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A Legend of Montrose by Sir Walter Scott, Fiction, Historical, Literary, Classics

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From the introduction: "The Legend of Montrose was written chiefly with a view to place before the reader the melancholy fate of John Lord Kilpont, eldest son of William Earl of Airth and Menteith, and the singular circumstances attending the birth and history of James Stewart of Ardvoirlich, by whose hand the unfortunate nobleman fell." From the introduction: "The Legend of Montrose was written chiefly with a view to place before the reader the melancholy fate of John Lord Kilpont, eldest son of William Earl of Airth and Menteith, and the singular circumstances attending the birth and history of James Stewart of Ardvoirlich, by whose hand the unfortunate nobleman fell."


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From the introduction: "The Legend of Montrose was written chiefly with a view to place before the reader the melancholy fate of John Lord Kilpont, eldest son of William Earl of Airth and Menteith, and the singular circumstances attending the birth and history of James Stewart of Ardvoirlich, by whose hand the unfortunate nobleman fell." From the introduction: "The Legend of Montrose was written chiefly with a view to place before the reader the melancholy fate of John Lord Kilpont, eldest son of William Earl of Airth and Menteith, and the singular circumstances attending the birth and history of James Stewart of Ardvoirlich, by whose hand the unfortunate nobleman fell."

30 review for A Legend of Montrose by Sir Walter Scott, Fiction, Historical, Literary, Classics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amit Mishra

    The novel is more successful in its portrait of history, particularly the opposing characters of Montrose, the Royalist, and Argyle, than its account of the lovers' problems. The novel is more successful in its portrait of history, particularly the opposing characters of Montrose, the Royalist, and Argyle, than its account of the lovers' problems.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sara Jesus

    Um dos meus escritores da minha adolescência. Cresci sonhando que aparecia um "Ivanhoe" me resgatar dos meus momentos difíceis. Sempre gostei de romances de cavaleria. E este é especial pois me lembra a saga Outlander.Talvez a escritora tenha buscado inspiração nestes romances. Tem lugares e nomes que possui na saga. Foi interessante conhecer mais sobre as clãs escosesas e as suas guerrras. O verdadeiro herói não é Montrose mas sim é o povo. O povo que nunca desiste. E que talvez consiga a sua a Um dos meus escritores da minha adolescência. Cresci sonhando que aparecia um "Ivanhoe" me resgatar dos meus momentos difíceis. Sempre gostei de romances de cavaleria. E este é especial pois me lembra a saga Outlander.Talvez a escritora tenha buscado inspiração nestes romances. Tem lugares e nomes que possui na saga. Foi interessante conhecer mais sobre as clãs escosesas e as suas guerrras. O verdadeiro herói não é Montrose mas sim é o povo. O povo que nunca desiste. E que talvez consiga a sua almejada independência

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

    Part of Scott’s Landlord tales. The story is set in the 1640s during the English Civil War. The location for the action is in Perthshire and Argyll. Once again the story is loosely based on true events. This story is based around the murder of Lord Kilmont by James Stewart of Ardvoirlich after the battle of Tippermuir. In the story Scott has one of his great comic characters with the Scottish mercenary, Captain Dalgetty, a soldier of fortune. We are introduced to Captain Dalgetty when he meets th Part of Scott’s Landlord tales. The story is set in the 1640s during the English Civil War. The location for the action is in Perthshire and Argyll. Once again the story is loosely based on true events. This story is based around the murder of Lord Kilmont by James Stewart of Ardvoirlich after the battle of Tippermuir. In the story Scott has one of his great comic characters with the Scottish mercenary, Captain Dalgetty, a soldier of fortune. We are introduced to Captain Dalgetty when he meets the Lord Menteith a kinsman of the Royalist Earl of Montrose's. Agreement is reached that Dalgetty will fight for Montrose in the Highland campaign against the Covenanters in 1644. Allan M'Aulay, par of Montrose's army, is slightly mad and has been in a feud Ranald MacEagh clan known as the Children of the Mist. They murdered Allans uncle and mistreated his mother. He is also in love with Annot Lyle whom he rescued during a foray against the clan MacEagh. Annot, however, prefers Allan's friend, the Earl of Menteith. There is a mystery about Annot's birth which is later revealed by Ranald. This is linked with Sir Duncan Campbell, the Knight of Ardenvohr, who is on the opposing side. The story includes an escape by Dalgetty, a battle and the intrigues of Montrose against his enemy the Earl of Argyll. Dalgetty and his horse Gustavus were fun characters based on Scott’s meeting and reading of such characters. Overall an enjoyable read based on historical facts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lucy

    Sir Walter is growing on me as I read chronologically through his work. There's not really much of a story to this one, and I can't say I'm very interested in this period of Scottish history, but for the first time I found one of this author's 'characters', Sir Dugald Dalgetty, quite entertaining. Sad about his horse, though. Sir Walter is growing on me as I read chronologically through his work. There's not really much of a story to this one, and I can't say I'm very interested in this period of Scottish history, but for the first time I found one of this author's 'characters', Sir Dugald Dalgetty, quite entertaining. Sad about his horse, though.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Steve R

    Set in the 1640s in Scotland, while England was divided in a Civil War that would eventually cost the King his head, thisshort novel (only about 300+ pp.) deals with the struggle between the Dukes of Argyle (pro-Roundhead) and Montrose (pro-Charles I). There are also the 'Children of the Mist' - a ragtag band of outlaws who, to right a wrong done them for poaching, beheadthe man they blame for it. Then, they go to have a meal at his very house and while the sister isaway on an errand to serve th Set in the 1640s in Scotland, while England was divided in a Civil War that would eventually cost the King his head, thisshort novel (only about 300+ pp.) deals with the struggle between the Dukes of Argyle (pro-Roundhead) and Montrose (pro-Charles I). There are also the 'Children of the Mist' - a ragtag band of outlaws who, to right a wrong done them for poaching, beheadthe man they blame for it. Then, they go to have a meal at his very house and while the sister isaway on an errand to serve them, they put the head on the table and stuff it with food. The sister goes mad, and runs to the woods, giving birth to Allan M'Aulay, who later is allied with Montrose. He is also a fierce rival of Monteith - another Montrose adherent - for the affections of Annot Lyle, a foundling, who is at theend revealed to be the only remainning offspring after the Children massacred all the children ofa lord allied with Argyle. When her noble birthis revealed, Monteith seeks and wins her hand, only to be severely wounded by Allan, who himself escapes never to be heard from again. The marriage takes place despite the couple being from opposite sides of thedispute. The real star of the novel is Dugald Dalgetty, a professionalsoldier whose main interests are a) getting paid for his services and b) getting enough to eat and drink. He had fought all over Europe formanydifferentsides, but best admired King Gustavus of Sweden and his Protestant campaigns, He named his horse Gustavus and treats him as his best friendf. Notsince the title chacter in the Antiquary has Scott put so much homor into one of his novel's main characters. His advice on defending a castle and ability to toast a whole group of people who really want to see the last of him asre classic pieces of comedic writing. All-in-all, a fairly spirited and fun novel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Monty Milne

    This novel came out shortly after “The Bride of Lammermoor” and was somewhat in the shadow of that more famous work. However, although I do think Lammermoor is a more impressive achievement, in some ways this is a more enjoyable experience. It isn’t quite so dark – it has a happy ending – and the character of Dugald Dalgetty is a brilliant creation and genuinely funny. He reminded me in some ways of the Knight of La Mancha, and although Dalgetty lacks the Spaniard’s moral earnestness, they both This novel came out shortly after “The Bride of Lammermoor” and was somewhat in the shadow of that more famous work. However, although I do think Lammermoor is a more impressive achievement, in some ways this is a more enjoyable experience. It isn’t quite so dark – it has a happy ending – and the character of Dugald Dalgetty is a brilliant creation and genuinely funny. He reminded me in some ways of the Knight of La Mancha, and although Dalgetty lacks the Spaniard’s moral earnestness, they both share some enjoyably absurd characteristics. There are some great elements in here: the sinister Highland clan known as the Children of the Mist, the splendid but flawed Royalist leader Montrose and the far less splendid and even more flawed Covenanting leader Argyle, and some great battle scenes and plenty of exciting action. The book is a bit shorter than the usual Scott, which also helps. When it was first published some didn’t like it because of the supernatural elements – I don’t care for too much of that either, but here it isn’t overdone. Others thought Scott showed too much partiality for the royalists by whitewashing Montrose, trashing Argyle, and going in for too much irreverent mockery of the hypocrisy of the bible-bashing Covenanters. I don’t think Scott is too unfair, but it is easy enough to see where his sympathies lay. As I share those same sympathies, I don’t mind at all. (Re read recently many years after the first reading, and upped from 3 stars to 4).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    The best kind of historical fiction is when it motivates you to learn more about its subject matter. In that, this book succeeds. The story recalls a brief episode in British history, during the time that Parliament had deposed Charles I, in which Montrose raised up royalist Highland clans to oppose the Lowland Covaenanters (led by Argyle) who supported English Parliament. Most popular historical accounts of this time period focus on Charles I and Parliament, and they sometimes mention royalist The best kind of historical fiction is when it motivates you to learn more about its subject matter. In that, this book succeeds. The story recalls a brief episode in British history, during the time that Parliament had deposed Charles I, in which Montrose raised up royalist Highland clans to oppose the Lowland Covaenanters (led by Argyle) who supported English Parliament. Most popular historical accounts of this time period focus on Charles I and Parliament, and they sometimes mention royalist Scottish forces that attempted to come to the aid of Charles, as a footnote in the margins. In this novel, Scott puts the focus on Montrose and Argyle, with a romantic story woven in the background. Scott makes the interesting choice to put a Falstaff character in the foreground of much of the novel, rather than relegate him to interludes of comic relief. This character, Dugald Dalgetty, underscores how Scottish mercenaries were widely utilized in the continental 30 Years War, and were then employed in the English Civil War with good effect, on both sides. Don't be surprised if reading this book results in a deep dive into Wikipedia. This may not be one of Scott's greatest novels, but it's great fun for Scottish history buffs, of which Scott was surely one.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    Another of the Waverley novels, somewhat shorter in length than some, set in Scotland during the times of the English civil war. The background for the tale is of Scottish conflict - of those sympathetic to the Crown versus those supportive of Parliament, of those supportive of the traditional Scottish Kirk versus the new Covenanters and of Highlanders versus Lowlanders. The main characters are of the former persuasions and for most of the story are in the ascendancy defeating their enemies unde Another of the Waverley novels, somewhat shorter in length than some, set in Scotland during the times of the English civil war. The background for the tale is of Scottish conflict - of those sympathetic to the Crown versus those supportive of Parliament, of those supportive of the traditional Scottish Kirk versus the new Covenanters and of Highlanders versus Lowlanders. The main characters are of the former persuasions and for most of the story are in the ascendancy defeating their enemies under the leadership of the Earl of Montrose. There are two significant subplots. For those familiar with Scott's novels the first, a romance, will come as no surprise. To be precise a love triangle where unknown genealogy plays a role in the final outcome. The second is an account of the "adventures" of a professional soldier, Major Dalgetty, who is persuaded to join the army of Montrose. An entertaining read. My only criticism is that, like others of Scott's novels, the conclusion of the various subplots seem to happen altogether very quickly during the final pages of the novel. It seems, having taken a leisurely pace through the build-up, that the author got bored and decided to finish the book as soon as possible.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jim Coats

    Short novel by Sir Walter Scott centring on the civil war between Scottish supporters of King Charles with the Marquis of Montrose as his champion and the Duke of Argyll (Argyle in Scott's spelling) as the leader of the Covenanter rebels. I thoroughly enjoyed it from start to finish. It has romance in the love triangle surrounding the fair damsel Annot Lyle, comedy in the Quixotic character of Sir Dugald Dalgetty and excitement especially in Dalgetty's escape from Inveraray Castle. I also enjoye Short novel by Sir Walter Scott centring on the civil war between Scottish supporters of King Charles with the Marquis of Montrose as his champion and the Duke of Argyll (Argyle in Scott's spelling) as the leader of the Covenanter rebels. I thoroughly enjoyed it from start to finish. It has romance in the love triangle surrounding the fair damsel Annot Lyle, comedy in the Quixotic character of Sir Dugald Dalgetty and excitement especially in Dalgetty's escape from Inveraray Castle. I also enjoyed Scott's description of the final battle between the rival armies. I'm a fan of Scott's writing and this didn't disappoint.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Scott's first novel written almost exclusively in English with English dialog. It is yet another novel touching on an aspect of the Jacobite Rebellion. This one features the battles led and won by the Earl of Montrose while touching on the Campbell clan, the MacAulays and the ostracized Children of the Mist. But mainly it tells of the adventures of a Scottish soldier of fortune, Captain Dugald Dalgetty of Drumthwacket who had lately served in King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden's army. The novel is Scott's first novel written almost exclusively in English with English dialog. It is yet another novel touching on an aspect of the Jacobite Rebellion. This one features the battles led and won by the Earl of Montrose while touching on the Campbell clan, the MacAulays and the ostracized Children of the Mist. But mainly it tells of the adventures of a Scottish soldier of fortune, Captain Dugald Dalgetty of Drumthwacket who had lately served in King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden's army. The novel is fairly well paced, has its share of romance, but really does little to develop any of the characters who are rather pieces on a story board.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. C.

    One of Scott's more well-drawn characters is Dugald Dalgetty, a character reminiscent of the periphrastic type often employed by James Fenimore-Cooper, a contemporary of Scott's. A story with a happy ending, this novel is set in the time of the Covenanters. Montrose was a royalist, and the story is told from his point of view, but the Covenanters are not reviled. The battle in the novel is based more on his feud with the Campbells than with a religious group. A fun read. One of Scott's more well-drawn characters is Dugald Dalgetty, a character reminiscent of the periphrastic type often employed by James Fenimore-Cooper, a contemporary of Scott's. A story with a happy ending, this novel is set in the time of the Covenanters. Montrose was a royalist, and the story is told from his point of view, but the Covenanters are not reviled. The battle in the novel is based more on his feud with the Campbells than with a religious group. A fun read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ian Jardine

    I am a fan and defender of Walter Scott, and the Marquess of Montrose is a bit of a historical hero of mine, so this should have suited me well. Sadly it didn't live up to hopes or expectations. The basis for a plot is set down early on but then seems to be forgotten until it is hastily resurrected in the closing chapters. Bits of historical fact are hastily inserted at times in between. Most of the first half of the book concerns the activities of Major Dalgetty. The major is a comic character, I am a fan and defender of Walter Scott, and the Marquess of Montrose is a bit of a historical hero of mine, so this should have suited me well. Sadly it didn't live up to hopes or expectations. The basis for a plot is set down early on but then seems to be forgotten until it is hastily resurrected in the closing chapters. Bits of historical fact are hastily inserted at times in between. Most of the first half of the book concerns the activities of Major Dalgetty. The major is a comic character, but comedy is not one of Sir Walter's strong points - at least at the distance of 200 years. One of the Major's humorous characteristics is that other characters in the book all find him deadly boring. The risk here of course is that the reader does too - and so it was. I'm not sure the timescales work either. For these to work the Major's little adventures must take the same time as whole of Montrose's first campaign of 1644 - theoretically possible but it doesn't ring true. All in all a novel that doesn't enhance Sir Walter's well deserved reputation as a historical novelist and maybe best overlooked.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    A somewhat unusual Scott novel, which centers around possible Scott's most humorous character, Sir Dugald Dalgetty of Drumthwacket. Sir Dugald is annoying, but comedic because we all know someone just like him. Although a fairly bland book overall, the high point is the description of the final battle, which excellently written. Worth picking up if seen in a shop, but otherwise, you're probably better passing over it for a better Scott book. A somewhat unusual Scott novel, which centers around possible Scott's most humorous character, Sir Dugald Dalgetty of Drumthwacket. Sir Dugald is annoying, but comedic because we all know someone just like him. Although a fairly bland book overall, the high point is the description of the final battle, which excellently written. Worth picking up if seen in a shop, but otherwise, you're probably better passing over it for a better Scott book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    A short story of warfare, highland clans and blood feuds leavened with the comic character of Dugald Dalgetty of Drumthwacket - a self important, self obsessed, and pedantic, soldier of fortune - devoted to his horse Augustus.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katja Labonté

    5+ stars & 7/10 hearts. I always forget how short this book is, compared to Scott’s other works! I really love this story. It doesn’t have all the breathless excitement and extremely high stakes as his other books, but it’s extremely humorous—the humour in proportion to the rest of the book is quite high. Dalgetty is Scott’s most hilarious character, I am convinced!! I especially love his interactions with Ranald; the contrast is particularly ludicrous! Monteith is a wonderful hero, & I do love 5+ stars & 7/10 hearts. I always forget how short this book is, compared to Scott’s other works! I really love this story. It doesn’t have all the breathless excitement and extremely high stakes as his other books, but it’s extremely humorous—the humour in proportion to the rest of the book is quite high. Dalgetty is Scott’s most hilarious character, I am convinced!! I especially love his interactions with Ranald; the contrast is particularly ludicrous! Monteith is a wonderful hero, & I do love Allan too—and Montrose. Annot is a lovely heroine, too. There is only one instance of language (blanked out) and while this book deals with second sight, and many characters believe in it, it is overall portrayed as a hoax. There is some violence, of course; and I don’t agree with everything; but I love seeing my hardy, brave Highlanders again <33 and there are so many wonderful characters and speeches. Recommended ages: 16+. A Favourite Quote: “‘There goes a true-bred Campbell,’ said Montrose, as the envoy departed, ‘for they are ever fair and false.’ “‘Pardon me, my lord,’ said Evan Dhu; ‘hereditary enemy as I am to their name, I have ever found the Knight of Ardenvohr brave in war, honest in peace, and true in council.’” A Favourite Beautiful Quote: “‘She touched her clairshach [Harp] to a song of the Children of the Mist, which she had learned when her dwelling was amongst us. The woods in which we had dwelt pleasantly, rustled their green leaves in the song, and our streams were there with the sound of all their waters.’” A Favourite Humourous Quote: “‘By the honour of a cavalier,’ said Captain Dalgetty, finding at length an opportunity to thrust in his word, ‘I am proud and happy in having an opportunity of drawing a sword under your lordship’s command; and I do forgive all grudge, malecontent, and malice of my heart, to Mr. Allan M’Aulay, for having thrust me down to the lowest seat of the board yestreen.... I do, before you all, recognise the justice of the preference, and heartily salute Allan as one who is to be his BON-CAMARADO.’ Having made this speech, which was little understood or attended to, without putting off his military glove, he seized on Allan’s hand, and began to shake it with violence, which Allan, with a gripe like a smith’s vice, returned with such force, as to drive the iron splents of the gauntlet into the hand of the wearer. Captain Dalgetty might have construed this into a new affront, had not his attention, as he stood blowing and shaking the injured member, been suddenly called by Montrose himself.”

  16. 5 out of 5

    Curt

    2020 was a year for reading books that would expand my understanding of 17th century Scotland. I chose to start 2021 with another Sir Walter Scott Novel set in the same time period with Montrose in the center. I thoroughly enjoyed the narrative describing the battle where Montrose faced Argyll. I also enjoyed Annot Lyle as a female thread throughout the novel. A Legend of Montrose is one of the shorter novels and not as well received as its predecessor, The Bride of Lammermoor. However, I do rec 2020 was a year for reading books that would expand my understanding of 17th century Scotland. I chose to start 2021 with another Sir Walter Scott Novel set in the same time period with Montrose in the center. I thoroughly enjoyed the narrative describing the battle where Montrose faced Argyll. I also enjoyed Annot Lyle as a female thread throughout the novel. A Legend of Montrose is one of the shorter novels and not as well received as its predecessor, The Bride of Lammermoor. However, I do recommend reading this novel.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    I read this, but so long ago I can't remember anything about it except that it went more easily than I had feared it would, being back-shelf Scott. See my review of Montrose for non-fiction back story. I read this, but so long ago I can't remember anything about it except that it went more easily than I had feared it would, being back-shelf Scott. See my review of Montrose for non-fiction back story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Little

    Similar to Old Mortality, the story is mainly an excuse to talk about Scottish military history. Not the most exciting topic, and the characters are not that interesting, either. At least there were less speeches filled with indecipherable Scottish dialect.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    Clearly not for the Covenanters in this story. But Captain Dalgetty made me laugh, roll my eyes, and shake my head.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This book was just ok. A decent story with interesting characters, but not as good as some of Scott's other works. This book was just ok. A decent story with interesting characters, but not as good as some of Scott's other works.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nikolay

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gayle Byrne

  23. 4 out of 5

    Helen Kiruiru

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sergio Gold

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo Pimenta

  26. 4 out of 5

    James F

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ivar Volmar

  28. 5 out of 5

    Liz Phillips

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sunny-san

  30. 4 out of 5

    Benicia Robrecht

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