Hot Best Seller

Hellraisers: A Graphic Biography

Availability: Ready to download

Raise a glass to the story of four of the greatest actors—and boozers—of all time: Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O’Toole, and Oliver Reed. This inventive graphic work seamlessly weaves their four biographies into one fast-paced adventure of drunken binges, orgies, parties, and fun. The story begins at a London pub one sorry Christmas and is told through the eyes of Raise a glass to the story of four of the greatest actors—and boozers—of all time: Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O’Toole, and Oliver Reed. This inventive graphic work seamlessly weaves their four biographies into one fast-paced adventure of drunken binges, orgies, parties, and fun. The story begins at a London pub one sorry Christmas and is told through the eyes of Martin, a wannabe hellraiser sitting at the end of the bar alone, drinking himself into oblivion. He’s joined in turn by Burton, Harris, Reed, and O’Toole, who take Martin on tours of their tumultuous childhoods, rises to stardom, and chaotic personal lives.


Compare

Raise a glass to the story of four of the greatest actors—and boozers—of all time: Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O’Toole, and Oliver Reed. This inventive graphic work seamlessly weaves their four biographies into one fast-paced adventure of drunken binges, orgies, parties, and fun. The story begins at a London pub one sorry Christmas and is told through the eyes of Raise a glass to the story of four of the greatest actors—and boozers—of all time: Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O’Toole, and Oliver Reed. This inventive graphic work seamlessly weaves their four biographies into one fast-paced adventure of drunken binges, orgies, parties, and fun. The story begins at a London pub one sorry Christmas and is told through the eyes of Martin, a wannabe hellraiser sitting at the end of the bar alone, drinking himself into oblivion. He’s joined in turn by Burton, Harris, Reed, and O’Toole, who take Martin on tours of their tumultuous childhoods, rises to stardom, and chaotic personal lives.

30 review for Hellraisers: A Graphic Biography

  1. 5 out of 5

    Antonomasia

    For once, the artwork was absolutely perfect for the subject. (With too many graphic novels I find this a sticking point.) JAKe's drawings are angular, scuzzy, thick-lined black and white: they suit the drunken and sometimes chaotic lives of the characters, they give a sense of very strong personalities - personalities from the past, who started their screen careers in the black and white era and who are presented in the story as Christmas Carol style ghosts. What has stayed with me about this b For once, the artwork was absolutely perfect for the subject. (With too many graphic novels I find this a sticking point.) JAKe's drawings are angular, scuzzy, thick-lined black and white: they suit the drunken and sometimes chaotic lives of the characters, they give a sense of very strong personalities - personalities from the past, who started their screen careers in the black and white era and who are presented in the story as Christmas Carol style ghosts. What has stayed with me about this book is an ambivalence about the way it treats its subjects. It's easy to see why an author might want to present an alternative to the lionisation of notorious drunks and still make it kind of fun and laddish. But there were a few too many instances when I felt like I was watching some paper equivalent of a public information film about the dangers of too much booze. (Dunno if Robert Sellers' prose book on this crowd is similar.) There are screeds of internet writing already tearing down such former heroes. And I can't stand the images and memories of the - relatively recently - deceased being used for causes they wouldn't necessarily have agreed with. How many of Burton, Harris, O'Toole and Reed would have wanted to come back as these ghosts of Christmas teaching a lesson to a thirtysomething dad who likes a bit too much to drink? It's a little embarrassing (in a teenage kinda way) to fall in with the contemporary trend of liking memoirs, but really I would much rather hear people in their own words. I have a bias here due to a couple of favourite exes having been alcoholics - crazy adventures, absolutely; violent, never - who simply gave up as they got older, deciding on their own terms that it was getting in the way of what they wanted to do or was no longer fun, and managing fine without AA etc. Maybe that's not an alcoholic by some people's definitions but the during certainly looked like one. (My experience of people who do a lot of drugs and don't like drink is more negative; I'd much rather be around someone who's hungover than with a person with Tuesday blues.) Perhaps experience means I'm not as into the premise of the book as some might be, but the principle of it means there is a sort of puritan hijacking - nowhere near as bad as Leah Betts, at least - that sticks in the craw. Which then begs the question why the fuck I gave it 4 stars. I really enjoyed the drawings - the faces, particularly, are great - and the anecdotes - there are plenty between the bouts of occasional didacticism - and the historical detail and the construction of the story. It has a kind of fanfic element - this guy gets to go on a night out with his heroes. A lot of it was funny. Plus, time travel!

  2. 5 out of 5

    GoldGato

    This graphic presentation of Hellraisers: The Inebriated Life and Times of Richard Burton, Peter O'Toole, Richard Harris & Oliver Reed is good fun, as the hellraising stars appear as Dickens-like ghosts (yes, O'Toole is still alive, but whatever) to relate their tales of wild debauchery. Jake does a good job of drawing each actor from their initial youthful appearances to their older and more well-remembered images. Burton takes us through his meeting with Errol Flynn who introduced him to a Holl This graphic presentation of Hellraisers: The Inebriated Life and Times of Richard Burton, Peter O'Toole, Richard Harris & Oliver Reed is good fun, as the hellraising stars appear as Dickens-like ghosts (yes, O'Toole is still alive, but whatever) to relate their tales of wild debauchery. Jake does a good job of drawing each actor from their initial youthful appearances to their older and more well-remembered images. Burton takes us through his meeting with Errol Flynn who introduced him to a Hollywood brothel and then on to the Liz & Dick years, which means pictures of Burton in fur coats and sunglasses. Richard Harris shows up as the wild man he really was, his hairline receding as the years pass by. Oliver Reed is more menacing, still looking like the Hulk until the end, and then the flamboyant O'Toole who saunters through life as though he were still playing the nobleman in THE RULING CLASS. Having worked in Hollywood and seen the so-called puritan/sober stars and producers, most of whom were whacked out of their minds on drugs and plastic surgery, I have always found the take-us-as-we-are alcoholic binges of these four British actors to be far more refreshing...and honest. Book Season = Winter (just live in the pub)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Diozzi

    It was OK. Entertaining, that's about it but otherwise...trying to find a point to all of the stories. It was OK. Entertaining, that's about it but otherwise...trying to find a point to all of the stories.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Blake Gladfelter

    A collection of great drinking stories. But like all drinking stories, the fun starts to dry up once the liver goes south.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    I normally love graphic novels but I found this to be a really bad interpretation of the original book in the sense that it added nothing, if not managed to magnify the flaws of the book. It glosses over so much of the detail I enjoyed in the book, and it also adds in a dumb narrator character in an attempt to turn this into some sort of moral tale. Framing the story as a drunken Christmas Carol could have worked had they put more care into crafting any sort of emotional both or truth with both I normally love graphic novels but I found this to be a really bad interpretation of the original book in the sense that it added nothing, if not managed to magnify the flaws of the book. It glosses over so much of the detail I enjoyed in the book, and it also adds in a dumb narrator character in an attempt to turn this into some sort of moral tale. Framing the story as a drunken Christmas Carol could have worked had they put more care into crafting any sort of emotional both or truth with both the narrator character and with each 'ghost.' The problem with the book was how it would gloss over some truly horrific incidents as a cheeky lark, "ha-ha those boys!", and in the comic is seems ten fold more dismissive as it tries to boil everybody down into 12~ pages of material. Showcasing Oliver Reed, for example, as a circus ringleader who gets to relive his glory days after his death doesn't exactly make me feel like I'm learning how dangerous binge drinking is, just the opposite. Of course none of these guys /were/ black and white morality tales, they all had their hefty share of issues with their ups and downs, which is all good and fine for a gossip-heavy biography, but not so much for a remake of A Christmas Carol. I was also just so-so on the art, sometimes it was great and other times it felt too broad – like that narrator who was so characterless it was almost insulting.

  6. 5 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    3.5 rounded up for presenting four peoples life stories in an entertaining fashion. If I knew what I was in for I'd have skipped it but I don't regret reading it- the time taken was my problem. The art is rough but it fits the themes, moods, characters and stories. This took me many sessions to read so I recommend preparing to read in four sittings- one for each character. It's Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Oliver Reed and Peter O'Toole as the ghosts of "A Christmas Carol" warning Joe Guy about 3.5 rounded up for presenting four peoples life stories in an entertaining fashion. If I knew what I was in for I'd have skipped it but I don't regret reading it- the time taken was my problem. The art is rough but it fits the themes, moods, characters and stories. This took me many sessions to read so I recommend preparing to read in four sittings- one for each character. It's Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Oliver Reed and Peter O'Toole as the ghosts of "A Christmas Carol" warning Joe Guy about what alcohol is capable of ruining in his life. Despite good intentions they still make booze abuse look fun most of the time. Despite being entirely dialogue and inner monologue there are so many time periods, scenes and people jammed into this book. I recommend the (lengthy) three page introduction but it's not necessary.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Setting up Burton, O'Toole, Harris, and Reed as some sort of ghosts of inebriations past is an interesting conceit to tell the most salacious bits of their individual biographies. The art is well done. I like the strong lines. Setting up Burton, O'Toole, Harris, and Reed as some sort of ghosts of inebriations past is an interesting conceit to tell the most salacious bits of their individual biographies. The art is well done. I like the strong lines.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The graphic part is OUTSTANDING. Worth the price, alone. The framing story angle makes no sense. So it's kind of a draw. Should've just told the stories . . . straight. The art is GREAT, though, to reiterate. The Oliver Reed visuals are especially awesome. Cheers. The graphic part is OUTSTANDING. Worth the price, alone. The framing story angle makes no sense. So it's kind of a draw. Should've just told the stories . . . straight. The art is GREAT, though, to reiterate. The Oliver Reed visuals are especially awesome. Cheers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

    A bit of a strange book, though the drawings of the actors was good.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bobby D

    Gossip makes the world go around and confirmed true gossip is the best kind especially when it involves high profile celebrities. The four Irish actors presented here were stage and screen actors extraordinary. Well let’s say all but Oliver Reed who never seemed close to breaking through to stardom the way O’Toole, Harris and Burton did. Oliver Reed was also the only one of the group who came from a well to do family. The point of this book is to entertain the reader with story after story of t Gossip makes the world go around and confirmed true gossip is the best kind especially when it involves high profile celebrities. The four Irish actors presented here were stage and screen actors extraordinary. Well let’s say all but Oliver Reed who never seemed close to breaking through to stardom the way O’Toole, Harris and Burton did. Oliver Reed was also the only one of the group who came from a well to do family. The point of this book is to entertain the reader with story after story of these four actors drinking with many other theatrical talents indulged in what can only be described as inappropriate behavior. There self-destructive behavior in all but O’Toole’s case resulted in their early deaths and the squandering of their talent. O’Toole said it was marvelous to wake up in the morning and not know what country he was in. He is alive today because in his 40s he had to quit drinking or die (so he took up smoking and laid off alcohol). My favorite of the group is Peter O’Toole and my favorite O’Toole story is: “When (Peter) Finch was working in Ireland in the early 60s O’Toole joined him one night for a drink but the pub refused to serve them because it was after closing time. Both stars decided that the only course of action was to buy the pub, so they wrote out a cheque for it on the spot. The following morning after realizing what they’d done the pair rushed back to the scene of the crime. Luckily the landlord hadn’t cashed the cheque yet and disaster was averted. O’Toole and Finch remained on friendly terms with the pub owner and when he died his wife invited them to his funeral. Both knelt at the graveside as the coffin was slowly lowered in, sobbing noisily. When Finch turned away, unable to stand it anymore, O’Toole saw his friend’s face change from a look of sorrow to one of total astonishment. They were at the wrong funeral. Their friend was being buried 100 yards away.” They were all alcoholics who lived hedonistic lives of misbehavior. Richard Harris eventually gave up drink because he realized he remembered none of it. Burton and Reed never did. Burton fought the demons of great talent (perhaps the greatest of all four especially on stage) by preferring great fame and notoriety and great wealth over quality work. He took the money and ran leaving one bad picture after another behind him. Oliver Reed comes off just a first class jerk. Reed it appears was a drunken, fighting, rude bloke with no charm and total disregard for health or life of even those around him. His stories are mostly ugly and sad. But the whole of the stories and lives presented from their dark sides are all sad. O’Toole less so as he has outlived the bunch and developed an eccentricity that is both charming and out of date. As I read the book I could not help myself from telling others around me a story or two from what I had just read. There just to amazing, many funny, many shocking made more so because my generation grew up with this talent. Who can forget Richard Harris in SNOW GOOSE perhaps the best Hallmark Hall of Fame film ever (Or This Sporting life or A Man Call Horse, or Mutiny on the Bounty). Or Richard Burton as BECKET (with Peter O’Toole) or his stage work as Hamlet or the king in CAMELOT. Oliver Reed not so much as he died before his last film the Russell Crow GLADIATOR even was finished. Yet it is O’TOOLE, the eccentric O’Toole that combined the best of all four with the luck of an amazing body of work. As you may be able to tell this book is a fun, light romp through these four lives as if told by their friend after a pint or two (or seven or eight). You will enjoy it and be outraged by the behavior of these four STARS.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    This graphic novel opens with Martin, a budding hellraiser, drinking himself into a stupor, stumbling home and mistreating his wife and child. After passing out on his bed, Martin is transformed to another place where he meets the spirit of Welsh actor Richard Burton. The spirit takes him through what is an autobiography of Burton’s extremely tumultuous life with an emphasis on his drinking and sex life. Some of his success as an actor is also included. While he died at the early age of 58, whe This graphic novel opens with Martin, a budding hellraiser, drinking himself into a stupor, stumbling home and mistreating his wife and child. After passing out on his bed, Martin is transformed to another place where he meets the spirit of Welsh actor Richard Burton. The spirit takes him through what is an autobiography of Burton’s extremely tumultuous life with an emphasis on his drinking and sex life. Some of his success as an actor is also included. While he died at the early age of 58, when reading this story of his life it is amazing he lived that long. Since he was nominated for seven Academy Awards and won many other awards, his acting skills are beyond dispute. Once the life of Burton is examined, the story rather seamlessly passes to Martin being exposed to the life of Irish actor Richard Harris. This job is also performed by his spirit. Another man devoted to drink and other debauchery, nominated for two Academy Awards for best actor and the winner of other awards, Harris is another actor that was very successful in spite of himself. After the life of Harris, the story makes a smooth transition on to the life of English actor Oliver Reed. He was also a man that chose a life of wildness, Reed suffered a serious facial scar in a barfight, fighting was something he was known for. Reed was known as a very belligerent drunk and his appearances on celebrity talk shows are the fodder for some dubious legends. Finally, Martin is taken on a trip through the life of British-Irish actor Peter O’Toole, again by his spirit. Another man that drank and womanized heavily, O’Toole was also an acclaimed star. He was nominated for an Academy Award for best actor in a leading role eight times, but was never selected. However, he did win many other awards. It is noted in this book that the reason none of the four ever won an Academy Award may have been due to the number of Academy men that refused to vote for them because the actor had bedded their wives. The amount of alcohol that these men supposedly drank is almost beyond belief. It has been said that for some time Burton drank three bottles of vodka a day. Other than the drinking and other debauchery, the one constant across the lives of these four men is that they had tumultuous childhoods. While some of that was due to the instability of their home life, all were rebels at an early age. Although it has an unusual form, this book is an excellent biography of four of the more notorious male actors that were extremely talented, but their flaws kept them from even higher levels of greatness. They certainly made great tabloid headlines.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Randall Smith

    Certain actors have a memorable presence in films that others lack. Everything I read about the stupid antics of these guys, the incredible waste of talent, wasted in the most ridiculous ways, did not stop the fact that I missed all of their voices and that somehow they had each somehow transcended the medium of film and connected with the audience. I remember the genuine excitement in the movie theater the first time I saw The Devils. Oliver Reed off the screen was a drunken blowhard, a childis Certain actors have a memorable presence in films that others lack. Everything I read about the stupid antics of these guys, the incredible waste of talent, wasted in the most ridiculous ways, did not stop the fact that I missed all of their voices and that somehow they had each somehow transcended the medium of film and connected with the audience. I remember the genuine excitement in the movie theater the first time I saw The Devils. Oliver Reed off the screen was a drunken blowhard, a childish, prankish, dangerous jerk. Yet either the director (Ken Russell) or the script or filming or something made him so memorable in that movie and in others (Women in Love, even Tommy). And Peter O’Toole; I don’t know anyone who has seen Lawrence of Arabia and not been thrilled with the young O’Toole. His eyes seemed to blaze out from screen. And then there’s Richard Burton’s voice. I remember hearing his King Arthur on a record. There was such real sadness, such real-world (and make-believe world) sadness in his singing. There was a lot of resonance in his head voice, you would swear it rang each distinct word. I even remember his character in The Desert Rats telling off James Mason’s Rommel. Burton’s voice and diction in that scene had almost the effect of a machine gun. And Richard Harris always had a human sympathetic presence even if playing a bad guy. Yet this book documents them being drunk through most of their lives, even acting while drunk. And all of them seem intelligent, cultured, civilized men! It’s a mystery. Maybe it’s a generational thing, but I just don’t connect with newer stars the same way. Perhaps there’s something about a shared world view that doesn’t survive the paradigmatic shift from one generation of actors to the next.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Brilliantly funny, jaw droppingly outrageous, sad and touching. I loved this book from the beginning to the end and deliberately took time reading it. Alot of people have said, of this book, that it is a sad account of four tragically wasted acting careers. The thing is, You never hear these four wishing to turn back the clock and do it differently. Yes, they acknowledged the memory loses, the insane decisions (not always whilst drunk) and the fact that they must have been demons to live with. Brilliantly funny, jaw droppingly outrageous, sad and touching. I loved this book from the beginning to the end and deliberately took time reading it. Alot of people have said, of this book, that it is a sad account of four tragically wasted acting careers. The thing is, You never hear these four wishing to turn back the clock and do it differently. Yes, they acknowledged the memory loses, the insane decisions (not always whilst drunk) and the fact that they must have been demons to live with. But they themselves said they never really regretted anything and would probably do all the same things if they could do them over. Even their ex wifes and girlfriends generally found them bores when sober! So, raise your glasses to the four greatest "Hellraisers" and celebrate their wicked ways...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gayle

    While some of this book is amusing, (people waking up in Marseilles 2 days after starting drinking in Paris and having no clue as to how they got there), it is ultimately an account of the tragic decline of some of the greatest actors of a generation: Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O'Toole, and Oliver Reed. It is pitiful to read about the depths they reached and the toll that rampant alcoholism took on their bodies, talent, and families. When Burton had spinal surgery, the doctors discove While some of this book is amusing, (people waking up in Marseilles 2 days after starting drinking in Paris and having no clue as to how they got there), it is ultimately an account of the tragic decline of some of the greatest actors of a generation: Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O'Toole, and Oliver Reed. It is pitiful to read about the depths they reached and the toll that rampant alcoholism took on their bodies, talent, and families. When Burton had spinal surgery, the doctors discovered that alcohol had crystallized along his spine. That sounds incredible until you realize he could take in 2 or 3 bottles a day of various booze. The author's style is engaging, but ultimately the book leaves the reader saddened.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Oliver

    Nice little trimmed down version of Sellers' tale of a quartet of 60s/70s British actors (OK, O'Toole and Harris are Irish by birth) and there legendary drinking; done as a graphic novel (OK, comic book), very loosely done along the lines of A Christmas Carol. Essentially it's brief biographies of the four interspersed with famous theatrical drinking anecdotes. Glad to say it's not too sentimental either, it's pretty clear that in the end, the bottle rather got the better of most of them. I'm al Nice little trimmed down version of Sellers' tale of a quartet of 60s/70s British actors (OK, O'Toole and Harris are Irish by birth) and there legendary drinking; done as a graphic novel (OK, comic book), very loosely done along the lines of A Christmas Carol. Essentially it's brief biographies of the four interspersed with famous theatrical drinking anecdotes. Glad to say it's not too sentimental either, it's pretty clear that in the end, the bottle rather got the better of most of them. I'm also not really convinced the Oliver Reed was as an actor in the same class as Burton, Harris and O'Toole; an entertaining read though.

  16. 4 out of 5

    M.J. Moore

    Imagine an alternate, modern version of Dicken's A Christmas Carol, where Ebeneezer Scrooge is a neglectful, violent alcoholic and the ghosts of the past/present/future are represented by legendary reprobates and phenomenal talents Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Oliver Reed, and Peter O Toole. Moved me, made me laugh, made me cry. Brilliantly written and illustrated. Sorry this review isn't very eloquent but this is what happens when I'm lost for words. ADORED it. Imagine an alternate, modern version of Dicken's A Christmas Carol, where Ebeneezer Scrooge is a neglectful, violent alcoholic and the ghosts of the past/present/future are represented by legendary reprobates and phenomenal talents Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Oliver Reed, and Peter O Toole. Moved me, made me laugh, made me cry. Brilliantly written and illustrated. Sorry this review isn't very eloquent but this is what happens when I'm lost for words. ADORED it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Hall

    Interesting insight into these 4 actors on a lot of levels. Felt a little tipsy just from reading the book even without anything to drink! Wow. I never heard of anyone drinking so much alcohol. Lots of curse worse and sex exploits talked about so be warned. All the drinking descriptions got a little tiresome near the end too. I enjoyed the book mostly but was happy to finish.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    It says a lot when the best bit of a graphic novel is the plain-prose introduction. I liked JAKe's art for the most part, but the book itself becomes boring and repetitive. Taking the format of Dickens' A Christmas Carol for the storytelling seems a clever idea at first, but it means that you effectively get told the same story four times in a row. Only the anecdotes are changed. Shame, that. It says a lot when the best bit of a graphic novel is the plain-prose introduction. I liked JAKe's art for the most part, but the book itself becomes boring and repetitive. Taking the format of Dickens' A Christmas Carol for the storytelling seems a clever idea at first, but it means that you effectively get told the same story four times in a row. Only the anecdotes are changed. Shame, that.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    I've been hearing about this bio on England's four most legendary Shakespearean bad boys and have been putting off reading it, so when I saw the graphic novel style version of the book I almost choked. It's such a great idea, and the way Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole in particular are depicted in these MAD Magazine from hell comics has to be seen to be believed. I've been hearing about this bio on England's four most legendary Shakespearean bad boys and have been putting off reading it, so when I saw the graphic novel style version of the book I almost choked. It's such a great idea, and the way Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole in particular are depicted in these MAD Magazine from hell comics has to be seen to be believed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    to'c

    Quite a delightful little morality tale and brief biography of four great actors. Well worth a read. The only flaw, and it's a small one, is that more familiarity of the actors' lives than I possess is, I think, necessary to get all out of this book there is to get. Knowing more about O'Toole than the others I enjoyed his chapter the most. Quite a delightful little morality tale and brief biography of four great actors. Well worth a read. The only flaw, and it's a small one, is that more familiarity of the actors' lives than I possess is, I think, necessary to get all out of this book there is to get. Knowing more about O'Toole than the others I enjoyed his chapter the most.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Craig Wilson

    Burton, O'Toole, Harris & Reed's wild years, documented in drunkenly loved detail. There's only so many tales that are entertaining before it gets tiresome, but some will revel in it. Oliver Reed's portions alone are enough to prove here are some things you simply can't "unsee." Burton, O'Toole, Harris & Reed's wild years, documented in drunkenly loved detail. There's only so many tales that are entertaining before it gets tiresome, but some will revel in it. Oliver Reed's portions alone are enough to prove here are some things you simply can't "unsee."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Edu

    Una especie de cuento de Navidad en el que en vez de espíritus los guías son cuatro grandes borrachos y desastres generales (y sin embargo o por eso mismo genios) de la actuación británica: Richard Burton, Richard Harrison, Oliver Reed y Peter O'Toole. Una especie de cuento de Navidad en el que en vez de espíritus los guías son cuatro grandes borrachos y desastres generales (y sin embargo o por eso mismo genios) de la actuación británica: Richard Burton, Richard Harrison, Oliver Reed y Peter O'Toole.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike Jennings

    Just the ticket if you want to dip in and out of some interesting, if not respectable, lives. Avoid the "hollywood" version of this: Brando and Hopper can't hold a light to these guys. Just the ticket if you want to dip in and out of some interesting, if not respectable, lives. Avoid the "hollywood" version of this: Brando and Hopper can't hold a light to these guys.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Josh Halpern

    Great read. All kinds of fun. The stories are a bit of a stretch of the imagination at times, but at other times, such stories may very well be understatements.

  25. 4 out of 5

    amy boese

    So, to sum up: drunk and disorderly, inconsiderate, childish men are great? I don't agree. The art was fun, the stories were painful but entertaining. Meh. So, to sum up: drunk and disorderly, inconsiderate, childish men are great? I don't agree. The art was fun, the stories were painful but entertaining. Meh.

  26. 4 out of 5

    McZine

    Get's straight to the point. A need to understand alcohol addiction would be highly recommended before bending the elbow to read this one. A very good read. Get's straight to the point. A need to understand alcohol addiction would be highly recommended before bending the elbow to read this one. A very good read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Leanne Ford

    fun look at lives of some of our greatest, naughtiest actors. jumps about a little abruptly at times.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christy Clare

    anecdotal with no real basis for any of the stories, just commentary on men behaving badly! would still have liked to knock around with them for a bit though!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brian Harley

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...