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40 review for A Nation At Risk: The Full Account

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Armstrong

    I'm left with two thoughts: first, this "report" is shameless propaganda and it is distressing that so much effort was put into trying to "fix" our nation as a result of it; and second, even the risks which transcend propaganda have not been addressed in any meaningful way in the 40 years since the report was first unveiled. Truly, this artifact is a sad commentary on our nation's educational system regardless of how you view it. I'm left with two thoughts: first, this "report" is shameless propaganda and it is distressing that so much effort was put into trying to "fix" our nation as a result of it; and second, even the risks which transcend propaganda have not been addressed in any meaningful way in the 40 years since the report was first unveiled. Truly, this artifact is a sad commentary on our nation's educational system regardless of how you view it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    I've read a lot of literature about education and teaching that references this text as basically the father of contemporary education reform. I can't believe I put off reading it until now, especially because this text is TINY. How is a text this short the catalyst for overhauling our education system in the worst was possible? The copy I acquired was printed in 1983 and is 45 pages (65 with appendices). First, the "diagnoses" and "recommendations" are incredibly vague and uncited. THERE ARE NO I've read a lot of literature about education and teaching that references this text as basically the father of contemporary education reform. I can't believe I put off reading it until now, especially because this text is TINY. How is a text this short the catalyst for overhauling our education system in the worst was possible? The copy I acquired was printed in 1983 and is 45 pages (65 with appendices). First, the "diagnoses" and "recommendations" are incredibly vague and uncited. THERE ARE NO CITATIONS! When the authors say "Some 23 million Americans adults are functionally illiterate..." (p. 8), there is no cited evidence of this functional illiteracy nor a description of how they are defining "functional illiteracy". Without providing specific evidence, the authors of this text are telling Americans - using sensational and alarming language - that our education system is ruined (compared to what, exactly?!) and that we will be basically taken over by other countries if we don't do anything about it. Second, it is hilarious that this book proposes a bunch of reforms without ever discussing how to pay for them. It's like, magically, this Utopian educational system will just appear without allocating funds to do all of the things they suggest while paying teachers more money. What this book fails to mention is that while test scores were declining (beginning in the 60s), so was FUNDING FOR PUBLIC EDUCATION. Is it really that our curricula or teachers are broken or that our society no longer thinks education is important? Lastly, the tone of this book is clearly pro-business; fiscally and socially conservative; and only focused on technology, math, and science rather than anything else. The authors have the audacity at one point to state "The citizen is dismayed at a steady 15-year decline in industrial productivity, as one great American industry after another falls to world competition" (p. 18). They are seriously trying to say that EDUCATION (or lack thereof) is responsible for the beginning of corporate outsourcing? The average American (who is dumb and functionally illiterate according to their findings) would read this and not see that jobs are disappearing because corporations have noticed that they can pay workers in third world countries markedly less than Americans, so why not? All in all, this is a must-read for anyone interested in educational policy, reform, politics, and/or teaching since this "open letter" marks the beginning of the educational reform in this nation that has brought us charter schools, No Child Left Behind, and standardized testing so serious that barely any other content is taught in classrooms but test material. The authors of this study (one a businessman from Bell Labs... why?) clearly wanted to scare the American public into changing education, but at whose behest? Who found these people and who paid them (or donated to some campaign) to write this?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    We had to read this for class, but it should almost be required reading for all educators. As a document that significantly impacted education in the decades following its release, A Nation At Risk is a study in politics driving policy. What's interesting, is that even now, 30 years after its release, the concerns and statements including in much of the report remain valid. Sadly, the state of education that has resulted in the last decades have only exacerbated the problem. While striving to edu We had to read this for class, but it should almost be required reading for all educators. As a document that significantly impacted education in the decades following its release, A Nation At Risk is a study in politics driving policy. What's interesting, is that even now, 30 years after its release, the concerns and statements including in much of the report remain valid. Sadly, the state of education that has resulted in the last decades have only exacerbated the problem. While striving to educate students "better", an environment has been created in which we can't hardly educate them at all. We go for breadth instead of depth and testing over the individuality the reported prizes so much. I almost feel it's time for a "new" Nation at Risk report.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Reuel

    Published in 1984, it made a huge impact in K-12 education circles nationally. Basically, it condemned K-12 public education saying that if a foreign power had imposed such awful schools on us, we'd consider it an act of agression/war, etc., but we'd done it to ourselves. Huge school reform efforts followed--not all that successful, however. Published in 1984, it made a huge impact in K-12 education circles nationally. Basically, it condemned K-12 public education saying that if a foreign power had imposed such awful schools on us, we'd consider it an act of agression/war, etc., but we'd done it to ourselves. Huge school reform efforts followed--not all that successful, however.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leanna Aker

    Nothing super profound here, but that might be because I'm reading it after the fact. Many spot on observations. Nothing super profound here, but that might be because I'm reading it after the fact. Many spot on observations.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Flieger

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rashi Verma

  8. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Cameroni

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leslee

  10. 5 out of 5

    Saeed Alqahtani

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Hibbert

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jesse L Knepper

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kaywin Cottle

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marina

  16. 5 out of 5

    Leisa

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mike Taylor

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ioana Colfescu

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eric Uecker

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Choi

  22. 5 out of 5

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scheiboeski

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  25. 4 out of 5

    Garo Green

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

  29. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm24601 Hunt

  31. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  32. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

  33. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

  34. 5 out of 5

    Janola

  35. 4 out of 5

    Naif Alamri

  36. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Smith

  37. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  38. 4 out of 5

    Lexi

  39. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn Shaver

  40. 4 out of 5

    Mia

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