30 review for Superman, Man of Steel No. 6

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    Actual rating 3.5 stars. Clark visits his old home, Smallville! Wanting a break from his busy life is a nice idea. Too bad a holographic version of Clark’s birth father puts a pin in normal. There is also Lana Lang who shows up and makes a speech about how being told about Clark’s secret completely flipped her life upside down. In the end, Clark acknowledges what Krypton was, as a place that conceived him but proudly states Earth is his home!

  2. 5 out of 5

    توفيق عبد الرحيم

    As far as origin stories go this one is really good. Superman returns to Smallville only to discover his origin and that he is an alien. The lana lang part was heartbreaking she was always in love with clark kent.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jedhua

    (Note: Due to Goodreads' alphanumeric character limit, the following "review" merely consists of the postscript to my main review of Superman: The Man of Steel, Vol. 1.) Postscript: The 4 major age-related flaws of this book are as follows (listed in no particular order): 1.) Primitive Dialogue/Writing Style I. The dialogue in this book is just littered with exclamation. My feeling is that if everyone's always excited or upset for the slightest things, how am I to fully appreciate their lively react (Note: Due to Goodreads' alphanumeric character limit, the following "review" merely consists of the postscript to my main review of Superman: The Man of Steel, Vol. 1.) Postscript: The 4 major age-related flaws of this book are as follows (listed in no particular order): 1.) Primitive Dialogue/Writing Style I. The dialogue in this book is just littered with exclamation. My feeling is that if everyone's always excited or upset for the slightest things, how am I to fully appreciate their lively reactions whenever something noteworthy occurs? II. The dialogue has a certain repetitiveness to it that really feels forced and overused. It's really the kind of thing that more belongs in expository narration than in what ought to be natural-sounding conversation. III. For some reason, everyone keeps saying each other's names during conversation, as if we (as readers) wouldn't be able to figure out who is being addressed at any given time otherwise. This of course is a natural part of English discourse, but it's also another thing that is implemented far too often. [Byrne, Byrne, Byrne... Won't you learn how to write, John Byrne? Honestly, I don't see all this name repetition as being all that necessary, Byrne.] 2.) Too Much Exposition I. Byrne often tries to explain the obvious whenever Superman is in action, and it would be far more preferable if he just relied on showing us in illustration rather than blatantly telling us in words. This makes everything feel so needlessly staged and unnatural. 3.) Old-Timey Illustration I. While it's certainly laudable that Byrne took it upon himself to draw the comic as well as write it, his style as a penciller lacks distinctiveness and is much too clean during fight scenes. The latter concern makes the fight scenes feel a bit dull, and it's difficult to appreciate the weight behind the characters' blows or to get a sense of the substantial physical strain/impact of certain actions. Moreover, the action is entirely bloodless, and doesn't even show bruises, scrapes, or tears. So even when Supes faces off against Bizarro, the fight isn't thrilling in the least, and you can't sense any element of danger to the showdown. II. Related to the earlier concern about the exclamatory dialogue, Byrne's facial expressions too often depict wide-eyed, jaw-hanging, and full-toothed grinning people. Again, this waters down the dramatic component, and trivializes the entire book. 4.) Overly Sentimental/Ham-fisted Panels I. In my experience, much of the fulfillment gleaned from reading a comic book comes from reading between the lines and reflecting on the story's hidden meaning. But there are times in this book where the writer explicitly spells out his intended message, thereby reducing the possibility for creative interpretation. This lack of subtlety can get really irritating at times. II. The old-fashioned sentimentality of certain moments in the story really underscores it's age, and makes pivotal moments come off far more as cheesy than genuinely moving. ------------------------------------------------ Here, I want to briefly revisit the Kryptonian/Earthling identity conflict I mentioned earlier. So here's two snippets from the the beginning and end of the volume: (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] A little over ten years ago, Bryne said of Clark that "[he] grew up as human, thinks as a human, reacts as a human. He lives and loves as a human. And that is what really defines him," and also condemned the "pychobabble of adopted children longing for and seeking out their biological parents," calling these adoptees "ungrateful little shits." I'm sure many readers wouldn't share these sentiments, but they certainly do help put in context the writer's decision to use Clark's Kryptonian birthing matrix to delay his physical birth until he landed on Earth with the Kents. Bryne even further drives home the character's Earth-bound self-definition by making his home planet of Krypton into a cold and emotionless place with a deeply arrogant populace. Although I too am annoyed and perplexed by the desperation many adoptees seem to feel concerning their biological parents (or genealogical homeland), I don't think I would have gone so far as to crush Clark's Kryptonian background quite so thoroughly; there's honestly no need to do so when it ought to be clear enough to readers that Superman's formative experiences, and all of his emotional ties, originate from Earth (and in America, specifically). And even if the Kryptonians' weren't completely heartless, insufferable assholes, we'd still get the message just fine. But if Bryne also wanted to define "humanity" as something to be revered, then he could have done a lot more to accomplish this. In Birthright, we saw the courageous capacity for humans portrayed through the Ghuri activists and through the citizens of Metropolis who eventually stood up to their oppressors. And in Secret Origin, the "Metropolites" have a similar moment standing against the armed forces. Not once does Bryne include a moment like this in The Man of Steel, and so he also fails to demonstrate Superman's capacity to inspire normal folks to bring out the best within themselves.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ian Williamson

    I'm really not a fan of Superman, it's a character I just can't relate to. Here is effectively a God, stronger than pretty much everything and everyone, with next to no weaknesses. It makes it increasingly difficult to build a story around him, one where the danger is substantial that you worry for the character and there's a slight doubt he is going to survive. And because of this it takes an exceptional writer to tell a good/great Superman story. Alan Moore was the only one who had done this f I'm really not a fan of Superman, it's a character I just can't relate to. Here is effectively a God, stronger than pretty much everything and everyone, with next to no weaknesses. It makes it increasingly difficult to build a story around him, one where the danger is substantial that you worry for the character and there's a slight doubt he is going to survive. And because of this it takes an exceptional writer to tell a good/great Superman story. Alan Moore was the only one who had done this for stories I'd read until now. John Byrne makes Clark Kent relatable, he flips the Batman/Bruce Wayne idea and shows Superman is Clark's ultimate mask a means of allowing him to make a difference. Byrne creates a real mythology for our title character that you can see heavily influences Synders Man of Steel film. We have an interesting first meeting between Batman and Superman with Batman playing a very neat trick on Superman leading to a respect for each other and the beginnings of a friendship. We are also introduced to an interesting dynamic between Lex Luthor and Superman, showing more a rivalry of jealousy than usual. The artwork is great and captures characters emotions perfectly. I'm surprised to say that I really enjoyed this!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tomas

    Overall I liked it but I must say that this book does not bring much to Superman mythos. It just re-iterates stuff that we like and drops some of Superman's previous ridiculous powers. Most of the book is just Superman's internal monologue saying what has changed. There is no proper villain and writing is really unsubtle. Everything is described in details. It reminds me of older comic books. I would say that this book does not age very well. Superman of 80's era is as uninteresting as it was in Overall I liked it but I must say that this book does not bring much to Superman mythos. It just re-iterates stuff that we like and drops some of Superman's previous ridiculous powers. Most of the book is just Superman's internal monologue saying what has changed. There is no proper villain and writing is really unsubtle. Everything is described in details. It reminds me of older comic books. I would say that this book does not age very well. Superman of 80's era is as uninteresting as it was in previous eras.

  6. 4 out of 5

    John

    I read this for "Miracle Monday". This was John Byrne's attempt to modernize the character in the 80s after Crisis on Infinite Earths. Man, is it dated. It looks and smells like an old man's pants. I read this for "Miracle Monday". This was John Byrne's attempt to modernize the character in the 80s after Crisis on Infinite Earths. Man, is it dated. It looks and smells like an old man's pants.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chayce

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jared

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dominik

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tina Keane

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gelozi

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anita

  13. 4 out of 5

    leonidas Koukos

  14. 5 out of 5

    Markéta Gajdošová

  15. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Barrett

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ansiktet

  17. 5 out of 5

    Vinícius Sztibe

  18. 4 out of 5

    Teufel Hosen

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Sheer

  20. 4 out of 5

    Clint

  21. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gonzalo

  24. 4 out of 5

    Philip Cosand

  25. 5 out of 5

    Upgradeslinky

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jaz

  27. 4 out of 5

    Veronika

  28. 5 out of 5

    StuFighter 2020

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tucker Stone

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