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The Kick-Ass Writer: 1001 Ways to Write Great Fiction, Get Published, and Earn Your Audience

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30 review for The Kick-Ass Writer: 1001 Ways to Write Great Fiction, Get Published, and Earn Your Audience

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    This is the fifth book in my Kindle Unlimited Experiment. For the 30 day trial, I'm only reading books that are part of the program and keeping track what the total cost of the books would have been. The Kick-Ass Writer is a collection of 1001 writing tips, broken down into 31 lists of 25 items each. I do realize that doesn't quite add up to 1001 but it's still a lot tips. Here are the contents: - 25 things you should know about being a writer - 25 questions to ask as you write - 25 things I want t This is the fifth book in my Kindle Unlimited Experiment. For the 30 day trial, I'm only reading books that are part of the program and keeping track what the total cost of the books would have been. The Kick-Ass Writer is a collection of 1001 writing tips, broken down into 31 lists of 25 items each. I do realize that doesn't quite add up to 1001 but it's still a lot tips. Here are the contents: - 25 things you should know about being a writer - 25 questions to ask as you write - 25 things I want to say to so-called "aspiring" writers - 25 things you should know about writing a novel - 25 ways to be a better writer - 25 things writers should stop doing - 25 things you should know about writing horror - 25 ways to defeat writer's block - 25 ways to plot, plan, and prep your story - 25 things you should know about character - 25 things you should know about description - 25 things you should know about writing a goddamn sentence - 25 things you should know about plot - 25 things you should know about narrative - 25 things you should know about protagonists - 25 things you should know about setting - 25 things you should know about suspense and tension in storytelling - 25 things you should know about theme - 25 things you should know about writing a scene - 25 things you should know about dialogue - 25 things you should know about endings - 25 things you should know about editing, revising, and rewriting - 25 things you should know about getting published - 25 things you should know about agents - 25 things you should know about queries - 25 things you should know about self-publishing - 25 things you should know about blogging - 25 things you should know about social media - 25 things you should know about crowdfunding - 25 things ways to earn your audience - 25 things you should know about hybrid authors There's a lot of useful tips contained in this book but writing, much like photography, is very much a "learn by doing" kind of activity. Still, Wendig dispenses some useful advice leavened with humor. Quite a bit of it feels recycled from his other writing books, though. Probably 80% of it. Considering how many writing books he has in print, I guess I shouldn't be this surprised. However, there's a lot of repetition between the individual topics as well. The most useful tips were in the writing horror section and the topics related to publishing. while I'm a tremendous Chuck Wendig fan, I don't think I'll be pickign up any more of his writing books. The humor isn't enough to make me forget I've read most of this before. 2 out of 5 stars. Current Kindle Unlimited Savings Total: $25.73.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Reading this book is like being cornered in a bar by some scary biker dude who is babbling advice at you in numbered bullet points. His language is filthy, his breath reeks and he is scaring the hell out of you, but you are stunned to realize that what he's saying makes sense. It's like that. Reading this book is like being cornered in a bar by some scary biker dude who is babbling advice at you in numbered bullet points. His language is filthy, his breath reeks and he is scaring the hell out of you, but you are stunned to realize that what he's saying makes sense. It's like that.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aerin O'Reilly

    I dithered a bit between three and four stars on this. Oh half-star, how I long for your elusive, intermediate embrace. Here's the thing: Chuck Wendig is undoubtedly a fantastic writer, one of my favorite people working today. He has a fantastic gift for language, and a refreshingly clear-eyed and honest view of the industry. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, he Knows His Stuff. My issue is the format. The book mainly consists of various 25 Things pieces taken from his blog at terribleminds.com. The li I dithered a bit between three and four stars on this. Oh half-star, how I long for your elusive, intermediate embrace. Here's the thing: Chuck Wendig is undoubtedly a fantastic writer, one of my favorite people working today. He has a fantastic gift for language, and a refreshingly clear-eyed and honest view of the industry. Beyond a shadow of a doubt, he Knows His Stuff. My issue is the format. The book mainly consists of various 25 Things pieces taken from his blog at terribleminds.com. The listicle is a great way to break up often complicated and nuanced issues so that they can be more easily understood. But it gets repetitive. And redundant. And repetitive. It's not a concern for online content, especially when you're only seeing one a week, but it makes the book a little difficult. I found myself reading only a few sections at a time and then having to put it down. The lists also frequently cover the same territory, especially at the beginning. There's only so much you can say about "writing" in the abstract, you know? When advising a fledgling writer or an old hand looking to hone their craft, I will absolutely point them in Wendig's direction. But I'm probably more inclined to direct them to his blog--or better yet, to his novels so they can see him in action--than to this particular volume.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Toby

    Chuck Wendig dispenses 1001 tips on how to write stuff and not be a dick online. I've not read any of his other work, not even been intrigued by it but he's one of these new, interesting authors (self described as a hybrid) who function in multiple mediums and aren't afraid to self-publish, give stuff away for free or interact with the world as somebody who loves to put words on the page and as such he seemed like somebody whose pennyworth was worth a few hours of my time. AND THEY WERE! If only Chuck Wendig dispenses 1001 tips on how to write stuff and not be a dick online. I've not read any of his other work, not even been intrigued by it but he's one of these new, interesting authors (self described as a hybrid) who function in multiple mediums and aren't afraid to self-publish, give stuff away for free or interact with the world as somebody who loves to put words on the page and as such he seemed like somebody whose pennyworth was worth a few hours of my time. AND THEY WERE! If only all authors were this interesting and obviously decent as a human being. His enthusiasm for his craft shines through and his willingness to pass on the hard learned facts of life as an author in the modern world to all of us wannabe wordsmiths should be lauded. Yes, I feel encouraged to write, enthused by my ongoing attempts to avoid procrastination and had my life choices affirmed by somebody who has made similar choices work for them. Who wouldn't be impressed by such a work? But also I was quite entertained by his particular brand of explanation, the many references to donkey sperm and geriatric sex dungeons. So, educational and entertaining combine to form one of the more interesting books for struggling writers as far as I'm concerned and if he gets a bit repetitive, what do you expect from 1001 tips anyway and if you know it all already, then surely you should feel ready to get out there and offer your creative concoction to the world in one of the many ways discussed within. WIN!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melanie R Meadors

    This writing book is prophetic!! You can use this book in many different ways. First, the normal way. Read it from cover to cover. You'll definitely want to do that because this baby is FULL of excellent writing advice presented in an entertaining yet oddly motivating fashion. I love Chuck's voice. He seems to say the things I need to hear in the way I need to hear them. Every aspect of writing that I could think of (inspiration, plot, theme, character, querying, websites, marketing...) is cover This writing book is prophetic!! You can use this book in many different ways. First, the normal way. Read it from cover to cover. You'll definitely want to do that because this baby is FULL of excellent writing advice presented in an entertaining yet oddly motivating fashion. I love Chuck's voice. He seems to say the things I need to hear in the way I need to hear them. Every aspect of writing that I could think of (inspiration, plot, theme, character, querying, websites, marketing...) is covered in this book in easily digestible nuggets. The second way you could use this book? Well, that's when he get into the metaphysical. Close your eyes and open the book to any random page. ANY. Jab your finger down and read that passage. IT WILL APPLY TO YOUR PROBLEM. Chuck's book will change the way you not only write, but live your life. Read the words behind the words...it's deep, man. Actually, it's even MORE helpful to do this when you are stuck with your story, because even when the advice doesn't apply to the exact problem you think you have, somehow thinking about these small chunks of info is enough to get things moving again in unexpected ways. In all seriousness, this book, well, kicks ass. It's equal parts funny, inspiring, and instructional. It'll get your writing engines rolling, and kick your career into high gear. So what are you waiting for?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Marinovich

    Kick-ass indeed. One of the best writers / publishing guides I have read in the last 24 months. Great little tit-bits of information laced with a clearly disturbed sense of humour If you don't like a little cursing or references to your pink naughty bits. You might get sidetracked from the insightful advice Mr Wendig shares. Shelve your prudishness and learn with a laugh.. Kick-ass indeed. One of the best writers / publishing guides I have read in the last 24 months. Great little tit-bits of information laced with a clearly disturbed sense of humour If you don't like a little cursing or references to your pink naughty bits. You might get sidetracked from the insightful advice Mr Wendig shares. Shelve your prudishness and learn with a laugh..

  7. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    In addition to being a fine author of urban fantasy and near-future YA dystopian epics, Chuck Wendig offers advice on writing via his blog (www.terribleminds.com). His posts on "25 Things"--covering topics from 25 things to know about protagonists to 25 ways to keep your death-spiraling novel from hitting a city full of innocent citizens (okay, I made that one up)-- are pithy, insightful and sometimes NSFW. That said, they are some of the best writing advice out there. THE KICK-ASS WRITER collect In addition to being a fine author of urban fantasy and near-future YA dystopian epics, Chuck Wendig offers advice on writing via his blog (www.terribleminds.com). His posts on "25 Things"--covering topics from 25 things to know about protagonists to 25 ways to keep your death-spiraling novel from hitting a city full of innocent citizens (okay, I made that one up)-- are pithy, insightful and sometimes NSFW. That said, they are some of the best writing advice out there. THE KICK-ASS WRITER collects a huge number of these, plus more never-before-seen, and presents them to YOU, O writer, for your edification and delight. I've read a LOT of books on writing over the years, some from name authors and some from writing coaches. Chuck's stuff is fantastic. It is advice you can apply to your work immediately, it is stuff to take to heart because it is not abstract and theoretical-- it is "here's what's going on and here's how you think about and/or fix it" which is what most of us want. So do yourself a favor and buy it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Zora

    If you read his blog, you know what you'll be getting. If adolescent male humor isn't your thing, you should avoid. (I myself like the occasional **** joke, so that wasn't my complaint with it.) The problem is, it's just not very useful information. I compare it to my favorite how-to writing books (Swain, Bickham, McKee), and it looks like pretty weak tea in comparison. I'm not disagreeing with the advice, which is largely correct. (Yes, do write every day.) It's just not precise advice. This boo If you read his blog, you know what you'll be getting. If adolescent male humor isn't your thing, you should avoid. (I myself like the occasional **** joke, so that wasn't my complaint with it.) The problem is, it's just not very useful information. I compare it to my favorite how-to writing books (Swain, Bickham, McKee), and it looks like pretty weak tea in comparison. I'm not disagreeing with the advice, which is largely correct. (Yes, do write every day.) It's just not precise advice. This book is like having a buddy come to your race-walk marathon and yell "go, go!" at you. That's nice and all...but it's not a fraction as useful as having a coach tell you how the placement of your foot could be adjusted to improve your time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    this was so try-hard. PLEASE DUDE, NO MORE TORTURED OVERLY SPECIFIC CULTURAL REFERENCES AND METAPHORS AND LONG STRINGS OF POINTLESS ADJECTIVES INVOLVING ANIMALS AND EVISCERATING. like the advice was solid I GUESS but for god's sake, the writing. the writing was so bad. also, a book published in the year of our lord 2k13 should not have a reference to an "alien squaw" in it. nope nope nope this was so try-hard. PLEASE DUDE, NO MORE TORTURED OVERLY SPECIFIC CULTURAL REFERENCES AND METAPHORS AND LONG STRINGS OF POINTLESS ADJECTIVES INVOLVING ANIMALS AND EVISCERATING. like the advice was solid I GUESS but for god's sake, the writing. the writing was so bad. also, a book published in the year of our lord 2k13 should not have a reference to an "alien squaw" in it. nope nope nope

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nick Wisseman

    Chuck Wendig’s The Kick-Ass Writer: 1001 Ways to Write Great Fiction, Get Published, & Earn Your Audience won’t change your writing life. But there are some useful tips inside, and at some point, he’ll make you laugh out loud. As the subtitle suggests, The Kick-Ass Writer is written in list format: each chapter (originally a blog post) contains 25 rapid-fire pieces of advice about a given topic. This approach results in some repetition, and prevents Wendig from doing deep dives or providing detai Chuck Wendig’s The Kick-Ass Writer: 1001 Ways to Write Great Fiction, Get Published, & Earn Your Audience won’t change your writing life. But there are some useful tips inside, and at some point, he’ll make you laugh out loud. As the subtitle suggests, The Kick-Ass Writer is written in list format: each chapter (originally a blog post) contains 25 rapid-fire pieces of advice about a given topic. This approach results in some repetition, and prevents Wendig from doing deep dives or providing detailed examples; I would have preferred a more focused edition—maybe “101 Ways to Write Great Fiction.” But because Wendig isn’t beholden to any single model of writing, he happily pulls from multiple theories, all while hammering home the point that there’s no one right way. “These are not regulations,” he says in the introduction. The Kick-Ass Writer is just a “bucket of ideas that serve as tools. And not every tool is meant for every job. And not every craftsman finds the value in every tool.” It’s a refreshing perspective; too many books about writing come off as narrow-minded. Wendig is also a pretty funny dude. Sometimes it feels like he’s trying too hard—I’m not sure I needed a joke in every paragraph—but at his best, he reminds me of a novel-writing version of The Oatmeal. If you’re up for an irreverent take on the craft and business of writing, you could certainly do worse. (For more reviews like this one, go to www.nickwisseman.com)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    I always take the same attitude toward books on business and/or writing. Take what you like and leave the rest. The same advice applies here. Chuck Wendig clearly knows what he's talking about. His advice is sound, couched in humor (sometimes of a more R-rated variety), and actionable ... even if I don't care for his digs at Smashwords (which is one of those things I'll be ignoring). Anyway, authors at any level of production will find something useful here, but the book is clearly aimed at those I always take the same attitude toward books on business and/or writing. Take what you like and leave the rest. The same advice applies here. Chuck Wendig clearly knows what he's talking about. His advice is sound, couched in humor (sometimes of a more R-rated variety), and actionable ... even if I don't care for his digs at Smashwords (which is one of those things I'll be ignoring). Anyway, authors at any level of production will find something useful here, but the book is clearly aimed at those who are getting their first manuscript together. I found the sections on marketing and promotion most helpful at my level of production.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Rodighiero

    I was surprised about how little useful information I got from this book. It has some good tips, maybe 10, but all the countless others are repetitive and redundant. As someone else said in the reviews, this may be caused because he forced himself to find 25 things to talk about in each section, when fewer would have been ok for that particular section. What it quickly got repetitive too was the humor, that tried to be "radical" or something, but it got teenager-y very quickly. I was surprised about how little useful information I got from this book. It has some good tips, maybe 10, but all the countless others are repetitive and redundant. As someone else said in the reviews, this may be caused because he forced himself to find 25 things to talk about in each section, when fewer would have been ok for that particular section. What it quickly got repetitive too was the humor, that tried to be "radical" or something, but it got teenager-y very quickly.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    There are some useful points in this book and plenty of good advice, but the format of the book means it doesn't work well as a cover-to-cover read. Reading endless lists can get tedious, especially since the entire book is formatted that way. Each section of the book is split into a list of 25 writing tips, each one pertaining to a certain aspect of writing - worldbuilding, for example, or publishing, or writing for particular genres, such as Horror. The lists are also interspersed with Chuck's There are some useful points in this book and plenty of good advice, but the format of the book means it doesn't work well as a cover-to-cover read. Reading endless lists can get tedious, especially since the entire book is formatted that way. Each section of the book is split into a list of 25 writing tips, each one pertaining to a certain aspect of writing - worldbuilding, for example, or publishing, or writing for particular genres, such as Horror. The lists are also interspersed with Chuck's own brand of humour - which probably wouldn't be for everyone and again, definitely gets tedious when you're reading it for pages and pages at a time. There are only so many jokes about bestiality and getting high off printer ink that I can handle, and after a certain point it started to get irritating. Don't get me wrong, I understand the reasoning behind it - intersperse your advice with humour to keep the reader interested, and on their toes. It makes sense, but unfortunately didn't work particularly well with the format, and the jokes started to seem kind of repetitive after a while. The most useful part of this book for me was the section that talked about different methods of publishing. So many writers seem reluctant to talk about the process of getting published, but Chuck went in-depth into all the subjects that strike fear into a writer's heart (or this particular writer's heart, in any case.) Agents! Query letters! Marketing! Rejection!! Crowdfunding, self-publishing, social media - this was the kind of information I wanted and I can imagine I'll return to the book quite often to reread this segment, as it was the most interesting to me - and also the most useful. Writing as a craft is difficult to teach, and something that's hard to learn without doing. I respect Chuck's attempt to give writing advice in this way, and he definitely had some valid points, but the format spoiled it a little for me. I'd recommend reading this in chunks, as and when you need advice on certain aspects of writing, rather than reading it cover to cover the way I did.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Ok, honesty being the best policy, even though I get the feeling Mr Wendig might beat the crap out of me for it, here goes. This is a good book, but it's not the book you think you're buying. If you're an aspiring writer and are on the constant hunt for that elusive book to transform you into a god of wordsmithery, or even just help you be a little better at it, this is not it. There is a lot of valuable insight in this book, although a lot of it will be common sense to you if you're already deep Ok, honesty being the best policy, even though I get the feeling Mr Wendig might beat the crap out of me for it, here goes. This is a good book, but it's not the book you think you're buying. If you're an aspiring writer and are on the constant hunt for that elusive book to transform you into a god of wordsmithery, or even just help you be a little better at it, this is not it. There is a lot of valuable insight in this book, although a lot of it will be common sense to you if you're already deep in the word-mines, but there will certainly be titbits you'd not considered before. The problem with offering teachings in the way this book lays it out is that it's a scattergun approach. There are 1001 bullet points, each a paragraph, peppered with almost as many bad puns, making it impossible to retain the information given. You really need a narrative flow to activate your memory, at least most of us do, it's like trying to learn the alphabet from a jumble of random letters instead of from A to Z. Not impossible perhaps, but bloody hard work. The man knows his stuff, I'll give you that, but still, I think this is more a book of entertainment for those who like to write, than tutelage to make you better at it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susie

    Chuck Wendig is the guy I turn to on Twitter to make me laugh. He always, always, always has a funny antidote, or a way to keep me motivated to write. Or makes fun of himself by illustrating how hard writing can be on a daily basis. This book is just a longer version of that.....very funny antidotes, references to aliens or otherwise, that points out various ways writers fall into traps while attempting a novel or other pieces of writing. Case in point: One of his recent TWEETs: "Writing and mak Chuck Wendig is the guy I turn to on Twitter to make me laugh. He always, always, always has a funny antidote, or a way to keep me motivated to write. Or makes fun of himself by illustrating how hard writing can be on a daily basis. This book is just a longer version of that.....very funny antidotes, references to aliens or otherwise, that points out various ways writers fall into traps while attempting a novel or other pieces of writing. Case in point: One of his recent TWEETs: "Writing and making stuff and being creative can feel lonely and the path to success is a janky-ass-cliff-side trail with rough winds and storms and, I dunno, violent puffins, so its good to not have to do it ALL alone, is what I'm saying. Leave a light on for those still coming." Amen brother. Much of his information is something I've already learned or knew, but to steal from another reviewer, it's much like your favorite middle school soccer coach screaming from the sidelines, yelling at you to "knock it off," or "good job buddy! You just need to keep moving forward." Even if occasionally, or more than occasionally, he makes references to vomiting, non-existent creatures or zombies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nicolás Pinto

    Useful advises, writing with an entertaining voice. Although they are not so new if you already read some 'more famous' book about writing. As I said on the updates, is not the WHAT but the HOW the advises are given: is like a soccer coach just bumping you out with enthusiasm and decision about write and care about what you are doing. The key part is about The Hybrid Author: the one who can save the worl... No, that's not it. Oh, I know! The one who can do everything and everywhere: self publish, Useful advises, writing with an entertaining voice. Although they are not so new if you already read some 'more famous' book about writing. As I said on the updates, is not the WHAT but the HOW the advises are given: is like a soccer coach just bumping you out with enthusiasm and decision about write and care about what you are doing. The key part is about The Hybrid Author: the one who can save the worl... No, that's not it. Oh, I know! The one who can do everything and everywhere: self publish, traditional publish, blog and so on. Never stop trying. I recommend specially to the writers that has some lower moments, to recharge and go back to work with full motivation.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    3.5 Stars

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kaye

    Not really a book to sit down and read cover to cover. This collection of lists of "25 Things" is a good kick in the pants when you need a quick bit of inspiration on a specific topic. Not really a book to sit down and read cover to cover. This collection of lists of "25 Things" is a good kick in the pants when you need a quick bit of inspiration on a specific topic.

  19. 4 out of 5

    dust

    I don't remember when I read this, but apparently I never rated it on goodreads! I don't remember when I read this, but apparently I never rated it on goodreads!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kate Lowell

    I'm kind of disappointed in this. Don't get me wrong--I love Chuck. He has a way of cutting right to the meat of things, but it didn't work in this book. There's a pile of good information in here. Great reminders and lots of encouragement, and a strong slant towards 'do your own thing', which I believe in very much (even if I often let myself be swayed by the 'one true way' crew). But the format of the book hampered Chuck's message. It was obvious in some sections that he was working hard, trying I'm kind of disappointed in this. Don't get me wrong--I love Chuck. He has a way of cutting right to the meat of things, but it didn't work in this book. There's a pile of good information in here. Great reminders and lots of encouragement, and a strong slant towards 'do your own thing', which I believe in very much (even if I often let myself be swayed by the 'one true way' crew). But the format of the book hampered Chuck's message. It was obvious in some sections that he was working hard, trying to find 25 things to talk about. There were parts that felt like they could have been taken care of in 10 tips, but because he was doing groups of 25, he had to find some way to stretch things. The other thing which diluted the book's message was the humour. Yes, it's entertaining, but it very quickly got tiresome--at least the way we were reading it, three groups of 25 at a time. My recommendation? This is a great book in small, small chunks. It's an excellent pick-me-up when you're feeling down about your writing. It won't tell you a lot of new stuff, but it will remind you of the stuff that might have drifted to the back of your mind. This would make excellent reading for when you're waiting in the doctor's office, in line at the grocery store, or any other place where you need something you can pick up and put down without losing your place in it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tiger Gray

    3.5 I've read a number of Wendig's books on writing so this is a rehash of old material for me, or so I find. Nonetheless it also contained many helpful tidbits that I as a writer really needed to hear at this stage in the game. I think that the book best serves writers, in fact, because Wendig doesn't give nuts and bolts examples of how to accomplish a particular thing (like how to make characters interesting, for example. he just says you ought to strive towards making your characters interesti 3.5 I've read a number of Wendig's books on writing so this is a rehash of old material for me, or so I find. Nonetheless it also contained many helpful tidbits that I as a writer really needed to hear at this stage in the game. I think that the book best serves writers, in fact, because Wendig doesn't give nuts and bolts examples of how to accomplish a particular thing (like how to make characters interesting, for example. he just says you ought to strive towards making your characters interesting). Instead, it's a good reminder for authors about what and what not to do. It's also easily absorbed thanks to the twenty five things format. Annoyances: Sometimes the shtick wears a little thin. Wendig is known for his over the top style and crazy analogies. A lot of times this is fun. Sometimes though it felt like he was trying too hard. Also started to get irritated by the constant references to "hobos" as if hobos aren't real people.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gus Sanchez

    I'm done with books on writing craft, but I'll read anything Chuck Wendig has to say. This collection of foul-mouthed yet soul-nourishing essays may or may not improve your writing style, but they'll constantly serve to remind you that you want to write, goddamn it, so here's how you fucking get to get at it. If you're reading Chuck's blogs at Terrible Minds, then you're already familiar with his essays. I'm done with books on writing craft, but I'll read anything Chuck Wendig has to say. This collection of foul-mouthed yet soul-nourishing essays may or may not improve your writing style, but they'll constantly serve to remind you that you want to write, goddamn it, so here's how you fucking get to get at it. If you're reading Chuck's blogs at Terrible Minds, then you're already familiar with his essays.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Noura Noman

    It's good advice. Needs to be less rambly though There's a lot of great advice in this book. For novice writers and more experienced writers. Just one thing: 1001 could easily be reduced to 300 and still be fantastic. It's good advice. Needs to be less rambly though There's a lot of great advice in this book. For novice writers and more experienced writers. Just one thing: 1001 could easily be reduced to 300 and still be fantastic.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bryce Calderwood

    Absolutely fucking indispensable thoughts, ideas, attitudes, and practices about being a successful professional writer. I don't think I'll ever cease reading in this; I can always open it up to a spot, dive in, and come away with something useful or motivational. Absolutely fucking indispensable thoughts, ideas, attitudes, and practices about being a successful professional writer. I don't think I'll ever cease reading in this; I can always open it up to a spot, dive in, and come away with something useful or motivational.

  25. 4 out of 5

    M. Brian Gardner

    There is only one place for this book after finishing it; on my desk and right next to my copies of On Writing by Stephen King and The Elements of Style by William Strunk.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    Loved it. Lots of tips, some common sense and some I hadn't thought of. Loved it. Lots of tips, some common sense and some I hadn't thought of.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Smock

    Novelist and screenwriter Chuck Wendig has succeeded at entertaining and informing writers of all types with his latest book on writing, The Kick-Ass Writer (published in 2013). For a book that is comprised of lists of advice for writers, here is a list of twelve and a half reasons why any writer should read Wendig’s book. #1) Contains advice that may or may not work Wendig openly admits that “nothing in the book is true” on the first page. Everything he has written down is simply just advice that Novelist and screenwriter Chuck Wendig has succeeded at entertaining and informing writers of all types with his latest book on writing, The Kick-Ass Writer (published in 2013). For a book that is comprised of lists of advice for writers, here is a list of twelve and a half reasons why any writer should read Wendig’s book. #1) Contains advice that may or may not work Wendig openly admits that “nothing in the book is true” on the first page. Everything he has written down is simply just advice that anyone reading can either use in his or her own writing or ignore entirely. Different writers use different techniques when creating prose and poems. Wendig’s words offer a breath of fresh air to writers: rather than telling a writer how he or she should write, he simply offers pointers on how one may choose to write. #2) Crafty and witty vocabulary Fun and witty words and phrases can be found in nearly every piece of advice Wendig gives in his book. It almost seems at times as if Wendig were in the room and talking directly to the reader. If anyone is familiar with the Marvel character Deadpool, he or she will be reminded of the fictional character as Wendig constantly breaks the fourth wall of storytelling. #3) Pop culture references galore! If anyone is a fan of any popular culture of any kind, one will more than likely find something he or she likes referenced in this book. From Star Wars to Harry Potter to Transformers to Doctor Who, one can only name it and will more than likely find a pop culture reference he or she enjoys and/ or is familiar with. #4) Warning: contains inappropriate language Returning to a previous point, if anyone is familiar with Deadpool, he or she will know the fictional anti-hero also has the title “merc with a mouth.” Same goes for Wendig. If one is not offended by foul or sexual language, than there is nothing to worry about (note: no f-bombs dropped anywhere in the book). However, if one is a bit iffy about words listed in the inappropriate category, be advised before reading. #5) Can be read sporadically In a busy and rather stressful world, who has the time to read? Due to Wendig’s book being one of advice, anyone who wishes to read it does not have to read it within a few days’ time. If one wishes to read just one section one week and then another section two weeks later, he or she can do that and still grasp Wendig’s words with ease. #6) Knowledgeable on the craft of writing With experience writing multiple novels, screenplays, graphic novels, and other writing books, Wendig is very knowledgeable when it comes to the craft of writing. Though he does insist what he offers is just advice, writers should at least consider the advice he is willing to give to future generations of writers. #7) For new and experienced writers This contains excellent tips for writers who are just starting out as well as those who have already completed a novel. Pieces of advice include, but are not limited to: how to write interesting characters, different ways to go about editing a written work, and different ways of how to publish a novel. #8) Something for everyone As aforementioned in number seven, there are so many different pieces of advice for every writer’s needs. The book is separated into three sections: “Part One: The Fundamentals,” “Part Two: The Craft,” and “Part Three: Publishing and Earning Your Audience.” Even if someone purchases the book for just one of these three parts, it will be worth the read. #9) Another warning: randomness will occur Along with the previous warning of made up words, randomness will also occur as one reads Wendig’s book. Such occurrences include, but once again are not limited to, random phrases from the author that make absolutely no sense, but provide much entertainment as well as random plot lines for books that are not and never will be in existence. #10) “Finish what you begin” This is a line readers will come across countless times. In many sections, this is the one line Wendig stresses for writers to take away from his book. #11) Different scenarios offered for writers More so found in the section of the book that focuses on publishing, Wendig offers different scenarios as to what could possibly happen to writers once they come to actually publishing their books and also what could happen once a writer has published his or her book and what to do next. #12) One final warning: made up words to appear If one is squeamish about made up words (though there are very few writers in the world who are), do not read this book. Wendig makes up many words and openly admits that these words are of his own creation, but claims that they work to make his points. #12.5) Why twelve and a half reasons? This marks the halfway point as to the number of tips Wendig gives per section. Wish to know what the remaining twelve and a half reasons could be? Do so by reading The Kick-Ass Writer. **Originally published on September 24, 2014 through www.examiner.com. Moved to my blog Roll Out Reviews (www.rolloutreviews.com) on August 6, 2016**

  28. 4 out of 5

    Glen Krisch

    Funny and full of knowledge about the writing craft. What's not to like? Funny and full of knowledge about the writing craft. What's not to like?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Larissa Lee

    [First Glance] I'd seen Pinterest pins of various quotes from this book, particularly during the NaNoWriMo season. Considering his mouth (foul words and verbal slaps in the face), I knew I'd likely be both amused and annoyed with Wendig's style. [Positive Bits] I love lists! A list forces a writer to be concise and to really make sense of their thoughts. Listmaking is one of my favorite writing tools, both for vague story outlines and for stretching my creative writing muscles. Between the jokes and [First Glance] I'd seen Pinterest pins of various quotes from this book, particularly during the NaNoWriMo season. Considering his mouth (foul words and verbal slaps in the face), I knew I'd likely be both amused and annoyed with Wendig's style. [Positive Bits] I love lists! A list forces a writer to be concise and to really make sense of their thoughts. Listmaking is one of my favorite writing tools, both for vague story outlines and for stretching my creative writing muscles. Between the jokes and silly metaphors, Wendig built a legitimate collection of writing tips I think any author could benefit from. Actually, I love the fact that the book's lists make quoting Wendig's points so easy! After all, every statement is numbered. Wendig's voice is approachable. There is no master-student dynamic in this book. Instead, he gives you that smartass friend who's telling you all about his opinions. If nonfiction usually bores you to tears, it's likely due to a teacher's tone being used throughout the text. Some people just learn better from peers. [Less Enjoyable Bits] One list is fun. A dozen lists can still be entertaining. But 282 pages of lists? I'm sure it made writing the book itself much easier, but lists with the exact same format can get a bit mind-numbing. Wendig ended up with a lot of repetition and contradiction between his lists. For example, he discussed how a plot generally needs a beginning, middle, and end on a list only to repeat that point again on another list a few pages later (maybe with a new joke). At the same time, he'd mention how you have to know how the story ends, except that you don't have to know until you get there, but be sure to write the ending first, unless you don't. It was a little frustrating. I think that Wendig's humor is best ingested in small amounts, like rich chocolate cake. Too much, and you just get sick of it. To be fair, though, I expected to end up feeling this way by the end of the book; I follow his blog, so I'm well aware of his voice and how I react to it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Justine Manzano

    This book was two things for me. 1) It is a comprehensive collection of tips and tricks of the writing trade, told by an author I generally enjoy, who works in genres I find interesting. No offense to those wonderful writing books out there that are written by literary fiction writers. They are usually very helpful as well, but there is something more enjoyable about someone who loves to write in Science Fiction/Fantasy, discussing the best ways to make it in that field, because that's my jam. T This book was two things for me. 1) It is a comprehensive collection of tips and tricks of the writing trade, told by an author I generally enjoy, who works in genres I find interesting. No offense to those wonderful writing books out there that are written by literary fiction writers. They are usually very helpful as well, but there is something more enjoyable about someone who loves to write in Science Fiction/Fantasy, discussing the best ways to make it in that field, because that's my jam. Tips in this book touched on a few different sections that every writer needs to know about, some of which are pretty soundly lacking in other writing books I've enjoyed in the past. While it does cover the basics of writing, such as setting, theme, plot, grammar, and mechanics such as these, it also deals with query letters and synopses, and other such tools to actually get yourself published. It discusses the ups and downs of traditional publishing, self-publishing, and hybrid publishing, without dumping on any of those routes (in fact, it makes a great case for hybrid publishing). And finally, it dives into author platform (don't let Wendig hear you discussing author platform. He soundly dislikes that term) and how to build an audience without becoming a sales bot...something I think half the people I follow on twitter could use (sorry guys! I know you're just doing your thing!). 2) This book wasn't just informative. It was interesting and hilarious. It was written in what was the perfect tone for someone like me, who is irreverent and sarcastic like it's my job. And it was motivational! At a time when my first book is playing rejection bingo, and my second book is in the Unholy Lands of Edit-onia, I really needed to hear many of these tidbits. And mostly, it was just good to see that I wasn't alone in all of my weird writerly quirks--even the published authors with the huge followings endure this crushing, soul-sucking doubt! Yay? All in all, this book is a must read for all my writer friends, so please--check it out. You won't be disappointed.

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