Hot Best Seller

New York Drawings: A Decade of Covers, Comics, Illustrations, and Sketches from the Pages of the New Yorker and Beyond

Availability: Ready to download

ILLUSTRATIONS AND COMICS FROM THE "NEW YORKER" COVER ARTIST AND AWARD-WINNING CARTOONIST Two strangers, both reading the same novel, share a fleeting glance between passing subway cars. A bookstore owner locks eyes with a neighbor as she receives an Amazon package. Strangers are united by circumstance as they wait on the subway stairs for a summer storm to pass. Adrian Tom ILLUSTRATIONS AND COMICS FROM THE "NEW YORKER" COVER ARTIST AND AWARD-WINNING CARTOONIST Two strangers, both reading the same novel, share a fleeting glance between passing subway cars. A bookstore owner locks eyes with a neighbor as she receives an Amazon package. Strangers are united by circumstance as they wait on the subway stairs for a summer storm to pass. Adrian Tomine's illustrations and comics have been appearing for more than a decade in the pages (and on the cover) of "The New Yorker." Instantly recognizable for their deceptively simple and evocative style, these images have garnered the attention of "The New Yorker"'s readership and the approbation of such venerable institutions as the Art Directors Club and "American Illustration." "New York Drawings "is a loving homage to the city that Tomine, a West Coast transplant, has called home for the past seven years. This lavish, beautifully designed volume collects every cover, comic, and illustration that he has produced for "The New Yorker "to date, along with an assortment of other rare and uncollected illustrations and sketches inspired by the city. Complete with notes and annotations by the author, "New York Drawings "will also feature a new introductory comic focusing on Tomine's experiences as a New York illustrator.


Compare

ILLUSTRATIONS AND COMICS FROM THE "NEW YORKER" COVER ARTIST AND AWARD-WINNING CARTOONIST Two strangers, both reading the same novel, share a fleeting glance between passing subway cars. A bookstore owner locks eyes with a neighbor as she receives an Amazon package. Strangers are united by circumstance as they wait on the subway stairs for a summer storm to pass. Adrian Tom ILLUSTRATIONS AND COMICS FROM THE "NEW YORKER" COVER ARTIST AND AWARD-WINNING CARTOONIST Two strangers, both reading the same novel, share a fleeting glance between passing subway cars. A bookstore owner locks eyes with a neighbor as she receives an Amazon package. Strangers are united by circumstance as they wait on the subway stairs for a summer storm to pass. Adrian Tomine's illustrations and comics have been appearing for more than a decade in the pages (and on the cover) of "The New Yorker." Instantly recognizable for their deceptively simple and evocative style, these images have garnered the attention of "The New Yorker"'s readership and the approbation of such venerable institutions as the Art Directors Club and "American Illustration." "New York Drawings "is a loving homage to the city that Tomine, a West Coast transplant, has called home for the past seven years. This lavish, beautifully designed volume collects every cover, comic, and illustration that he has produced for "The New Yorker "to date, along with an assortment of other rare and uncollected illustrations and sketches inspired by the city. Complete with notes and annotations by the author, "New York Drawings "will also feature a new introductory comic focusing on Tomine's experiences as a New York illustrator.

30 review for New York Drawings: A Decade of Covers, Comics, Illustrations, and Sketches from the Pages of the New Yorker and Beyond

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    If you’ve ever been to New York, you’ll know the place is incredible and majestic and so recognisable from a million movies and tv shows and photographs and paintings and songs that you’ll find yourself stopping in the middle of the street just to marvel at a corner you’ve seen somewhere before. It’s like you’ve stepped into that work of art, you are in that movie, and you are expecting that character to walk past at any moment. Adrian Tomine creates moments like this in his art. Scenes that any If you’ve ever been to New York, you’ll know the place is incredible and majestic and so recognisable from a million movies and tv shows and photographs and paintings and songs that you’ll find yourself stopping in the middle of the street just to marvel at a corner you’ve seen somewhere before. It’s like you’ve stepped into that work of art, you are in that movie, and you are expecting that character to walk past at any moment. Adrian Tomine creates moments like this in his art. Scenes that anyone familiar with New York city will see and find themselves reminiscing, their minds travelling back in time to when they were there. At least, that was my experience with this book. Tomine is best known for his comic book series “Optic Nerve” and his graphic novel “Shortcomings” as well as numerous other books, but he’s also been a continuous contributor to the New Yorker magazine, supplying several covers and the occasional strip. These, along with sketches of snatched moments with strangers around the city, are collected here in a beautifully produced hardback with high quality thick paper. The sketches are particularly good - Tomine includes a small note about the scene and the person within it like on the subway “this woman stared ahead, unmoving, smiling for 4 stops and then got off”. Each drawing feels like a story in itself. The New Yorker drawings are absolutely gorgeous, Tomine’s clean, precise style and eye for placement and angle making for an image that captures your attention instantly. There are also a few strips here, though not many, including a 3-page comic intro to the book which tells the story of the artist’s first New Yorker party when he had just moved to the city. The strips are the kind of low-key yet thoughtful and interesting stories that Tomine fans love him for. “New York Drawings” is a book containing portals into New York and for anyone who loves the city Tomine offers you a scene to step into, a person to imagine a conversation with, and a moment to lose yourself in. It is a wonderful tribute to an incredible artist and definitely worth buying and returning to again and again to include exquisite New York moments within your days.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Mostly fabulous New Yorker covers, some sketches woven in from subway rides or park sits, and a few scattered one page stories that make the often grumpy Tomine (by his one admission grumpy!) sort of endearing, in a self-deprecating way. Terrific art work; interesting how in the last ten years Tomine evolved from a real outsider artist to a sophisticated New Yorker cartoonist, one of the quintessential New Yorker artists (though there are several of those). Great stuff. I like the story of his g Mostly fabulous New Yorker covers, some sketches woven in from subway rides or park sits, and a few scattered one page stories that make the often grumpy Tomine (by his one admission grumpy!) sort of endearing, in a self-deprecating way. Terrific art work; interesting how in the last ten years Tomine evolved from a real outsider artist to a sophisticated New Yorker cartoonist, one of the quintessential New Yorker artists (though there are several of those). Great stuff. I like the story of his going at a New Yorker party, completely imposter syndrome stuff, hilarious...running into Philip Roth and Steve Martin, not really talking to anyone except to ask where the coat check was... :) Why would I not give this 5 stars? I dunno, I guess because it is a collection of covers and not a story, and I'm reading for stories at the moment... but the art is amazing on so many levels.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    Have you ever felt nostalgic for a place you've never lived? Have you ever felt nostalgic for a place you've never lived?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Five stars for the artwork - after reading a few of Adrian Tomine's books in a row now, I think I'm in love with his style. Particularly in these New Yorker illustrations, the simple, clean lines and clear scenarios present a narrative far stronger than you'd expect. It reminds me of Chris Van Allsburg's works. With that in mind, much of New York Drawings reminded me of The Chronicles of Harris Burdick. Images are paired with the article titles, making the reader wonder what exactly the images ar Five stars for the artwork - after reading a few of Adrian Tomine's books in a row now, I think I'm in love with his style. Particularly in these New Yorker illustrations, the simple, clean lines and clear scenarios present a narrative far stronger than you'd expect. It reminds me of Chris Van Allsburg's works. With that in mind, much of New York Drawings reminded me of The Chronicles of Harris Burdick. Images are paired with the article titles, making the reader wonder what exactly the images are attempting to evoke. After a while, you end up writing the story in your mind. That said, I often found myself wanting some commentary from Tomine. Why choose this illustration? How was the image received? That piece seemed to be missing from New York Drawings... until I reached the Index, which contained a full description of the article associated with each image, as well as occasional commentary from the author. What the heck is that?! So, if I want to truly understand Tomine's artwork, I have to flip back and forth from the index to get the full context? Hell naw. That'll cost you a star, New York Drawings.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jo Cameron-Symes

    This is the third book of Tomine's that I have recently read. It is a collection of his cartoons from The New Yorker. I bought it thinking that the drawings could make excellent prompts for writing short stories. I think that lots of the drawings are reminiscent of Edward Hooper in their realism but set of course in today's society. I liked the drawings he did of real people on the subway, this was a nice touch. Another standout for me was the cartoon at the beginning of Tomine's awkward experie This is the third book of Tomine's that I have recently read. It is a collection of his cartoons from The New Yorker. I bought it thinking that the drawings could make excellent prompts for writing short stories. I think that lots of the drawings are reminiscent of Edward Hooper in their realism but set of course in today's society. I liked the drawings he did of real people on the subway, this was a nice touch. Another standout for me was the cartoon at the beginning of Tomine's awkward experience of his first New Yorker party.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mateen Mahboubi

    Going through this collection in the days of “shelter in place”, I half expect to turn to the last page and see Tomine’s December 7, 2020 New Yorker cover that seems to have captured the feeling of 2020 best. This collection of sketches, illustrations, comics and covers that Tomine made for the New Yorker (or simply while in New York) that was published in 2012 includes a lot of great work. At times it definitely feels like missing the context of the associated article lessons the impact of the Going through this collection in the days of “shelter in place”, I half expect to turn to the last page and see Tomine’s December 7, 2020 New Yorker cover that seems to have captured the feeling of 2020 best. This collection of sketches, illustrations, comics and covers that Tomine made for the New Yorker (or simply while in New York) that was published in 2012 includes a lot of great work. At times it definitely feels like missing the context of the associated article lessons the impact of the drawing and the brief end notes don’t do much to make this more of a collection that you can quickly just page through. Good for completionists but even as a fan, I didn’t find much here to grab onto.

  7. 4 out of 5

    N. N. Santiago

    Over-hyped, I feel. Some of the pieces have more visual interest than others (Storytelling, below), while some are so bland I wonder why they were singled out for inclusion in a retrospective (Reviving Handel and Back on their Feet, not below as their images are not called out on the internet, I wonder why). The pieces with narrative (like the cover) have a little more to them, though as with much Tomine, tend to get stuck at a level of dispirited tweeness. Over-hyped, I feel. Some of the pieces have more visual interest than others (Storytelling, below), while some are so bland I wonder why they were singled out for inclusion in a retrospective (Reviving Handel and Back on their Feet, not below as their images are not called out on the internet, I wonder why). The pieces with narrative (like the cover) have a little more to them, though as with much Tomine, tend to get stuck at a level of dispirited tweeness.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shoshanna

    I need to buy this. The way his art still makes me feel, like feelings are possible, like romance is possible, and not necessarily only for another person.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Simmons

    New York Drawings is a collection work from Adrian Tomine, most of which originally appeared in the New Yorker over the last decade. I bought this book thinking I would be disappointed. I had seen some of Tomine's New Yorker covers before - I have a copy of the great Amazon delivery one somewhere - but most of my exposure to his work had been through two of his graphic novels (Shortcomings and Summer Blonde). The main thought running through my mind as I opened the book was will Tomine's themes New York Drawings is a collection work from Adrian Tomine, most of which originally appeared in the New Yorker over the last decade. I bought this book thinking I would be disappointed. I had seen some of Tomine's New Yorker covers before - I have a copy of the great Amazon delivery one somewhere - but most of my exposure to his work had been through two of his graphic novels (Shortcomings and Summer Blonde). The main thought running through my mind as I opened the book was will Tomine's themes of loneliness and alienation blend well with his love of awkward moments in a single panel? My worries were for nothing! This collection is amazing. I want to leave it on my coffee table so everyone can marvel over the images as I have. Some of my favorites - The Lost Girl and Meditation - are not available online to show you and I am to lazy to scan them myself, but trust me they are so beautifully simple. Tomine manages to condense complexity to one page over and over. Take the cover above. Has one image ever so subtly mocked our entire conception of reality? We are obsessed with seeing what is real on T.V. and experiencing simulated realities. Yet, the image mocks this whole concept. It seems to call for the people watching the movie to take down the screen and stare at the real existence behind it. The image below is equally stunning and simple. Two strangers on trains heading separate directions make eye contact as they read the same book. The loneliness and sense of lost opportunity that this image conveys needs time to be properly absorbed. Perhaps this is love for Tomine - two strangers destined to be heading separate ways. There are also a few short comic strips in here that showcase the wit and dialogue of Tomine - which is almost always great. However, if you really want to have more experiences with Tomine's comic work I would suggest picking up Shortcomings, Summer Blonde, or Optic Nerve #12 - they are all pretty amazing. If you are looking for a coffee table book, love drawings, are a fan of Tomine, or just want something different check this book out. If you happen to see it somewhere take a few moments to browse through it. This book is worth a first and second look.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Liam

    This isn't a story, it's a collection of Tomine's work for the front cover of 'The New Yorker'. Premium coffee table material. Many of these images make up part of my laptop desktop background slideshow. It's therefore sort of silly to review it, but the art does not disappoint. I couldn't choose one favourite. It's a tie between the cover image ('Missed Communication'), 'Road Trips' and 'The Next Small Thing'; to me these three all have a stronger sense of setting than the others. More than the This isn't a story, it's a collection of Tomine's work for the front cover of 'The New Yorker'. Premium coffee table material. Many of these images make up part of my laptop desktop background slideshow. It's therefore sort of silly to review it, but the art does not disappoint. I couldn't choose one favourite. It's a tie between the cover image ('Missed Communication'), 'Road Trips' and 'The Next Small Thing'; to me these three all have a stronger sense of setting than the others. More than the others, they tell a story. Perhaps I see it this way because there is more focus between the interaction of two characters in a strict non-mundane context (no extras, clearly a 'main' scene to the people involved, many questions raised).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Thorner

    A beautiful collection of Adrian Tomine's illustrations. He has a wonderful compositional and colour sense that always seem to add to the mood of the story he tells through pictures, and this is no less true with his stand alone drawings. Highly recommended. A beautiful collection of Adrian Tomine's illustrations. He has a wonderful compositional and colour sense that always seem to add to the mood of the story he tells through pictures, and this is no less true with his stand alone drawings. Highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Adan

    A bunch of Tomine's art that has been featured in The New Yorker and other magazines and ephemera. Nowhere near as many comics as I would have liked, but Tomine's illustrations are pretty great regardless. A bunch of Tomine's art that has been featured in The New Yorker and other magazines and ephemera. Nowhere near as many comics as I would have liked, but Tomine's illustrations are pretty great regardless.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Keen

    This compilation mostly consists of work that Tomine has done for “The New Yorker”. These images are like a collection of snapshots and fragments, beautifully drawn, with lovely colouring. It creates a feel, which is a bit like watching a new and interesting world unspool by the window of a lazy train ride. There are a handful of short, short stories in here and each one is a treasure in its own way “My Ex-Barber” and “E-vangelism” both made me smile in recognition, but surely the pick of the bun This compilation mostly consists of work that Tomine has done for “The New Yorker”. These images are like a collection of snapshots and fragments, beautifully drawn, with lovely colouring. It creates a feel, which is a bit like watching a new and interesting world unspool by the window of a lazy train ride. There are a handful of short, short stories in here and each one is a treasure in its own way “My Ex-Barber” and “E-vangelism” both made me smile in recognition, but surely the pick of the bunch is the opening story. Some of the details made in some of the notes on the sketches he made whilst on the train, were quite interesting. A dark haired woman with a bandana looking out the train window, 6/27/04 -STARING STRAIGHT AHEAD, SMILING – SEEMINGLY VERY CONTENT – DIDN’T MOVE A MUSCLE FOR FOUR STOPS. Or an Asian looking woman 7/3/04 –MAYBE SHE KNEW I WAS SKETCHING HER – GOT UP AND LEFT ABRUPTLY. Tomine draws women as well as anyone in the graphic genre and I particularly love the way he catches the angles of their faces, they always appear so absorbed and intense. “Missed connection”, the drawing that is also used in the cover speaks beautifully about What ifs? This collection makes for a voyeuristic, intimate, profound, poignant, seductive and subtle experience that shows the many sides to Tomine’s work. The only criticism would be the length, it is a bit short, but it does stand up well to repeat viewing. He captures that space between and his art work is soaked in sehnsuct and wistful contemplation that makes his work such a pleasure to engage with.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Israel Vento

    The few comics in this are funny and the subtle nod of including himself in his best work is a fun detail to continue to search for. Almost all the images feel flat because there are no shades of color or shadows, but it makes when he does include shadow that much more meaningful. For it all feeling flat his ability to still give depth in simple layers just shows he's a dog at drawing and perfected what his personal illustration technique is. He sticks to his guns. His portraiture and figure dra The few comics in this are funny and the subtle nod of including himself in his best work is a fun detail to continue to search for. Almost all the images feel flat because there are no shades of color or shadows, but it makes when he does include shadow that much more meaningful. For it all feeling flat his ability to still give depth in simple layers just shows he's a dog at drawing and perfected what his personal illustration technique is. He sticks to his guns. His portraiture and figure drawing is what his style leans on the most, although he doesn't explore the range of the single body, he makes panels (or covers) that are filled with motion feeling paused in that moment. Also the title is everything you need, it feels older than it actually is given the subject matter but more contemporary than it is because of the colors. Would love to read more of his comics

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    He's a skilled artist, but too much of his work just seems pointless. Or whatever. There's a series called New York Sketches, with observational notes on the subject of each piece. I kind of wish he had done more like that. Favorites: "Road Trips" - Two women kissing. (I wonder why he chose that title for that scene.) "The Lost Girl" - A woman alone at a bar, with the guys checking her out. "Missed Connection" - A woman reading a book on a subway car sees a man reading the same book on the adjacen He's a skilled artist, but too much of his work just seems pointless. Or whatever. There's a series called New York Sketches, with observational notes on the subject of each piece. I kind of wish he had done more like that. Favorites: "Road Trips" - Two women kissing. (I wonder why he chose that title for that scene.) "The Lost Girl" - A woman alone at a bar, with the guys checking her out. "Missed Connection" - A woman reading a book on a subway car sees a man reading the same book on the adjacent subway car. "A.C." - A woman sleeping.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shayna Ross

    A collection of illustrations and a few short comics by Adrian Tomine that shows his work he's done for the New Yorker, as well as a few album covers and miscellaneous projects. If you like Tomine's style, you will enjoy looking at additional art of his. If you are looking for a collection of work that has deeper meaning or a story, this is not the way to go - find his graphic novels instead. A collection of illustrations and a few short comics by Adrian Tomine that shows his work he's done for the New Yorker, as well as a few album covers and miscellaneous projects. If you like Tomine's style, you will enjoy looking at additional art of his. If you are looking for a collection of work that has deeper meaning or a story, this is not the way to go - find his graphic novels instead.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adrien

    I have never been to New York but felt connected with it as soon as I opened Adrian Tomine's beautiful collection of sketches and illustrations, most of them taken from the pages of The New Yorker. I loved how he portrayed scenes of daily life through his characters's happiness, love, dreams but also loneliness and nostalgia. There is a vibrant energy coming from these drawings. They appeal to the imagination, giving you a feel of the stories behind them, their movements, sounds and music. I als I have never been to New York but felt connected with it as soon as I opened Adrian Tomine's beautiful collection of sketches and illustrations, most of them taken from the pages of The New Yorker. I loved how he portrayed scenes of daily life through his characters's happiness, love, dreams but also loneliness and nostalgia. There is a vibrant energy coming from these drawings. They appeal to the imagination, giving you a feel of the stories behind them, their movements, sounds and music. I also liked the references to cultural icons, with movies like Mulholland Drive and Chungking Express (all-time favorites!) and music bands like TV on the Radio. After reading the fantastic Shortcomings, Summer Blonde, Sleepwalk and Killing & Dying, it's another piece of work that I highly recommend to anyone!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Neil Pasricha

    A collection of New Yorker covers by graphic novelist Adrian Tomine. Likely just for superfan completists because it’s more of a flipper. If you’re new to Adrian’s incredible work then I’d recommend starting with KILLING AND DYING (my fave) or SUMMER BLONDE.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This would make a nice coffee table book, Mr. Tomine's drawings are compelling. This would make a nice coffee table book, Mr. Tomine's drawings are compelling.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debs

    I really love Tomine's style; each of these deceptively clean drawings tells a much deeper story. I found myself dwelling on a number of them and daydreaming. I really love Tomine's style; each of these deceptively clean drawings tells a much deeper story. I found myself dwelling on a number of them and daydreaming.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    OK, so there weren't many words in this one, but the images were great and I'm glad to have finally given it a look. OK, so there weren't many words in this one, but the images were great and I'm glad to have finally given it a look.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mona

    Not entirely worth a 4 star rating, because there are so few words. Alighted a different sense of beauty however; and one that made me like people even more.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Aurora

    Some of them were neat, a lot of them were boring. I liked the comics best.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian Mulhall

    Pleasant enough. The bookshop one being the most prescient.

  25. 5 out of 5

    SanaBanana

    I loved this! Adrien Tomine's art is very clean yet expressive and some of his original concept art and his life sketches, I absolutely loved. I loved this! Adrien Tomine's art is very clean yet expressive and some of his original concept art and his life sketches, I absolutely loved.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steve Portigal

    A really nice overview of Tomine's work, primarily for the New Yorker but a few interesting variations of style. A really nice overview of Tomine's work, primarily for the New Yorker but a few interesting variations of style.

  27. 5 out of 5

    The_Mad_Swede

    Having read and enjoyed (to various degrees) Shortcomings , Summer Blonde , Scenes from an Impending Marriage and Killing and Dying: Stories by Adrian Tomine, I could not resist checking this volume out from my local library. Still, I am not quite certain what I was expecting from it, since it only contains a few comics (which are really good) and mainly consists of covers and internal art originally published in The New Yorker (or at least commissioned by the magazine) or in some Having read and enjoyed (to various degrees) Shortcomings , Summer Blonde , Scenes from an Impending Marriage and Killing and Dying: Stories by Adrian Tomine, I could not resist checking this volume out from my local library. Still, I am not quite certain what I was expecting from it, since it only contains a few comics (which are really good) and mainly consists of covers and internal art originally published in The New Yorker (or at least commissioned by the magazine) or in some other channels. However, the collection knocked my proverbial socks off. Tomine is very good as an illustrator, and this book showcases it wonderfully. I am still arguing with myself whether I would have wanted the contextual notes on the pieces (sometimes very brief facts; other times short anecdotes) printed next to the actual pieces rather than at the end of the book. On the one hand, it would have been nice (and it would have meant my not going through the book quickly an extra time while reading the notes), but on the other, I can see the visual appeal of leaving the art pieces with their white framing without additional text segments. On the whole, I guess I am just happy that the notes are there one way or the other. If you are a fan of Tomine's work, I would strongly recommend this book. If you are unfamiliar with his work, it might be a good introduction if you are primarily interested in the art. If you are interested in comics, I would recommend one of his other works as a better starting point.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erin Britton

    Adrian Tomine needs to invest in a smartphone. That way, instead of shuffling around in an embarrassed fashion asking for directions to the coat check room, the next time he feels awkward at a party he can simply faff about checking fictional text messages like a regular person. Although, while arguably more socially comfortable, such a move may well deprive the world of another excellent book like New York Drawings since, as the opening comic in the book reveals, the germ of an idea for creatin Adrian Tomine needs to invest in a smartphone. That way, instead of shuffling around in an embarrassed fashion asking for directions to the coat check room, the next time he feels awkward at a party he can simply faff about checking fictional text messages like a regular person. Although, while arguably more socially comfortable, such a move may well deprive the world of another excellent book like New York Drawings since, as the opening comic in the book reveals, the germ of an idea for creating said book came to Tomine while he was hiding in a toilet at a party after exhausting his coat check bit. The creator of cult comic series Optic Nerve and the writer/illustrator of Shortcomings and Summer Blonde, Tomine is perhaps still most widely known for his illustration work for The New Yorker and the beautifully produced New York Drawings collects every cover, comic and illustration that he has produced for that iconic magazine to date. Although many of the illustrations will be familiar only to readers of The New Yorker, a notable few have crossed over into the general consciousness. Perhaps the most famous of these is the cover featuring a fleeting glance shared by a young man and a young women, both reading the same book, as they pass each other while travelling in opposite directions on the subway. Another particular favourite cover features the owner of a bookshop glancing over to spot his neighbour receiving a delivery from Amazon. However, New York Drawings is more than just a sumptuous catalogue of Tomine’s work for The New Yorker; spread across its pages is Tomine’s love letter to New York City. In addition to The New Yorker material, also included are a host of character sketches, location drawings, album artwork and an assortment of short comics. All of Tomine’s artwork is great but the character studies are particularly fine. It’s clear that he has a lot of love for New York and New Yorkers. At the back of New York Drawings are brief descriptions (and the occasional commentary) of each included image which help to contextualise the more esoteric illustrations and provide an interesting insight into Tomine’s thought process when he is drawing. Adrian Tomine is a masterful illustrator and cartoonist. New York Drawings is a fascinating collection of his art and comics and is a volume that can be enjoyed again and again. Tomine has an excellent eye for capturing the millions of small sadnesses that exist against the backdrop of a city that is by turns thrilling and tragic, mundane and hilarious. New York Drawings is a glorious, poignant tribute to all that humanity has to offer and is an invaluable archive of Adrian Tomine’s work. Even the endpapers are beautiful.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Parka

    (More pictures on my blog) Adrian Tomine has a clean, simple and elegant style of art, one that goes well with The New Yorker. This book has illustrations he created from 1999 for the magazine, and also some unpublished works that includes a few comics and a few sketches he did on the subway. While some pieces capture scenes of New York, the rest are more editorial illustrations. The art is beautiful. I like the toned down use of colours, the strong black and lovely line work. He has a rather time (More pictures on my blog) Adrian Tomine has a clean, simple and elegant style of art, one that goes well with The New Yorker. This book has illustrations he created from 1999 for the magazine, and also some unpublished works that includes a few comics and a few sketches he did on the subway. While some pieces capture scenes of New York, the rest are more editorial illustrations. The art is beautiful. I like the toned down use of colours, the strong black and lovely line work. He has a rather timeless style. Some drawings really work, such as the one on the cover. Two strangers look at each other after realising they are reading the same book while the train they are on are about to go the opposite direction. In this case, the picture is better than what can be expressed in works. The editorial drawings, however, would be much better if the captions had explained the context rather than just giving the story's title. Adrian Tomine's comments are insightful but he only wrote for selected pieces. The layout of the book could be better. There's too much unnecessary white space at times. Several drawings can certainly be printed bigger. Those printed at full height looks so much better, even when printed across the page gutter. I didn't like the publication details are by the side but the captions are located at the back of the book, even when there's enough space on the pages in front. Recommended to those who like editorial art.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shonna Froebel

    This collection intrigued me from the cover, which was actually a The New Yorker cover. It shows a young woman on a subway train reading a book, looking through a window to see a young man on another subway train going in the opposite direction, reading the same book. I liked the image, and was interested to see what else he had done. The book is structured with the images, placed nicely on the page, with just their titles, where they were published, and the date of publication. There is a sectio This collection intrigued me from the cover, which was actually a The New Yorker cover. It shows a young woman on a subway train reading a book, looking through a window to see a young man on another subway train going in the opposite direction, reading the same book. I liked the image, and was interested to see what else he had done. The book is structured with the images, placed nicely on the page, with just their titles, where they were published, and the date of publication. There is a section of notes at the end that explains the context of the images: what they were accompanying, if anything; the artist's intention (sometimes), and other commentary. I didn't discover the notes until I'd looked through all the images, so then I went back to the beginning again and looked through them all again, checking the notes as I went. Because I hadn't seem the images in context originally, when they were published, my first round left me unclear for many what their context and purpose were. The notes helped immensely with this and I found them very useful. I am of two minds as to whether they should have been included with the image, as I think they would have cluttered the clear pages, but they were essential to my understanding and appreciating the images.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...