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Music Downtown: Writings from the Village Voice

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This collection represents the cream of the more than five hundred articles written for the Village Voice by Kyle Gann, a leading authority on experimental American music of the late twentieth century. Charged with exploring every facet of cutting-edge music coming out of New York City in the 1980s and '90s, Gann writes about a wide array of timely issues that few critics This collection represents the cream of the more than five hundred articles written for the Village Voice by Kyle Gann, a leading authority on experimental American music of the late twentieth century. Charged with exploring every facet of cutting-edge music coming out of New York City in the 1980s and '90s, Gann writes about a wide array of timely issues that few critics have addressed, including computer music, multiculturalism and its thorny relation to music, music for the AIDS crisis, the brand-new art of electronic sampling and its legal implications, symphonies for electric guitars, operas based on talk shows, the death of twelve-tone music, and the various streams of music that flowed forth from minimalism. In these articles—including interviews with Yoko Ono, Philip Glass, Glenn Branca, and other leading musical figures—Gann paints a portrait of a bristling era in music history and defines the scruffy, vernacular field of Downtown music from which so much of the most fertile recent American music has come.


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This collection represents the cream of the more than five hundred articles written for the Village Voice by Kyle Gann, a leading authority on experimental American music of the late twentieth century. Charged with exploring every facet of cutting-edge music coming out of New York City in the 1980s and '90s, Gann writes about a wide array of timely issues that few critics This collection represents the cream of the more than five hundred articles written for the Village Voice by Kyle Gann, a leading authority on experimental American music of the late twentieth century. Charged with exploring every facet of cutting-edge music coming out of New York City in the 1980s and '90s, Gann writes about a wide array of timely issues that few critics have addressed, including computer music, multiculturalism and its thorny relation to music, music for the AIDS crisis, the brand-new art of electronic sampling and its legal implications, symphonies for electric guitars, operas based on talk shows, the death of twelve-tone music, and the various streams of music that flowed forth from minimalism. In these articles—including interviews with Yoko Ono, Philip Glass, Glenn Branca, and other leading musical figures—Gann paints a portrait of a bristling era in music history and defines the scruffy, vernacular field of Downtown music from which so much of the most fertile recent American music has come.

30 review for Music Downtown: Writings from the Village Voice

  1. 4 out of 5

    John

    Gann covered the NYC downtown art music scene for the Village Voice at a time of great upheaval and change (mid-'80's to early '90's). These pieces represent some of the best writing about American music of this time. For the obituary of Julius Eastmen alone, this book is worth the price. Gann covered the NYC downtown art music scene for the Village Voice at a time of great upheaval and change (mid-'80's to early '90's). These pieces represent some of the best writing about American music of this time. For the obituary of Julius Eastmen alone, this book is worth the price.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    This is a collection of Kyle Gann's reviews from the village voice. These are excerpted in such a way as to provide an engaging read even for a person who did not attend the original concerts, though at times I did find myself wishing I had been there. This is a collection of Kyle Gann's reviews from the village voice. These are excerpted in such a way as to provide an engaging read even for a person who did not attend the original concerts, though at times I did find myself wishing I had been there.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Phil Overeem

    Besides learning a ton about "Downtown" classical music from them, Gann's essays also kept my mind stimulated and excited by his description of the tensions between classical schools and within the work of his favorite composers. Besides learning a ton about "Downtown" classical music from them, Gann's essays also kept my mind stimulated and excited by his description of the tensions between classical schools and within the work of his favorite composers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    John Cage is championed and serialism is the worst. CLASSICAL MUSIC IS DEAD. Read to find out who killed it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    Excellent. I very much agree with Gann's aesthetic and philosophical positions. Required reading for making sense of the new music scene of the 80's and 90's. Excellent. I very much agree with Gann's aesthetic and philosophical positions. Required reading for making sense of the new music scene of the 80's and 90's.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Larry-bob Roberts

    Includes obituary for composer Julius Eastman.

  7. 5 out of 5

    JW

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Hovatter

  9. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  10. 4 out of 5

    Raub

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chris Gunnell

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elsa

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ned

  15. 5 out of 5

    Herb

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ani

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Josep

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aleksei Stevens

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  22. 4 out of 5

    Harpreet Singh

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  24. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  25. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Austin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matt Mayhall

  28. 5 out of 5

    Madison

  29. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

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