Hot Best Seller

The Year's Best Horror Stories VII

Availability: Ready to download

This contains: Amma by Charles R. Saunders; Chastel by Manly Wade Wellman; Sleeping Tiger by Tanith Lee; Intimately with Rain by Janet Fox; The Secret by Jack Vance; The Night of the Tiger by Stephen King; The Pitch by Dennis Etchison; Hear Me Now My Sweet Abbey Rose by Charles L. Grant; Divers Hands by Darrell Schweitzer; Heading Home by Ramsey Campbell; In the Arcade by This contains: Amma by Charles R. Saunders; Chastel by Manly Wade Wellman; Sleeping Tiger by Tanith Lee; Intimately with Rain by Janet Fox; The Secret by Jack Vance; The Night of the Tiger by Stephen King; The Pitch by Dennis Etchison; Hear Me Now My Sweet Abbey Rose by Charles L. Grant; Divers Hands by Darrell Schweitzer; Heading Home by Ramsey Campbell; In the Arcade by Lisa Tuttle; Nemesis Place by David Drake; Collaborating by Michael Bishop; and Marriage by Robert Aickman.


Compare

This contains: Amma by Charles R. Saunders; Chastel by Manly Wade Wellman; Sleeping Tiger by Tanith Lee; Intimately with Rain by Janet Fox; The Secret by Jack Vance; The Night of the Tiger by Stephen King; The Pitch by Dennis Etchison; Hear Me Now My Sweet Abbey Rose by Charles L. Grant; Divers Hands by Darrell Schweitzer; Heading Home by Ramsey Campbell; In the Arcade by This contains: Amma by Charles R. Saunders; Chastel by Manly Wade Wellman; Sleeping Tiger by Tanith Lee; Intimately with Rain by Janet Fox; The Secret by Jack Vance; The Night of the Tiger by Stephen King; The Pitch by Dennis Etchison; Hear Me Now My Sweet Abbey Rose by Charles L. Grant; Divers Hands by Darrell Schweitzer; Heading Home by Ramsey Campbell; In the Arcade by Lisa Tuttle; Nemesis Place by David Drake; Collaborating by Michael Bishop; and Marriage by Robert Aickman.

30 review for The Year's Best Horror Stories VII

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

    And so we reach Gerald Page's last YEAR'S BEST HORROR, Volume 7, covering (roughly) the year 1978. Karl Edward Wagner would take over the next year, as Page had decided to "strap the guns back on" (I can only assume that means he went back to writing his own fiction). And it's one of the most solid, so bully for Page to be going out on a high note! As usual, weakest to strongest, so here we go. Dennis Etchison turns in a atypically straightforward piece in "The Pitch", about a stranger who shows And so we reach Gerald Page's last YEAR'S BEST HORROR, Volume 7, covering (roughly) the year 1978. Karl Edward Wagner would take over the next year, as Page had decided to "strap the guns back on" (I can only assume that means he went back to writing his own fiction). And it's one of the most solid, so bully for Page to be going out on a high note! As usual, weakest to strongest, so here we go. Dennis Etchison turns in a atypically straightforward piece in "The Pitch", about a stranger who shows up at a demonstration for a new "kitchen helper" type device in a department store and really, really wants to sell it to the housewives. He has ulterior, cruel, psychological motives, as it turns out. Not bad, but not much more than that. Tanith Lee, typically strong, falters a bit with the dark fantasy "Sleeping Tiger" about a waylaid, Asian traveler in feudal times who happens to stop at the wrong temple where something bad happened some time ago. Eh. Jack Vance's "The Secret" is similar - more dark fantasy involving a quest with an unlikely solution. "Heading Home" by Ramsey Campbell is, like Etchison's, atypical for him, a very pulpy little story about the unsuccessful murder of a scientist by his unfaithful wife and her lover. Unsuccessful because, well, that would be telling, but the title is something like a pun. Slight, but fun. David Drake's "Nemesis Place" is one of his very authentic Roman era stories about a search for a dead alchemist's lost gold. The character interaction is nice, the story a little underwhelming when it finally reveals the horror contained in an underground chamber (somewhat easily dispatched). Michael Bishop's "Collaborating", a memoir from an authentic two-headed man is well-written, touching (what is a two-headed man's sex-life like?) and all around well done, except there's nothing all that horrifying about it. Stephen King's "The Night Of The Tiger" is a little unfocused, but the solid writing makes this tale of a strange rivalry between a lion-tamer and a mysterious pursuer engaging enough. "Amma" by Charles Saunders is an exercise in African folkloric writing. More dark fantasy, but it has a surprisingly vivid ending involving a stampede of gazelles. The psychic detective duo in Manly Wade Wellman's "Chastel" are a bit, well, stuffy, but this tale of New England vampires and lost loves manages some effective moments (including a horde of the creatures stalking a small town being held asleep late at night through the lead vampire's powers). I can honestly say that I'm unsure what the ending of Charles L. Grant's subtle, well-written "Hear Me Now, My Sweet Abbey Rose" was supposed to imply, exactly (always a danger with "quiet horror") but I enjoyed reading it very much. Is is a meditation on absent parenting? Over-parenting? Selective parenting? Am I too darkly current in thinking there's an intimation of sexual hanky-panky? Any help would be appreciated. Janet Fox weaves a nice little southern Gothic tale in "Intimately, With Rain", in which a woman's return to her provincial hometown (where she grew up notorious as the local "easy" girl) uncovers some things the reader might not see coming. Disembodied, ambulatory parts are a horror staple (this collection already features one, there's your second hint for you about the Ramsey Campbell story) and "Divers Hands" by Darrell Schweitzer, featuring his ongoing character Knight Julian in a Byzantium-era setting, features a hell of a lot of ambulatory (and flat-out flying) dis-attached hands. It's some fun and creepy/pulpy dark heroic fantasy. Best story in the collection is a tie between Robert Aickman and Lisa Tuttle. Aickman's "Marriage" is a somewhat less dense and obscure tale than usual, but for Aickman that means that you're still unsure just what the hell it all means and what was/is going on, just slightly less so than normal. Laming Gatestead has a problem because this normally milquetoast little accountant/office type suddenly finds himself carrying on with two woman, roommates, one of whom is a bit dry and chaste, the other a bit, well, let's just say I blushed once or twice. Aickman again proves himself the master of masterful, evocative, elliptical writing that says little and implies a lot. This is a very dark story, even if more straightforward readers may find the ending unsatisfying - I found it chilling. Psychological horror at its best. Lisa Tuttle's "In The Arcade" begins with a woman waking up late at night in her poverty-ridden, tenement-choked neighborhood to discover that the moon doesn't look quite right and nobody else in her apartment, the building or even the streets seems to be responsive, appearing either asleep/dead or somehow turned-off. She walks out of town and discovers an invisible wall and some true horror behind a door. Elements of the story may be familiar now, in a way they weren't in 1978 unless you read a lot of Philip K. Dick, but Tuttle's story has a specific social point to make and makes it very well. Very, very well done! And that's it. Thanks for the hard work, Gerald Page, I hope you used your time to get some good shots in!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

    I've read other books in this series, edited by Karl Edward Wagner. This book, however, was edited by Wagner's predecessor Gerald W. Page. There are different types of horror here: fantasy, science fiction, naturalistic, and supernatural. I'll just comment on some stories, My favorite story here is "In The Arcade" by Lisa Tuttle. This is an alternate history/parallel universe story where a black woman awakes and discover curious things, such as the people around her are dead or unconscious. She w I've read other books in this series, edited by Karl Edward Wagner. This book, however, was edited by Wagner's predecessor Gerald W. Page. There are different types of horror here: fantasy, science fiction, naturalistic, and supernatural. I'll just comment on some stories, My favorite story here is "In The Arcade" by Lisa Tuttle. This is an alternate history/parallel universe story where a black woman awakes and discover curious things, such as the people around her are dead or unconscious. She wonders, was this the aftermath of a genocidal attack? Or was there a natural disaster, of which she doesn't remember? Details at the end of the story lead the reader to realize the horrifying reason. My vote for second best story is "Collaborating" by Michael Bishop. It could be questioned whether this story could properly be classified as horror. But I give slack on boundary cases, especially if it is a good story.. The story is told from what could be called the double first person point of view. The narrators are two heads on one body. Michael Bishop gets a lot of mileage out of this premise. The narrators talk about their life--for example, if their body succumbs to a disease, they both die. They are media celebrities. They even had a romantic relationship with a woman. Witty banter between the two heads. This volume contains the story "Marriage" by Robert Aikhman. I've seen reviewers think well of the story, but it didn't work for me. I think highly of 90 percent of Aickman's stories, but the other 10 percent I find underwhelming. For me, this story fell in the latter category. Laming Gateshead has two girlfriends, who live together. There is a lot of talk about the theater. The relationships get somewhat complicated. At the end of the story, one of Laming's girlfriends runs after him, takes a fall and seriously injures herself. Laming goes back to his mother. I searched on the internet for reviews of this story-- I figured, if people like the story more than I do, I must be missing something. I came across a psycho-analytical analysis of the story in the the journal AIckman Studies. Well, psycho-analysis is bunk.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    Although many of the stories in this anthology were eminently forgettable, there were four stories that were good enough to raise the overall rating of this book from 2 to 3 stars (but barely). The four best stories were: "The Night of the Tiger" by Stephen King. Although not one of King's best, this had an intriguing plot and enough of his trademark characterization and easy writing style to make the story memorable. The story involves a mysterious feud between a pair of big cat trainers, told fr Although many of the stories in this anthology were eminently forgettable, there were four stories that were good enough to raise the overall rating of this book from 2 to 3 stars (but barely). The four best stories were: "The Night of the Tiger" by Stephen King. Although not one of King's best, this had an intriguing plot and enough of his trademark characterization and easy writing style to make the story memorable. The story involves a mysterious feud between a pair of big cat trainers, told from the viewpoint of a circus roustabout who's caught in the middle. "In the Arcade" by Lisa Tuttle. A woman wakes up in the middle of the night to find that her whole family, and in fact, everyone in her inner city neighborhood, is dead. She goes off to find out what happened. This was the first story I've read by Tuttle, and it made me want to find more. "Collaborating" by Michael Bishop. An absolute gem. The two personalities of a real, live, two-headed man review their joint life, loves, and the difficulties of having two divergent persons with widely different likes and attitudes sharing the same body. Bishop approaches the psychological complications of the situation seriously (though not without a few puns for good measure), which turns a seemingly hopeless cliche into fascinating reading. "Marriage" by Robert Aickman. Perhaps the best, most affecting piece in the collection. A young man finds himself torn between the staid, stolid girl he's dating, and her passionate, insatiable roomate. Somehow Aickman manages to give this seemingly mundane state of affairs a creepy, nightmarish feel, reminiscent of Thomas Ligotti.

  4. 5 out of 5

    [on hiatus] The rockabilly werewolf from Mars

    Another of the weaker volumes, but with a few excellent stories. A fair number of them were pure fantasy, which I enjoy when I'm in the mood, but they weren't what I was looking for here. The best stories were by King, Tuttle, Grant, Campbell, Saunders, and Etchison. Surprisingly, I didn't especially enjoy the Aickman piece, despite how much I enjoy much of his work. The only story that I especially disliked was the Drake piece, due to a combination of my lack of interest in ancient Rome and the Another of the weaker volumes, but with a few excellent stories. A fair number of them were pure fantasy, which I enjoy when I'm in the mood, but they weren't what I was looking for here. The best stories were by King, Tuttle, Grant, Campbell, Saunders, and Etchison. Surprisingly, I didn't especially enjoy the Aickman piece, despite how much I enjoy much of his work. The only story that I especially disliked was the Drake piece, due to a combination of my lack of interest in ancient Rome and the fact that I wasn't in the mood for fantasy at the time. The rest were mostly mediocre.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Hirsch

    This year's crop skews toward the dark fantasy, mixing more than a dash of sword and sorcery into the mix. That's fine, but I prefer less fantasy and more horror (the title is "The Year's Best Horror Stories," after all). Also, another frustrating thing not just about this collection, but the series in general, is that the same names keep appearing again and again. One would expect some return contributors, especially among the most skilled craftsmen, but the editor of this year's edition (Geral This year's crop skews toward the dark fantasy, mixing more than a dash of sword and sorcery into the mix. That's fine, but I prefer less fantasy and more horror (the title is "The Year's Best Horror Stories," after all). Also, another frustrating thing not just about this collection, but the series in general, is that the same names keep appearing again and again. One would expect some return contributors, especially among the most skilled craftsmen, but the editor of this year's edition (Gerald W. Page), brags of scouring the "littles" and small magazines of horror fandom before putting it together. And yet, here again, are King and Campbell and Co. And speaking of horror maestro Stephen King, his contribution to this year's collection is "The Night of the Tiger," a short story that, by his own admission, was moldering rejected for years before he sent it in again to "The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction," only after his name and fame had been made. It's not a strong year when you're leading with "trunk stories," no matter whose trunk they came out of. That said, there are some strong pieces, starting with the first one, "The Pitch" by Dennis Etchison, a gleefully wicked story about a man who sells time-saving kitchen appliances, but modifies them so that the customers end up julienning and blooming more than potatoes. The best of the predominating fantasy tales have to be Charles Saunders' "Amma," about a strange beast masquerading as a woman, and Darrell Schweitzer's "Divers Hands," a stellar and quite original "possessed hand" tale that reinvigorates one of the hoariest and cliché-ridden stories in the horror canon. Those three and maybe one or two others make it almost worth it. But then I remember the bulk of the tales and I have to say, it was a bit of a slog on the whole.

  6. 4 out of 5

    James

    One of the weaker volumes in the DAW series and the last volume edited by Gerald Page. But there are still some scary gems in here. By far the best story was Robert Aickman’s “Marriage.” A highly ambiguous and tension ratcheting tale to the weird end. Also of note is Charles Grant’s “Hear Me Now, My Sweet Abbey Rose.”

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elisa Nocerino

  8. 5 out of 5

    D. E.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jay Rothermel

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jack Tripper

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Collins

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anneka Ever

  15. 4 out of 5

    Marko

  16. 4 out of 5

    Will Errickson

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pablo Diaz

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cinzia

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  21. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  22. 4 out of 5

    Isamontag

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jaime Hallen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matthew St. Cyr

  26. 4 out of 5

    Waffles

  27. 5 out of 5

    Allan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chiara

  29. 5 out of 5

    Greg Fasolino

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sara-Iris e Periplo Review

    Questa raccolta di racconti horror l’ho letta perchè comprende la storia di Stephen King, LA NOTTE DELLA TIGRE, scritta nel 1977 e lunga 11 pagine. La raccolta in se non è proprio delle migliori, alcuni racconti belli ma la maggior parte non proprio una grande lettura. Il racconto di King non male, tra l’altro molto raro, visto che esiste solo in un paio di raccolte di artisti vari. Diciamo che se non ci fosse stato Stephen King tra gli autori, forse non lo avrei mai letto, ma il bello sta propr Questa raccolta di racconti horror l’ho letta perchè comprende la storia di Stephen King, LA NOTTE DELLA TIGRE, scritta nel 1977 e lunga 11 pagine. La raccolta in se non è proprio delle migliori, alcuni racconti belli ma la maggior parte non proprio una grande lettura. Il racconto di King non male, tra l’altro molto raro, visto che esiste solo in un paio di raccolte di artisti vari. Diciamo che se non ci fosse stato Stephen King tra gli autori, forse non lo avrei mai letto, ma il bello sta proprio nel leggere cose mai pensate.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...