Hot Best Seller

Education Or Imitation

Availability: Ready to download

The earthly ministry of Jesus was all about rightly interpreting and applying God’s Word. We can do the same. No special training required. In fact, right interpretation of Scripture, followed by right application, is the primary way that Christians are to be like God. This is not an issue of education. It’s an issue of imitation. How can we interpret Scripture rightly? Im The earthly ministry of Jesus was all about rightly interpreting and applying God’s Word. We can do the same. No special training required. In fact, right interpretation of Scripture, followed by right application, is the primary way that Christians are to be like God. This is not an issue of education. It’s an issue of imitation. How can we interpret Scripture rightly? Imitate Jesus.


Compare

The earthly ministry of Jesus was all about rightly interpreting and applying God’s Word. We can do the same. No special training required. In fact, right interpretation of Scripture, followed by right application, is the primary way that Christians are to be like God. This is not an issue of education. It’s an issue of imitation. How can we interpret Scripture rightly? Im The earthly ministry of Jesus was all about rightly interpreting and applying God’s Word. We can do the same. No special training required. In fact, right interpretation of Scripture, followed by right application, is the primary way that Christians are to be like God. This is not an issue of education. It’s an issue of imitation. How can we interpret Scripture rightly? Imitate Jesus.

30 review for Education Or Imitation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    When interpretating the word of God, do we have Jesus as the object of that interpretation. We may be a generation that is poorly knowledgeable in the word of God and therefore bringing up other gernerations that don't properly know the word of God. Which brings us to poor application and selfishness. The book starts in a surprising way, the author Curt Allen interpretation of some guys in the hood while doing drugs. His interpretation led to application which saved his life. The same is true fo When interpretating the word of God, do we have Jesus as the object of that interpretation. We may be a generation that is poorly knowledgeable in the word of God and therefore bringing up other gernerations that don't properly know the word of God. Which brings us to poor application and selfishness. The book starts in a surprising way, the author Curt Allen interpretation of some guys in the hood while doing drugs. His interpretation led to application which saved his life. The same is true for us in all areas of life. Without good interpretation, we cannot live as Jesus calls us. Our interpretation defines our functional reality. The book goes on to and very well I might add on the Pharisees interpretation of the Sabbath and where they went wrong. Their view of God was what they wanted him to be. Which I would have to admit, that I have done that a many times. Sabbath began in the Garden of Eden and was shown more when the Lord led Israel out of Egypt. There is so much signficance. I am looking forward to reading that part again to see God's goodness and mercy. Resting fully in God is what was lost in the Garden of Eden. That is what the Pharisees failed to see. Among other things. We are probably more like the Pharisees than we would like to admit. One of the things that also spoke to me was "Yet somehow we often place our hope in the details of our interpretation rather than in the goodness and mercy of our sovereign and loving God." God acts according to who he is, not what we want him to be. Which leads bad interpretation reads selfish expectations into scripture. Do you have a love for the word? If not, but would like to. I would encourage you to read this short book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Craig Hurst

    Interpretation of Scripture, followed by right application, is the primary way that we are to be like God. This is not an issue of education. It’s an issue of imitation. (p. 23) It has been the concern of many that the church has abandoned the task of serious Bible interpretation to the “ivory towers” of the academy and the PhD’s that dwell therein. This has resulted in an unhealthy and shallow church as well as a look of suspicion of the church upon the academy. For too long the church has releg Interpretation of Scripture, followed by right application, is the primary way that we are to be like God. This is not an issue of education. It’s an issue of imitation. (p. 23) It has been the concern of many that the church has abandoned the task of serious Bible interpretation to the “ivory towers” of the academy and the PhD’s that dwell therein. This has resulted in an unhealthy and shallow church as well as a look of suspicion of the church upon the academy. For too long the church has relegated the task of interpreting Scripture to those with formal education while the church goes along reading their Bible’s simply at “face value”. This is the current model of thinking for many Christians. But according to Curtis Allen, this should not be the case. To combat this wrongheaded thinking he has written Education or Imitation?: Bible Interpretation for Dummies Like You and Me. This is a challenging and thought provoking book that will shed new light on what it means for Christians to faithfully and fully imitate Jesus. Allen’s central thesis is simple: the primary way in which Christians imitate Christ is by being faithful interpreters of Scripture. Initially, to many who read that statement, it will come across very odd, out of place and, well, seemingly down right wrong. After all, aren’t the churches two main responsibilities to evangelize and disciple the nations to the glory of God (Matt. 28:19-20)? For Allen, those two commands may be the beginning and end of the mission of the church but there is the middle to consider as well. Allen asks, “What are the means that produced the end?” (p. 19). The answer – “Interpretation of the Word of God, spoken and applied, is the primary means that Jesus used.” (p. 19) If interpretation of God’s Words is the primary means of imitating Christ then there is a lot of bad imitation because there is a lot of bad interpretation going on within the world and the church. “Bad interpretation of one kind or another can be seen in all acts of disobedience to the Word of God. And like anything else in creation, bad interpretation had a beginning.” (p. 25) Starting with Adam and Eve, mankind has been an interpreter of God’s Word. In the garden, Adam and Eve had to interpret God’s instructions to them regarding the fruit on the various trees and the consequences for eating the fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. As we know from Genesis 3, Satan challenged both God’s Word and their interpretation of it. In the end, Adam & Eve accepted Satan’s misinterpretation of God’s word and correction of their interpretation resulting in their sin. But Adam and Eve were just the beginning of a long line of bad interpreters of God’s Word. Some notable examples that Allen points out are Saul and Satan. In 1 Samuel 10-15 Saul misinterprets Samuel’s words to him concerning how God would mediate His blessing on Saul as king. Later, Satan enters the scene to tempt the 2nd Adam, Christ, while He is in the desert and misinterprets Scripture three times (Matt. 4). But not only does Christ have to correct the misinterpretation of Scripture by Saul and Satan, he has to with the Pharisees as well – the religious leaders of the day! Most of Christ’s interaction with these kinds of religious leaders was correcting their bad interpretations of Scripture. Thankfully there is hope for bad interpreters like all of us. Jesus. Yes, Jesus is the answer to our bad interpretations of Scripture. Jesus is “the primary interpreter of Scripture because He is the primary object of Scripture.” (p. 43) So often we focus so much imitating Jesus in word and deed that we miss out on an equally important way in which Jesus lived out His ministry among people on earth – as the perfect interpreter of Scripture. Allen points out that “some of the most amazing things recorded in Scripture are not actually miracles but the instances when God explains His own Word to people and then shows them how to apply it….Interpretation and application of God’s Word is of the highest importance to Jesus.” (p. 43-44) Time and time again, Jesus was challenging the bad interpretations of the religious leaders of the day. Then moving from correcting their bad interpretations He corrects their bad applications stemming from their bad interpretations. This is what Jesus wants to do for us. He corrects our bad interpretations and applications so that we can better live for Him. By following the example of the Bereans, who searched the Scriptures daily to see if the words of the apostles were true (Acts 17:11), Christians are to be actively involved in interpreting Scripture for themselves and not just leaving it up to those educated in biblical studies. Allen is not saying we cannot learn from others. After all, God speaks through His Word to all believers. However, we are not to entirely depend on the interpretations of others (p. 69). Allen’s words are bold, “All believers should be able to interpret the Bible with little to no theological education.” (p. 72) Again, Allen is no discouraging formal theological education. In fact he encourages it for those who are able and gifted to do so. Rather, he is encouraging all Christians to realize that intentional, active and faithful interpretation on Scripture is a necessary part of imitating Christ. Therefore, all Christians need to take it seriously. Allen’s proposal is right on the money and he should be applauded for his work here. There is only one thing I felt was missing from the book. Besides a few passing references to the Holy Spirit, there was no extended discussion of the role of the Holy Spirit as the believers helper in imitating Jesus as an interpreter of Scripture. In John 14, as Jesus tells the disciples that He will be leaving them soon, He encourages them with the coming of the Holy Spirit. In 14:26 He tells them that the Holy Spirit will “teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you.” It seems that the Holy Spirit would be the primary way in which believer can imitate Jesus as a Spirit led interpreter of Scripture. Nevertheless, Education or Imitation? is definitely a challenge to much of the contemporary churches thinking on education as a requirement for interpretation and the, quite frankly, lackadaisical attitude that too many believers have towards interpreting Scripture for themselves. This is the kind of book I would want to put into the hands of everyone in my church and would pray that every Christian reads it. Allen’s book is spot on and his words need a wide hearing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Solid introductory book on Bible interpretation.

  4. 4 out of 5

    LaRosa Jr.

    Curtis Allen has been an acquaintance of mine for a number of years now. I came to know him because of his work as a Christian rapper under the stage name “Voice.” With several theologically heavy hip-hop albums under his belt, I quickly became a fan. Rap is not all that Curtis is known for. After attending the Pastor’s College, Curtis became a pastor at Solid Rock Church (a Sovereign Grace church in Prince Georges County, Maryland). Using his spiritual gifting as a pastor & his ability to break Curtis Allen has been an acquaintance of mine for a number of years now. I came to know him because of his work as a Christian rapper under the stage name “Voice.” With several theologically heavy hip-hop albums under his belt, I quickly became a fan. Rap is not all that Curtis is known for. After attending the Pastor’s College, Curtis became a pastor at Solid Rock Church (a Sovereign Grace church in Prince Georges County, Maryland). Using his spiritual gifting as a pastor & his ability to break down weighty truths in a manner that is easy to understand, Curtis is now ready to tackle his first book titled Education or Imitation: Bible Interpretation for Dummies Like You and Me. The book is published by Cruciform Press, a publisher that is all about releasing books that are: short, clear, concise, helpful, inspiring, and gospel-focused. This book from Curtis fits right into that mold and tackles the topics of biblical hermeneutics & exegesis. While the title may catch you off guard, it is quite succinct & sums up the book’s contents quite nicely. Broken down into five chapters, the book seeks to drive home the point that whoever you are you can understand the Bible, and you do not have to go to Bible college or seminary to do so. The Bible is meant to be understood by its readers, and you’ll be confident that you will have the tools needed to understand the Bible after you’ve finished reading this book. In the first chapter of the book, Curtis shows the reader that interpretation is vital in every aspect of our lives, not just when it comes to reading the Bible. As an illustration, Curtis uses a vivid story from his life before he came to know the Lord and how even then he was interpreting things. As the subtitle for the chapter seeks to drive home, what you don’t know can kill you; this is true too when it comes to the Bible. It may not kill you, but it can definitely harm you spiritually or stunt your growth. In the second chapter, you are given a history of what bad interpretation looks like and how we’ve gotten to where we are now. This is a vital chapter, as it shows you some of the areas where you can go wrong in interpretation, which is vital for knowing how to make the correct interpretation. It is in the third chapter that you begin getting into the meat of the book, as you start looking at the life of Jesus Christ. Why Jesus Christ? Well, this book is titled Education or Imitation for a reason. The point being, correct interpretation is more about imitating the example that Jesus left for us than it is about needing a seminary-level education to understand & interpret the Bible. The fourth chapter moves to the next logical step, which is making application of what you’ve read. Moving from interpretation to application is key, as you have to apply to your life everything that you’re learning from Scripture. Then, finally, you learn in the final chapter that the Bible isn’t all about you and fulfilling your needs, but it is about theology & focusing on God. Me-ology versus Theology is the final word of this book. Simply put, you’re reading the Bible not for your own benefit (although you will), but to put you in a better position to know & worship your God. All in all, this book is a terrific read & one that I recommend every new believer read. It is one that I will make sure that anyone I disciple reads very early on in their walk. While going deeper in your studies is worthwhile, it is not needed to understand the Bible, and that is the message that is clearly driven home by Curtis in this book. Bible interpretation is more about imitating Jesus than it is about having some deep theological background. Don’t be fooled into thinking that Bible interpretation is some secret left for pastors & scholars to unfold; every Christian can read & understand the Bible. Bible interpretation is indeed for dummies like you AND me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Lehr

    My Pastor always says... The MacArthur commentary states.... Well I heard Piper say... That's not what it says here in my study Bible notes..... Is Bible interpretation only for the experts? Can we, or should we, read the Bible for ourselves? Curtis Allen, tackles this question in his book Education or Imitation?: Bible Interpretation for Dummies Like You and Me. In the course of church history interpretation wasn't always left to a few scholars. A seminary education wasn't a requirement for understa My Pastor always says... The MacArthur commentary states.... Well I heard Piper say... That's not what it says here in my study Bible notes..... Is Bible interpretation only for the experts? Can we, or should we, read the Bible for ourselves? Curtis Allen, tackles this question in his book Education or Imitation?: Bible Interpretation for Dummies Like You and Me. In the course of church history interpretation wasn't always left to a few scholars. A seminary education wasn't a requirement for understanding scripture. It seems God gave us his Word so that all could know him. So why do we let others tell us what scripture means? So, how do I do it? The answer to this dilemma is that we need to focus on imitation as opposed to education. We need to imitate Jesus. While he walked this earth Jesus rightly interpreted God's Word, most noticeably in the face of the Pharisee's wrong interpretation. But why were the Pharisees so wrong? They focused all there interpretive powers on finding themselves in scripture. They wanted to know what was right and wrong for them. (well, mostly for others!). They wanted to see their role in this world. They fell into the error of believing the Bible was written about them. So who is it about? God of course! The scriptures reveal God and more specifically Jesus as the fulfillment of all scripture. When we seek to understand the Bible without looking for and to Jesus, we begin to see things that aren't really there. Education or Imitation? is an easy to read book, pointing and encouraging us towards a firsthand and correct interpretation of God's Word. It seeks to remove fear and equip us to take up the message of the Bible for ourselves. He walks us through some of the dangers as well as through some good examples, showing us how to walk on our own. This is a great book for those who are taking their first steps into discovering the message of the Bible for themselves.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    My full review can be read at Blogging Theologically: What does it take to interpret Scripture correctly? Education? A seminary degree? Learning Greek and Hebrew? These are great and helpful things, but argues Curtis (Voice) Allen, they’re not the secret to becoming a good interpreter of Scripture. The secret is imitating Jesus. “Interpretation of Scripture, followed by right application, is the primary way that we are to be like God,” he writes in his new book, Education or Imitation?: Bible Int My full review can be read at Blogging Theologically: What does it take to interpret Scripture correctly? Education? A seminary degree? Learning Greek and Hebrew? These are great and helpful things, but argues Curtis (Voice) Allen, they’re not the secret to becoming a good interpreter of Scripture. The secret is imitating Jesus. “Interpretation of Scripture, followed by right application, is the primary way that we are to be like God,” he writes in his new book, Education or Imitation?: Bible Interpretation for Dummies Like You and Me. “This is not an issue of education. It’s an issue of imitation” (p. 21). And through the book’s five short, but powerful chapters, Allen unpacks how “the call of imitation will walk hand in hand with interpretation” (p. 18)...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tim Sheppard

    I was hooked right from the start with this book because of the intense story of gang life. The rest of the book seemed to be a little fluffy, but it was a nice read overall. I like how the author threw in some street speak every now and then. His walkthrough of Jesus' treatment of the Pharisees was helpful. He wrote about how the Pharisees basically thought that God was just like them. That seems to be similar to the moral therapeutic deism that is so prevalent today. God is basically ok with m I was hooked right from the start with this book because of the intense story of gang life. The rest of the book seemed to be a little fluffy, but it was a nice read overall. I like how the author threw in some street speak every now and then. His walkthrough of Jesus' treatment of the Pharisees was helpful. He wrote about how the Pharisees basically thought that God was just like them. That seems to be similar to the moral therapeutic deism that is so prevalent today. God is basically ok with me and my life, and He really understands why I act this way... Thanks Curt for pointing this out. All in all a good quick read about imatating Christ when reading Scripture.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    In Education or Imitation, Curt Allen argues that Bible interpretation involves relating the Scriptures to Jesus Christ, and that you do not need to be educated especially to do that, but rather simply need the help of the Holy Spirit. Right interpretation then should lead to right application, which results in the imitation of Christ, which is God's goal for us. Allen does not see formal Bible education as useless, needless to say, just not the main qualification the Bible itself sets forth for In Education or Imitation, Curt Allen argues that Bible interpretation involves relating the Scriptures to Jesus Christ, and that you do not need to be educated especially to do that, but rather simply need the help of the Holy Spirit. Right interpretation then should lead to right application, which results in the imitation of Christ, which is God's goal for us. Allen does not see formal Bible education as useless, needless to say, just not the main qualification the Bible itself sets forth for interpreting the Scriptures. This is a useful book to remind us of the main issues in Bible interpretation.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mark A Powell

    Allen rightly draws a distinction between education and imitation, stating that the latter has much more to do with proper interpretation of Scripture than the former. While he is quick to extol the virtues of education, he laments the mentality that relegates understanding Scripture to those who are ‘educated’ instead of every Christian believer. Though brief (even shorter than most Cruciform Press offerings), and in need of additional unpacking, Allen manages to support his conclusion well.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Nice short e-read. A reminder that Biblical interpretation can and ought to be done by all. Interesting case-study on the Sabbath.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Owen

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Brock

  14. 5 out of 5

    Will Allen

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lance

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  17. 5 out of 5

    Al Garlando

  18. 4 out of 5

    David

  19. 5 out of 5

    Greg Smith

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nate Claiborne

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Pulley

  22. 5 out of 5

    Charles Lynch

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nicholi

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael Dewalt

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Anderson ii

  27. 4 out of 5

    Floyd

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bauer Evans

    Look forward to reading this on Kindle ...

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...