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Before the Rain: A Memoir of Love and Revolution

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In a voice haunting and filled with longing, Before the Rain tells the story of love unexpected, its fragile bounds and subtle perils. As a newspaper editor in the ’80s, Luisita Torregrosa lived her career. Enter Elizabeth, a striking, reserved, and elusive writer with whom Torregrosa falls deeply in love. Their story—irresistible romance, overlapping ambitions, and fragil In a voice haunting and filled with longing, Before the Rain tells the story of love unexpected, its fragile bounds and subtle perils. As a newspaper editor in the ’80s, Luisita Torregrosa lived her career. Enter Elizabeth, a striking, reserved, and elusive writer with whom Torregrosa falls deeply in love. Their story—irresistible romance, overlapping ambitions, and fragile union—unfolds as the narrative shifts to the Philippines and the fall of Ferdinand Marcos. There, on that beautiful, troubled island, the couple creates a world of their own, while covering political chaos and bloody upheavals. What was effortless abroad becomes less idyllic when they return to the United States, and their ending becomes as surprising and revealing as their beginning. Torregrosa captures the way love transforms those who experience it for an unforgettable, but often too brief, time. This book is distinguished not only by its strong, unique, and conflicted heroines, but also by Torregrosa’s lyrical portrait of the Philippines and the even more exotic heart of intimacy.


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In a voice haunting and filled with longing, Before the Rain tells the story of love unexpected, its fragile bounds and subtle perils. As a newspaper editor in the ’80s, Luisita Torregrosa lived her career. Enter Elizabeth, a striking, reserved, and elusive writer with whom Torregrosa falls deeply in love. Their story—irresistible romance, overlapping ambitions, and fragil In a voice haunting and filled with longing, Before the Rain tells the story of love unexpected, its fragile bounds and subtle perils. As a newspaper editor in the ’80s, Luisita Torregrosa lived her career. Enter Elizabeth, a striking, reserved, and elusive writer with whom Torregrosa falls deeply in love. Their story—irresistible romance, overlapping ambitions, and fragile union—unfolds as the narrative shifts to the Philippines and the fall of Ferdinand Marcos. There, on that beautiful, troubled island, the couple creates a world of their own, while covering political chaos and bloody upheavals. What was effortless abroad becomes less idyllic when they return to the United States, and their ending becomes as surprising and revealing as their beginning. Torregrosa captures the way love transforms those who experience it for an unforgettable, but often too brief, time. This book is distinguished not only by its strong, unique, and conflicted heroines, but also by Torregrosa’s lyrical portrait of the Philippines and the even more exotic heart of intimacy.

30 review for Before the Rain: A Memoir of Love and Revolution

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christina (A Reader of Fictions)

    Originally reviewed on A Reader of Fictions. Having completed Before the Rain, I find myself with very little to say, a rather rare occurrence for me. Speechlessness, of course, can be the result of many emotions, too fraught by the impact of the tale or too bored to care. Unfortunately, my reactions more closely resemble the latter. What drew me to this book was both the lgbt element and the historical aspect. Coming into it, I knew practically nothing about the history of the Philippines, and le Originally reviewed on A Reader of Fictions. Having completed Before the Rain, I find myself with very little to say, a rather rare occurrence for me. Speechlessness, of course, can be the result of many emotions, too fraught by the impact of the tale or too bored to care. Unfortunately, my reactions more closely resemble the latter. What drew me to this book was both the lgbt element and the historical aspect. Coming into it, I knew practically nothing about the history of the Philippines, and learning about that history as a backdrop for a touching romance sounded like perfection. Having read the last page of this memoir, though, I do not feel that I know much more than I did when I started, other than now knowing a couple of names of political figures. This autobiography should, more accurately, be subtitled simply A Memoir of Love, as there is little of revolution. The focus lies almost entirely upon the relationship between Luisita and Elizabeth. While that's fine, the book's description prepared me for something with a broader scope. History receives only the barest treatment, insomuch as it separated the two lovers, as both are reporters and had to travel to cover various events. I would expect, though, that I would have a very strong picture of Luisita and Elizabeth in my head, since they are the focus, that I would have a good sense of their bond. Alas, I do not. I feel like Torregrosa keeps the audience at a distance from them. She clues us in on the big events of their romance, but does not let us in on any of the small details that really make a life. For all that she is proudly discussing her lesbian relationship, I found it surprising that we never get any sense of their sexual life at all. For all the talk of their intense passion, only a couple of kisses and hugs are mentioned. This made for a disconnect between what she claimed and what I was actually sensing through her words. I will say, however, that the writing is incredibly beautiful. Torregrosa composes lovely sentences, and she has a unique flair for language. She puts her sentences together in ways I might never think to, slightly strangely, and coaxes a new and different beauty out of them. For me, this memoir was vastly disappointing, but lovers of language largely for its own sake might find this more interesting than I did. I, personally, hoped to learn more about the author in reading a memoir, but left it with very little sense of Luisita herself.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Audra (Unabridged Chick)

    This is a memoir that reads like a novel, and that's both a good and bad thing. Torregrosa has a sinuous, vague, slippery style of writing that I love in a good novel (I was reminded a bit of early '90s Jeannette Winterson) but feels a bit incomplete in a memoir. This story of 'love and revolution' had plenty of revolution -- on an international and interpersonal scale -- but I felt a real lack of love in Torregrosa's narrative. Which leads me back to my original complaint. Were this a novel -- w This is a memoir that reads like a novel, and that's both a good and bad thing. Torregrosa has a sinuous, vague, slippery style of writing that I love in a good novel (I was reminded a bit of early '90s Jeannette Winterson) but feels a bit incomplete in a memoir. This story of 'love and revolution' had plenty of revolution -- on an international and interpersonal scale -- but I felt a real lack of love in Torregrosa's narrative. Which leads me back to my original complaint. Were this a novel -- with some exploration into the motivations of our two heroines -- I would be all over this. But as a memoir, I wanted more from Torregrosa: I wanted her to go deeper in her recounting and analysis of her relationship and that juxtaposition with the tumultuous world of 1980s Philippines and international journalists. There's an enormous distance between Torregrosa and the reader due to her writing style.  A little dreamy, very much removed, Torregrosa sums up weeks at a time with a small paragraph.  She recounts other people's words but never offers her own direct statements.  The moment when (I think) she and her married lover consummated their relationship felt obfuscated, as if Torregrosa didn't want to write about it but felt like she had to. In many ways, this felt like an homage to a relationship rather than a memoir of a life, as Torregrosa's obvious affection and gratitude toward her lover, Elizabeth, spills out from every page. She writes very poetically about Elizabeth but I never got to 'know' the woman -- which would be fine if I got to know Torregrosa. Instead, I felt at arm's length from both women, watching their squabbles uncomfortably, and drinking in the gorgeous landscapes around them. (Torregrosa can evoke place like a song; its wonderful.) This book reminded me of those 'gay classics' one gobbles up when first coming out, desperate for someone to relate to and, let's be honest, some sex. And like those classics -- like Rubyfruit Jungle and Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit -- they're lovely, moody books that aren't nearly as gay as one wants them to be. All this and I still liked the book in many ways; I just wanted more. Shelf Awareness loved this one and found it passionate, so it may be that I focused on the wrong themes with this reading. In another moment, I might see it as deeply passionate. Still, I enjoyed very real look at international journalism Torregrosa offered; this is armchair escape of the first order.

  3. 5 out of 5

    l

    If straight people can get their beautifully written but pointless, reeking of privilege love affair memoirs published then I guess there's no reason why lesbians shouldn't be able to as well. Doesn't make it a compelling read though. If straight people can get their beautifully written but pointless, reeking of privilege love affair memoirs published then I guess there's no reason why lesbians shouldn't be able to as well. Doesn't make it a compelling read though.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Since I was in the Philippines during the period covered in this book I enjoyed experiencing the end of the Marcos regime and Cory Aquino's people power revolution from the perspective of the foreign press core. The love story is also very poignant and well drawn. Since I was in the Philippines during the period covered in this book I enjoyed experiencing the end of the Marcos regime and Cory Aquino's people power revolution from the perspective of the foreign press core. The love story is also very poignant and well drawn.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    I received this book free from Goodreads First Reads. This book had me from page 1. Once I started, I couldnt put it down. Definitely a must read!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    I'm beginning to realize that sense of place is one of the most important things to me in a book. I love a dreamy vivid writing style that brings to your mind's eye a place and time you'll never actually visit. This book feels like an old movie. Exotic locations, languid rich people, a restrained love affair. Something about it was just very enjoyable to read. So, high points for writing style. There are uncomfortable elements to the book- the way she describes developing countries and the peopl I'm beginning to realize that sense of place is one of the most important things to me in a book. I love a dreamy vivid writing style that brings to your mind's eye a place and time you'll never actually visit. This book feels like an old movie. Exotic locations, languid rich people, a restrained love affair. Something about it was just very enjoyable to read. So, high points for writing style. There are uncomfortable elements to the book- the way she describes developing countries and the people who live in them just reeks of privilege and unquestioned colonialism at times. That was my least favorite aspect of the book. Also, many reviewers complain that she holds herself and her relationship at an arm's length through the book, and that's true.. It reminds me of the movie Carol, like the passion is SO restrained that they barely have chemistry. Yet she lets enough through that by the end I was like, shit no wonder your girlfriend left you. Like.. their emotional dynamic seems kind of abusive at times, with the author being the more fucked up one. But, whatever, it's not a how to guide to relationships, it's a dreamy book about lesbian reporters drinking wine and giving each other the silent treatment in fabulous settings. So take it for what it is an enjoy it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I was swept up with Torregrosa's writing in the beginning. I began to lose interest after 100 pages, but I may have been distancing myself from the emotion knowing the demise of the relationship was coming. Memorable quote: I believed then that writing came from the night, from someplace secret and glorious, that it came with the moon and the wind, from the simple act of breathing. I did not study it, or practice it faithfully like the scales on the piano. I was too romantic, always, for that. I I was swept up with Torregrosa's writing in the beginning. I began to lose interest after 100 pages, but I may have been distancing myself from the emotion knowing the demise of the relationship was coming. Memorable quote: I believed then that writing came from the night, from someplace secret and glorious, that it came with the moon and the wind, from the simple act of breathing. I did not study it, or practice it faithfully like the scales on the piano. I was too romantic, always, for that. I did not have it sketched out, or in outlines. I did not believe it was something one talked about, discourses on style and technique, but something that came or did not come, an inspiration. (74) We had a year, or perhaps only weeks, months, or an eternity. We did not know how much time we had, how much time we would last together, because nothing about us had come conventionally, arranged, foreseen, with preambles and assurances. (86)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (LiteraryLatinax)

    DNF! This was wayto slow for me. I felt like I was a actually going backwards, not gaining an ounce of interest. We know there is a woman who falls for another woman who is married and they are reporters and they go to different countries and nothing is happening but they are in love but one is married and omg I cant take it anymore. It was like reading a powerpoint presentation on the developing fungus of an ant (you're saying, what?) well, that's how I was the entire time. It''s a no go people DNF! This was wayto slow for me. I felt like I was a actually going backwards, not gaining an ounce of interest. We know there is a woman who falls for another woman who is married and they are reporters and they go to different countries and nothing is happening but they are in love but one is married and omg I cant take it anymore. It was like reading a powerpoint presentation on the developing fungus of an ant (you're saying, what?) well, that's how I was the entire time. It''s a no go people. I love mi gente pero Dios mio, ayudame.

  9. 4 out of 5

    S-Haq

    Felt like First world problems, where white expats exotcize the chaos of Third world in the 80s. The Two stars for this sentence "Someday I will be able to write, because I will have to, about the years in which I knew you"and the finale. Felt like First world problems, where white expats exotcize the chaos of Third world in the 80s. The Two stars for this sentence "Someday I will be able to write, because I will have to, about the years in which I knew you"and the finale.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    2.5

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Seductively written. I could not put this book down, but when I looked for passages to quote, realized most are generally devoid of insight. The title is a little misleading -- Lopez Torregrosa mentions the Philippine revolution and associated crises but with little bearing on her story. Nor does she seem to have much understanding of her story, which is basically that she had a tremendously intense relationship and then it ended. She shares a few tidbits, probably insights her ex laboriously im Seductively written. I could not put this book down, but when I looked for passages to quote, realized most are generally devoid of insight. The title is a little misleading -- Lopez Torregrosa mentions the Philippine revolution and associated crises but with little bearing on her story. Nor does she seem to have much understanding of her story, which is basically that she had a tremendously intense relationship and then it ended. She shares a few tidbits, probably insights her ex laboriously imparted on the way out the door. There's not much depth in the minimal foreshadowing we get, tiny cracks look like bumps on the road, which is probably how the author experienced the fissures that eventually tore the pair apart. So this isn't a particularly well-constructed story, but the book is a pleasure to read in spite of that.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    2.5 stars. I think this book would have gotten in a higher rating if I had been more in the mood for what it was, which is basically about being a journalist. I saw it at the library and read the first page or two--really really gorgeous writing--and decided to go ahead and check it out (even though I almost always regret those decisions later--I have a huge to-read pile that I'm pretty selective about, and then I just waltz into the library and just stack the books into my arms without any kind 2.5 stars. I think this book would have gotten in a higher rating if I had been more in the mood for what it was, which is basically about being a journalist. I saw it at the library and read the first page or two--really really gorgeous writing--and decided to go ahead and check it out (even though I almost always regret those decisions later--I have a huge to-read pile that I'm pretty selective about, and then I just waltz into the library and just stack the books into my arms without any kind of vetting first?! But I digress...). As it turns out, I had little patience for it. The book is billed as "a memoir of love & revolution," but it's not really either. The Philippine People Power revolution of the late 1980s is dealt with very superficially, which is okay with me (it is a short book after all), so I was hoping to at least get a good love story/memoir. Reading about people falling in and out of love can be really poignant. But...honestly there's not much of that in this book either. When it is covered, it's done well--especially (view spoiler)[near the end. The breakup and the aftermath were high parts of the book for me, because there was finally some emotion and something I could relate to (hide spoiler)] . But it's too little. I understand that it's a memoir so we're talking about real people, and even though Torregrosa used a false name for her partner, the person is still known to many and I can understand how certain things wouldn't make it into the book. But...I didn't...I mean, there is basically nothing in here about their relationship. It's just like "oh yeah it was passionate." And that's it. There's a lot of telling us how passionate it was but she doesn't let us in on shared jokes or romantic gestures, the comfort and acceptance relationships can give, or any real disagreements or fights. I never felt it and I didn't get it, and I wasn't emotionally invested at all. Which made it really hard to sit through THIS bottle of wine at THIS restaurant, THAT bottle of wine at THAT restaurant, THIS wine THAT wine, wine wine wine, travel travel travel, food food food, travel, servants, phone call, "passion," wine, travel, moodiness about writing, travel. I don't really care what wine you had to drink at what place in what month. I forgot that stuff before the sentence was even finished. And there was a lot of that in here. Also: I don't romanticize journalism or writing, and it's pretty clear the author does. I could still have related to that had Torregrosa told us what it means to her, but she doesn't. And then there are things likes this: "It was a fear growing in me that our life was changing, that something--I didn't know or didn't want to know exactly what--was pulling us apart. We were becoming ordinary." Yes. Being ordinary is definitely what tore you guys apart, not your hectic & incompatible schedules, or refusing to understand each other or to be kind to each other. It was definitely the dread "ordinariness." If only you guys could have lived in a new country every year I'm sure you'd still be together. ??????????? Anyway. The writing is good--often times it's great, but unfortunately for me the subject discussed weren't all that interesting. I would recommend it to anyone with an interest in journalism, though.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    This book was received for free through Goodreads First Reads. I read this memoir quickly, and was fully absorbed into Torregrosa's universe during the two days I spent reading it. The writing was beautiful, and the love story in many ways touching. I did feel, however, that Torregrosa was holding back - not wanting to paint the romance as passionate as perhaps it was (whether this was because of the time elapsed or personal decision, I’m not sure), and then trying to present a fair and balanced This book was received for free through Goodreads First Reads. I read this memoir quickly, and was fully absorbed into Torregrosa's universe during the two days I spent reading it. The writing was beautiful, and the love story in many ways touching. I did feel, however, that Torregrosa was holding back - not wanting to paint the romance as passionate as perhaps it was (whether this was because of the time elapsed or personal decision, I’m not sure), and then trying to present a fair and balanced view of the difficult times, though I still didn’t feel I got the full story – I almost would have preferred hearing the author’s more biased view. I loved hearing about the author’s and “Elizabeth’s” work as foreign journalists. The lifestyle was absolutely fascinating. More than any takeaways about love and relationships, I think I’ll be taking away a better understanding of the lives of people I know (and whose articles I read) who work in this field. As an aside, I wanted to read some of Elizabeth’s old articles from Manila and went searching online. There is a lesbian identified writer/actress Elizabeth Whitney who came up in searches, but I am pretty sure this is not the same person. The book says that some names were changed up front, but I would have liked a more explicit note within the text that Elizabeth’s name was changed (if indeed it was). This would have prevented 15 minutes of fruitless Google-ing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was a conflicted read. It is well written and compelling but doesn't seem to make the most of its material perhaps because it doesn't know its focus. It is all over the place and nowhere. It is a story about being a journalist, the passion for news and the challenges of being a foreign correspondent but it isn't primarily about that. It is about a love affair but for all the eloquence the other person didn't live for me. There are no pictures, no observations but those of writer. It would h This was a conflicted read. It is well written and compelling but doesn't seem to make the most of its material perhaps because it doesn't know its focus. It is all over the place and nowhere. It is a story about being a journalist, the passion for news and the challenges of being a foreign correspondent but it isn't primarily about that. It is about a love affair but for all the eloquence the other person didn't live for me. There are no pictures, no observations but those of writer. It would have been nice to see her side. Is it about the life arc of the writer? Yes, but the arc didn't have enough detail for me. It is about regrets and about relationships that fail without the one person knowing why. Some of the descriptions of people and places, particularly the Manila section, are admirably vivid.

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

    The kind of book that talks about the truth about falling in love. Everything is emotional and raw, yet poetic and flowing. Torregrosa's prose is graceful, leaving the reader with a vivid portrait of the small, domestic parts of her life that made it so memorable. She doesn't focus much on dialogue or misunderstandings, instead choosing to highlight the way her relationship with Elizabeth was the single greatest thing (and the worst) that she has ever experienced. This book deals with other cult The kind of book that talks about the truth about falling in love. Everything is emotional and raw, yet poetic and flowing. Torregrosa's prose is graceful, leaving the reader with a vivid portrait of the small, domestic parts of her life that made it so memorable. She doesn't focus much on dialogue or misunderstandings, instead choosing to highlight the way her relationship with Elizabeth was the single greatest thing (and the worst) that she has ever experienced. This book deals with other cultures, wars, and the lifestyle of reporting in foreign territories in the 80's/90's, yet it does so with a quiet majesty that speaks of all of life's smaller moments and how they compound into one larger, greater existence. It filled me with so many great emotions, and then it broke my heart.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Had a difficult time deciding how many stars to give this book. Truly beautiful writing. You feel the passion and anguish of the author and the relationship. Could visualize all the exotic places they traveled. And yet at the same time, it felt like more of a daily diary at times rather than a story setting (it is a memoir after all). Intensely personal. And yet somehow through all that beautiful writing, I still felt I was at the periphery of their relationship rather than fully understanding e Had a difficult time deciding how many stars to give this book. Truly beautiful writing. You feel the passion and anguish of the author and the relationship. Could visualize all the exotic places they traveled. And yet at the same time, it felt like more of a daily diary at times rather than a story setting (it is a memoir after all). Intensely personal. And yet somehow through all that beautiful writing, I still felt I was at the periphery of their relationship rather than fully understanding each of their actions and "in it". Found myself wondering where each of the women is today and hoping they have found peace and happiness.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Before the Rain is a formal chronological account of the Author Luisita Lopez Torregrosa's life as a newspaper reporter and editor. In this account she finds love where she wasn't expecting that ends just the same. The book is well written and easy to understand. As the audience you have to take in to account that the relationship is between a reporter named Elizabeth and Miss Torregrosa. I am not fond of the same gender relationship; however, on a non bias note, the book is good and will keep y Before the Rain is a formal chronological account of the Author Luisita Lopez Torregrosa's life as a newspaper reporter and editor. In this account she finds love where she wasn't expecting that ends just the same. The book is well written and easy to understand. As the audience you have to take in to account that the relationship is between a reporter named Elizabeth and Miss Torregrosa. I am not fond of the same gender relationship; however, on a non bias note, the book is good and will keep you interested in what is going to happen next.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    I received this book as a First Reads giveaway from Goodreads. I did not finish this book, I tried because I thought the writing was beautiful. I loved the descriptions that helped me visualize the scenes and emotions. Yet the story seemed to me like a high school tragedy of love that was doomed yet the actors can't stay apart. The whole book seemed adolescent to me and as a teacher, I see enough of that during the day. I received this book as a First Reads giveaway from Goodreads. I did not finish this book, I tried because I thought the writing was beautiful. I loved the descriptions that helped me visualize the scenes and emotions. Yet the story seemed to me like a high school tragedy of love that was doomed yet the actors can't stay apart. The whole book seemed adolescent to me and as a teacher, I see enough of that during the day.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I won this book from the Goodreads First Reads program. Primarily the book deals with the author's relationship with a foreign news correspondent and their life abroad. While I appreciated how Torregrosa was so honest about her own behavior and feelings, it was difficult for me to like either her or her girlfriend or root for their turbulent relationship. I wish that the book had focused more on the experiences of living abroad and reporting on revolutions than on a couple's quarrels. I won this book from the Goodreads First Reads program. Primarily the book deals with the author's relationship with a foreign news correspondent and their life abroad. While I appreciated how Torregrosa was so honest about her own behavior and feelings, it was difficult for me to like either her or her girlfriend or root for their turbulent relationship. I wish that the book had focused more on the experiences of living abroad and reporting on revolutions than on a couple's quarrels.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Solid memoir, but I didn't love it. It kind of lost me half way through. I don't know what it is. I will say that this book contains a really fascinating look at the history of The Philippines and the life of a reporter abroad. This was more interesting and well-developed than the love story component. Solid memoir, but I didn't love it. It kind of lost me half way through. I don't know what it is. I will say that this book contains a really fascinating look at the history of The Philippines and the life of a reporter abroad. This was more interesting and well-developed than the love story component.

  21. 4 out of 5

    willowdog

    Beautifully written memoir of love, passion, isolation, pain, and longing much of it set in the atmospheric backdrop of Manila during the Peoples Revolution. Torregrosa looks at the crossroads of her relationship with Elizabeth, its growth, its mellowing, its end and examines the trials of the relationship in terms of separation, work, self-fullment and career.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I somewhat enjoyed this book, which is about the passionate love affair of two women reporters against the background of the revolution in Manila. However, I did find the day to day chronology somewhat tedious to get through. I was glad when I finished it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Michael Caylo-Baradi

    I reviewed this for Our Own Voice. The writing is beautiful. But this book is not about the Philippines at all, although it gives color to the book's narrative, like the flowers on the cover.http://www.oovrag.com/oovnew/insatiab... I reviewed this for Our Own Voice. The writing is beautiful. But this book is not about the Philippines at all, although it gives color to the book's narrative, like the flowers on the cover.http://www.oovrag.com/oovnew/insatiab...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Audacia Ray

    I admit that I'm not really sure why I read the whole book. I like stories of heartbreak and also living in interesting places/having interesting jobs. But I found the memoirist really unlikeable and overly impressed with herself in an imperial, obnoxiously classist and breathless way. Ugh. I admit that I'm not really sure why I read the whole book. I like stories of heartbreak and also living in interesting places/having interesting jobs. But I found the memoirist really unlikeable and overly impressed with herself in an imperial, obnoxiously classist and breathless way. Ugh.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christa Sigman

    Not a fan of non -fiction that doesn't have a point. If I don't know you, why would I care about the story presented. The cover and the jacket blurb were far more interesting than this book Not a fan of non -fiction that doesn't have a point. If I don't know you, why would I care about the story presented. The cover and the jacket blurb were far more interesting than this book

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Beautiful writing and a sad story. I just couldn't help wondering about all the parts that had been left out. It didn't seem complete, but maybe that's the point. Beautiful writing and a sad story. I just couldn't help wondering about all the parts that had been left out. It didn't seem complete, but maybe that's the point.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Trish Perkins

  29. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  30. 4 out of 5

    Serena Zets

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