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See What I Mean: How to Use Comics to Communicate Ideas

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Comics are a unique way to communicate, using both image and text to effectively demonstrate time, function, and emotion. Just as vividly as they convey the feats of superheroes, comics tell stories of your users and your products. Comics can provide your organization with an exciting and effective alternative to slogging through requirements documents and long reports. In Comics are a unique way to communicate, using both image and text to effectively demonstrate time, function, and emotion. Just as vividly as they convey the feats of superheroes, comics tell stories of your users and your products. Comics can provide your organization with an exciting and effective alternative to slogging through requirements documents and long reports. In See What I Mean, Kevin Cheng, OK/Cancel founder/cartoonist and founder of Off Panel Productions, will teach you how you can use comics as a powerful communication tool without trained illustrators. This book will help you: * Learn a method to document your organization's work, ideas and vision in a way that any project teammate, customer or manager will readily understand and consume * Put the "story" back in "storyboarding" and really describe the user experience from the users' perspective * Include the use of comics in the product development life cycle to prevent wasted time and resources spent building the wrong product * Use comics as a way to engage users early and solicit their feedback * Sell the value of the method to the rest of your organization * Discover the properties of the comics medium that make them so much more than either words or pictures In See What I Mean, Kevin will walk you step by step through the process of using comics to communicate, and provide examples from industry leaders who have already adopted this method.


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Comics are a unique way to communicate, using both image and text to effectively demonstrate time, function, and emotion. Just as vividly as they convey the feats of superheroes, comics tell stories of your users and your products. Comics can provide your organization with an exciting and effective alternative to slogging through requirements documents and long reports. In Comics are a unique way to communicate, using both image and text to effectively demonstrate time, function, and emotion. Just as vividly as they convey the feats of superheroes, comics tell stories of your users and your products. Comics can provide your organization with an exciting and effective alternative to slogging through requirements documents and long reports. In See What I Mean, Kevin Cheng, OK/Cancel founder/cartoonist and founder of Off Panel Productions, will teach you how you can use comics as a powerful communication tool without trained illustrators. This book will help you: * Learn a method to document your organization's work, ideas and vision in a way that any project teammate, customer or manager will readily understand and consume * Put the "story" back in "storyboarding" and really describe the user experience from the users' perspective * Include the use of comics in the product development life cycle to prevent wasted time and resources spent building the wrong product * Use comics as a way to engage users early and solicit their feedback * Sell the value of the method to the rest of your organization * Discover the properties of the comics medium that make them so much more than either words or pictures In See What I Mean, Kevin will walk you step by step through the process of using comics to communicate, and provide examples from industry leaders who have already adopted this method.

30 review for See What I Mean: How to Use Comics to Communicate Ideas

  1. 4 out of 5

    Arah

    This is helpful how-to (and evangelizing) book for using visual storytelling in UX and product design work. I hope to use these methods, soon!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jon Dubielzyk

    Short and nifty book about using comics to sell a product or an idea. Covers everything from storyline, composition, point of views, techniques etc. More useful for those who don't have a good idea of what's great about the comic format or new people looking to learn a new tool of communication. Short and nifty book about using comics to sell a product or an idea. Covers everything from storyline, composition, point of views, techniques etc. More useful for those who don't have a good idea of what's great about the comic format or new people looking to learn a new tool of communication.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nestor Jimenez

    A great introduction to comics but most important, at least in my case, enough to use it as a tool to communicate a product vision or simplify requirements for stakeholders that do not need so much detail but it's critical to get a shared understanding before implementing. A great introduction to comics but most important, at least in my case, enough to use it as a tool to communicate a product vision or simplify requirements for stakeholders that do not need so much detail but it's critical to get a shared understanding before implementing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Excellent book about the how to use comics for communication, and also acts as a good guide on how to get started with creating comics.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Xu Zhang

    It does give me some new ideas I’m thinking about using Comics in my work. But I still think that I should learn much more details about drawing and storytelling.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mikal

    See what I mean? See what I mean like other Rosenfeld Media books is a well written self-standing book that covers the use of comics in the product development process. If the goal is to communicate the framework for integrating comics in to the technology design process-- the book is successful. Cheng creates a case study (that is later unceremoniously dropped and never revisited) focusing on Comics as a marketing communication-- but I came away convinced more so of Comics importances in the ear See what I mean? See what I mean like other Rosenfeld Media books is a well written self-standing book that covers the use of comics in the product development process. If the goal is to communicate the framework for integrating comics in to the technology design process-- the book is successful. Cheng creates a case study (that is later unceremoniously dropped and never revisited) focusing on Comics as a marketing communication-- but I came away convinced more so of Comics importances in the early stage validation of an idea or concept. Surprisingly this book was written as well... a book; where it may have been better served as 60% written in comic with supplementary text. Kevin's detours into teaching people to draw seemed a bit disjointed. The information and techniques covered in the books are not comprehensive enough to take someone who is not inclined to draw to confident comic creator-- so the target audience is really someone committed enough to spend a few weeks learning to draw or someone already comfortable enough with drawing to take the step into applying it to creating comics. For people who are not fully confident in their sketching skills (myself included), I recommend taking some of Kevin's examples (particularly his appendix) and turning them into exercises. For example-- 30 sketches of each emotional expression or 10 sketches each of each of the scene. It may sound arduous but relearning pen/pencil control is in my opinion a needed step to increasing comic proficiency, There is no doubt that with some of the forward thinking on sketching advanced by Adaptive Path that comics and sketching will play an increased role in the UX process (even while others push to replace front end research with a prototyping phase) and this book- like Donna Spencers' Card Sorting (also a Rosenfeld book) will be a life saving resource to many a designer tasked with incorporating comics into the design and communication process.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    What I liked: -There’s a solid introduction to comics without belaboring a study of sequential art. -Great tips on how to get started quickly in creating your own comics for planning out projects. -Excellent examples of comics in use in the industry. -The comics that front each chapter cover the topics really quickly, allowing for a really fast read through for those not interested in the nitty gritty. What I didn’t like: -I was hoping for more of an explanation of how best to integrate comics into ex What I liked: -There’s a solid introduction to comics without belaboring a study of sequential art. -Great tips on how to get started quickly in creating your own comics for planning out projects. -Excellent examples of comics in use in the industry. -The comics that front each chapter cover the topics really quickly, allowing for a really fast read through for those not interested in the nitty gritty. What I didn’t like: -I was hoping for more of an explanation of how best to integrate comics into existing planning processes. The example lays out the creation of a comic rather than how to meet a business case with one. Bottom line: This book has a good explanation of comics and is very practically minded. For those not used to taking comics seriously, this text is a great place to get them jump-started on making comics. I was hoping for something different which I can’t fault the book for. A great high-level read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elisa

    Read this for the local UX book club. I found it complementary to the books: "Understanding Comics" and "Sketching the User Experience." Our book club discussion centered around the applicability of comics or that form of storyboard sketching in our personal situations. Frankly, I don't get to do this much, but it might be useful in the process of designing personas. It did reinforce my belief that I need to practice sketching more! Read this for the local UX book club. I found it complementary to the books: "Understanding Comics" and "Sketching the User Experience." Our book club discussion centered around the applicability of comics or that form of storyboard sketching in our personal situations. Frankly, I don't get to do this much, but it might be useful in the process of designing personas. It did reinforce my belief that I need to practice sketching more!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I finished this book either the day I got it in the mail or the day after. It's a slim volume that has a lot to offer. I especially enjoyed the comics at the beginning of each chapter that mirrored the text that followed, as they clearly illustrated the overall lessons of the book. I can't wait to use this technique sometime. I finished this book either the day I got it in the mail or the day after. It's a slim volume that has a lot to offer. I especially enjoyed the comics at the beginning of each chapter that mirrored the text that followed, as they clearly illustrated the overall lessons of the book. I can't wait to use this technique sometime.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nestor Mata Cuthbert

    This book is easy to read and gives helps you to understand how to put your words into images to communicate better. This book is not to learn how to draw or for people who already does, but still gives you enough so you can do things your self and communicate those ideas to others.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dave Emmett

    Read for August's User Experience Book Club Vancouver. Read for August's User Experience Book Club Vancouver.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

    Teaches you a process how to come up with a comic e.g. for a storyboard. Every chapter starts with a comic which summarizes the chapter. So it practices what it preaches.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Krystal

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Whitmore

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tom Beck

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Barry

  18. 5 out of 5

    Morco

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matty

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kina'ole Inc

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ayodeji Alaka

  23. 5 out of 5

    Philippe

  24. 4 out of 5

    Vaibhav Gautam

  25. 4 out of 5

    Winsarinfosoft

  26. 4 out of 5

    N/A

  27. 5 out of 5

    Yaniv

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Wayne Hill

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeremiah Sanders

  30. 4 out of 5

    T

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