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The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself

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The German Model is running out of steam. Both America’s college and university system, and its K-12 education system, were originally created based on German approaches in the 19th century. Now that it’s the 21st century, Glenn Harlan Reynolds suggests, it’s time for a change. Higher education in America is facing a bust much like the housing bubble. It is the product of c The German Model is running out of steam. Both America’s college and university system, and its K-12 education system, were originally created based on German approaches in the 19th century. Now that it’s the 21st century, Glenn Harlan Reynolds suggests, it’s time for a change. Higher education in America is facing a bust much like the housing bubble. It is the product of cheap credit, coupled with popular expectations of ever-increasing returns on investment and, as with housing prices, the cheap credit has caused college tuitions to vastly outpace inflation and family incomes. Now this bubble is bursting. Reynolds explains the causes and effects of this bubble and the steps colleges and universities must take to ensure their survival. As students become less willing to incur debt for education, colleges and universities will have to adapt to a new world of cost pressures and declining public support. Economist Herb Stein famously said that something that can't go on forever, won't. For decades now, America has been putting ever-growing amounts of money into its K-12 education system, while getting steadily poorer results. Now parents are losing faith in public schools, new alternatives are appearing, and change is on the way. As the best students abandon traditional public schools, Disrupted provides a succinct description of what's wrong, and where the solutions are likely to appear, along with advice for parents, educators, and taxpayers.


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The German Model is running out of steam. Both America’s college and university system, and its K-12 education system, were originally created based on German approaches in the 19th century. Now that it’s the 21st century, Glenn Harlan Reynolds suggests, it’s time for a change. Higher education in America is facing a bust much like the housing bubble. It is the product of c The German Model is running out of steam. Both America’s college and university system, and its K-12 education system, were originally created based on German approaches in the 19th century. Now that it’s the 21st century, Glenn Harlan Reynolds suggests, it’s time for a change. Higher education in America is facing a bust much like the housing bubble. It is the product of cheap credit, coupled with popular expectations of ever-increasing returns on investment and, as with housing prices, the cheap credit has caused college tuitions to vastly outpace inflation and family incomes. Now this bubble is bursting. Reynolds explains the causes and effects of this bubble and the steps colleges and universities must take to ensure their survival. As students become less willing to incur debt for education, colleges and universities will have to adapt to a new world of cost pressures and declining public support. Economist Herb Stein famously said that something that can't go on forever, won't. For decades now, America has been putting ever-growing amounts of money into its K-12 education system, while getting steadily poorer results. Now parents are losing faith in public schools, new alternatives are appearing, and change is on the way. As the best students abandon traditional public schools, Disrupted provides a succinct description of what's wrong, and where the solutions are likely to appear, along with advice for parents, educators, and taxpayers.

30 review for The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself

  1. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    With the cost of education skyrocketing, some Americans have begun to question the value of sending their children to college. In this timely book, Glenn Reynolds looks both at the reasons for the increasing costs and considers alternatives to the current college/university model -- as well as that of elementary and secondary education. Reminding his readers that whenever there are problems in education, certain voices clamor that they could solve the problem if only they had more money, the auth With the cost of education skyrocketing, some Americans have begun to question the value of sending their children to college. In this timely book, Glenn Reynolds looks both at the reasons for the increasing costs and considers alternatives to the current college/university model -- as well as that of elementary and secondary education. Reminding his readers that whenever there are problems in education, certain voices clamor that they could solve the problem if only they had more money, the author, a professor at the University of Tennessee School of Law -- and prolific blogger, points out that we have been spending increasingly amounts on education. And the problems persist. The problem, however, is not one of spending, but of (what I would call) "institutional paralysis"* whereby university president and administrators are not willing to tamper with the status quo. Instead of tampering, they only just tinker, putting more computers in classrooms or creating new spaces to accommodate technology. They don't consider real, systemic change. As Reynolds points out, "What's striking is that most of the potentially revolutionary change we're seeing has come from outside the educational establishment. Then again, breakthroughs often come from people working outside old industries." Although a professor himself. Reynolds is a bit of an iconoclast, a thinker willing to consider perspectives from outside the system. That allows him to recognize the problem and the failure of recent reforms. This book is, in many ways, a must-read for those concerned with education in the United States in the early 21st century.. Reynolds asks the right questions and considers a variety of solutions. He gets the conversation going. All university presidents should read this book. To that end, I ordered a copy for the president of my undergraduate alma mater and will, in short order, be sending it to him. ----- *Perhaps there's a better term?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sera

    Solid book about the current education bubble, which was a nice complement to The Lawyer Bubble: A Profession in Crisis that I had read last year. The current secondary school system is outdated and the incredible rise in the tuition in higher education can't be sustained. Reynolds puts forth some good ideas on how overall the American education system can change for the better, most of which I agreed with; however, the clock is ticking for our kids, and many of us don't have time to wait, which Solid book about the current education bubble, which was a nice complement to The Lawyer Bubble: A Profession in Crisis that I had read last year. The current secondary school system is outdated and the incredible rise in the tuition in higher education can't be sustained. Reynolds puts forth some good ideas on how overall the American education system can change for the better, most of which I agreed with; however, the clock is ticking for our kids, and many of us don't have time to wait, which is why parents should be looking at different alternatives for their children. I would recommend this book for parents who are interested in exploring other options that than the traditional public school route.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    "The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself" by Glenn Harlan Reynolds is a very interesting book. He goes into details about the origins of American education both at the elementary/secondary and post-secondary levels. He then goes on to predict how the internet age will usher in changes to the status quo. I thought Reynold had some good ideas and I enjoyed reading his book. It'll be interesting to watch to see what shifts occur in the next ten years or so t "The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself" by Glenn Harlan Reynolds is a very interesting book. He goes into details about the origins of American education both at the elementary/secondary and post-secondary levels. He then goes on to predict how the internet age will usher in changes to the status quo. I thought Reynold had some good ideas and I enjoyed reading his book. It'll be interesting to watch to see what shifts occur in the next ten years or so to see if his predictions are correct. This book is a pretty fast read and worth it just for the origin information he provides.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura Brogan

    This book provides some new perspectives on the reality that today's education systems (public and collegiate) are not offering students enough for their time and money. The author does offer some interesting solutions; although, I am not sold that technology will be the answer. This book provides some new perspectives on the reality that today's education systems (public and collegiate) are not offering students enough for their time and money. The author does offer some interesting solutions; although, I am not sold that technology will be the answer.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Walter

    The New School, How the information age will save American Education from itself. By Glenn Harlan Reynolds 2014 The book is well written and helpful. The book is a criticism of American Education. It is unfortunate that because of Covid the book is already a bit dated. One of the main theses is that Higher education is a bubble and will eventually will collapse. He higher education has been devalued and the costs to students greatly out weigh the value received. His hope is that eventual collapse w The New School, How the information age will save American Education from itself. By Glenn Harlan Reynolds 2014 The book is well written and helpful. The book is a criticism of American Education. It is unfortunate that because of Covid the book is already a bit dated. One of the main theses is that Higher education is a bubble and will eventually will collapse. He higher education has been devalued and the costs to students greatly out weigh the value received. His hope is that eventual collapse will bring to us something better. I found the book to be weak on recommendations. Having read the book in 2021 the books predictions have yet to have a chance at fruition. He wants education to be more crafted to the individual. Our current system he says was modeled after the German system and was designed for Industry in the 20th century. Much of that Industry has been lost. Here are some of my favorite quotes: "The explosion of administrators is a major case of college tuition increases." p.32 “Administration grew by more than seven times the increase in students,...” p 72 "Modern adolescence, he observes, is a modern invention,.....” p.71 “... the United state spends more than many nations whose schools produce better performance." p. 73 We are yet to see that Covid induced online education will hold on to its bumped up status....but is easy for us to imagine that it will.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    Snappy. My ideal self would have my kids trying alternatives to public school and standard universities. My lazy self thinks that's probably too much work. From the book: "The education bubble isn’t bursting because of a shortage of money. It is bursting because of a shortage of value. " https://docs.google.com/document/d/1j... Snappy. My ideal self would have my kids trying alternatives to public school and standard universities. My lazy self thinks that's probably too much work. From the book: "The education bubble isn’t bursting because of a shortage of money. It is bursting because of a shortage of value. " https://docs.google.com/document/d/1j...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    A good light look at the modern schooling system and how it makes sense historically . This is like if gatto's books on school were written about college in modernity and were a bit more coherent A good light look at the modern schooling system and how it makes sense historically . This is like if gatto's books on school were written about college in modernity and were a bit more coherent

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ilib4kids

    370.973 REY Expansion of his books The Higher Education Bubble ,The K-12 Implosion p1 Today's schools - both K-12 and universities ..based on models imported from Germany in 19th century. At one time, those 19th century models seems modern themselves...But they represented a major departure from the previous entirely of human history, and it maybe that the industrial model ..was a temporary detour. For most of human history, ...education wasn't a product but a process, a part of everyday living. p3 370.973 REY Expansion of his books The Higher Education Bubble ,The K-12 Implosion p1 Today's schools - both K-12 and universities ..based on models imported from Germany in 19th century. At one time, those 19th century models seems modern themselves...But they represented a major departure from the previous entirely of human history, and it maybe that the industrial model ..was a temporary detour. For most of human history, ...education wasn't a product but a process, a part of everyday living. p3 Industrial Revolution was marked by 2 things: specialization and economics scale. With these two came a third: standardization. p18 A college education can help people make more money in 3 ways. First, it may actually make them more economically productive by teaching them skills valued in the workplace: computer programming...religious and women's studies,not so much. Second, it may provide a credential that employers want - not because it represents actual skills but because it's weeding tool that doesn't produce civil-rights suits as, say IQ test mights..... Third, a college degree - at least an elite one - may hook its holders up with a useful social network that can provide jobs and opportunities in the future. (This is perhaps truer if it's a degree from Yale...) While an individual might rationally pursue all there of these, only the first one - actual added skills - produces a net benefit for society. The other tow are just distributional; they're about who get the goodies, not about making more of them. Yet today's college education systems seems to be in the business of selling parts 2 and 3 to much degree than part 1, along with selling the even-harder-to-quantify "college experience", which as often as not boils down to four (or more) years of partying. p66 As Seth Godin writes:"Part of the rationale to sell this major transformation to industrialists was the idea that educated kids would actually become more compliant and productive workers. Our current system of teaching kids to sit in straight rows and obey instructions isn't a coincident - it was an investment in our economic future. The plan: trade short-term child-labor wages for longer-term productivity by giving kids a head start in doing what they're told. Large-scale education as not developed to motivate kids or to create scholars. It was invented to churn out adults who worked well within the system. Scale was are important than quality.. Of course, it worked. Several generations of productive, fully employed workers followed, But now? Industrial Revolution schooling involved Industrial Revolution goals and Industrial Revolution methods - organization, standardization, and an overall assembly-line approach. In fact, the industrial-ear public school (which persists to the present) is basically an assembly line: kindergartens come in at one end; graduates with diplomas emerge at the other. Each year they advance to the next stage(grade), where the next group of assembly workers(teachers) performs the standardized tasks (curricula) to advance the product (students) to the next assembly stage(grade). Eventually they roll off the assembly line and into the marketplace at graduation... But while it worked then, Godin's other question - But now?"- is the questions for our age...Education is a knowledge industry, after all, and why should we expect a knowledge industry in the 21st century to succeed by following a model pioneered in the 19th? As Godin says, "Every year, we churn out millions of workers who are trained to do 1925-style labor." That won't work when kids in the first grade as this(book) is being written will be on the job market in 2025. Escaping the Endless Adolescence: How We Can Help Our Teenagers Grow Up Before They Grow Old /Allen, Joseph P /155.5 ALLEN The Case Against Adolescence: Rediscovering the Adult in Every Teen Epstein, Robert /155.5 EPS Schoolhouses, Courthouses, and Statehouses: Solving the Funding-Achievement Puzzle in America's Public Schools/Eric A. Hanushek

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    A solid primer on the state of US education in 2 parts - college and k-12, and a great place to begin reading about the status quo and understand the challenges we face. With regard to both aspects, the author grounds his critique with the phrase "Anything that cannot go on forever, won't." This applies to the insane sums being paid as tuition and being thrown at public schools, all while outcomes deteriorate. In higher ed, rule #1 is Don't go into debt. This goes for students and colleges, whic A solid primer on the state of US education in 2 parts - college and k-12, and a great place to begin reading about the status quo and understand the challenges we face. With regard to both aspects, the author grounds his critique with the phrase "Anything that cannot go on forever, won't." This applies to the insane sums being paid as tuition and being thrown at public schools, all while outcomes deteriorate. In higher ed, rule #1 is Don't go into debt. This goes for students and colleges, which will be unable to compete with debt restraining their flexibility. Colleges must make sure their students are actually learning (citing Academically Adrift, reviewed earlier in this book list) - through rigor, the value proposition for students improves because employers will know they are capable. He theorizes that many parents see college as "not-falling-out-of-the-middle-class-insurance" and when parents realize that this is no longer the case, the bubble will really burst. The notion of 4-yr colleges being good for all students is undone by the book Paying For the Party (referenced by the author and also reviewed earlier). New models, whether they be MOOCs or Georgia Tech's $7000 master's degree, are coming and will be incredibly disruptive. Employers may be more willing to find a credential that is not college-based (a huge hole in the marketplace). Citizens should take more control of state universities - attend trustees meetings and learn the arcana of the budget process. The higher ed bubble is not bursting due to a shortage of money, but a shortage of value. In k-12 education, we are burdened with a system designed to produce 19th century employees. Teenagers are consumers, not producers as they have been thru most of history, and have zero experience working with and learning from adults. Perhaps this is why millennials arrive in the workplace with absurd expectations. Spending in schools has risen astronomically but has largely gone to more administrators (even more so at the collegiate level, in truth). Can innovation take place within the current system? Can the link be cut between location and school quality? (talk about an upending of the status quo) The author acknowledges that there will be a painful transition for incumbents, even as it provides benefits to consumers. He sees more customization, gamifcation, integration (leave school earlier but return for specific skill instruction), cheapification, and fragmentation (in contrast to our history of assimilation).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paul Sand

    [Imported automatically from my blog. Some formatting there may not have translated here.] I noticed that the Dimond Library at the University Near Here owned this slim volume from Glenn Harlan Reynolds, aka Instapundit. I very much enjoyed his book An Army of Davids way back in 2006. It's not often you get a chance to read Glenn in a format longer than his typical blog post. The book, short as it is, adapts two previous works: one on the higher education crisis, the other on K-12 problems. In [Imported automatically from my blog. Some formatting there may not have translated here.] I noticed that the Dimond Library at the University Near Here owned this slim volume from Glenn Harlan Reynolds, aka Instapundit. I very much enjoyed his book An Army of Davids way back in 2006. It's not often you get a chance to read Glenn in a format longer than his typical blog post. The book, short as it is, adapts two previous works: one on the higher education crisis, the other on K-12 problems. In both cases, there is a theme of unsustainability, and not the mushy kind that environmentalists prattle about. Glenn's favorite saying is (Herbert) Stein's Law: "If something cannot go on forever, it will stop." There are any number of trends in the US education "system" that can't go on forever. At the college level, costs keep increasing, along with the debts incurred by victims students. Yet the outcomes remain mediocre, with graduates moving on to unemployment and underemployment. (The problem is especially bad in law schools, apparently: they produce far more graduates than the market can bear.) At the K-12 level, things are similar: ever-increasing costs, never-improving actual education. The stranglehold of government on schooling at this level is greater, and (hence) the problems are less tractable. Still: Stein's Law. It's hard to see how things can continue this way. So, what's predicted for the "new" school? Glenn's outlook is kind of hazy. It would be nice if we got away from the Procrustean ideal: one size fits all, all students moving through the same curriculum in the same time in the same way. To a certain extent, technology offers a (partial) way out: cheap courses that can be taken on your own schedule. If one course (say) in Python programming doesn't fit your learning style, you can move on to a different one. Glenn is an engaging writer, but the book doesn't offer much in the way of new observations. At least for insights about the future of college education, I'd recommend Kevin Carey's The End of College instead.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    This book may rub many of my colleagues in higher education the wrong way. However, this brief treatise is essential to the future considerations of education. Glenn Harlan Reynolds begins by focusing on the higher education bubble. The worth of college degrees are going down as the cost for them rise. The burst or deflation of this bubble will be rough on many in the short-term, but will benefit anyone with a little common sense in the long-term. Is an art history degree worth being $60,000 in d This book may rub many of my colleagues in higher education the wrong way. However, this brief treatise is essential to the future considerations of education. Glenn Harlan Reynolds begins by focusing on the higher education bubble. The worth of college degrees are going down as the cost for them rise. The burst or deflation of this bubble will be rough on many in the short-term, but will benefit anyone with a little common sense in the long-term. Is an art history degree worth being $60,000 in debt? Is it worth being $30,000 in debt? Perhaps, but schools need to be more forthcoming in the job prospects. Yes, many still attend for the classic education, but far more attend to receive appropriate job training or simply to have some form of a bachelor's degree to demonstrate a base level of qualification. The author argues that more variety will help relieve the issue. The Harvards and Yales may continue as they always have, but other schools, such as state institutions, will need to adapt as costs rise with no additional benefit and taxpayers begin to revolt. More transparency with budgets will aid this process. Reynolds then sets his sights on and eviscerates K-12 education. The current public school model was created at the dawn of the industrial revolution to create disciplined and literate factory workers. That does not fit our needs today. Again, one way to fix the problem is choice. Some may fair well in the current public setting, but others may do better in private, charter, online, homeschooling, or some blended option. This brief read will be a tough pill to swallow for many in education. As Reynolds repeatedly says, though, something that can't go on forever won't. The current explosion in costs in higher education can't go on forever and nor can the failure of public schools. Consumers will stop paying and students will no longer attend. It's time to accept this and try some new ideas.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    I thought this book was going to be about technology in education, specifically the ways that technology will enhance education and create myriad possibilities for learning. This was not the case. Reynolds manages to make only a few salient points in about 90 pages. Yes, there is a bubble in education as far as student loan availability, money spent on useless paper (i.e. diploma) with nothing to show for it, and contributed misguided philosophies that only twist and turn themselves into wastefu I thought this book was going to be about technology in education, specifically the ways that technology will enhance education and create myriad possibilities for learning. This was not the case. Reynolds manages to make only a few salient points in about 90 pages. Yes, there is a bubble in education as far as student loan availability, money spent on useless paper (i.e. diploma) with nothing to show for it, and contributed misguided philosophies that only twist and turn themselves into wasteful bureaucracy. That point can be made in a few pages with several charts and a couple examples. However, Reynolds pores over this idea for more than half the book. More than that, he uses extremely long block quotes to write the book for him. And even more than that, he doesn't mention in any succinct manner how the information age will actually and practically make changes in US education systems. The main takeaway is that college and primary/secondary education in the US has suffered at the hands of mismanagement, obscurity, and a lack of creativity. Technology and information can help improve on that problem, and it will be cool to see. Go Udacity. I'm not joking when I say that last paragraph is an honest sum of the book. Do yourself a favor: jump to the last 30 or so pages, look for his numbered list of things that he thinks need to happen in education, and get on with your day.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dan McGirt

    This short book is more of an extended essay on the causes of the higher and lower education bubbles Reynolds sees bursting and some of his prescriptions and predictions about how our systems of education may change in the near future. His style is breezy and accessible, as you might expect from the Instapundit. As a regular reader of the Instapundit blog, I found little new here, but the book is a good thought-provoking introduction to the topic. (I would also recommend Change.edu: Rebooting fo This short book is more of an extended essay on the causes of the higher and lower education bubbles Reynolds sees bursting and some of his prescriptions and predictions about how our systems of education may change in the near future. His style is breezy and accessible, as you might expect from the Instapundit. As a regular reader of the Instapundit blog, I found little new here, but the book is a good thought-provoking introduction to the topic. (I would also recommend Change.edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy by Andrew Rosen, another short book focused on changes in higher education.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Interesting book that summarizes much of what you suspect or fear about education today. Teenagers live in a peer driven world that is extended by 2 - 4 - 6 years of college. I appreciated the data about declining applications to law schools and declining attendance at urban public schools. To be convincing The New School should be enhanced with factual backup. For example the author insinuates that gender and diversity programs produce graduates who cannot pay their student loans. I wouldn't en Interesting book that summarizes much of what you suspect or fear about education today. Teenagers live in a peer driven world that is extended by 2 - 4 - 6 years of college. I appreciated the data about declining applications to law schools and declining attendance at urban public schools. To be convincing The New School should be enhanced with factual backup. For example the author insinuates that gender and diversity programs produce graduates who cannot pay their student loans. I wouldn't encourage a relative to pursue those studies. But still - is the author's insinuation true? Could he provide some data? How many graduates fall into this group? Who knows? Perhaps they all get great jobs for the federal government!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    An easy read on a subject of considerable importance. The big-box education system is too expensive, is achieving low quality outcomes and leaving its customers deeply in debt as a a consequence. Glenn Reynolds puts the whole thing in context and proposes potential solutions that are more in-line with customers' needs and the demands of the contemporary workplace. He doesn't have all of the answers but he does a great job of convincing the reader that it's better to be in the business of educati An easy read on a subject of considerable importance. The big-box education system is too expensive, is achieving low quality outcomes and leaving its customers deeply in debt as a a consequence. Glenn Reynolds puts the whole thing in context and proposes potential solutions that are more in-line with customers' needs and the demands of the contemporary workplace. He doesn't have all of the answers but he does a great job of convincing the reader that it's better to be in the business of educational change management than not.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    This book is like a slap to the face that wakes you from sleeping. I mean that in a good way. Its barely one hundred pages but it hits you hard with vivid and tightly argued analysis of the current situation in American education. The content is not as positive as the title suggests. Reynolds has an urgent message and he gives it to you in the clearest terms. Big changes are coming or are already here. Anyone involved in education would benefit from taking note.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Mexican boy: Viene la tormenta! Sarah Connor: What did he just say? Gas Station Attendant: He said there's a storm coming in. Sarah Connor: [sighs] I know. Talks about the state of education in the US and the current educational bubble. Although he didn't necessarily say anything new, Reynolds did put it into the context of other economic bubbles. Made me think about how to pursue education more rationally that works for students and what they need in terms of learning. Mexican boy: Viene la tormenta! Sarah Connor: What did he just say? Gas Station Attendant: He said there's a storm coming in. Sarah Connor: [sighs] I know. Talks about the state of education in the US and the current educational bubble. Although he didn't necessarily say anything new, Reynolds did put it into the context of other economic bubbles. Made me think about how to pursue education more rationally that works for students and what they need in terms of learning.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lee Welter

    Thomas Jefferson (paraphrased): a poorly educated society will not remain free. Because I believe America's K-12 school monopoly needs a free market option, I had read much that Glenn Reynolds includes in his book. However, the breadth and depth of his content (plus references), perspicuously presented, delighted me. Thomas Jefferson (paraphrased): a poorly educated society will not remain free. Because I believe America's K-12 school monopoly needs a free market option, I had read much that Glenn Reynolds includes in his book. However, the breadth and depth of his content (plus references), perspicuously presented, delighted me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This had some interesting thoughts about the origins of the American school system (both higher education and K-12) and how we'll have to leave those conventions behind if we want our kids to succeed in the 21st century economy. Great companion to The Smartest Kids in the World. This had some interesting thoughts about the origins of the American school system (both higher education and K-12) and how we'll have to leave those conventions behind if we want our kids to succeed in the 21st century economy. Great companion to The Smartest Kids in the World.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Check out my review over at Check out my review over at

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schultz

    A quick insightful read. The author talks about education reform and the "education bubble". Recommend A quick insightful read. The author talks about education reform and the "education bubble". Recommend

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ulli

    A must read for anyone with kids in the school system. The US is one of the highest spenders in the world when it comes to education but one of the lower performers.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Excellent, readable summary of the present bubble in higher education.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    Got some great ideas for helping those stuck in the CC morass!

  25. 4 out of 5

    C

    Brief, very readable, and full of thought-provoking ideas.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Some powerful thoughts about our current education system and whether it can be sustained at its current levels.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  28. 5 out of 5

    Seth

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aneil

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