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Miss Moore Thought Otherwise: How Anne Carroll Moore Created Libraries for Children

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Once upon a time, American children couldn’t borrow library books. Reading wasn’t all that important for children, many thought. Luckily Miss Anne Carroll Moore thought otherwise! This is the true story of how Miss Moore created the first children’s room at the New York Public Library, a bright, warm room filled with artwork, window seats, and most important of all, borrow Once upon a time, American children couldn’t borrow library books. Reading wasn’t all that important for children, many thought. Luckily Miss Anne Carroll Moore thought otherwise! This is the true story of how Miss Moore created the first children’s room at the New York Public Library, a bright, warm room filled with artwork, window seats, and most important of all, borrowing privileges to the world’s best children’s books in many different languages.


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Once upon a time, American children couldn’t borrow library books. Reading wasn’t all that important for children, many thought. Luckily Miss Anne Carroll Moore thought otherwise! This is the true story of how Miss Moore created the first children’s room at the New York Public Library, a bright, warm room filled with artwork, window seats, and most important of all, borrow Once upon a time, American children couldn’t borrow library books. Reading wasn’t all that important for children, many thought. Luckily Miss Anne Carroll Moore thought otherwise! This is the true story of how Miss Moore created the first children’s room at the New York Public Library, a bright, warm room filled with artwork, window seats, and most important of all, borrowing privileges to the world’s best children’s books in many different languages.

30 review for Miss Moore Thought Otherwise: How Anne Carroll Moore Created Libraries for Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Idarah

    "Many early libraries were not free and open to the public. Sometimes a wealthy person would donate a collection of books and people would pay a membership fee for the privilege of reading them. Often, these collections did not have many books for children. At a time when few people thought children's books were very important, Miss Moore took them seriously, helping fill library shelves with more and better books for children." "Many early libraries were not free and open to the public. Sometimes a wealthy person would donate a collection of books and people would pay a membership fee for the privilege of reading them. Often, these collections did not have many books for children. At a time when few people thought children's books were very important, Miss Moore took them seriously, helping fill library shelves with more and better books for children."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    Lovely story of how childrens libraries evolved from silently gesturing you would like to borrow a book from a locked shelf to them being a friendly place to find a book that suited you. It really is amazing that in a short period of time, libraries have gone from that to nowadays just being thankful a child has taken out a book. Our library has a poster in the childrens section that shows a book that has been destroyed by a young child saying something like ' don't worry we're just glad you're Lovely story of how childrens libraries evolved from silently gesturing you would like to borrow a book from a locked shelf to them being a friendly place to find a book that suited you. It really is amazing that in a short period of time, libraries have gone from that to nowadays just being thankful a child has taken out a book. Our library has a poster in the childrens section that shows a book that has been destroyed by a young child saying something like ' don't worry we're just glad you're taking a book out ! This is a lovely simple story, we liked the illustrations and appreciated their folk art style but couldn't help thinking the illustrator had used the paint straight from the tube, I have often told my 11 yr old that the colour that you want is so unlikely to come straighr from the tube you must akways mix, and she has taken this on board. Some more muted colours and perhaps at the end some more photos of childrens libraries through the ages would have turned a four star book to a 5.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Author Jan Pinborough and illustrator Debby Atwell team up in this immensely engaging picture-book biography of Anne Carroll Moore, the early twentieth-century librarian who did so much to establish the field of children's librarianship in the United States. Noting that many libraries didn't have a room set aside for children, or a particularly strong collection of books for young readers - many libraries of the late nineteenth-century didn't even allow children on the premises! - Miss Moore set Author Jan Pinborough and illustrator Debby Atwell team up in this immensely engaging picture-book biography of Anne Carroll Moore, the early twentieth-century librarian who did so much to establish the field of children's librarianship in the United States. Noting that many libraries didn't have a room set aside for children, or a particularly strong collection of books for young readers - many libraries of the late nineteenth-century didn't even allow children on the premises! - Miss Moore set out to change things, once she received her degree from Pratt Institute, in New York City. After her first job at the Pratt Free Library, Moore was offered a job overseeing the children's sections of all thirty-six branches on the New York Public Library. She would go on to design the children's room at the world-famous 42nd Street branch, which opened in 1911. She worked hard to create lists of good books for children, and to create child-friendly programming. Friends with many famous authors and artists, and an author herself, she was deeply involved in the world of children's literature for many decades, and she left her mark on that world. Some may have thought that childhood reading was unimportant, but Miss Moore thought otherwise... Having read Anne Carroll Moore's 1924 Nicholas: A Manhattan Christmas Story , which featured her famous storytelling Nicholas doll, and which was chosen as a Newbery Honor Book in 1925, and being well aware of her central role in the children's literature scene in New York City for many decades, I was curious to pick up Miss Moore Thought Otherwise: How Anne Carroll Moore Created Libraries for Children. I was particularly eager to peruse it, moreover, because illustrator Debby Atwell is someone whose own picture-books, from The Thanksgiving Door to Pearl and River , I have found so excellent. All in all, I was pleased with the book, finding the narrative both informative and entertaining, and the artwork, done in Atwell's vintage folk-art style, just lovely. It's both astonishing and heartening to think that one person could have such an influential role in a developing field, and America's children are indeed fortunate that Miss Moore so often did think otherwise, and bucked the prevailing library trends of her day. My only criticism of the book is that no mention is made in the afterword of Moore's somewhat thorny relationship with E.B. White. Surely, in the section about her many author friendships, that could have been included? Its omission felt almost deliberate, and while I understand that every biographer must pick and choose what to focus on, I never like the feeling that less pleasant aspects of any true story are being deliberately occluded. Leaving that one quibble aside, I highly recommend this one to anyone looking for engaging picture-book biographies and/or children's stories about libraries and librarianship. For my part, I finished it with a stronger desire than ever to read some of Moore's adult books, such as Cross-Roads to Childhood , which I own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    I have to like a book that sheds some light on the early days of children's literature and the evolution of library collections designed specifically for the interests and enjoyment of children. It also tells the story of one of the first, and perhaps the most influential of children's librarians, Anne Carroll Moore. I do, however, have a quibble: Ms. Moore is well-known for having disliked the Oz books, and banned them all from "her" libraries. She also gave her very vehement stamp of disapprov I have to like a book that sheds some light on the early days of children's literature and the evolution of library collections designed specifically for the interests and enjoyment of children. It also tells the story of one of the first, and perhaps the most influential of children's librarians, Anne Carroll Moore. I do, however, have a quibble: Ms. Moore is well-known for having disliked the Oz books, and banned them all from "her" libraries. She also gave her very vehement stamp of disapproval to both "Stuart Little", and "Charlotte's Web" (!?). I love "Charlotte's Web", and I believe the passing years have definitively proved that Miss Moore was wrong about both L. Frank Baum's and E. B. White's books. None of this is mentioned in this story.. I know the book is aimed at kids and all, but you don't need to make Ms. Moore out to be a saint. I think kids could handle the fact that she was not infallible.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is a wonderful tale of a spunky woman who wouldn't cave to conventional wisdom and followed her own path. She was determined to pursue higher education when most thought she should just settle down and get married. And she thought that books should be available for children to borrow, for free. What a concept! I grew up going to my local library very often and I have fond memories of the children's section and the librarian who worked there. I could never imagine not having access to such a This is a wonderful tale of a spunky woman who wouldn't cave to conventional wisdom and followed her own path. She was determined to pursue higher education when most thought she should just settle down and get married. And she thought that books should be available for children to borrow, for free. What a concept! I grew up going to my local library very often and I have fond memories of the children's section and the librarian who worked there. I could never imagine not having access to such a wonderful collection of books and I am so grateful to Anne Carroll Moore and others for making this a reality. The narrative was entertaining to read and I loved that the author emphasized her contrary thinking throughout the text. The illustrations are colorful and complement the story nicely. We really enjoyed reading this book together.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    Annie Carroll Moore grew up in Limerick, Maine in a time when girls were not encouraged to be opinionated but she had her own ideas. Children in that time were also not allowed in libraries, especially not girls, because reading was not seen as important. Annie had always loved stories and books and though she thought at one time of being a lawyer like her father, she decided to become a librarian. She studied in New York City, living alone even though others thought it was dangerous. Miss Moore Annie Carroll Moore grew up in Limerick, Maine in a time when girls were not encouraged to be opinionated but she had her own ideas. Children in that time were also not allowed in libraries, especially not girls, because reading was not seen as important. Annie had always loved stories and books and though she thought at one time of being a lawyer like her father, she decided to become a librarian. She studied in New York City, living alone even though others thought it was dangerous. Miss Moore became a children’s librarian at the Pratt Free Library, with a room designed just for children. She had new ideas, of course, like letting children take books home and removing the large “SILENCE” signs from the libraries. As her new ideas took hold, Miss Moore changed library service for children into what we love today. Pinborough clearly admires Miss Moore and her gumption and willingness to approach problems with new ideas. Miss Moore’s life work is detailed here but we also get to see to her personal life and the tragedies that marred it. Perhaps my favorite piece is the ending, where Miss Moore retires in her own special way, on her own terms. Don’t miss the author’s note with more information about Miss Moore as well as a couple of photographs of the woman herself. The illustrations by Atwell have the rustic feel of folk art. It is colorful, vibrant and lends the entire work a playfulness that is entirely appropriate to the subject. A celebration of one woman who changed the face of library service to children around the world, this book will be welcomed by librarians and children alike. Appropriate for ages 6-8.

  7. 4 out of 5

    KC

    Anne Carroll Moore was the master of story-time and the inspiration of children's department in libraries. Anne Carroll Moore was the master of story-time and the inspiration of children's department in libraries.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Allyson

    Anne Carroll Moore is to children's libraries as Benjamin Franklin is to the young United States. She was one of the first librarians to not only let young people inside the library, but to create a space just for them. So much of what we take for granted in libraries today was almost directly a result of her work as head children's librarian for the New York Public Library. She insisted that children be allowed to come in the library and take books home. She began the cornerstone of modern chil Anne Carroll Moore is to children's libraries as Benjamin Franklin is to the young United States. She was one of the first librarians to not only let young people inside the library, but to create a space just for them. So much of what we take for granted in libraries today was almost directly a result of her work as head children's librarian for the New York Public Library. She insisted that children be allowed to come in the library and take books home. She began the cornerstone of modern children's services, story time, by reading to children in the library. She had furniture specially made to fit children (where would demco be without her??). Her guides and reviews of children's books made her so influential in publishing that she was largely responsible for a huge increase in the number and quality of books for children in the early twentieth century. At a time when often libraries are at best taken for granted and at worst scorned outright, "Miss Moore Thought Otherwise" does an amazing job of reminding us exactly how amazing and important the children's library is, and how it all began.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    This was a charming and decently factual account of a librarian who championed the cause of children's libraries. Back in the day, children often were not even allowed inside libraries, and people didn't like for them to touch books with their "grubby" hands, much less take them home, from where they couldn't trust children to remember to return them. But, as the title suggests, Miss Moore thought otherwise. Alice Carroll Moore was a great advocate for children, and implemented many ideas you st This was a charming and decently factual account of a librarian who championed the cause of children's libraries. Back in the day, children often were not even allowed inside libraries, and people didn't like for them to touch books with their "grubby" hands, much less take them home, from where they couldn't trust children to remember to return them. But, as the title suggests, Miss Moore thought otherwise. Alice Carroll Moore was a great advocate for children, and implemented many ideas you still see in libraries today, such as reading aloud to children for story time, using puppets, having child-sized tables and chairs, and inviting guest authors and illustrators to present to children at the library. She actively sought child-friendly books in a time when few children's books existed. For anyone who, like me, loves libraries and books and anything that gets children hooked on reading, Miss Moore is a hero. A brief section at the end of the book gives a little more historical information about Alice Carroll Moore and other women librarians of that time who helped make libraries more child friendly.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Kotkin

    Picture book biography about Anne Carroll Moore, New York City librarian in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Focuses on how Miss Moore achieved her legacy of children's libraries even though that idea went against the thinking of her era. Very effective use of the refrain, "But Annie/Miss Moore thought otherwise." I first read about Anne Carroll Moore's accomplishments in my graduate Publishing program, but she is definitely not a household name. I'm very happy to see that more people will be made Picture book biography about Anne Carroll Moore, New York City librarian in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Focuses on how Miss Moore achieved her legacy of children's libraries even though that idea went against the thinking of her era. Very effective use of the refrain, "But Annie/Miss Moore thought otherwise." I first read about Anne Carroll Moore's accomplishments in my graduate Publishing program, but she is definitely not a household name. I'm very happy to see that more people will be made aware of her important life's work and dedication.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I really enjoyed this picture book about a spear-head in the movement toward children-focused centers within public libraries. It is strange to think of a library now not having such a place for the youngest members of our society, but back when Anne Carroll Moore was growing up, children weren't allowed to step into the library (the reasoning being that adults of that day did not believe reading to be important for children). Great book and illustrations, and interesting information I didn't kn I really enjoyed this picture book about a spear-head in the movement toward children-focused centers within public libraries. It is strange to think of a library now not having such a place for the youngest members of our society, but back when Anne Carroll Moore was growing up, children weren't allowed to step into the library (the reasoning being that adults of that day did not believe reading to be important for children). Great book and illustrations, and interesting information I didn't know before!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alana/MiaTheReader

    I thoroughly enjoyed this biographical picture book. It's not too much text or to slow a telling to keep little kids interested, but plenty of information to learn something new about an important person in history. I wish I could've have known Anne Carroll Moore. My 3-year-old did not like the style of illustrations though - she thought all the children looked unhappy. They do not, but the impressionist style isn't her thing. =) I thoroughly enjoyed this biographical picture book. It's not too much text or to slow a telling to keep little kids interested, but plenty of information to learn something new about an important person in history. I wish I could've have known Anne Carroll Moore. My 3-year-old did not like the style of illustrations though - she thought all the children looked unhappy. They do not, but the impressionist style isn't her thing. =)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    My son and I read and reviewed this book for http://MotherDaughterBookReviews.com. Here is my interview with my son about the book and my own bottom line. Visit us for the full review. SON SAYS: 1. This is a non-fiction book. Did you enjoy it? I enjoyed it because it told the story of someone who used to live and is now dead. 2. What do you think about the cover and the pictures? I like the picture of the big white house at the start of the book because I want to go there. I also liked the picture My son and I read and reviewed this book for http://MotherDaughterBookReviews.com. Here is my interview with my son about the book and my own bottom line. Visit us for the full review. SON SAYS: 1. This is a non-fiction book. Did you enjoy it? I enjoyed it because it told the story of someone who used to live and is now dead. 2. What do you think about the cover and the pictures? I like the picture of the big white house at the start of the book because I want to go there. I also liked the picture of the Children’s Room in the New York Public Library. It looks comfy and I would like to go there too. The picture of New York City is cool – it’s one of my favorites. 3. What did you learn from this book? I learned that girls couldn’t do lots of stuff that they can now do and that kids weren’t allowed in libraries. 4. How are children treated differently today than the way they were in this book? Now children can go to libraries and then they couldn’t. It would be bad to not be able to go to the library because I get books and videos from the library all the time. Girls can do whatever they want and go to school to become lawyers and doctors. I know some girls who are doctors and lawyers like Dr. Lamb and Isabella’s Mom. 5. If you had to choose between going to the library and going to a bookstore where would you go and why? I would like to go to the bookstore because you get to keep the books that you buy. It makes me sad to return books to the library when I really like them. 6. What are your favorite books that you’ve read recently? I really like the Nature Elves series – Dream Robbers, The Witch Sticker Ball, and the Shadow Beast by R.C. Scott. 7. Who do you think would like this book? I learned some stuff with this book. I think boys and girls 20 years old and younger would like this book. MOM SAYS: Miss Moore Thought Otherwise is a well-written, beautifully illustrated account of the life of Anne Carroll Moore who helped created libraries for children in America which became the model for libraries around the world. I would recommend this book to children aged 5 years and older who enjoy reading non-fiction titles about historical figures whose actions resulted in a real perceivable change in society. * This book was provided to us by the publisher free-of-charge in exchange for our honest review.*

  14. 5 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    I can't imagine not allowing children into libraries. I can't imagine not having a children's room in libraries, especially with all the children's books and magazines that were published in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Thank goodness Anne Carroll Moore came along to change all that! When she was put in charge of all the children's sections in all of the public libraries in New York City, she was in a position to make changes that would be reflected in libraries all over the country. She i I can't imagine not allowing children into libraries. I can't imagine not having a children's room in libraries, especially with all the children's books and magazines that were published in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Thank goodness Anne Carroll Moore came along to change all that! When she was put in charge of all the children's sections in all of the public libraries in New York City, she was in a position to make changes that would be reflected in libraries all over the country. She introduced story times and a nifty book pledge and filled the shelves with books that weren't "dull" and locked away from children's touch. She designed the children's room of the brand new New York Public Library, which opened in 1911. She filled the room with child-sized furniture and interesting artwork and objects. She invited authors and illustrators to speak to the children, and performers to entertain them. Everything that we take for granted in a children's library today started with Anne. She also wrote reviews of children's books. What an amazing woman! Pinborough includes additional information about Anne's life and career at the end of the book. I hope that children reading this will appreciate their libraries even more. Highly recommended.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christina Getrost

    Very nice book describing the work of a pioneering children's librarian, Anne Carroll Moore. She created children's rooms in New York libraries, encouraged librarians to take down "Silence" signs and talk more with children and tell them stories; she got rid of the rule that children could not check out books; she made book lists and wrote reviews of children's books to help parents, teachers and librarians find good books and to encourage publishers to make better children's books. I vaguely re Very nice book describing the work of a pioneering children's librarian, Anne Carroll Moore. She created children's rooms in New York libraries, encouraged librarians to take down "Silence" signs and talk more with children and tell them stories; she got rid of the rule that children could not check out books; she made book lists and wrote reviews of children's books to help parents, teachers and librarians find good books and to encourage publishers to make better children's books. I vaguely recall reading about her during my library school days, so I was glad to get reacquainted with her in this picture book. She wasn't the first to create the children's library but she had a lot of influence and connections with publishers and authors, and was an inspiration to many children's librarians who followed her. The illustrations in this book are charming, reminiscent of primitive paintings, with lots of tiny details but not realistic; flat and childlike. I liked the repetitive use of the phrase "but Miss Moore thought otherwise," which makes for a nice read-aloud. Book has a nice list of sources and also references other pioneering children's librarians.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A wonderful introduction to Anne Carroll Moore's pioneering work in children's library services. A wonderful introduction to Anne Carroll Moore's pioneering work in children's library services.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sunday

    "She saw that many librarians did not let children touch the books for fear that they would smudge their pages or break their spines. They thought if children were allowed to take books home, they would surely forget to bring them back. But Miss Moore thought otherwise. She trusted children, so she created a big black book with this pledge inside: When I write my name in this book I promise to take good care of the book I use at home and in the library and to obey the rules of the library." pp. 15-1 "She saw that many librarians did not let children touch the books for fear that they would smudge their pages or break their spines. They thought if children were allowed to take books home, they would surely forget to bring them back. But Miss Moore thought otherwise. She trusted children, so she created a big black book with this pledge inside: When I write my name in this book I promise to take good care of the book I use at home and in the library and to obey the rules of the library." pp. 15-16 The kind of story you can read aloud to children and their eyes will pop. Children weren't allowed in libraries? Children's books were locked in cases? There weren't tables their size? And colorful art? And storytellers? NOPE. The reoccurring line "But Miss Moore thought otherwise" makes it very easy for our youngest students to understand how Moore was a change agent who made things happen. While Anne Carroll Moore was a remarkable woman, she also had her flaws - which are not included in this book. She had a fixed mindset about the worthiness of some types of children's literature, promoting some authors over others. Evidently she had a stamp "Not Approved by Expert" she used in some books ;) Nevertheless, "thing to remember is that ACM helped to make the field of children’s librarianship an important entity in the lives of children" (see SLJ essay by Elizabeth Bird at bit.ly/348357G). SO NOT A DEAL BREAKER. With older students, encourage them to research Moore further and judge for themselves. With younger students, there's always room to say, "No one is perfect, but Miss Moore seemed to do a lot of good for us, didn't she?" I'd PAIR this read aloud with PLANTING STORIES: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpre (Denise, 2019). Both women worked in the New York Public Library - Belpre may have worked under the guidance of Moore. The story of Belpre adds another layer of knowledge -- the lack of stories from other countries in the public libraries and Belpre's endeavors to change that. (There is some indication in Bird's essay that Moore may have worked on this endeavor as well.). I'm also planning to read The Important Thing About Margaret Wise Brown (Barnett, 2019) in which Moore makes an appearance (and does not look so nice) to think about how these two titles might be contrasted with students. https://bit.ly/348357G

  18. 4 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    I really liked this book the first time I read it when I was in library school. Now I think it's a bit oversimplified and after reading The New Yorker piece "The Lion and the Mouse" my feelings towards Anne Carroll Moore have changed. I'll try to review the book for the book's sake. Anne Carroll Moore was a spirited young girl in the 19th-century who loved to read and dream of far off places. She eschewed traditional gender roles aside from raising her young nieces after the death of their mother I really liked this book the first time I read it when I was in library school. Now I think it's a bit oversimplified and after reading The New Yorker piece "The Lion and the Mouse" my feelings towards Anne Carroll Moore have changed. I'll try to review the book for the book's sake. Anne Carroll Moore was a spirited young girl in the 19th-century who loved to read and dream of far off places. She eschewed traditional gender roles aside from raising her young nieces after the death of their mother and went to library school. Annie, as she was known, bucked tradition and actually allowed children to check out fun books, be noisy and enjoy the library. She helped immigrant children learn English through her wooden doll Nicholas Knickerbocker. Her work at the New York Public Library was groundbreaking and I really admire that. I have very fond memories of the children's room at the various libraries I visited. The book contains a brief biography and timeline of children's libraries. I was pleased to discover the library I checked the book out from was the first to have a children's library! The illustrations are colorful but realistic. Mostly though, this little biography is rather ho-hum. I don't see kids being fascinated by the history of children's libraries. The past is impossible for them to understand!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Anne Carroll was born in Limerick, Maine in the 1800's. People thought girls should sew and embroider and be quiet. Annie thought otherwise and played outside energetically. Libraries didn't let children enter. As an adult, Annie heard that libraries were hiring women as librarians and so she moved to New York to enroll in the Pratt Institute library school. She got a job at a library that had a library room just for children. One day she was hired to oversee the children's sections in 36 branch Anne Carroll was born in Limerick, Maine in the 1800's. People thought girls should sew and embroider and be quiet. Annie thought otherwise and played outside energetically. Libraries didn't let children enter. As an adult, Annie heard that libraries were hiring women as librarians and so she moved to New York to enroll in the Pratt Institute library school. She got a job at a library that had a library room just for children. One day she was hired to oversee the children's sections in 36 branches of the New York Public Library. Annie made the children's sections warm and inviting and safe spaces. She trusted children to touch books, read them, check them out and return them. People came to visit her libraries and soon the idea of children's sections spread...all because "Annie thought otherwise". She was willing to break with convention and lead out in making changes. How glad I am that she helped these changes come about...as I grew up visiting the library weekly and the library is an integral part of my life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Anne Carroll Moore was a pioneer for the library world and especially for children. Did you know that women were not librarians until the late 1800's? Did you know that libraries were not accessible to the public, much less children for a long time? Did you know that Miss Moore (along with other female librarians) helped establish children's spaces in libraries? Did you know Miss Moore had Dr. Seuss, President Taft and King and Queen of Belgium come to the New York Library she worked at, specifi Anne Carroll Moore was a pioneer for the library world and especially for children. Did you know that women were not librarians until the late 1800's? Did you know that libraries were not accessible to the public, much less children for a long time? Did you know that Miss Moore (along with other female librarians) helped establish children's spaces in libraries? Did you know Miss Moore had Dr. Seuss, President Taft and King and Queen of Belgium come to the New York Library she worked at, specifically for the kids??? Every librarian, regardless of whether you work with kids or not, public/private/school, needs to read and love this book. I'm so glad I found this book and I hope that every library around the globe has a copy. It's important to remember. Besides, you never know what you might learn from a library book about a famous librarian! She is a hero for me!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ann Woodbury Moore

    True story: my parents did not give their daughters middle names. When I was around five or six I insisted that I should have one, and selected "Carol" (probably because I had several friends with that name). I actually signed my name that way at times, Ann Carol Woodbury. Later in life I became a librarian and have worked in numerous positions, including as a children's librarian. I also married and became Ann Woodbury Moore. So, IF my parents had thoughtfully named me Ann Carol as I wished, I True story: my parents did not give their daughters middle names. When I was around five or six I insisted that I should have one, and selected "Carol" (probably because I had several friends with that name). I actually signed my name that way at times, Ann Carol Woodbury. Later in life I became a librarian and have worked in numerous positions, including as a children's librarian. I also married and became Ann Woodbury Moore. So, IF my parents had thoughtfully named me Ann Carol as I wished, I could be Ann Carol Moore! (And, ironically, "Carroll" is a family surname a couple of generations back.) At any rate, my sister recently saw this book displayed in her library and--not knowing the above story--gave it to me because of my jobs over the years. It's a lighthearted, enjoyable picture-book biography that emphasizes the importance and value of women, children, reading, and libraries.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    A beautifully illustrated introduction to Moore's work in Children's libraries. My first grader enjoyed the story and it was a good conversation starter for a discussion about how children are treated and how they behave when in public places. A beautifully illustrated introduction to Moore's work in Children's libraries. My first grader enjoyed the story and it was a good conversation starter for a discussion about how children are treated and how they behave when in public places.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Librarian as hero, works for me. Another child's picture book biography about someone I'd not heard about. And books. Lots of books. Don't know that I was ever inside the main branch of the NYC library, but I've read so many stories. I've always had a library card, my River Edge card with my signature on it is one of the oldest things I own. Librarian as hero, works for me. Another child's picture book biography about someone I'd not heard about. And books. Lots of books. Don't know that I was ever inside the main branch of the NYC library, but I've read so many stories. I've always had a library card, my River Edge card with my signature on it is one of the oldest things I own.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Danette

    Thanks in part to Miss Moore, my 6 yr old can't fathom a time when children were not welcome in libraries. 2/26/2018 Read with Naomi & Julia. Thanks in part to Miss Moore, my 6 yr old can't fathom a time when children were not welcome in libraries. 2/26/2018 Read with Naomi & Julia.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    Using for National Library Week storytime

  26. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    This should be required reading for all librarians. Very touching

  27. 4 out of 5

    Luisa Knight

    A short history on the life of Anne Carroll Moore and how the children's sections of the libraries came to be. Loved the colorful illustrations! Ages: 6 - 9 Cleanliness: Phrases such as "many people thought a girl should stay inside and do quiet things," "she had ideas of her own," and "strong pioneering women" could be taking for a feminist slant but I did not find it too overbearing. **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break- A short history on the life of Anne Carroll Moore and how the children's sections of the libraries came to be. Loved the colorful illustrations! Ages: 6 - 9 Cleanliness: Phrases such as "many people thought a girl should stay inside and do quiet things," "she had ideas of her own," and "strong pioneering women" could be taking for a feminist slant but I did not find it too overbearing. **Like my reviews? I also have hundreds of detailed reports that I offer too. These reports give a complete break-down of everything in the book, so you'll know just how clean it is or isn't. I also have Clean Guides (downloadable PDFs) which enable you to clean up your book before reading it! Visit my website: The Book Radar.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vera Godley

    Just suppose you had no money for books. Just suppose you had little ones at home and you wanted to broaden their outlook on life and introduce them to the joys of the written word in stories or poetry or travel the world on the pages of a book. You could go to the library if you were an adult and if there was a library in your town. But really, there was not much there to appeal to the child. Your child could NOT even enter the doors. Children were NOT welcome in libraries and children defini Just suppose you had no money for books. Just suppose you had little ones at home and you wanted to broaden their outlook on life and introduce them to the joys of the written word in stories or poetry or travel the world on the pages of a book. You could go to the library if you were an adult and if there was a library in your town. But really, there was not much there to appeal to the child. Your child could NOT even enter the doors. Children were NOT welcome in libraries and children definitely could NOT check out a book. What children's books there were in the libraries were only available to adults. But Miss Moore Thought Otherwise ....... In the late 1800's this was the story of libraries and this was the plight of children who wanted to read books. But Miss Moore thought otherwise and began a movement to bring the children into the libraries. To allow children to have library cards to check out books. And to have their very own children's book rooms and story time. Even as a child Miss Moore was different from the other girls in that she liked rambunctious play and more active activities. And she liked books. Upon reaching adulthood, she began her movement to bring books to children via the public library. Today's children have much to be thankful for in having such ease of access to public libraries and books designed especially for them and their specific age group. This is all because Miss Moore Thought Otherwise. The illustrations in this delightful, informative book were created by Maine artist Debby Atwell. She uses paints to boldly draw the scenes picturing Miss Moore, the children, and the libraries in a primitive style that is charming, bright, and delightful and will certainly appeal to children. GIVEAWAY: Ms. Jan Pinborough has agreed to provide one of Chat With Vera's readers a copy of Miss Moore Thought Otherwise, and you can try to win it for yourself or someone you wish to have it by simply using the Rafflecopter form below. Begins August 2 & ENDS August 21 @ 12:01 a.m EDT. Open to USA addresses only. http://chatWithVera.blogspot.com DISCLOSURE: I was provided a complimentary review copy by the author, Jan Pinborough, in exchange for my honest review. The winner's copy in the giveaway is also provided by Ms. Pinborough and will be shipped directly to the winner by the author. The book is published by Houghton Mifflin Books for Children.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shari

    Anne Carroll Moore is the outspoken librarian who launched children's library department movement. You can read about her in THE LIBRARY BOOK by Susan Orlean. I had tremendous admiration for Moore until I read about how she treated Margaret Wise Brown in THE IMPORTANT THING ABOUT MARGARET WISE BROWN. I wonder how Moore's attitudes influenced today's censorship of children's literature. Anne Carroll Moore is the outspoken librarian who launched children's library department movement. You can read about her in THE LIBRARY BOOK by Susan Orlean. I had tremendous admiration for Moore until I read about how she treated Margaret Wise Brown in THE IMPORTANT THING ABOUT MARGARET WISE BROWN. I wonder how Moore's attitudes influenced today's censorship of children's literature.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Margo Tanenbaum

    In her debut book for children, author Jan Pinborough offers a charming picture book biography of Anne Carroll Moore, an individual not well known among the general public but whose advocacy of library services for children are worthy of being celebrated in this handsome new volume released just in time for Women's History Month. The book begins almost like a fairy tale: "Once in a big house in Limerick, Maine, there lived a little girl named Annie Carroll Moore. She had large gray eyes, seven ol In her debut book for children, author Jan Pinborough offers a charming picture book biography of Anne Carroll Moore, an individual not well known among the general public but whose advocacy of library services for children are worthy of being celebrated in this handsome new volume released just in time for Women's History Month. The book begins almost like a fairy tale: "Once in a big house in Limerick, Maine, there lived a little girl named Annie Carroll Moore. She had large gray eyes, seven older brothers, and ideas of her own." We soon learn that Annie is a bit of a rebel, not content to do what a girl was supposed to do in those days. She loved books, but in those days children weren't allowed in the library. When she grew up, she went to New York City on her own to enroll in library school, and soon went to work in a library where they had something brand new--a room just for children, where Annie even read aloud to them. An advocate for children, she later became head of the children's rooms at the New York Public Library's many branches. At this time, children weren't allowed to take books home, since the librarians thought the children wouldn't bring them back. Pinborough portrays Anne Carroll Moore's feisty personality with a constant refrain in the book: "Miss Moore thought otherwise." When a grand new central library was built in the city of New York, Miss Moore was responsible for creating and designing the special place for children, complete with child-sized furniture. She brought authors, musicians and storytellers to entertain the children, and entertained them herself with her special doll Nicholas Knickerbocker and stories of his life. Even when she retired, she continued educating librarians across the country on how to create wonderful libraries for children. Back matter includes more details about Miss Moore, the "trailblazing librarian," and a list of sources. The lively artwork by Debby Atwell, executed with brightly colored acrylics in a folk-art influenced style, is a wonderful match for Pinborough's breezy writing style. Every children's librarian will want to have a copy of Pinborough's tribute to this remarkable woman on his or her shelf. She was a true hero for librarians and children everywhere!

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