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The Mosaic of Christian Belief: Twenty Centuries of Unity & Diversity

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An ECPA 2003 Gold Medallion Finalist! The story of Christian theology has often been divisive and disjointed. Providing this companion volume to his earlier work The Story of Christian Theology, Roger E. Olson thematically traces the contours of Christian belief down through the ages, revealing a pattern of both unity and diversity. He finds a consensus of teaching that is An ECPA 2003 Gold Medallion Finalist! The story of Christian theology has often been divisive and disjointed. Providing this companion volume to his earlier work The Story of Christian Theology, Roger E. Olson thematically traces the contours of Christian belief down through the ages, revealing a pattern of both unity and diversity. He finds a consensus of teaching that is both unitive and able to incorporate a faithful diversity when not forced into the molds of false either-or alternatives. The mosaic that emerges from Olson's work displays a mediating evangelical theology that is nonspeculative and irenic in spirit and tone. Specifically written with the nonspecialist in mind, Olson has masterfully sketched out the contours of Christian faith with simplicity while avoiding oversimplification.


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An ECPA 2003 Gold Medallion Finalist! The story of Christian theology has often been divisive and disjointed. Providing this companion volume to his earlier work The Story of Christian Theology, Roger E. Olson thematically traces the contours of Christian belief down through the ages, revealing a pattern of both unity and diversity. He finds a consensus of teaching that is An ECPA 2003 Gold Medallion Finalist! The story of Christian theology has often been divisive and disjointed. Providing this companion volume to his earlier work The Story of Christian Theology, Roger E. Olson thematically traces the contours of Christian belief down through the ages, revealing a pattern of both unity and diversity. He finds a consensus of teaching that is both unitive and able to incorporate a faithful diversity when not forced into the molds of false either-or alternatives. The mosaic that emerges from Olson's work displays a mediating evangelical theology that is nonspeculative and irenic in spirit and tone. Specifically written with the nonspecialist in mind, Olson has masterfully sketched out the contours of Christian faith with simplicity while avoiding oversimplification.

30 review for The Mosaic of Christian Belief: Twenty Centuries of Unity & Diversity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    PART ONE : AN OLD SONG BY REM Adoptionism, adventism, albigensianism, annihilationism, antinomianism, atonement, arianism Cessationism, creationism, Chalcedinian definition, consubstantiation It's the end of the world as we know it It's the end of the world as we know it It's the end of the world as we know it And I feel fine Unconditional election, eutychianism, prevenient grace, nestorianism Soul sleep, tulip, womanism, rosicrucianism, panentheism, hypostatic union, SEMI-PELAGIANISM!!! It's the end of PART ONE : AN OLD SONG BY REM Adoptionism, adventism, albigensianism, annihilationism, antinomianism, atonement, arianism Cessationism, creationism, Chalcedinian definition, consubstantiation It's the end of the world as we know it It's the end of the world as we know it It's the end of the world as we know it And I feel fine Unconditional election, eutychianism, prevenient grace, nestorianism Soul sleep, tulip, womanism, rosicrucianism, panentheism, hypostatic union, SEMI-PELAGIANISM!!! It's the end of the world as we know it It's the end of the world as we know it It's the end of the world as we know it And I feel fine PART TWO : MASTERMIND Our next contestant is Mr Paul Bryant, a clinical trial support consultant from Nottingham. You have selected Christianity as your specialist subject. You have two minutes, starting …now How was the discovery of fossils explained by English theologian Philip Gosse in the 19th century? He said that God had created the universe relatively recently but with the appearance of antiquity. Correct. Bishop Anselm replaced the ransom theory of atonement with what in his book Cur Deus Homo? He said that Christ's death was a feudal satisfaction paid by the sinless Jesus to the honour of God. Correct. Many people have a bumper sticker "God helps those who help themselves". What's wrong with that? It's heretical. Explain? It's semi-pelagian. I'll accept that. It gives insufficient weight to the saving grace of God. What were early Christians accused of by people mistaking the nature of Holy communion? Cannibalism. Correct. Complete the statement : Jesus saves…" But Buddha nets the rebound. Correct. Who won the FA Cup Final in 1967? Er…. Er… I'm going to have to hurry you Chelsea. No, sorry, they were the losing finalists. It was Spurs. Ah, crap. (apologies to Michael Palin for stealing his idea) PART THREE : HOW RELIGION WORKS I heard a comedian once who summed it up (forgot his name though). When he was a little lad he wanted a bicycle. And he was a devout little lad so he prayed to God for one. No bicycle. Really prayed night after night. Nothing. Then he came to a deeper understanding of how religion works, and stole a bicycle, and prayed earnestly for forgiveness. PART FOUR : WHAT CHRISTIANS BELIEVE One older member of our family, she's in her 70s, was shocked by something I said not so long back. Before you jump to conclusions, I was mentioning something about Christianity and referred to Jesus as God. She thinks of herself as a Christian and she had never heard Jesus described as God before – it actually shocked her. But this has been the fundamental belief of all Christian churches since the third century. Christ is fully human and fully divine. God and man. But it was the first time she'd ever heard of such a thing. With respect, I think most Christians take their Christianity like that. They don't pay it too much attention. PART FIVE : AN ACTUAL REVIEW OF THIS BOOK, HOW ABOUT THAT I loved it. It was just what I was after – a plain and lucid description of the core beliefs of Christianity. Look no further, this is the one stop shop. Roger Olson has my deepest admiration. The heavy lifting this guy has done to synthesise and organise all this material is nothing short of inspired. His method is to take what he refers to as the great tradition of Christianity and explain its beliefs, subject by subject, and then explain how people have disagreed with these, and whether these disagreements are so serious that they became heresies. Because what is Christianity? Is it anything you happen to feel like believing which has something to do with Jesus? Is Jesus an aerosol? One or two puffs and your house is now Christian? No, Roger says, sorry, you can't be a Christian and believe in, for instance, reincarnation - and throw that book on astrology in the bin, and Christ wasn't just the greatest of moral teachers, and you can't believe that there are many ways to God and Christianity is only one of them, all of that is OUT. It's heresy. No. Sorry. It has to go. Words do mean things, one belief is not another belief, and Roger is really sorry if he sounds like the Spanish inquisition but these are the facts. What's a heresy? Well, for instance, one of the very first was that Jesus was God and only appeared to be a human. People with that view couldn't stomach the concept of God Himself living a human life - that to them was blasphemous so they solved it by saying Jesus was a spiritual being in the form of a man. But the main lot of Christians insisted that no, he was completely human, and that was the point of the whole thing. It doesn't mean anything if Jesus only appeared to suffer. He was a real man and he suffered all that we suffer (and more). Heresies usually try to simplify the paradoxes of Christian thought. Olson is often in the position of sadly saying that many modern Christians are heretics without realising it. He's not mad at them, he's sorry they haven't been given better instruction and have been allowed to lapse into semi-pelagianism (for instance). If Olson has a message of his own, it's that the Church is in danger of lapsing into a "folk religion": Folk religions often flourish in a compartmentalised, largely privatised sphere of life such as small cell groups of people with similar experiences who network with each other… Feelings tend to take precedence over intellect, and cliches and slogans (often put to music) take the place of coherent and developed doctrinal affirmations. … Impulses within Christian movements contribute to the process of reducing Christianity to a set of subjective experiences and feel-good cliches. Roger wants you all to buck up and get real. He is also very unhappy about modern Christians' obsessions with evolution and the age of the Earth. He thinks these are total red herrings which have been allowed to hijack debates to the detriment of all involved. Many of the creationists, he says, "fall unthinkingly into heresies… they strain at gnats and swallow camels". (However Young earth creationism per se is not heretical, it's just wrong. Being wrong isn't necessarily heretical.) I didn't like the title of this book because it undersells it badly. It should be called something like CHRISTIANITY - THE WHOLE KIT AND CABOODLE. Something like that. I made a lot of notes as I read through this very dense but always fascinating book, but I've been banging on about Christianity all year, so now is the time to spare you all…hooray, no homework! In conclusion – if Roger Olson ever turns up at the Gladstone (just round the corner from here) I'll be very happy to buy him a pint of Landlords while we discuss how easy it is to become a semi-pelagian without realising it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maddison Holland

    This book wasn't awful but not the best either. This was a required reading for my Evangelical Theology class and many times I ended up quickly scanning a chapter instead of really paying attention to every detail. My main issue with it was how wordy it was - the author seemed to take a while explaining everything. I think I would have been more engaged (and it would have been a much quicker read) if it was more direct in explaining concepts. I got used to the way each chapter was organized and This book wasn't awful but not the best either. This was a required reading for my Evangelical Theology class and many times I ended up quickly scanning a chapter instead of really paying attention to every detail. My main issue with it was how wordy it was - the author seemed to take a while explaining everything. I think I would have been more engaged (and it would have been a much quicker read) if it was more direct in explaining concepts. I got used to the way each chapter was organized and eventually found that aspect helpful as well.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chet Duke

    Really enjoyed reading and outlining this book for my Systematic Theology class. Olson's style is organized and accessible to even the most inexperienced (me) students of traditional issues in systematic thought. It actually made the reading quite enjoyable. He openly acknowledges the position that he writes from in the beginning, which was refreshing. For the most part his layout of the different topics felt pretty fair to all sides. Really enjoyed reading and outlining this book for my Systematic Theology class. Olson's style is organized and accessible to even the most inexperienced (me) students of traditional issues in systematic thought. It actually made the reading quite enjoyable. He openly acknowledges the position that he writes from in the beginning, which was refreshing. For the most part his layout of the different topics felt pretty fair to all sides.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lawson Hembree

    Pretty basic book. While the "both-and" approach works in some areas of theology, some areas are definitely "either-or". I felt like this book was a cop out because Olsen refused to come down firmly on aspects of theology that Scripture firmly comes down on in an attempt to make everyone feel included. Pretty basic book. While the "both-and" approach works in some areas of theology, some areas are definitely "either-or". I felt like this book was a cop out because Olsen refused to come down firmly on aspects of theology that Scripture firmly comes down on in an attempt to make everyone feel included.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nelson Banuchi

    This is an excellent read on what are the core essential doctrines that, so to speak, make a Christian a Christian. With so many Christian denominations with their varied doctrines and interpretations of the BIble, and with so many Christians making the claim that it is their doctrinal beliefs that are more in line with the Bible while all others are considered false and heretical, it is sometimes hard to figure just exactly what is to be believed in order to correctly describe oneself as a Chri This is an excellent read on what are the core essential doctrines that, so to speak, make a Christian a Christian. With so many Christian denominations with their varied doctrines and interpretations of the BIble, and with so many Christians making the claim that it is their doctrinal beliefs that are more in line with the Bible while all others are considered false and heretical, it is sometimes hard to figure just exactly what is to be believed in order to correctly describe oneself as a Christian. As Roger E. Olson states in his introduction, "This is a book about doctrine and theology, which are both about beliefs" (p.21). Here Olson goes step by step to bring clarity to the multitudinous doctrines that are thrown out there and just catching those doctrines that have been agreed upon and held by the Christian Church throughout history since the days of the apostles. He differentiates between those teachings that are truly Christian, those teachings that allow for differences of opinion yet are essentially Christian in it's core elements, and those doctrines that are heretical and outside proper Christian belief. Each chapter distills particular core Christian doctrines and approaches each of them by first discussing the need for shared common beliefs (ch.1) and what those core beliefs are (ch.2), that is, the "proper Christian beliefs, mot merely beliefs held by most Christians" (p.50). Afterwards, he devotes each chapter to a particular core Christian doctrine, approaching each by pointing out and discussing (a) the issues surrounding it. (b) what beliefs about it wer Christian united on (c) alternative understandings outside the Christian consensus (d) legitimate diversity of "interpretation and opinion" respecting the core doctrine (e) proposals on how to unify these doctrines "for uniting Christians (especially evangelical Protestants)." Olson does a great job in clarifying much of the issues and the differences held between Christians and does so in a way that is both well organized and without technical jargon. This is a book I wish all Christians would seriously read in he hope of, at least, challenging all who profess to the Lordship of Christ over their lives to unity.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tanja Lunney

    I absolutely love this book. It was a required read for my theology class. I'm not sure if I love this book because throughly enjoy theology or because it was so well written. Olson takes you through some of the founding church father's and their perspective and thoughts of Christianity. This book encouraged me to think outside the box and seek the answers through the help of the Holy Spirit. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to deepen their faith and who are seeking understanding. I absolutely love this book. It was a required read for my theology class. I'm not sure if I love this book because throughly enjoy theology or because it was so well written. Olson takes you through some of the founding church father's and their perspective and thoughts of Christianity. This book encouraged me to think outside the box and seek the answers through the help of the Holy Spirit. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to deepen their faith and who are seeking understanding.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stephani Hannahs

    Read for School Assignment.

  8. 4 out of 5

    John Kight

    The Mosaic of Christian Belief: Twenty Centuries of Unity and Diversity (2nd ed.) by Roger E. Olson is an up-to-date, revised and expanded exploration into the history of Christian doctrine. As with the previous edition, Olson does an excellent service to the reader by thematically tracing the contours of Christianity down through the centuries in and easy-to-read package. Olson carefully unearths much of the consensus teaching to be discovered in the history of the Church, including details sur The Mosaic of Christian Belief: Twenty Centuries of Unity and Diversity (2nd ed.) by Roger E. Olson is an up-to-date, revised and expanded exploration into the history of Christian doctrine. As with the previous edition, Olson does an excellent service to the reader by thematically tracing the contours of Christianity down through the centuries in and easy-to-read package. Olson carefully unearths much of the consensus teaching to be discovered in the history of the Church, including details surrounding various areas of doctrinal diversity, and adds an additional chapter on the Holy Spirit. There is much to be excited about here. First, and probably foremost, Olson does an incredible job keeping his audience in focus as he surveys the land of theological belief. Olson makes historical theology exciting and accessible for the nonspecialist. Second, Olson’s overall tone is to be appreciated as he interacts with various figures and ideas that have plagued the history of Christianity—some for good, others not so much. Third, while addressing various doctrines (divine revelation, the Trinity, divine providence, Christology, Soteriology, Eschatology, etc.), Olson constructs a picture (or mosaic) of Christian belief as it has been handed down through the centuries. The benefits of this are immediately accessible to the reader and compound as the journey continues. Those familiar with Olson’s work will be able to easily detect his theological bias and Arminian presuppositions. This framework is visible throughout and should be noted. However, compared to some of Olson’s other works, The Mosaic of Christian Belief is much more mild and balanced. If you identify with Olson’s tradition, you will likely find his analysis helpful and cooperative in your convictions. Those who do not identify with Olson’s theological tradition will unavoidably approach disagreement more frequently than others. Still, as one who rarely agrees with Olson, for the reasons mentioned above (and more), I found The Mosaic of Christian Belief: Twenty Centuries of Unity and Diversity to be an excellent (possibly even one of the best) introduction to historical theology. I received a review copy of this books in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andy Hickman

    Excellent!!! Olson, Roger. The Mosaic of Christian Belief: Twenty Centuries of Unity and Diversity. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2002; Leicester and Apollos, 2002. Christian Belief: Unity & Diversity Theology is what we believe about God. It involves unpacking our faith, “faith seeking understanding.” The Great Tradition is the minimal beliefs generally agreed upon by most of the church fathers plus 16th century Reformers. Orthodoxy is right beliefs & doctrinal correctness. Heresy is that Excellent!!! Olson, Roger. The Mosaic of Christian Belief: Twenty Centuries of Unity and Diversity. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2002; Leicester and Apollos, 2002. Christian Belief: Unity & Diversity Theology is what we believe about God. It involves unpacking our faith, “faith seeking understanding.” The Great Tradition is the minimal beliefs generally agreed upon by most of the church fathers plus 16th century Reformers. Orthodoxy is right beliefs & doctrinal correctness. Heresy is that which contradicts orthodoxy. In light of Olson's definitions, I say Theology can be classified into three categories: 1.DOGMAS (essential truths which hold Christianity's identity at stake. “What think ye of Christ?”) 2.DOCTRINES (important but not essential, secondary issues. “What sayeth Scripture?”) 3.OPINIONS (speculative guesswork, not clearly taught, no Christian consensus. “What's your opinion?”) Who decides the categories? We should look to Scripture, the Great Tradition, reason and experience (and creation). In consideration of “The Wesleyan Quadrilateral” (Scripture, tradition, reason and experience), reason must be seriously valued as a legitimate contributor to testing González's theology in light Christ's missional intent. Cyprian said, "he can no longer have God for his Father, who has not the Church for his mother." (Olson, 288) Humanity: Creature, Sinner and New Being in Christ “Humanity: Essentially Good and Existentially Estranged” Are infants born innocent or guilty? Olson talks about the variety of views regarding, “Are infants born guilty, or is guilt acquired?” Olson says, “... the trinitarian doctrine (as contrasted with belief in God as triune)...” What is the difference? B) As a new believer I was given the illustration of “ice, water, steam” as a way of grasping the Trinity (same substance, three distinct forms). I taught this to my Youth Group kids. Years later I was told by one of the those youth who went on to seminary that “ice, water, steam” is an unhelpful illustration. Is this what Olson means, “Certain analogies used in teaching children about the Trinity border on tritheism as they describe it in terms of a piece of fruit or en egg: one object made up of three parts.” Or is it “just a dim analogy to the triunity of God”? similar to Gregory of Nyssa's “analogy of gold and individual coins”?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ashish Jaituni

    It is always difficult to write such a book! Olson has really done well. In this ambitious book, Olson delineates from an evangelical perspective what is and is not authentic Christian belief. The book features such topics as the Bible, God, Jesus and the Church, beginning with an overview of orthodox belief about the topic, citing Scripture, the Church Fathers and noted Christian writers throughout history. Olson then devotes a section to heretical beliefs, and follows this with an examination It is always difficult to write such a book! Olson has really done well. In this ambitious book, Olson delineates from an evangelical perspective what is and is not authentic Christian belief. The book features such topics as the Bible, God, Jesus and the Church, beginning with an overview of orthodox belief about the topic, citing Scripture, the Church Fathers and noted Christian writers throughout history. Olson then devotes a section to heretical beliefs, and follows this with an examination of diverse non-heretical beliefs among orthodox Christians (including Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox believers, and most Protestants). He ends each chapter envisioning greater unity among Christians, despite honest disagreements. Attempting to mediate among the myriad dogmas, doctrines and opinions of orthodox Christians is no easy task, and Olson's descriptions of certain right beliefs and heresies (such as the psychological analogy for the Trinity and modalism) are sometimes barely distinguishable. Despite these and other small logical problems, Olson's book contributes greatly to contemporary evangelicalism not only in its impressive survey of many theologies, but also in its use of "The Great Tradition" of Christian belief as an essential guide to orthodoxy. Olson's writing renders many complex theological concepts surprisingly accessible. A very well written book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Радостин Марчев

    Олсън е написал добра книга, която (интересно) го представя едновременно като прогресивен и консервативен богослов. Авторът представя основни християнски догми през примата на това, което той нарича "Великата традиция" - консенсуса на вярващите през всички векове. На тази основа той определя какво следва да се приеме за необходимо за вярата по съответния въпрос, кое излиза извън допустимите граници и къде християните могат да мислят различно, но все пак да останат в сферата на ортодоксалността. Олсън е написал добра книга, която (интересно) го представя едновременно като прогресивен и консервативен богослов. Авторът представя основни християнски догми през примата на това, което той нарича "Великата традиция" - консенсуса на вярващите през всички векове. На тази основа той определя какво следва да се приеме за необходимо за вярата по съответния въпрос, кое излиза извън допустимите граници и къде християните могат да мислят различно, но все пак да останат в сферата на ортодоксалността. Друга характерна черта на подхода на Олсън е неговият стремеж да "събира" идеи често смятани за изключващи се във всяко от своите разглеждания (Царството като тук вече, но не още е вероятно най-известният пример, но авторът представя още доста подобни на него.) Намирам това за особено ценно тъй като сам често съм се убеждавал, че християните съвсем ненужно отхвърлят аспекти на дадена доктрина, които всъщност могат да се интегрират - особено когато самата Библия ни дава основание да търсим подобна интеграция. Накрая, Олсън пише много просто и ясно като обяснява всяко понятие, което използва. В същото време той не е повърхностен в своите разглеждания. Макар че човек, който е донякъде напреднал в богословието няма да намери в нея нещо ново книгата си заслужава прочита.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    If you are interested in getting a "lay of the land" view of what Christians believe and why, don't read this book. If you want to see both sides of the coin--why one Christian believes one way about a Scripture and another Christian believes another way--give this book a try. I appreciate Olson tackling the evangelical-fundamental-conservative-moderate-liberal struggle when discussing foundational doctrine and beliefs. But get ready to furrow your brow and do some re-reads. He's a meaty writer If you are interested in getting a "lay of the land" view of what Christians believe and why, don't read this book. If you want to see both sides of the coin--why one Christian believes one way about a Scripture and another Christian believes another way--give this book a try. I appreciate Olson tackling the evangelical-fundamental-conservative-moderate-liberal struggle when discussing foundational doctrine and beliefs. But get ready to furrow your brow and do some re-reads. He's a meaty writer with a thick sauce. This is not a fast-food meal. You will have to take your time in chewing on the content and digesting the meaning.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Matt Butler

    Found this particularly good ...... discussed many aspects of Christian belief, the various different views held and the reasons and explanations of these beliefs - not labelling them necessarily as 'heresies' but merely as wrong or questionable truths. It highlights the diversity in Christianity and not suggesting that one view over another is right but 'sitting on the fence' really - which was perfectly fine Found this particularly good ...... discussed many aspects of Christian belief, the various different views held and the reasons and explanations of these beliefs - not labelling them necessarily as 'heresies' but merely as wrong or questionable truths. It highlights the diversity in Christianity and not suggesting that one view over another is right but 'sitting on the fence' really - which was perfectly fine

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lego Ergo Sum

    Another catch up post. This is a kind of modern day attempt at doing the same thing C.S. Lewis did with "Mere Christianity." The author attempts to describe the great tradition of christianity--what most believe in common and where orthodox Christians differ, and where the borders of orthodoxy might be. Another catch up post. This is a kind of modern day attempt at doing the same thing C.S. Lewis did with "Mere Christianity." The author attempts to describe the great tradition of christianity--what most believe in common and where orthodox Christians differ, and where the borders of orthodoxy might be.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Interesting take on the spectrum of Christian belief...the author really tries to get at the question of "what have Christians always believed?", then discussing what beliefs fall in and outside of the general range. Interesting take on the spectrum of Christian belief...the author really tries to get at the question of "what have Christians always believed?", then discussing what beliefs fall in and outside of the general range.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I really enjoyed getting clarity on the storage Christian beliefs and some of the variations that fit into that great tradition. It was also helpful to clarify those police which are heretical.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Schofield

    I'm reading this as it's a set book for a course I'm doing. I find most of it quite basic and repetitive. I'm reading this as it's a set book for a course I'm doing. I find most of it quite basic and repetitive.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashton Reynolds

    A very good, concise exlporation of basic Christian theological perspectives. This book reads easily, yet doesn't water anything down. A very good, concise exlporation of basic Christian theological perspectives. This book reads easily, yet doesn't water anything down.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Milan Doshi

    Really learned a lot. I'd recommend this as a read Really learned a lot. I'd recommend this as a read

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brian D.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tim Cheney

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kirah

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adelaide

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Stephens

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emma Cann

  26. 4 out of 5

    Craig

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cheung Yat

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Smith

    Easy read, written more specifically for the lay person or new readers of systematic theology. "Mile wide and an inch deep" kinda book. Easy read, written more specifically for the lay person or new readers of systematic theology. "Mile wide and an inch deep" kinda book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  30. 5 out of 5

    Richard

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