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Developing and Promoting Graphic Novel Collections

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Demographic projections show that the teenage population in the U.S. will reach an all-time high during this decade. Edited by Joel Shoemaker, a former President of the Young Adult Services Association (YALSA), this groundbreaking series is designed to ensure that public and school librarians have the tools they need to develop and adapt their collections, services, and pr Demographic projections show that the teenage population in the U.S. will reach an all-time high during this decade. Edited by Joel Shoemaker, a former President of the Young Adult Services Association (YALSA), this groundbreaking series is designed to ensure that public and school librarians have the tools they need to develop and adapt their collections, services, and programs to meet the diverse--and ever-changing--needs of young adults. Yesterday's comic book has evolved into today's graphic novel. Richer storylines and artwork can entice "reluctant readers" into the reading habit. Here is a comprehensive overview of graphic novels and their use as reader development tools. Miller explores the evolution, categories, and genres of graphic novels; he then addresses the nitty-gritty details of collection development, acquisition, cataloging, and maintenance for this unique format. A special section shows how to promote graphic novels (including display and programming Ideas). Especially valuable is a carefully crafted annotated list of core titles. This exciting new addition to the [email protected] series is the perfect guide for using one of today's most popular genres to draw teens into the library.


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Demographic projections show that the teenage population in the U.S. will reach an all-time high during this decade. Edited by Joel Shoemaker, a former President of the Young Adult Services Association (YALSA), this groundbreaking series is designed to ensure that public and school librarians have the tools they need to develop and adapt their collections, services, and pr Demographic projections show that the teenage population in the U.S. will reach an all-time high during this decade. Edited by Joel Shoemaker, a former President of the Young Adult Services Association (YALSA), this groundbreaking series is designed to ensure that public and school librarians have the tools they need to develop and adapt their collections, services, and programs to meet the diverse--and ever-changing--needs of young adults. Yesterday's comic book has evolved into today's graphic novel. Richer storylines and artwork can entice "reluctant readers" into the reading habit. Here is a comprehensive overview of graphic novels and their use as reader development tools. Miller explores the evolution, categories, and genres of graphic novels; he then addresses the nitty-gritty details of collection development, acquisition, cataloging, and maintenance for this unique format. A special section shows how to promote graphic novels (including display and programming Ideas). Especially valuable is a carefully crafted annotated list of core titles. This exciting new addition to the [email protected] series is the perfect guide for using one of today's most popular genres to draw teens into the library.

30 review for Developing and Promoting Graphic Novel Collections

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kend

    Certain parts of Steve Miller’s Developing and Promoting Graphic Novel Collections offered great insights for me as I work on developing a philosophy for our library’s nascent comic book and graphic novel collection; I think one of the strengths of this text, actually, is the fact that no matter where you are at in the process of creating or maintaining such a collection, he has suggestions for how to move forward. A librarian with a collection much further along than ours would still have found Certain parts of Steve Miller’s Developing and Promoting Graphic Novel Collections offered great insights for me as I work on developing a philosophy for our library’s nascent comic book and graphic novel collection; I think one of the strengths of this text, actually, is the fact that no matter where you are at in the process of creating or maintaining such a collection, he has suggestions for how to move forward. A librarian with a collection much further along than ours would still have found much to value here. My favorite three suggestions were: 1. The Five Cs of Graphic Novel Librarianship. This section (beginning p. 29) is perhaps the clearest and most well-articulated defense for a dedicated comic books and graphic novel collection—and exactly the kind of defense I will need to take to my Library Director and eventually our Library Board of Trustees in order to acquire the budget necessary to create a comprehensive “starter” collection. I ought to be able to use the “Five Cs” (and the following section, “Making the Case”) in requesting funding from the Library Foundation if we are, as I suspect, unable to budget the library’s own monies for the project. 2. Local Sources: Shops and Chains. I honestly hadn’t even considered the possibility of buying comics from a comic store, as the hassle of driving to Missoula has more or less led us to online-only purchasing for our other collections, despite the aforementioned loyalty. When you live in a part of the world where the roads are dangerous four to five months of the year, and you have to do your library shopping on your own time on weekends (such trips are not considered paid work time) … well, it’s prohibitive. But I’ll look into it. Supporting “local” business is a part of our ethic. 3. Determining the Value of a Collection: Statistics. This section, as with the “Five Cs” section, will prove most helpful in acquiring and budgeting further collection development. Right now we don’t have enough comics and graphic novels to create a dedicated section of its own, but we’re getting close. We have been seeding all of our other collections, slowly, with items that can eventually be pulled out to make a standalone shelf or two. Some of Miller’s suggestions in this section will come in particularly handy as we evaluate the checkout counts on these existing items and compare them against average checkouts for those sections to demonstrate just how popular comics and graphic novels really are.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Quick summary: As the title states, it is a collection development book aimed at librarians who work with k-12 on purchasing, promoting, justifying, and defending their graphic novel collection. tl;dr summary: Despite the fact this is geared for public librarians, there is a lot of rich material and resources that are relevant to academics or special librarians. Miller ditches chatter and presents the content in a clean, organized style. While I read this on consecutive order, you could easily ju Quick summary: As the title states, it is a collection development book aimed at librarians who work with k-12 on purchasing, promoting, justifying, and defending their graphic novel collection. tl;dr summary: Despite the fact this is geared for public librarians, there is a lot of rich material and resources that are relevant to academics or special librarians. Miller ditches chatter and presents the content in a clean, organized style. While I read this on consecutive order, you could easily jump from section to section. Each section is summed up with main points presented, which I found refreshing and easy to track. While the most content is still relevant nearly a decade after publication, it is not without its flaws. Which brings us to tbe problem of the book: It was published in 2005 and many of the recommended titles are out of print or recommended web resources are dead. This title should should not be a one off, but should be revised every few years to keep it fresh. Review When looking for titles for support in graphic novels, titles are usually geared for public libraries, school libraries, hard core research, or the youths; basically everyone and thing other than what I’m looking for. I’m an academic librarian at a community college whose demographic is older then teens but whose collections are not geared for serious research. We’re kind of in a no mans land when it comes to available materials to support some of our topics, graphic novels being one of them. There has to be something that can answer my questions about collection development and be easily accessible. So when I was shelf walking one day, I saw this title sitting with other collection development titles. I was intrigued but skeptical because we’re neither a public library nor is our core audience teens, so it seemed out of place. I picked it up regardless of my first impression. Boy was I wrong. At only 130 pages, Developing and Promoting Graphic Novel Collections, doesn’t seem like it would offer a lot of guidance on collection development or offer practical advice. You would be wrong. Organized in an easy to follow manner, DaPGNC cuts to the quick starting with history of GNs to genres, and then moves briskly along to collection development guidelines (Use the 5 Cs: credibility, circulation, commitment, collection, and cost), maintenance, suggestions for circulation, marketing, and programming, Each section is broken down to a paragraph or two of what it is, then examples (if needed), then a summary which includes bullet points of what you’ve just read. I thought this set up was brilliant because it makes it easier to find information later if you’re scanning bullet points. I also liked how he wrote with a very minimalist style and dropped the theory behind all the information he was presenting. Just the facts please. Additionally, what makes DaPGNC intriguing is that the use of “teen,” “YA,” “juvenile” or anything to signify the youths is kept at a very bare minimum. For example, in promotions, Miller refers to using both Teen Advisory Board and general public when soliciting ideas. In fact, Miller’s lack of mentioning the youths was so infrequent, I kept checking the title of the book to make sure I was reading the right book because after all, this is part of a Teens @ The Library series. This is not to say there isn’t sections about working with teens and the collection, but it’s so subtle you almost miss it. Someone looking for a how-to book geared to working with teens might find this bit annoying. Personally, I loved it. This for me is a good thing – I am thrilled to not only have a great resource but I needed it to be a resource I could practically use that was not heavily slated to one demographic over another, which was my big worry. This title definitely fits that bill. All through the book, Miller makes recommendations for print titles as well as websites to support the collection. While many of the suggestions are still easily available and the websites are still active, due to the age of the book (8 years), many were not. This was pretty frustrating when Miller makes a great recommendation only to find not only is the link dead, but it was never picked up somewhere else. In addition to succinct information, Miller also presents lots and lots of ideas on marketing, programming, and collection development. While some of them are not feasible at my current library, but his suggestions and recommendations will become handy one day. Additionally, he includes cross reference of recommended titles in the back, along with an index and list of additional resources (many of which are now dead ). I give this book 3.5/5 because of the currency issue and some of the content issue, but overall this book is stellar for anyone needing a reference title for graphic novel collection development, regardless of library.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    (borrowed from my state library) This is a good book for any librarian (public or school) to read for a introduction to graphic novels. For those of us with a bit of experience with graphic novels the marketing and educational sections can still prove useful. There are a lot of good ideas for programs and activities for both education and entertainment. There is also a decent suggestion list for a core collection. The web & publisher information may have changed a bit since this book was printed (borrowed from my state library) This is a good book for any librarian (public or school) to read for a introduction to graphic novels. For those of us with a bit of experience with graphic novels the marketing and educational sections can still prove useful. There are a lot of good ideas for programs and activities for both education and entertainment. There is also a decent suggestion list for a core collection. The web & publisher information may have changed a bit since this book was printed (2004) but what is still acurate is indeed useful. So even though this book is now over a decade old it is still worth while reading for any graphically inclined librarian out there.

  4. 5 out of 5

    kelly

    Has a small list of essential books as well as a way of figuiring out circulation tallies - goodbook to get overview

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

  7. 5 out of 5

    Allison Atkins

  8. 5 out of 5

    Khalil

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christy

  10. 4 out of 5

    Percy

  11. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  15. 4 out of 5

    D

  16. 4 out of 5

    David

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Owens

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alice

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lauralee

  20. 4 out of 5

    Frank Yuan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Cox

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Diane

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robin Ibanez

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gail de Vos

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

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