we spent together. She was an avid knitter (who even had her Christmas stockings on display at a window at Tiffany’s in NYC) and a voracious reader. I remember large bookshelves on display in her living room with many hardcover books. One name that I remember seeing on many of the spines was Danielle Steel. This month, my grandma w As a child, I fondly remember spending time with my maternal grandmother. Whether it was for a holiday, an afternoon, or an entire week, I would always enjoy the time we spent together. She was an avid knitter (who even had her Christmas stockings on display at a window at Tiffany’s in NYC) and a voracious reader. I remember large bookshelves on display in her living room with many hardcover books. One name that I remember seeing on many of the spines was Danielle Steel. This month, my grandma would have been 100 years old, so I read a Danielle Steel book in her honor. I selected Silent Honor because I am not typically a fan of the romance genre. This book appeared to be more of a historical fiction piece rather than a romance novel. Set in both Japan and the United States at the beginning and through World War II, the story is of a young girl (Hiroko) whose family sends her to the US for the first year of her college education. She arrives in the US shortly before the bombing of Pearl Harbor. As we know from history, the Japanese living in California were ostracized even though many of them were born in the United States. They were rounded up, stripped of all of their belongings, and forced to live in internment camps. Hiroko was no different except for the concern that she might be an enemy of the state. Hiroko was a visitor, not a citizen. A story of love, loss, hope, and survival, the book provides a view of this Executive Order from the eyes of the people most impacted. It made me realize how little we have learned from our history when reflecting on how we treated Muslims after 9/11, Asians during the COVID-19 pandemic, and immigrants at the US/Mexico border. While somewhat predictable, the book is a quick and pleasurable read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Victor Henrique

    Pure historical fiction, well-written and somewhat exciting, but not flawless. I felt i needeed some more enthusiasm to keep reading, for in the beginning the story is very dramatic and mellow. I'm very fond of japanese culture, so it might be one of the reasons i felt the book a little bit repetitive and clichéd . Despite all the trouble i had in the first 120 pages, Steel handled very well the repetition and started to turn the tide of the story . Suddenly, i started to see trough her writing Pure historical fiction, well-written and somewhat exciting, but not flawless. I felt i needeed some more enthusiasm to keep reading, for in the beginning the story is very dramatic and mellow. I'm very fond of japanese culture, so it might be one of the reasons i felt the book a little bit repetitive and clichéd . Despite all the trouble i had in the first 120 pages, Steel handled very well the repetition and started to turn the tide of the story . Suddenly, i started to see trough her writing the miserable conditions that suffocates human beings in periods of irrationallity and unreasonable boundaries. It seems that prejudice is a social disease and in war times things can go very dishumane. This work can teach you a lot, such as to think and reason when things starts to cross the frontiers of control and abrubtly becoming excuses for atrocities... not to mention the amount of historical facts you can learn from the book. Danielle Steel managed to frame the feeling of hostility at that period and added the sentiment that japanese people care so much for... Honor . She could also depict how awful it is for the innocent people from that nation the dreadful emotion of dishonor. The work insn't perfect, but as soon as the historical facts started pouring into my head i knew i hadn't lost my time with over 400 pages. Certainly, when reading the book you will feel the maturity of the writing style and the story itself.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gayathri

    Masao a professor was man ahead of his tkme who has a thought for modern ideals was married to a women who strong believed in tradition. She believed by not having son for her son, she has failed her husband. They had a daughter, Hiroko and son Yuji. Masao wanted to send both of them for education. He sent Hiroko to Palo Alto where her uncle Takeo stays with his family. She had joined st.andrew's College. Her uncle and cousins were completely Americans than japanese. She had cultural shock both w Masao a professor was man ahead of his tkme who has a thought for modern ideals was married to a women who strong believed in tradition. She believed by not having son for her son, she has failed her husband. They had a daughter, Hiroko and son Yuji. Masao wanted to send both of them for education. He sent Hiroko to Palo Alto where her uncle Takeo stays with his family. She had joined st.andrew's College. Her uncle and cousins were completely Americans than japanese. She had cultural shock both with her Uncle's family and country. She was as traditional as her mother Hidemi. One fine day, pearl Harbor was bombed by japanese. Within hours after the incident, war is declared. This cause a sudden change Thier lives. Meanwhile she falls in love with Peter who is an American. As they try to survive through the war, Takeo ,his family and other Japanese and Japanese American were moved to various camps, were questions, their loyalties tested. Set in the backdrop of war, the story is about a woman who struggles to triumph through the war to get reunited with her love of her life and also how she tries to balance between the culture she has grown up with and the one she fallen in love with

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...