Hot Best Seller

Writing Women's Lives: An Anthology Of Autobiographical Narratives By Twentieth Century American Women Writers

Availability: Ready to download

Representing fifty distinguished American women writers, this collection of autobiographical narratives reflects the diverse intersections of race, class, religion, and sexual identity as they have been experienced in every region of the United States over the course of the twentieth century. The selections showcase the common experiences of women writers as children, daug Representing fifty distinguished American women writers, this collection of autobiographical narratives reflects the diverse intersections of race, class, religion, and sexual identity as they have been experienced in every region of the United States over the course of the twentieth century. The selections showcase the common experiences of women writers as children, daughters, wives, lovers, mothers, artists, travelers, and intellectuals; together they form a moving cultural history of the United States form a moving cultural history of the United States from a female perspective. Among the different voices of these accomplished prose stylists, one hears a common note of humor and irreverence, and the ring of conviction and confidence that comes from a well-forged identity.


Compare

Representing fifty distinguished American women writers, this collection of autobiographical narratives reflects the diverse intersections of race, class, religion, and sexual identity as they have been experienced in every region of the United States over the course of the twentieth century. The selections showcase the common experiences of women writers as children, daug Representing fifty distinguished American women writers, this collection of autobiographical narratives reflects the diverse intersections of race, class, religion, and sexual identity as they have been experienced in every region of the United States over the course of the twentieth century. The selections showcase the common experiences of women writers as children, daughters, wives, lovers, mothers, artists, travelers, and intellectuals; together they form a moving cultural history of the United States form a moving cultural history of the United States from a female perspective. Among the different voices of these accomplished prose stylists, one hears a common note of humor and irreverence, and the ring of conviction and confidence that comes from a well-forged identity.

30 review for Writing Women's Lives: An Anthology Of Autobiographical Narratives By Twentieth Century American Women Writers

  1. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Hines

    I loved this book so much. It has pushed me to try writers new to me (Madeleine L'Engle, Jane O'Reilly). I really love the diversity and beauty of women's voices. Madeleine L'Engle, on the consequences of her husband's smoking, which was so fashionable once: "Consequences: cancer is a result of consequences. It is not sent as a punishment. I do not have to make the repulsive theological error of feeling that I have to see cancer as God's will for my husband. I do not want anything to do with tha I loved this book so much. It has pushed me to try writers new to me (Madeleine L'Engle, Jane O'Reilly). I really love the diversity and beauty of women's voices. Madeleine L'Engle, on the consequences of her husband's smoking, which was so fashionable once: "Consequences: cancer is a result of consequences. It is not sent as a punishment. I do not have to make the repulsive theological error of feeling that I have to see cancer as God's will for my husband. I do not want anything to do with that kind of God. Cancer is not God's will. The death of a child is not God's will. The deaths from automobile accidents during this long holiday weekend are not God's will. I would rather have no God at all than that kind of punitive God. Tragedies are consequences of human actions, and the only God worth believing in does not cause the tragedies but lovingly comes into the anguish with us." Lucille Clifton: "Things don't fall apart. Things hold. Lines connect in thin ways that last and last and lives become generations made out of pictures and words just kept." Feeds right into my current obsession with family photographs.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I loved this book. I have read it twice. The collection of women writers is varied and impressive. I became a huge M. F. K. Fisher fan as a result of this book. All the excerpts were worth reading.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    This is a wonderful collection of memoir excerpts by women writers and poets. I got it as a high school graduation present (great gift) and over the years I've kept coming back to it, like returning to a circle of old friends. This is a wonderful collection of memoir excerpts by women writers and poets. I got it as a high school graduation present (great gift) and over the years I've kept coming back to it, like returning to a circle of old friends.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tibyan

    Great book on how 20th century women struggled in writing, a huge literature to discover.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    This anthology edited by Susan Cahill is a beautiful collection of writing by women --primarily in the Western tradition and in English, though there a few exceptions--that gives the reader a taste of the writing of women of letters through the decades. For this reader, the introductions to the various women were also really useful because there were several with whom I was unfamiliar. While iti s a book that can be read straight through, I'm not ashamed to say I've been carrying this book with This anthology edited by Susan Cahill is a beautiful collection of writing by women --primarily in the Western tradition and in English, though there a few exceptions--that gives the reader a taste of the writing of women of letters through the decades. For this reader, the introductions to the various women were also really useful because there were several with whom I was unfamiliar. While iti s a book that can be read straight through, I'm not ashamed to say I've been carrying this book with me since it was published, dipping in and reading when the mood strikes and then reading more from specific authors as I'm moved. This is a book that will appeal to readers interested women writers and their histories, and those who hope to fill in gaps in their education (there are more--this book is not exhaustive).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shira

    Only partly finished this book, but the opening chapters and the introduction made it clear that these women need to be read more and that more women need to write. I will put this book back on my to read list for when I have more time, because these writers lives deserve closer scrutiny, particularly as an aspiring novelist myself.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fay Van Kerckvoorde

    Great selection of women writers with enthusiastic introductions by Susan Cahill. Thanks to this book i discovered unknown and underappreciated authors. Especially grateful to meet Dorothy Allison, May Sarton, Diane Glancy and Kate Millet.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    An interesting anthology that makes you want to find and read the whole books.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim Amadril

  10. 4 out of 5

    Txangelbaby

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Lingley

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  15. 4 out of 5

    Judy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trisha Niermeyer Potter

  17. 4 out of 5

    scherzo♫

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessy Sykes

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Diamond

  22. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Susan Sonnen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joshunda Sanders

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tonya

  26. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tonya Snow-Cook

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sheryl Burpee Dluginksi

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  30. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Carter-cole

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...