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Survive the Unthinkable: The 5 Most Effective Methods and 2 Controversial Truths about Women's Self-Protection

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Self-defense expert and former Navy Seal Tim Larkin presents a complete guide to unique self-protection methodology for the everyday person in any situation.Approximately 1.9 million women are physically assaulted annually in the United States alone. In "Think Like a Predator," Tim Larkin shows women that surviving an attack is not about being physically bigger, faster, or Self-defense expert and former Navy Seal Tim Larkin presents a complete guide to unique self-protection methodology for the everyday person in any situation.Approximately 1.9 million women are physically assaulted annually in the United States alone. In "Think Like a Predator," Tim Larkin shows women that surviving an attack is not about being physically bigger, faster, or stronger - it's about knowing how to self-"protect," not self-"defend.""Think Like a Predator" reveals the effective, proven principles behind a system that Larkin has used to train everyone from celebrities to soccer moms. He calls it Target Focus Training, and it's a counter-intuitive mind/body approach women can use to protect themselves and their loved ones. The methodology shows readers how: Identifying risky situations Recognizing personal behaviors that may jeopardize safety Targeting highly specific areas on an attacker's body for a strategic counter attack. Larkin discusses how predators think, teaching women how to spot them, outsmart them, and stop them in their tracks. With principles proven to work regardless of size, strength, or athleticism, Larkin's approach will revolutionize women's perspective on violence and self-protection. Armed with the tools to neutralize any threat, readers will blast through the victim mindset and live freer, safer, more peaceful lives.


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Self-defense expert and former Navy Seal Tim Larkin presents a complete guide to unique self-protection methodology for the everyday person in any situation.Approximately 1.9 million women are physically assaulted annually in the United States alone. In "Think Like a Predator," Tim Larkin shows women that surviving an attack is not about being physically bigger, faster, or Self-defense expert and former Navy Seal Tim Larkin presents a complete guide to unique self-protection methodology for the everyday person in any situation.Approximately 1.9 million women are physically assaulted annually in the United States alone. In "Think Like a Predator," Tim Larkin shows women that surviving an attack is not about being physically bigger, faster, or stronger - it's about knowing how to self-"protect," not self-"defend.""Think Like a Predator" reveals the effective, proven principles behind a system that Larkin has used to train everyone from celebrities to soccer moms. He calls it Target Focus Training, and it's a counter-intuitive mind/body approach women can use to protect themselves and their loved ones. The methodology shows readers how: Identifying risky situations Recognizing personal behaviors that may jeopardize safety Targeting highly specific areas on an attacker's body for a strategic counter attack. Larkin discusses how predators think, teaching women how to spot them, outsmart them, and stop them in their tracks. With principles proven to work regardless of size, strength, or athleticism, Larkin's approach will revolutionize women's perspective on violence and self-protection. Armed with the tools to neutralize any threat, readers will blast through the victim mindset and live freer, safer, more peaceful lives.

30 review for Survive the Unthinkable: The 5 Most Effective Methods and 2 Controversial Truths about Women's Self-Protection

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    Every woman should read this book! As a female and a martial arts instructor, I am always looking for more ideas, more information, to help me evaluate & improve the content of my own women's self-defense classes. Survive the Unthinkable has provided me with a very valuable new framework for thinking about violent encounters. I was also pleased that many of the things I already teach were echoed in his book (for example, your best weapon is your brain). Tim Larkin gets it. He demonstrates a nuanc Every woman should read this book! As a female and a martial arts instructor, I am always looking for more ideas, more information, to help me evaluate & improve the content of my own women's self-defense classes. Survive the Unthinkable has provided me with a very valuable new framework for thinking about violent encounters. I was also pleased that many of the things I already teach were echoed in his book (for example, your best weapon is your brain). Tim Larkin gets it. He demonstrates a nuanced understanding of what women face, the situations they are likely to encounter, as well as the concerns that many women have when it comes to self-protection. He knows how to coach you through these concerns, and his advice is to-the-point, simple, and something you can immediately start using as you go about your daily routine. Not only that, but his writing conveys his belief in your ability. He very clearly demonstrates that size/strength/fitness are not the most important factors in self-protection. Honestly, if you are male, female, or otherwise, you will be able to read this book and feel empowered. I wish more self-defense instructors taught along these lines. Excellent stuff!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    For starters, this book is a “total guide” for women written by a man. Which wouldn’t be so bad if it didn’t come across so patronizing. You can do it even if you are smaller and weaker! Size doesn’t matter! And while I do think that anyone can do great harm to anyone else, the fact of the matter is that size, training, muscle mass, fitness level… those things do count. It’s going to be a lot harder to overcome someone stronger and bigger than you. If someone reads this book and has no other tra For starters, this book is a “total guide” for women written by a man. Which wouldn’t be so bad if it didn’t come across so patronizing. You can do it even if you are smaller and weaker! Size doesn’t matter! And while I do think that anyone can do great harm to anyone else, the fact of the matter is that size, training, muscle mass, fitness level… those things do count. It’s going to be a lot harder to overcome someone stronger and bigger than you. If someone reads this book and has no other training, they’re going to be in for a rude awakening when they actually encounter an attacker. But not just any training! The only self defense training that will actually work is the author’s. (That’s sarcasm, folks.) His disdain for any self defense classes other than his own is mentioned several times in the book. It seems like a big reason that he wrote this book was to promote his own classes (just read the back about the author.) The format of the book reads like a college essay paper. First I’ll teach you this, then in the next section you’ll learn about this. Definitely not the formatting I expected from a New York Times Bestseller. The only practical defense strategies he talks about in any detail is a strike to the throat and a knee to the groin. From a martial arts perspective, I was definitely underwhelmed. He did talk about asocial behavior and did a good job portraying that. So the whole book wasn’t a total waste. He talks about how women are very likely to be assaulted. The book starts off with all the scary statistics. But then he jumps right into asocial attackers and makes it sound like that’s the bad guy you’ll be facing. The reality is that most of the time it’ll be someone that you know that assaults you. Tony Robbins mentions that in the forward, but Larkin never really addresses it. So if you want to learn about self defense take a class instead. In a high adrenaline situation, your body will do what you have physically practiced. If you want a better understanding on the mental side of self defense read The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker. The Unthinkable by Amanda Ripley will also give you great insights on how to better respond to life or death situations. If you find yourself getting into those toxic relationships over and over again, read Men That Hate Women and the Women That Love Them by Dr Susan Forward. As for this book, I’m sorry to say that I can’t recommend it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    I had high hopes for this book. I help teach a self-defense seminar for women several times a year. I think the author is spot on in his approach, particularly about not using a martial artist mind-set. I felt that his separation of what constitutes asocial and antisocial violence was brilliant. My only frustration was that he talked for a couple hundred pages about the vulnerable aspects of the human anatomy without actually listing which areas to strike. He only explicitly discussed the chop t I had high hopes for this book. I help teach a self-defense seminar for women several times a year. I think the author is spot on in his approach, particularly about not using a martial artist mind-set. I felt that his separation of what constitutes asocial and antisocial violence was brilliant. My only frustration was that he talked for a couple hundred pages about the vulnerable aspects of the human anatomy without actually listing which areas to strike. He only explicitly discussed the chop to the neck and kick to the groin. I know that this book is something of a primer on the subject but even a quick bullet list of areas with associated strikes would have been helpful. All-and-all a mixed review on this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This is a great book to read if you are a woman who is on the fence about self defense. It will help you overcome your worries about if it is appropriate. As an instructional guide, it is lacking in exact moves to make. I suggest reading the book for background information on why it is so important to have the mindset of survival and then go take a class for hands on instruction.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    A must read for every woman. Self-Protection, even for pacifists.

  6. 5 out of 5

    chsmiley

    This was an interesting book and different from the sort of thing I'd normally read. Larkin spent the first half of the book motivating why you need to be willing to use extreme violence in life threatening situations. He shows how to distinguish antisocial vs. asocial behaviors and reminds us that asocial people are not playing by the same rules and societal constraints as the rest of us. It reminded me a little of the Sociopath Next Door in the sense that we forget there are people living amon This was an interesting book and different from the sort of thing I'd normally read. Larkin spent the first half of the book motivating why you need to be willing to use extreme violence in life threatening situations. He shows how to distinguish antisocial vs. asocial behaviors and reminds us that asocial people are not playing by the same rules and societal constraints as the rest of us. It reminded me a little of the Sociopath Next Door in the sense that we forget there are people living among us who will take advantage of us with no remorse. The second half of the book gets into techniques for self defense. There's good information in there but it does get pretty repetitive. A bit more editing and streamlining would have been nice along with illustrations of the various techniques he describes. He mentions that there are at least 70 vulnerable areas on the body but mainly focuses on attacking the eyes, groin, and throat in various ways. All in all, I'd say the book is worth reading and gave some good insights on why and how to respond with violence should the unthinkable happen.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Cuzzacrea

    This book has some really good info for women. Interesting info about what the research and psychology says about asocial predators too. It's not a "self-defense" book and it talks heavily about using violence with intent if you are being attacked. I found it a little repetitive, but admit I was sold on the idea of causing harm to someone who intends to hurt me before reading the book. I believe the idea is to drive that home for women who feel uncomfortable (and rightly so) with the subject mat This book has some really good info for women. Interesting info about what the research and psychology says about asocial predators too. It's not a "self-defense" book and it talks heavily about using violence with intent if you are being attacked. I found it a little repetitive, but admit I was sold on the idea of causing harm to someone who intends to hurt me before reading the book. I believe the idea is to drive that home for women who feel uncomfortable (and rightly so) with the subject matter.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    A very quick read. Somewhat repetitive. I was all ready familiar with much of what is contained in this book. However, reviewing techniques and practices for staying safe is never a bad idea. Also, the author does an excellent job distinguishing between antisocial and asocial behaviors. He also provides some strong reflections on why many women have difficulty in dealing with behaviors outside of "the norm". Overall, a good primer for personal safety. A very quick read. Somewhat repetitive. I was all ready familiar with much of what is contained in this book. However, reviewing techniques and practices for staying safe is never a bad idea. Also, the author does an excellent job distinguishing between antisocial and asocial behaviors. He also provides some strong reflections on why many women have difficulty in dealing with behaviors outside of "the norm". Overall, a good primer for personal safety.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Judy Cadena

    Edit: wording Interesting. Reaffirming. Either I'm not a psycho or I'm as crazy as this guy is. There were some areas I felt that needed to be discussed a bit further based on the direction his advice was going but unfortunately, he didn't venture into those areas. So I'm left with hoping for the best and planning for the worst. Towards the second half, the book got really repetitive but I suppose to be fair, it's the written equivalent of Mr. Miyagi telling you to wax on and wax off all day. Overal Edit: wording Interesting. Reaffirming. Either I'm not a psycho or I'm as crazy as this guy is. There were some areas I felt that needed to be discussed a bit further based on the direction his advice was going but unfortunately, he didn't venture into those areas. So I'm left with hoping for the best and planning for the worst. Towards the second half, the book got really repetitive but I suppose to be fair, it's the written equivalent of Mr. Miyagi telling you to wax on and wax off all day. Overall, it helped to instill some confidence in myself and I learned a few things along the way.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    If I could buy a million copies and hand this book to every woman I meet and cross paths with, I would! This information is invaluable and every woman needs this knowledge. It has nothing to do with guns and everything to do with using your brain and your body to get yourself out of a conflict. I do wish he actually gave some more details on areas to strike and wish he included visual aides for those of us who are visual learners.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Excellent, practical and realistic instruction on how and when to incapacitate an attacker. I wish more women and men viewed antisocial and asocial behavior the way Mr. Larkin describes here. Highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rose B

    Interesting information, but I could have done without the constant reminders that, as a wife and a mother and a member of the gentler sex, I need to be handled with kid gloves. Blech. Looking past that though, the advice was pretty good.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katie Lundberg

    This book is not exactly fun to read but unfortunately with the society we live in, it is necessary for women. The whole book discusses his reasoning why which is helpful but I wanted more substance on what exactly to do.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Great review material!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lori Hammond

    My takeaway from this book was learning ways (gruesome as they may be) to stop an assailant.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Violence happens. Prepare now in order to survive. Violence in required in order to survive violence. This is how I understand the premise of Survive the Unthinkable: The 5 Most Effective Methods and 2 Controversial Truths about Women's Self-Protection. The body of the book works to convince readers of the need to learn how to survive in a violent interaction and that in order to survive, the victor will need to injure the other person. I thought Tim Larkin's arguments were on the convincing side Violence happens. Prepare now in order to survive. Violence in required in order to survive violence. This is how I understand the premise of Survive the Unthinkable: The 5 Most Effective Methods and 2 Controversial Truths about Women's Self-Protection. The body of the book works to convince readers of the need to learn how to survive in a violent interaction and that in order to survive, the victor will need to injure the other person. I thought Tim Larkin's arguments were on the convincing side of the unconvincing-convincing continuum, but in full disclosure, I didn't need to be convinced. He does try to address the fears readers might have of what the moral implications are of hurting others or the squeamishness some might feel at contemplating the physical aspect of causing injury. While he suggests that later in the book he will provide some techniques for physically harming another, they are limited and may disappoint if that's the reason the book was read. If, however, the reader is looking for validation that she has the right to defend herself, even if it means seriously injuring another, or if the reader is looking for psychological insight into violence with suggestions on how to avoid putting oneself in dangerous situations, then the book will likely deliver, although the suggestions are not revolutionary for one who is familiar with preventative self-defense. Two of the more helpful parts of the book are the discussions on the difference between antisocial aggression and asocial violence and the insistence that one must decide now in order to survive later. In other words, don't wait until you feel a gun at your head to work through the emotional, moral, and psychological concerns of survival. Do that now so that if the time comes when you feel your life is threatened, you have given yourself the chance to act in time to survive. Even though the content of the book is easy to read and sticks to the main point, discussing it from different directions, the delivery is a bit melodramatic. Larkin writes of "predators who stalk among us" (p. 68), then a few pages later, he mentions an "owie" (p. 70). Even the title suggests an emotional reaction, calling life-threatening violence "unthinkable," as it if were something all people pretend doesn't exist. The other possible downside is that this book seems to primarily be written for people who shrink from the thought of hurting others. If the reader already believes in her right to do what it takes to escape harm, she might feel a bit insulted that "this material will almost certainly make you uncomfortable" (p. 63). Even so, the reader is likely to find much of value to help her mentally prepare to defend herself and to explain her position to friends and family who might shrink from the thought of harming another in order to survive.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alain Burrese

    “Survive The Unthinkable: A Total Guide To Women's Self-Protection” by Tim Larkin with a Foreword by Tony Robbins is a good book for all women, and men too, to read to better understand violence and self-defense. While I don't think it is a “total guide” to self-protection, I do believe it is an important part of the equation and a very good read that shares some extremely important information on the topic. This is not a self-defense technique book, it is a principle and concept oriented book th “Survive The Unthinkable: A Total Guide To Women's Self-Protection” by Tim Larkin with a Foreword by Tony Robbins is a good book for all women, and men too, to read to better understand violence and self-defense. While I don't think it is a “total guide” to self-protection, I do believe it is an important part of the equation and a very good read that shares some extremely important information on the topic. This is not a self-defense technique book, it is a principle and concept oriented book that discusses the realities of violence and self-defense as Larkin teaches through his Target Focus Training. Larkin doesn't believe in mutual fights, fighting over ego or possessions, escalating arguments to physically hitting each other and so on. These are avoidable, and because they are avoidable, he advises you do just that. Avoid them, don't engage. Leave. I agree with him on this point entirely. Avoidance is always the best course of action when it comes to violence. Unfortunately, avoidance is not always possible. There are situations where a physical response will be necessary to save one's life. This is the focus of Larkin's teachings, and the focus of this book. He wants people, especially women in this book, to understand that violence happens. There are people out there that prey on others. Chapter two explains how predators think, to allow the reader to better understand what they may be up against. Chapter three shares a person's most powerful weapon, a person's brain and intuition. I agree, as I wrote about the same thing in my first book. The next chapter covers an extremely important element of self-defense and survival, and that is the will to survive. Without this, all the techniques in the world will most likely do a person no good. Larkin shares the necessary mindset. The next few chapters focus on violence and the means to stop violence against you through stopping you attacker with physical force that injures and incapacitates him so he can no longer hurt you. It's brutal, but in some situations the only thing that might get you home alive. There are three pages of this entire book devoted to explaining two simple techniques that Larkin recommends. He then ends with some final thoughts on fear, prevention, and controlling your own life. I found the book to be motivational and empowering, as well as full of some important information on violence that many are unaware of. But again, I think it is only a piece of the whole. I would strongly recommend this book as a supplement to other learning and training for both men and women. In that capacity, yes, this book is a good addition to everyone's self-defense resource library.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kami

    This book gives good explanations about the mindset you need to defend yourself, but the descriptions of how are a bit lacking. However, the intensity behind your efforts is more important in a life/death situation as well explained and knowing where the weak spots are.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Case

    Really good summary of Tim Larkin's principles behind his chosen method of "self defense" (self offense?), along with several things to practice to potentially avoid a violent encounter. In the event asocial violence occurs, he explains how to recognize that, and a few key target areas on your attackers body that, when struck with enough force, will cause an involuntary response that will give you time to inflict more injury until the attacker is no longer able to hurt/damage/kill you. This book Really good summary of Tim Larkin's principles behind his chosen method of "self defense" (self offense?), along with several things to practice to potentially avoid a violent encounter. In the event asocial violence occurs, he explains how to recognize that, and a few key target areas on your attackers body that, when struck with enough force, will cause an involuntary response that will give you time to inflict more injury until the attacker is no longer able to hurt/damage/kill you. This book is an excellent precursor to the TFT videos that show the moves. My favorite part of this book is the mentality he teaches. It's part situational awareness, and part readiness. "If _____ happens, I could respond by doing ______." That mentality helps prep the brain so that in a violent encounter, you're less likely to freeze and more likely to respond--perhaps even preemptively--and disable the attacker before serious injury is done to you. The other perk to this is that Tim Larkin isn't recommending we carry special equipment to defend ourselves, such as guns, knives, or mace. Instead, he teaches that we are the special equipment. Use of our bodies and our environment. That's convenient and realistic. I don't always have a gun or tazer on me. This review is for Mila, who asked about the book. Yes. Read it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Branden

    This is by no means a "total guide" to self protection. But it is an EXCELLENT reality check and solid foundation for any woman looking into the realities of protecting themselves and getting through a violent encounter alive. The pages spent on understanding the difference between asocial and antisocial violence are outstanding, and Larkin really explains the reality of predatory violence and why calibrating the proper mindset is the most important step on the road to self reliance and freedom This is by no means a "total guide" to self protection. But it is an EXCELLENT reality check and solid foundation for any woman looking into the realities of protecting themselves and getting through a violent encounter alive. The pages spent on understanding the difference between asocial and antisocial violence are outstanding, and Larkin really explains the reality of predatory violence and why calibrating the proper mindset is the most important step on the road to self reliance and freedom from fear. Two stars are docked because Larkin doesn't actually explain any of the specific methodologies you should employ to incapacitate an attacker. 5 minutes of internet research revealed this is by design: this book is basically a primer to get you to go spend $300-$600 on his instructional DVDs, available at http://www.targetfocustraining.com/vi... While I cannot fault a guy for trying to make a buck, I'm still going to take umbrage at the a book that titles itself as "A Total Guide to Women's Self Protection," when it's basically a warm-up/ infomercial. Bottom line: if you are interested in the honest realities of violence and self protection, read this book. If you want to take the next step, you can always look into purchasing Larkins DVDs later. Personally, I would suggest you find a good Krav Maga studio near you.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Em

    This book is great, full of good information. I knew I had to read it when I stumbled along this book at the local library. The level of violence talked about in this book didn’t bother me, as due to my background I realise it is necessary. However I believe this book explains to the average person why such a level of violence is necessary when it comes to asocial aggression. It introduces the fact that not everyone will play by the same social rules as you. Because of this, I will be encouragin This book is great, full of good information. I knew I had to read it when I stumbled along this book at the local library. The level of violence talked about in this book didn’t bother me, as due to my background I realise it is necessary. However I believe this book explains to the average person why such a level of violence is necessary when it comes to asocial aggression. It introduces the fact that not everyone will play by the same social rules as you. Because of this, I will be encouraging females, particularly my sisters, to read this, despite the fact they have never really experience any sort of violence. It will make me feel better to know they are armed with this information when going out for a jog alone, etc. Whilst the book can be a bit repetitive with its ideas, I got a lot out of it, particularly targets to hit on an offender’s body, and how he will react to injury. The book is a good reminder to always trust your gut, and to think proactively rather than defensively. You’ll like this if you like: Sanford Strong - Strong on Defense; Rory Miller - Meditations on Violence. Further education: “I Survived” on the Biography Channel.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aeryn

    "Survive the Unthinkable" is incredibly informative about the subconscious aspects of violence, and allows you to change what your reactions would be in a dangerous situation, in order to survive. It seems a little repetitive, but actually, the repetition is completely necessary in order to ensure absorption of the material and proper subconscious action if and when the time comes for you to defend yourself from an asocial predator. This book is also very good for teaching the reader how to read "Survive the Unthinkable" is incredibly informative about the subconscious aspects of violence, and allows you to change what your reactions would be in a dangerous situation, in order to survive. It seems a little repetitive, but actually, the repetition is completely necessary in order to ensure absorption of the material and proper subconscious action if and when the time comes for you to defend yourself from an asocial predator. This book is also very good for teaching the reader how to read a situation and once it turns into life-or-death, it will ingrain into you how to choose life. Tim Larkin does a fabulous job of showing you the tools that you have available to you, without taking a class or buying anything, but simply by making you aware of the science of injuring someone and the willpower needed to do it. I would definitely recommend this book. *I won this book on Goodread's First Reads

  23. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    This book was interesting. Although it was somewhat annoying the way he kept repeating over and over that women need to give themselves permission to injure if not kill a person who aims to kill them. Um... Ya think? Dude, if someone's goal is to hurt me in a violent manner you better believe that person is gonna be seriously injured in the end, and yeah, if I kill him? At least I got him before he got me. The other thing about this book is that I wish he gave more examples on what the weak spot This book was interesting. Although it was somewhat annoying the way he kept repeating over and over that women need to give themselves permission to injure if not kill a person who aims to kill them. Um... Ya think? Dude, if someone's goal is to hurt me in a violent manner you better believe that person is gonna be seriously injured in the end, and yeah, if I kill him? At least I got him before he got me. The other thing about this book is that I wish he gave more examples on what the weak spots are and how to cause injury (not just pain or blood but actual injury to incapacitate an attacker). He only listed like three places to shoot for but mentioned there are a lot more than that; more than 50! But overall an educating read and a quick read too. I'll have to look into taking the training course.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jen Ponce

    I was undecided about this book. I read it for work--we received it in the mail from a concerned donor, I suppose. On the one hand, the information about asocial aggression was fascinating. I thought it would be great fodder for an antagonist in a book, as a matter of fact. The information about asocial aggression versus antisocial aggression was also interesting. The annoying thing for me is he teased through the whole book that he would get down to specific ways to bring down an asocial attacke I was undecided about this book. I read it for work--we received it in the mail from a concerned donor, I suppose. On the one hand, the information about asocial aggression was fascinating. I thought it would be great fodder for an antagonist in a book, as a matter of fact. The information about asocial aggression versus antisocial aggression was also interesting. The annoying thing for me is he teased through the whole book that he would get down to specific ways to bring down an asocial attacker and yet, in the end, the entire book felt like an advertisement for the author's self-defense classes. I was disappointed in that part and enjoyed the first. So. Three stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    This was an excellent book to read if you have a hard time imagining using violence as a tool to save yourself. He keeps it easy, using no technique, but does stress practice is needed to be assured to hit the targets when you need to. One of my fav quotes from this book: "My aversion to violence runs so strong that it makes me something of a contradiction to my friends -- I will do whatever I can to avoid physical, antisocial confrontations and yet wouldn't hesitate to stomp someone into the mo This was an excellent book to read if you have a hard time imagining using violence as a tool to save yourself. He keeps it easy, using no technique, but does stress practice is needed to be assured to hit the targets when you need to. One of my fav quotes from this book: "My aversion to violence runs so strong that it makes me something of a contradiction to my friends -- I will do whatever I can to avoid physical, antisocial confrontations and yet wouldn't hesitate to stomp someone into the morgue in the asocial realm. I"m like Gandhi with a nuclear weapon." And yes, he does explain the difference between antisocial and asocial interactions.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Standard gender binary stranger-danger scenarios. Even a short chapter on "women's intuition"that made me laugh out loud. However, this one did get me thinking about injury. How training NOT to injure via effective escapes is not the same as training to survive by injuring the attacker. Larkin does a nice job explaining that there is a point of no return (he calls it the "effect state") in which an injured person simply can't go on. The goal of defending yourself, then, is to get your attacker i Standard gender binary stranger-danger scenarios. Even a short chapter on "women's intuition"that made me laugh out loud. However, this one did get me thinking about injury. How training NOT to injure via effective escapes is not the same as training to survive by injuring the attacker. Larkin does a nice job explaining that there is a point of no return (he calls it the "effect state") in which an injured person simply can't go on. The goal of defending yourself, then, is to get your attacker into this state. No middle ground, no questioning, just put the full force of your body behind some targeted strikes. Probably worth checking out his Targeted Focus Training.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cailean

    This a fast read but not necessarily "easy" - there is a lot of information, and guidance...but most importantly and memorably there is a lot of encouragement -- to not be afraid, to be determined to survive, etc. He emphasizes fear and not giving into fear -- to believing you can protect yourself and defend yourself and be on the offensive as well. He discusses techniques but there isn't enough information or visuals to do much with the techniques -- you would need to take a class, probably. Wo This a fast read but not necessarily "easy" - there is a lot of information, and guidance...but most importantly and memorably there is a lot of encouragement -- to not be afraid, to be determined to survive, etc. He emphasizes fear and not giving into fear -- to believing you can protect yourself and defend yourself and be on the offensive as well. He discusses techniques but there isn't enough information or visuals to do much with the techniques -- you would need to take a class, probably. Worth checking out at the library.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amz

    I really liked this book. It was a super fast read and I feel more educated and informed on what I should do if ever a situation arises that I need to protect myself. The only reason I don't give it 5 stars is that I felt like it ended abruptly. I thought at the end the author would tie it all together and go over the target points he mentioned. He alluded several times "I will cover that later in the book" but some things I didn't feel got the attention they needed to truly understand the techn I really liked this book. It was a super fast read and I feel more educated and informed on what I should do if ever a situation arises that I need to protect myself. The only reason I don't give it 5 stars is that I felt like it ended abruptly. I thought at the end the author would tie it all together and go over the target points he mentioned. He alluded several times "I will cover that later in the book" but some things I didn't feel got the attention they needed to truly understand the technique. It was very anticlimactic!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marymackmusings

    Very good book. I disliked how he went on and on, though, about how using violence in self-defense is ok. I'm way over that. If someone is trying to kill me, I'm good with using any means to get away from him. Also, the author didn't spell out the vulnerable areas of the body to target. I will have to do more research. The best part is the idea that anyone has the tools to deliver violent trauma to an attacker in order to survive an attack. Very good book. I disliked how he went on and on, though, about how using violence in self-defense is ok. I'm way over that. If someone is trying to kill me, I'm good with using any means to get away from him. Also, the author didn't spell out the vulnerable areas of the body to target. I will have to do more research. The best part is the idea that anyone has the tools to deliver violent trauma to an attacker in order to survive an attack.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Skylar

    Heavy on the philosophy and mindset (all very important) but light on actual techniques. It's basically "why you should take my class or buy my DVD." Granted, I want to now, but ugh, that's why I checked a free book out from the library! Now I know some ideas and why they're important but have the powerlessness of knowing I don't know what to do with that information. Not cool. I predict some nightmares tonight. Heavy on the philosophy and mindset (all very important) but light on actual techniques. It's basically "why you should take my class or buy my DVD." Granted, I want to now, but ugh, that's why I checked a free book out from the library! Now I know some ideas and why they're important but have the powerlessness of knowing I don't know what to do with that information. Not cool. I predict some nightmares tonight.

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