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God's Poetry: The Identity and Destiny Encoded In Your Name

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What's in a name? Shakespeare said a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. But is that true? Are names simply labels to be swapped around indiscriminately? Or are they more significant? God's Poetry is about identity and destiny as well as the ancient concept of the power of names to body forth purpose and meaning. It's also about why most of us never come into the What's in a name? Shakespeare said a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. But is that true? Are names simply labels to be swapped around indiscriminately? Or are they more significant? God's Poetry is about identity and destiny as well as the ancient concept of the power of names to body forth purpose and meaning. It's also about why most of us never come into the calling prophetically breathed into what we are called. The first edition of God's Poetry was an award-winning finalist in the International Book Awards 2011, Christian Inspirational category. This new acclaimed edition is greatly expanded.


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What's in a name? Shakespeare said a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. But is that true? Are names simply labels to be swapped around indiscriminately? Or are they more significant? God's Poetry is about identity and destiny as well as the ancient concept of the power of names to body forth purpose and meaning. It's also about why most of us never come into the What's in a name? Shakespeare said a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. But is that true? Are names simply labels to be swapped around indiscriminately? Or are they more significant? God's Poetry is about identity and destiny as well as the ancient concept of the power of names to body forth purpose and meaning. It's also about why most of us never come into the calling prophetically breathed into what we are called. The first edition of God's Poetry was an award-winning finalist in the International Book Awards 2011, Christian Inspirational category. This new acclaimed edition is greatly expanded.

57 review for God's Poetry: The Identity and Destiny Encoded In Your Name

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paula Vince

    A couple of people I showed this book to thought it was a poetry book and immediately said, "No thanks, I don't read poetry." I want to make it clear that this is not a poetry book but rather, the title suggests that we, with the names we're given, are each individual works of God's poetry. If you venture into the book, get ready for some amazing, true-life examples of how peoples' names have shaped not only their characters but their life's works. Several times, I thought, "Wow, that must be m A couple of people I showed this book to thought it was a poetry book and immediately said, "No thanks, I don't read poetry." I want to make it clear that this is not a poetry book but rather, the title suggests that we, with the names we're given, are each individual works of God's poetry. If you venture into the book, get ready for some amazing, true-life examples of how peoples' names have shaped not only their characters but their life's works. Several times, I thought, "Wow, that must be more than a coincidence." It is not light reading for relaxing with, but something meaty for those times you feel like delving deeply into some interesting study. Towards the end, Anne Hamilton gives some tips on how we might begin to plumb the mysteries of our own names or those of others, but I don't dare to think I could ever do as complete and thorough a job as she does. It did make me wonder, "What have I set in motion for my kids, through the names I've chosen?" Altogether, an unusual and interesting read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Iola

    God’s Poetry isn’t a book of poems, but is about the identity and destiny encoded in your name. It’s not a traditional book of baby names either – it’s more a combination of poetry, literary fantasy, linguistic and mathematical concepts underlying the meaning and origin of words, especially names, and how these can have an unknowing impact on our personal dreams and destinies. It’s worth making the point, even in a review, that Anne Hamilton makes several times in God’s Poetry: while our names h God’s Poetry isn’t a book of poems, but is about the identity and destiny encoded in your name. It’s not a traditional book of baby names either – it’s more a combination of poetry, literary fantasy, linguistic and mathematical concepts underlying the meaning and origin of words, especially names, and how these can have an unknowing impact on our personal dreams and destinies. It’s worth making the point, even in a review, that Anne Hamilton makes several times in God’s Poetry: while our names have a meaning, we are not bound to that destiny. We have a choice. And seeking understanding of the destiny implied in our name (given names and surname) can help us to pursue or change that destiny. As you’ve probably guessed, God’s Poetry is a complex book. It’s a symphony rather than a three-minute pop song (like Your Secret Name, which is a twenty-minute sermon lengthened into a lightweight 200-page book with the addition of some amusing and occasionally relevant anecdotes). God’s Poetry is the opposite – a 200-page book filled with seemingly irrelevant anecdotes that suddenly become important (much like some of the seemingly irrelevant asides in the Bible). The stories seem to be going off on tangents, yet come together to make her point. Names have been a passion of Anne’s, and the years of research and thought that have gone into God’s Poetry are evident in her writing. She incorporates a huge variety of ancient and modern languages and cultures into her research, to the point where I can see I will have to read it again to really understand some of the nuances. It’s well-written, and the ideas resonate with me as truth. Recommended. Thanks to Anne Hamilton and Even Before Publishing for providing a free book for review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    L.D. Taylor

    Anne Hamilton has that rare combination of gifts I love in a non-fiction writer: solid, thorough researcher and talented, fluid writer. This book is a compilation of decades of research on the meaning of names: going well beyond the usual etymological and into the cultural - specifically looking at how the ancient Hebrew culture understood names. It is fascinating, informative and well-written. I look forward to more updates of this book in the future.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mazzy Adams

    Anne Hamilton's book provides an interesting exploration of an idea which seems complex and profound yet resonates with my current understanding and experience of the power of names. There is much within these pages to consider and meditate upon. I think I'll be pondering its implications for some time to come. I found it quite challenging to read, but also difficult to put down. When I did, it was only so I could begin to explore my own names in greater depth (and grab a few hours sleep). Anne Hamilton's book provides an interesting exploration of an idea which seems complex and profound yet resonates with my current understanding and experience of the power of names. There is much within these pages to consider and meditate upon. I think I'll be pondering its implications for some time to come. I found it quite challenging to read, but also difficult to put down. When I did, it was only so I could begin to explore my own names in greater depth (and grab a few hours sleep).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Omega Writers

    Seven reviews from our CALEB reviewers: Overall rating: Four and a half stars (includes a 1 star) (1) Deep yet personal, this book is an intriguing look at what shapes our lives. Drawing on history, literature, personal testimony, scripture and packed full of thoughtful wisdom, Anne Hamilton will take you on a journey behind the stage lights of your life to examine your purpose, identity and challenge your ideas about who you really are. It is a perfect coffee table size, and can be read in a few h Seven reviews from our CALEB reviewers: Overall rating: Four and a half stars (includes a 1 star) (1) Deep yet personal, this book is an intriguing look at what shapes our lives. Drawing on history, literature, personal testimony, scripture and packed full of thoughtful wisdom, Anne Hamilton will take you on a journey behind the stage lights of your life to examine your purpose, identity and challenge your ideas about who you really are. It is a perfect coffee table size, and can be read in a few hours (the first time). There is a wide spectrum of information in this little book, from exegesis to history as you’ve never heard it, to the poetry and power in our names, to the wonderful quotes peppered throughout the book which will make you think about your life and destiny. There are practical steps to help you on your own journey of discovery, as you walk with God and ask for His revelation and insight. Anne Hamilton’s years of learning in many disciplinary areas, with her experience in walking with the Lord both personally and in ministry shows through with the incredible depth of insight contained here. There are several books emerging about the underlying ideas and worldviews prevalent in our society, which are excellent. This book takes another step behind these questions again to ask how and why our lives can sometimes be frustrated and hindered. If you are bored with the clinical, tasteless Western way of looking at the world, I exhort you most strongly to take time to work through God’s Poetry, and discover a world in God bursting with music, meaning, wonders and imagination. Even if you think you already have your identity and ministry direction wrapped up, this book is so full of interesting historical, Biblical, practical and inspiring information, it is worth the read anyway (and you might just be surprised by God as well). This should be compulsory reading for anyone seriously interested in pursuing God’s purpose for their life. AC (2) God’s Poetry is certainly a fascinating read. Anne Hamilton believes we should re-examine the ancient concept of the naming of a child as a prophetic pronouncement over that child’s life. She believes that our names define and even drive our destinies. She gives many interesting examples of how a person’s name is connected with whom and what they are. She also makes it clear that we are new creations in Christ Jesus. Much of what she says is certainly intriguing, but there were times when I wondered if she was writing with the benefit of hindsight. I would have liked to see a Bibliography, which would give her research more authenticity, although the plethora of footnotes goes somewhat towards that end. Although, for me, the jury is still out, I suggest you read it and make up your own mind. You may well find it a blessing. WN (3) I should have been more prepared to expect the unexpected when I picked up Anne Hamilton’s latest book God’s Poetry. Having read her previous trilogy of little gems The Singing Silence, The Listening Land and The Winging Word where she uses her mathematical mind to illustrate the presence of God throughout His entire creation God’s Poetry was still a surprise. God’s Poetry is essentially about our name and how our name impacts both our identity and our destiny. It articulates who we are and how far we have gotten away from the Jesus and the Hebraic concept of both name and destiny. We have adopted a Greek way of believing and thinking about a Hebrew world-view and we have done this at our peril. This little book would make an excellent gift to all who struggle with their identity and destiny, especially those who find their destiny blocked. We are each God’s special poem and we can find this message encoded throughout Scripture. (4) This book was not what I expected. A lot of thought was required when reading this. Bookseller’s Choice – reviewer CALEB Prize (5) There are some challenging ideas here, some of which make big jumps to arrive at suitable words to explain names. The historical aspects are good. The cover could possible be made more appealing. Bookseller’s Choice – reviewer CALEB Prize (6) I did expect this to be in verse form, and I would have liked shorter chapters. I commend the author for her knowledge of Hebrew, which she applies to people’s names. She connects names to our destiny and concludes by saying that despite our names and their meanings, “God’s love and grace and His willingness to intervene are just a prayer away” (P.64). This book is beyond my practical mind, so I would not keep it in my library. Bookseller’s Choice – reviewer CALEB Prize (7) Absorbing. Fascinating. Thought provoking. Well researched and beautifully written, God’s Poetry is one scintillating journey from start to finish. The meaning encoded in names is just the beginning of a dizzying array of educated hypotheses by the author. Not everyone will agree with some of Anne Hamilton’s conjecture or conclusions – the author herself acknowledges the need for caution – but no one can complain that they’ve not had a glorious ride and their money’s worth of ideas. Hang onto your hat. KL

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dale Harcombe

    This is the third time I have read this book, and each time I do I get more and more out of it. The first two times it was the earlier version but this is the new expanded version with the stunning new cover. It makes the reader look at how we define ourselves. I loved this quote, ‘when identity is padlocked to job or looks, to relationship or money, it’s imprisoned. It’s not free.’ Anne goes on to make the point that liberty needs to be tempered with discipline so as to become a blessing and no This is the third time I have read this book, and each time I do I get more and more out of it. The first two times it was the earlier version but this is the new expanded version with the stunning new cover. It makes the reader look at how we define ourselves. I loved this quote, ‘when identity is padlocked to job or looks, to relationship or money, it’s imprisoned. It’s not free.’ Anne goes on to make the point that liberty needs to be tempered with discipline so as to become a blessing and not a curse. We see ample evidence in the world around us of where liberty has been taken to extremes and not tempered with discipline and the results of such behaviour. The breadth of material covered includes myths and legends from other cultures and writers like Homer and Euripides as well as Welsh Legends and the Bible. It was interesting too how Anne defined the difference between fate and destiny. As well as the extent of knowledge and research, what I particularly like about the work of Anne Hamilton is that Like Madeleine L’Engle she makes me think about things I may not have considered before. I’d be fascinated to know just how many dictionaries and books of names Anne has at her disposal, and even more interested to read her link between events of 537AD- 540AD and the book of Revelation. I also loved the inclusion of be Thou My Vision which has always been one of my favourite old hymns. You’ll find quotes throughout from William Shakespeare, W H Auden, Christina Rossetti or George Macdonald mingling with quotes from modern fantasy by Andrew Lansdown, and humourist Ken Rolph. I found it interesting to compare the two versions and see just how much extra information about names Anne had included in this new version. This is a book to make the reader question, think and, no doubt, could well result in making some changes in your life. It’s a book that bears more than one reading

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maria Tatham

    It’s difficult to do justice to this excellent book; it came to be through years of prayer, study, and ministry. Essentially, it is Anne Hamilton’s account of how she came to see that names are of far greater significance than we assume, by dealing with questions about her own name, and helping others with the same questions. Anne addresses her readers in a direct and personal way; through offering her story, she invites them into an intimacy through which she can help them in that area of their It’s difficult to do justice to this excellent book; it came to be through years of prayer, study, and ministry. Essentially, it is Anne Hamilton’s account of how she came to see that names are of far greater significance than we assume, by dealing with questions about her own name, and helping others with the same questions. Anne addresses her readers in a direct and personal way; through offering her story, she invites them into an intimacy through which she can help them in that area of their lives that can be called: reaching our God-given potential. She demonstrates that the Lord is The Poet, and that His children are His Poetry, named and valuable and beautiful works, made to walk in the beautiful works He has prepared for us. I’ve read Anne’s book twice. During the first reading, I found myself wanting to disagree with her, stacking up arguments against her views. As a result, my copy of her book, which I won at her site Fire of Roses, is underlined and notated. The second time through, I added more notes but was receptive to what she had to say, quickly becoming convinced that names have power in our lives. After all, as Anne discusses, God gave Adam the mandate and authority to name all living creatures. What better sphere in which to use this mandate and authority – this intriguing and wonderful gift – than in naming people with deliberateness, purpose, and effectiveness? I still disagree with a few of Anne’s emphases, but completely agree with her premise that there is inherent power in naming; that when we name a child, we are speaking a benediction or a curse over them. However, as Anne explains or notes repeatedly, a name doesn’t determine destiny. What we do with the givens of our names is crucial, she says. We must let God have our names so that He can give them back, restored to us in the way He intends them for us. They truly say something crucial about who we are in Him.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Susan Barnes

    The title of this book comes from Ephesians 2:10 “For we are God’s workmanship” – since workmanship can also be translated “poem”. God sees our life and destiny as a poem he is writing. “God’s Poetry” encourages Christians to seek God’s purposes and destiny for their lives and not be content with a mediocre spiritual life. However for many reasons we don’t always experience all that God has for us. Sometimes it is because we are simply not aware of it or it may because Satan has restricted our s The title of this book comes from Ephesians 2:10 “For we are God’s workmanship” – since workmanship can also be translated “poem”. God sees our life and destiny as a poem he is writing. “God’s Poetry” encourages Christians to seek God’s purposes and destiny for their lives and not be content with a mediocre spiritual life. However for many reasons we don’t always experience all that God has for us. Sometimes it is because we are simply not aware of it or it may because Satan has restricted our spiritual growth in some way. Throughout the Bible we see references to names, their meanings and their power to affect circumstances. In our Western culture we tend to regard names as nothing more than labels. However in God’s economy they are still important and God may use the understanding our name to spur us on in our spiritual journey. It is also another avenue God employs to minister emotional healing to us. Anne Hamilton shares from personal experience and from her research into her own name as well the names of other people and Biblical characters. Her conclusions are startling and appear fanciful yet she backs up her claims with so many examples that you realize that is something going on in the process of naming that is beyond rational explanation. In order for Anne to explain the depth and breadth of her understanding of names, it necessitated many historical descriptions, plus she has added quotes from other works – factual, fictional and fantasy to add validity, variety and interest for the reader. It is a fascinating book, a little heavy going at times, but certainly one that provides much food for thought. Thanks to Even Before Publishing for providing a free book for review

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linsey Painter

    I found this book incredibly interesting. I love names and finding out the meanings of names and I'm so excited to read about the deeper meanings of names of people in the Bible and how some of their names tied in with their purpose in life. Anne Hamilton has written a deeply personal book about how God has touched her life in a unique way and about her experience of God through the passions and talents that God has gifted her with. I found this book incredibly interesting. I love names and finding out the meanings of names and I'm so excited to read about the deeper meanings of names of people in the Bible and how some of their names tied in with their purpose in life. Anne Hamilton has written a deeply personal book about how God has touched her life in a unique way and about her experience of God through the passions and talents that God has gifted her with.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anne Hamilton

    Ok, it's weird - but sometimes this review section comes up blank. Sometimes it has comments from me about the writing of the book. Try another edition if you're looking for the author's review. And check out the newly available preview of the book. Great - except for the numbers which refer to the Endnotes. They've suddenly gone bold and inline. Another weirdness. Ok, it's weird - but sometimes this review section comes up blank. Sometimes it has comments from me about the writing of the book. Try another edition if you're looking for the author's review. And check out the newly available preview of the book. Great - except for the numbers which refer to the Endnotes. They've suddenly gone bold and inline. Another weirdness.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary Hawkins

    Excellent thoughts on various naming.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peter Harris

    Anne Hamilton is herself a poet. This makes for amazing leaps of intuition in her investigations of names, often difficult to follow with the left brain. Also she is a mathematician and philosopher of the Logos, which is a great and unusual mix. She is, however, a Christian, and alas! not a Platonist or a systematiser like me :) However, the mix of mercurial logic, personal research, philology and poetry is irresistible and utterly valuable, and hence despite my reservations I find myself giving Anne Hamilton is herself a poet. This makes for amazing leaps of intuition in her investigations of names, often difficult to follow with the left brain. Also she is a mathematician and philosopher of the Logos, which is a great and unusual mix. She is, however, a Christian, and alas! not a Platonist or a systematiser like me :) However, the mix of mercurial logic, personal research, philology and poetry is irresistible and utterly valuable, and hence despite my reservations I find myself giving this intensely sincere prose poem five stars. If it is hard at first to accept the thesis that there is a providential meaning to all our names, let the Christian remember that Jesus himself said that the very hairs of our head are numbered. A Platonist, too, can accept that since the One is the 'Absolute Infinite' as Cantor named it, every atom of this finite world may be numbered without even breaking into the second order of infinity! How much more, then, these beings which we call humans will be numbered! And all their acts and words in naming things and each other. Not that they act and speak always well or wisely, of course - often wickedly and with great folly; and that is why Anne urges that we investigate diligently our own names and our family's, for strange and fateful twists are to be found there, and only by recognising them can they be straightened out - redeemed, to use a biblical word. So, read this book with an open mind and heart, and uncover, REcover, your identity and destiny! I contacted Anne because I was stuck, with a sense of mission and destiny but a track record of being stuck on the very threshold of all my dreams (the quote from the Moody blues which launched my Cafe Eutopia says it all, in hindsight: 'Live hand in hand, and together we'll stand, on the THRESHOLD of a Dream'). Read this book and see how the name Peter is loaded with threshold issues. Anne has helped me tease out far more fateful details bound up in the three words of my name, and a fourth which my mother was going to name me but decided upon my birth not to. Her thesis that the works of fiction we write are workings-out of the meaning, destiny and covenants entailed in our names, strange and far-fetched though it sounds, is eerily true for me as an author, and for others she mentions in the book. The example of C.S.Lewis is particularly relevant to me, as he (through his books) was woven into the history of my own family. Anne's writing is like that: follow the threads of it and they will lead you into your own life and you will see that the 'mythic' view of life is actually true. To quote Francis Thompson: The angels keep their ancient places;— Turn but a stone, and start a wing! ‘Tis ye, ‘tis your estrangèd faces, That miss the many-splendoured thing. Read this book: it is an antidote to the materialism mechanism and secularism that infects the modern world, and yes, also the modern versions of Christianity. Any Christian (and I know of some) who scoffs at the thesis that our names are all mythically meaningful and important is scoffing at the world-view which is manifest throughout the Bible - explicitly regarding personal names in the Old Testament. So, I am with Anne on this one: life - and Truth - is nothing if not mythic. Now, Read God's Poetry!

  13. 5 out of 5

    David

    I must preface this review with the fact that I know the author personally. However, this has helped me appreciate this book more. The thought that your name would contain your destiny may seem far-fetched to some but as you read through the pages, you see how prophetically true it is. I've used wisdom from this book in sermons, during private prayer ministry and it has helped me personally in relation to walking out my own destiny. I must preface this review with the fact that I know the author personally. However, this has helped me appreciate this book more. The thought that your name would contain your destiny may seem far-fetched to some but as you read through the pages, you see how prophetically true it is. I've used wisdom from this book in sermons, during private prayer ministry and it has helped me personally in relation to walking out my own destiny.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Bonetti

    Anne Hamilton's extensive research widens the reader's mind. She spans extensive knowledge of the Bible and Greek, Hebrew and Latin with scholarly research and insight. This book challenges us to understand names and life patterns, and to realise our God given destiny. Well worth reading, it may change your life. Anne Hamilton's extensive research widens the reader's mind. She spans extensive knowledge of the Bible and Greek, Hebrew and Latin with scholarly research and insight. This book challenges us to understand names and life patterns, and to realise our God given destiny. Well worth reading, it may change your life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Any Length

    First off, I received this book as a goodreads give-away. Thank you to goodreads and to Anne Hamilton. This is my second book by Anne Hamiton. I read teh second one first and was amazed by it's complexity and the messages I received from it. I have always believed very strongly that the naming of children or even animals is of vital importance and ought not be guided by the most fashionable day time TV character or pop-artists names or by old great uncle Arthur who died in the war. A child or eve First off, I received this book as a goodreads give-away. Thank you to goodreads and to Anne Hamilton. This is my second book by Anne Hamiton. I read teh second one first and was amazed by it's complexity and the messages I received from it. I have always believed very strongly that the naming of children or even animals is of vital importance and ought not be guided by the most fashionable day time TV character or pop-artists names or by old great uncle Arthur who died in the war. A child or even an animal deserves their own name which cannot possibly be known before the child is born and ought not be argued about as to which grandparents name will be "passed onto" this child because it is "tradition in the family". It may dramatically alter the destiny of the child who will now have to "grow into a name that wasn't meant for them". (My words not Anne's.) I live by this belief and as I don't have children to name I take the naming of my animals even more seriously. One of my dogs waited 6 weeks, another one waited 10 months for their name to come through. But once named, anyone could see that the dog's name was revealed, not just picked. Anne Hamilton's book God's poetry is as complex as a book could be. I do not want to put anyone off, but to give this masterpiece justice one must not rush through it. I read this book at the rate of 2-5 pages a day and even then felt I sometimes needed a couple of days to really internalise the importance of the messages coming through "God's poetry" for me. In reading this book the concepts revealed in it have become part of my own spiritual journey and thus incredibly enriched my life. I am always amazed how God talks to me through the words of others and am intensly grateful to Anne for revealing so many truths in this book. On page 125 the concept that Satan destroys lives by getting in early is brought to our attention. By gaining a foothold in a child's life in order to prevent the child turning to God. Thus losing the real refuge and instead looking for false refuge in other things. Material things, and ultimately by entering into covenants with death or other manifestations of Satan. Aren't most addictions covenants with death? Aren't most of our "keeping busy with the newest technological gadget" also convenants with death. There is no peace to be found in them. What I get out of the following pages is that making us lose not only our connection to the true God, thus being unable to follow in the true covenant with God, we are also live in a state of "quiet desperation" unable to consolidate our identity with our destiny. By not knowing our name's true background and meaning we flounder through life, often by hit and miss and "die with our music still inside of us". We need to be willing to let our false refuges go. To renounce the false convenants with one or more of Satans manifestations and death. We cannot avoid our pain by hoping someone/something will take our pain away if we consume enough of it. With it we must also be willing to totally forgive those who may have passed bad covenants onto us or hurt us by their actions and or ommissions. Anne makes a great point about forgiveness not being the making of excuses. A common mistake among those who have been hurt, to say" Oh, well, they couldn't help themselves", or "they did the best they could". That doesn't make the hurt go away or make us feel one bit better. Only God can heal the hurt if we invite Him to come into our being and really take it away and plant true forgiveness. I think forgiveness is much harder to achieve than most people think and is one of the biggest hurdles for anyone living by moral principles or by God's word. I was again very amazed by Anne's ability, a true gift, to follow the trail of a name to find it's hidden meaning. Her wllingness to search through a mass of languages, poetry, fantasy, bible stories, legends, and the like to find the truth is a calling if ever there was one. I had quietly hoped that my real name would come up somewhere in the book and when it did I was almost dismayed to find myself described in such detail as well as given some lengthy instructions as to what to do about it. Yet having lived for years with a second "assumed" name which also got a good workout in the book I feel I got twice the value out of this book. However, I find myself also facing twice the work with the names just creating an extra layer on top of each other. More work and research than I had bargained for. I can highly recommend this book. It helps if you have read the bible or are not averse to reading it. It helps more if you have a small interest in the fantasy genre or poetry. But even if you don't, this book will leave a lasting mark on you.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Corder

    GOD'S POETRY by ANNE HAMILTON "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet," claimed Shakespeare. Anne Hamilton would not agree. God's Poetry is in no way a book of poems, and it took me a while to understand where the author was coming from. The book is an extraordinary mix of historical facts, astonishing revelation and mind-blowing research woven together with what at first appear to be unrelated anecdotes. Yet the message is clear. The author believes that as we understand the meaning of ou GOD'S POETRY by ANNE HAMILTON "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet," claimed Shakespeare. Anne Hamilton would not agree. God's Poetry is in no way a book of poems, and it took me a while to understand where the author was coming from. The book is an extraordinary mix of historical facts, astonishing revelation and mind-blowing research woven together with what at first appear to be unrelated anecdotes. Yet the message is clear. The author believes that as we understand the meaning of our names, so we are able to find our true identity, and pursue our true calling as children of God. On one hand, I found this book extremely well written, and therefore easy to read. On the other hand, I found it to be extremely deep, with some complicated examples that had me reading and re-reading as I tried to follow the author's reasoning. Anne is clearly passionate about names, and has been since a young age. I therefore think this would be a wonderful book for a person with a similar interest. If I had the time, I would like to take each example and thoroughly research it for myself. The author has done a great amount of research and presents her information in an unusual but appealing way. I'm not sure I'm totally convinced by some of her hypotheses, but her point of the importance God attaches to names is a valid one—and she's done the research, not me. I would recommend this book for someone with an interest in the topic, who is prepared to spend time digging into the many fascinating facts and theories Anne has to offer. And the cover is gorgeous!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This book was maddening because it is rich and I wanted to ‘get it’. When I realized that it is poetic and written by a mathematician I began to suspect that was the issue... I’ve never been well versed in either of those languages. The subtitle of this book is ‘The identity and Destiny Encoded in Your Name’. In the last few pages the author finally acknowledges, ‘If you’ve had a great desire for some time to know what your name means... I want to stress there is no formula for knowing.’ She spe This book was maddening because it is rich and I wanted to ‘get it’. When I realized that it is poetic and written by a mathematician I began to suspect that was the issue... I’ve never been well versed in either of those languages. The subtitle of this book is ‘The identity and Destiny Encoded in Your Name’. In the last few pages the author finally acknowledges, ‘If you’ve had a great desire for some time to know what your name means... I want to stress there is no formula for knowing.’ She spends a great deal of time discussing the history of (and her research of) specific names including her own. This is a thought provoking challenge to recognize that identity is coded in names... but you’re on your own to do your own research. Many terms were unclear and difficult for me to follow and grasp though the author asserts that this second edition of the book added greater clarifying information at the suggestion of readers of the first edition.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mahima

    Beautiful Book I have no idea how i got to know Anne and her books. But she has a great Wisdom which i have seen in seldom people. Also The wisdom of Lord is seen in her writings. I am learnibg from this book as God leads me. Its something that you sit ponder and meditate upon. The revelations of God that flow through her is what caught my eye. GOD sometimes bring everything to a standstill so that you there is nothing left for you to see except what is right in front of you. This is what He made Beautiful Book I have no idea how i got to know Anne and her books. But she has a great Wisdom which i have seen in seldom people. Also The wisdom of Lord is seen in her writings. I am learnibg from this book as God leads me. Its something that you sit ponder and meditate upon. The revelations of God that flow through her is what caught my eye. GOD sometimes bring everything to a standstill so that you there is nothing left for you to see except what is right in front of you. This is what He made me read when i was wondering away. Trust me when God narrows stuff for you it means He is making a way out for you as well. Your name has a meaning from the Lord and this book will teach you what it exactly means. Trust GOD and read this book!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janine Chen

    Powerful and Insightful! Anne Hamilton is an excellent and inspiring author. She has helped awaken new ways of thinking in my heart! I’m looking forward to reading more of her work.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rose Dee

    What is in a name? I discovered through this book that there is so, so much to who I am and what the Lord has destined me to be. I highly recommend this series.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Josephine-Anne

    I have had this book on my Kindle for a while now. It's definitely going to be read very soon. After reading Anne's 'Daystar, The Days Are Numbered', I am curious to learn about the poetry of God. If this book is written in a similar fashion to the Daystar fantasy, I know I'm just going to gobble it up. I have had this book on my Kindle for a while now. It's definitely going to be read very soon. After reading Anne's 'Daystar, The Days Are Numbered', I am curious to learn about the poetry of God. If this book is written in a similar fashion to the Daystar fantasy, I know I'm just going to gobble it up.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Brenton Carbins

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kiara Kreppner

  24. 5 out of 5

    Crabgrass

  25. 4 out of 5

    Quinta Maxwell

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rowan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Hollingsworth

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kayt18

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marcela Sara

  31. 4 out of 5

    Reliable

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  33. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

  34. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Gates

  35. 4 out of 5

    Susan

  36. 5 out of 5

    Kim Coomey

  37. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Mcghee

  38. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  39. 4 out of 5

    Mary Darris

  40. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  41. 4 out of 5

    Shayna L.

  42. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  43. 4 out of 5

    Katy

  44. 5 out of 5

    Paula

  45. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  46. 4 out of 5

    Dr Wesley Rose

  47. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Hellmann

  48. 4 out of 5

    Pam Marin

  49. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Sanders

  50. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  51. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  52. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

  53. 4 out of 5

    Alana

  54. 5 out of 5

    Kita Kerford

  55. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

  56. 4 out of 5

    Che'rei Holley

  57. 5 out of 5

    Wanda Morrison

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