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The Coming Revolution

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The Coming Revolution An insight into the political thought of one of the main architects of the 1916 Rising and of Ireland's Proclamation of Independence Full description The Coming Revolution An insight into the political thought of one of the main architects of the 1916 Rising and of Ireland's Proclamation of Independence Full description


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The Coming Revolution An insight into the political thought of one of the main architects of the 1916 Rising and of Ireland's Proclamation of Independence Full description The Coming Revolution An insight into the political thought of one of the main architects of the 1916 Rising and of Ireland's Proclamation of Independence Full description

30 review for The Coming Revolution

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cian Morey

    "Tiocfaidh ár lá" ~ Gerry Not-in-the-IRA Adams The Coming Revolution is a mostly chronological record of all of the greatest political speeches and essays of Pádraig Pearse - the Easter Rising's famous "Big Cheese" and massively influential architect of modern Ireland - from somewhat humble beginnings in 1912 to his revolutionary obsessions of 1915 and 1916. These writings were first collected and published as one only a year after his death, and have endured for a century. Quite simply, I wou "Tiocfaidh ár lá" ~ Gerry Not-in-the-IRA Adams The Coming Revolution is a mostly chronological record of all of the greatest political speeches and essays of Pádraig Pearse - the Easter Rising's famous "Big Cheese" and massively influential architect of modern Ireland - from somewhat humble beginnings in 1912 to his revolutionary obsessions of 1915 and 1916. These writings were first collected and published as one only a year after his death, and have endured for a century. Quite simply, I would hold The Coming Revolution to be the most important piece of literature ever written in Irish history. Before I begin this review in earnest, though, let me make one thing quite clear: I am not a supporter of Pádraig Pearse. I do not like the man; I do not like what he did; I would never call him a "hero". This book did nothing to sway me. The Coming Revolution did not make me like Pádraig Pearse, and I didn't expect it to. But it made me understand him, which is far more important. So I feel very strongly that everyone in Ireland should read this book. (And I mean the Republic and the North.) Regardless of your own social, religious or political standpoints, this book can be used simply to obtain a relatively unbiased education. Pearse writes about the works of Tone, Davis, Lalor and Mitchell as forming "the Bible of Modern Ireland" - but Pearse himself has written the Bible. This is the Bible; or as close as we will ever get to it. In just under 300 pages Pearse has summarised about two centuries of the foremost Nationalist/Unionist thought and several centuries more of varying general-public attitudes. Nigh on all of Anglo-Irish social history prior to 1916 is very clearly and very concisely conveyed through this book. This is a colossal achievement. Secondly, and more significantly, this book is the greatest insight that one could ever get into the mind of Pearse himself. It is better than any schoolbook, college thesis, biography or even autobiography, because it focuses so completely on what we all want to know - why did he think the way he thought, and why did he act the way he acted? For 16 years, more or less, I firmly believed that Pearse was nothing but a maniac and a terrorist who acted only for his own ludicrous beliefs and deserved what he got in the end. This book almost changed that for me. (It didn't change it in the end, mind you, but it got pretty damn close.) The cases that Pearse makes here for every one of his alleged "ludicrous beliefs" are incredibly convincing. I can now see why he himself believed all that he believed. And though I don't like him, I can't help but admire him for how diligently and passionately he stuck to and worked for his beliefs. Better men than Pearse have lacked his passion for their better deeds, and in the end it seems to me that passion is what matters most. Whether that is good or bad is for another essay. Finally, this book made me appreciate Pearse for another reason - because he was an exceptionally talented orator. He was Ireland's closest thing to Winston Churchill, writing and speaking with equivalent genius and inspiring zeal about what he believed. The book, to me, was a masterclass in how to make an effective speech; how to prove your points; how to make everyone listen to you; and then how to make them join you. As a piece of writing alone, with all the political content stripped away, this book is phenomenally good, and that is really what I want most in a piece of literature. First and foremost I will grade these writings for what they actually, simply, are - writings. I can hate the author, I can hate their ideas, but if I love the way they express it all, then I will gladly applaud them. I can now see how Pearse could have persuaded his followers to believe all that he believed. And if I had existed way back then, without any knowledge that he would one day go completely round the Nationalistic bend and lay siege to a post-office for the glory of Éire, I think that Pearse would have persuaded me to believe all of it too. Read this. Everyone. Now. This is why Ireland is Ireland today. (So if you're not happy about the Water Charges, you know who's really to blame...)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Reagan Ward

    It is easy to see why Pearse is often considered the literary mind behind the Irish republican movement of the early 20th century. His poems are powerful, his rhetoric passionate, and his vision for education and the greater culture of Ireland broad.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Say what you want about Patrick Pearse (and there are a lot of opinions), you can't deny that the man had a gift for oration and writing. Whether you agree or disagree with them his arguments are so beautifully, constructed and articulated. I found so many of them beautiful, powerful and persuasive. It's easy to see why he became the leader of this movement. His first essay, The Murder Machine, is probably the most fascinating essay I've read on education. It's interesting to think about what he Say what you want about Patrick Pearse (and there are a lot of opinions), you can't deny that the man had a gift for oration and writing. Whether you agree or disagree with them his arguments are so beautifully, constructed and articulated. I found so many of them beautiful, powerful and persuasive. It's easy to see why he became the leader of this movement. His first essay, The Murder Machine, is probably the most fascinating essay I've read on education. It's interesting to think about what he could have done if he would have continued his work in the education system and at St. Enda's. I also found it shocking how applicable the ideas he wrote in 1913 are to today's society 100 years later. I would be so interested to see what my teacher friends think of it. If anyone is interested that particular text can be found here: http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/E900...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pausonious

    Fantastic, definitive collation of the writings of Pádraig Mac Piarais, undeniably the most influential figure in modern, 20th century Irish History. Not totally chronological in order, at least in the beginning, as it fluctuates between 1913/14, but it does end on his last 'work' of the 31st of March 1916, just before the Easter Rising. Must-read for anyone interested in Irish history, Irish politics and Irish Nationalism. Fantastic, definitive collation of the writings of Pádraig Mac Piarais, undeniably the most influential figure in modern, 20th century Irish History. Not totally chronological in order, at least in the beginning, as it fluctuates between 1913/14, but it does end on his last 'work' of the 31st of March 1916, just before the Easter Rising. Must-read for anyone interested in Irish history, Irish politics and Irish Nationalism.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zac

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Connor

  7. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jack

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

  10. 4 out of 5

    BOB

  11. 5 out of 5

    Max Stevens

  12. 4 out of 5

    nova

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tanvir Ahmed

  14. 4 out of 5

    John-Gerard Carson

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erick Carvalho

  16. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  17. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aoife Murphy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maitiú Ó Coimín

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brian Ua

  21. 5 out of 5

    Aïda Jaïdane

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eamonn

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Matheny

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Thickett

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Stevens

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ziggy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Mulligan

  30. 5 out of 5

    e.a. wixtrom

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