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The Night Wanderer: A Graphic Novel

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A mesmerizing blend of vampire thriller and coming-of-age story—now available as a graphic novel. Newcomers to the Otter Lake native reserve don’t go unnoticed for long. So it’s no surprise that 16-year-old Tiffany’s curiosity is piqued when her father rents out her room to a complete stranger. But little do Tiffany, her father, or even her insightful Granny Ruth suspect t A mesmerizing blend of vampire thriller and coming-of-age story—now available as a graphic novel. Newcomers to the Otter Lake native reserve don’t go unnoticed for long. So it’s no surprise that 16-year-old Tiffany’s curiosity is piqued when her father rents out her room to a complete stranger. But little do Tiffany, her father, or even her insightful Granny Ruth suspect the truth about their guest. The mysterious Pierre L’Errant has a dreadful secret. After centuries roaming Europe as a brooding vampire, he has returned home to reclaim his Native roots before facing the rising sun and certain death. Meanwhile, Tiffany is deeply troubled—she doubts her boyfriend is being faithful, has escalating disputes with her father, and her estranged mother is starting a new life with somebody else. Fed up and heartsick, Tiffany threatens drastic measures and flees into the bush. There, in the midnight woods, a chilling encounter with L’Errant changes everything as Pierre introduces Tiffany to her proud Native heritage. For Pierre, though, destiny is fixed at sunrise. In this stunning graphic version of the award-winning novel first developed as a play in 1992, artist Mike Wyatt brings a brilliant story to visual life.


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A mesmerizing blend of vampire thriller and coming-of-age story—now available as a graphic novel. Newcomers to the Otter Lake native reserve don’t go unnoticed for long. So it’s no surprise that 16-year-old Tiffany’s curiosity is piqued when her father rents out her room to a complete stranger. But little do Tiffany, her father, or even her insightful Granny Ruth suspect t A mesmerizing blend of vampire thriller and coming-of-age story—now available as a graphic novel. Newcomers to the Otter Lake native reserve don’t go unnoticed for long. So it’s no surprise that 16-year-old Tiffany’s curiosity is piqued when her father rents out her room to a complete stranger. But little do Tiffany, her father, or even her insightful Granny Ruth suspect the truth about their guest. The mysterious Pierre L’Errant has a dreadful secret. After centuries roaming Europe as a brooding vampire, he has returned home to reclaim his Native roots before facing the rising sun and certain death. Meanwhile, Tiffany is deeply troubled—she doubts her boyfriend is being faithful, has escalating disputes with her father, and her estranged mother is starting a new life with somebody else. Fed up and heartsick, Tiffany threatens drastic measures and flees into the bush. There, in the midnight woods, a chilling encounter with L’Errant changes everything as Pierre introduces Tiffany to her proud Native heritage. For Pierre, though, destiny is fixed at sunrise. In this stunning graphic version of the award-winning novel first developed as a play in 1992, artist Mike Wyatt brings a brilliant story to visual life.

30 review for The Night Wanderer: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Gordon

    Cross-posted at: http://mgbookreviews.wordpress.com/20... Synopsis Pierre L’Errant is an Anishinabe man who has been away from home for centuries. When the desire to come back becomes too much to bear, he flies to Otter Lake to deal with his inner demons. However, when he arrives, he finds himself embroiled in the problems of the family that he is staying with. Tiffany, the teenager of the house, is struggling. Her parents are separated, her boyfriend isn’t treating her well, her grades are droppi Cross-posted at: http://mgbookreviews.wordpress.com/20... Synopsis Pierre L’Errant is an Anishinabe man who has been away from home for centuries. When the desire to come back becomes too much to bear, he flies to Otter Lake to deal with his inner demons. However, when he arrives, he finds himself embroiled in the problems of the family that he is staying with. Tiffany, the teenager of the house, is struggling. Her parents are separated, her boyfriend isn’t treating her well, her grades are dropping at school, and her dad refuses to understand her difficulties. By intervening, Pierre not only helps Tiffany start to sort through her issues, but he comes to a conclusion about his own struggles. The Good The Night Wanderer is a great story for young adults from an Aboriginal author who fills the narrative with Indigenous characters and themes, issues that are solely lacking in literature, particularly in the young adult genre. It’s a great coming-of-age tale for teens. Tiffany is struggling with her boyfriend, her grades are slipping, her parents are divorced, and she just can’t handle everything that is happening to her. These are all very realistic problems facing youths, but the narrative also lets readers explore Indigenous culture, and engages in questions about racism. Consequently, I think this book would be a fabulous addition to school curriculums or library reading programs. The story even has a paranormal hook to draw readers in. The vampire angle of this story is also interesting and unique. Pierre was an Anishinabe man who left his community and travelled to Europe several hundred years ago. However, his new life was not as fantastic and enlightened as he thought it would be, and he soon fell ill. Just as he was about to die, he was visited by a strange man who turned him into a vampire. For three hundred years, he stalked Europe, feeling as if he no longer deserved to go home. His return to Otter Lake is a story about his struggle to reconcile his monstrous being with his cultural values and beliefs. Unlike many current vampire stories, Pierre is not portrayed as a sexy anti-hero who just needs the love of a good woman. Instead, Pierre gives himself to the sun when he realises that if he wants to embrace the good that he was taught to aspire to, he can’t continue being a monster. This is certainly not the way most YA vampire novels have been ending, and I thought this different conclusion was powerful and thought-provoking. The Bad Perhaps the most glaring issue that readers may take issue with is the art. The illustrations in The Night Wanderer are not bad. In fact, the art is better than a lot of what I see in current DC books at the moment. However, it is a very different style with distinctive weaknesses. Wyatt is fond of thick line art, and his work is not always very fluid. There are some pages where the action is not quite as believable because of the stiffness of the illustrations, but overall, I thought the art showed a good command over anatomy, expression, and background. In fact, the illustration style grew on me as I read the book, and the thickness to the lines reminded me of some styles of Indigenous art. While I will definitely admit that Wyatt is not yet a master at his craft, I enjoyed this different style, and I did not find the flaws to be so distracting that I could not enjoy the book. One of my personal complaints was I thought the story would have been stronger if it was longer. Pierre’s emotional journey would have been more effecting had readers gotten to explore his emotions and why he was feeling them. Extending the narrative may also have helped with the topic I discuss below. The last issue I want to touch on is not “bad” at all, but readers may find it challenging to engage with the book if they lack a particularly lens for understanding. The Night Wanderer is best read with some knowledge of Indigenous perspectives, or some the deeper themes of the narrative may be difficult to fully comprehend. For example, in other reviews online, I noticed that some people thought that the coming-of-age part of the story was overdone, and that Tiffany was just being an insufferable teenager who needed to get over herself. However, Tiffany isn’t just a normal North American teen. She’s a First Nations youth living on a small reserve in Canada. Her boyfriend wasn’t just being a generic, thoughtless teenage boy; he was engaging in some very hurtful racist behaviour. Many of Tiffany’s fears and insecurities were grounded in the fact that she felt excluded and discriminated against when she was among the non-Indigenous teenagers from her area. While readers never see her being called derogatory terms, the narrative hints at quieter types of oppression, much of which are probably largely unconsciousness. Additionally, Pierre’s actions are also largely motivated by his Indigenous identity, and the story’s power comes from the cultural lessons that influence his choices. Consequently, for those who really want to get the most out of this book, you have to be ready to think about the story from a different perspective (and doing so makes the book that much stronger!). Final Thoughts The Night Wanderer is an absolutely fantastic graphic novel that I would definitely recommend to readers interested in a unique take on vampires and teenagers. It is not on the level of some of the graphic novel greats that I have featured on this blog, but as an independent piece produced by individuals who are not big names in the literary and comic worlds, I thought this was a very strong volume. It also represents a very important addition of Indigenous perspectives in a genre that is woefully lacking in these voices. I liked this book enough that even though I received a copy on NetGalley, I will be seeking out a hardcopy for my personal collection.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    it's indigenous history month so i picked this up from my local library's online resources. it was pretty good, i liked the art and the spin on a classic vampire story was cool. however, i wish it had been a little longer. i know it's a graphic novelization of an actual book so technically, yeah, i could read the original, but they still could have included more of the story. it's indigenous history month so i picked this up from my local library's online resources. it was pretty good, i liked the art and the spin on a classic vampire story was cool. however, i wish it had been a little longer. i know it's a graphic novelization of an actual book so technically, yeah, i could read the original, but they still could have included more of the story.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melinda Worfolk

    I received this review copy through NetGalley from Annick Press. This review is also posted on my blog and on NetGalley. I will definitely use this as a text for First Peoples English. First of all, I'm intrigued by the use of genre--I think the story suits the graphic novel format particularly well given that the narrative relies on atmosphere. The illustrations are clear, crisp, and make good use of contrasts (dark/light areas). The book tells a simple story and tells it well--Tiffany Hunter i I received this review copy through NetGalley from Annick Press. This review is also posted on my blog and on NetGalley. I will definitely use this as a text for First Peoples English. First of all, I'm intrigued by the use of genre--I think the story suits the graphic novel format particularly well given that the narrative relies on atmosphere. The illustrations are clear, crisp, and make good use of contrasts (dark/light areas). The book tells a simple story and tells it well--Tiffany Hunter is an Anishnaabe teenager living on the Otter Lake Reserve who is clashing with her dad, not doing well at school, and experiencing the pains of young love. Pierre L'Errant is a mysterious European stranger whom the Hunter family take in as a boarder to help with the rent since Tiffany's mother left. Even though the book is short and we don't get to know Tiffany or Pierre particularly deeply, Drew Hayden Taylor does a good job of revealing their personalities and circumstances through current events and flashbacks. The narrative provides opportunities to discuss various aspects of Indigenous storytelling as well as social issues like prejudice and racism. My only issue with the book is that I wish it were longer! It seemed to end a bit abruptly. Recommended for young adult audiences or anyone interested in a good fast read that combines a look at Indigenous culture and...vampire lore. ------- The program I teach in uses a lot of Drew Hayden Taylor's plays as required reading, so I am eager to check out this graphic novel to see if it would be suitable for our new First Peoples English course. It is a graphic novel adaptation of The Night Wanderer: A Gothic Novel. As far as I know, there aren't a lot of vampire novels set on First Nations reserves! So far, I'm enjoying it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dianne Everson

    I gave this three stars because it is in a format that many young people enjoy, and I was curious. I will give it to my granddaughter to read, because she does enjoy scary vampire stories. That said, it is not really very scary. It is basically a story about a 16 year old girl with family and boyfriend problems. As such it is a universal theme that should resonate with an adolescent audience. If I were a bookseller or librarian I would purchase it for my shelves. As an adult I found the teenage gir I gave this three stars because it is in a format that many young people enjoy, and I was curious. I will give it to my granddaughter to read, because she does enjoy scary vampire stories. That said, it is not really very scary. It is basically a story about a 16 year old girl with family and boyfriend problems. As such it is a universal theme that should resonate with an adolescent audience. If I were a bookseller or librarian I would purchase it for my shelves. As an adult I found the teenage girl to be a stereotype rather than an individual. What saves the book is the unusual pairing with First Nations lore. This is the part that can be new and fascinating. Good to see that girls from yet another culture than English can find themselves reflected in popular literature. I missed the humour usually found in stories by Drew Hayden Taylor. For adults there are better graphic novels, but it may be good for its intended audience.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    The Night Wanderer tells the story of a vampire who returns home after hundreds of years. His people lived as Native Americans off the land. He is on a self imposed fast during his journey. He takes a room with a broken family. Tiffany, her father and grandmother are still feeling the effects of Tiffany's mother leaving the family behind for a white man. Tiffany is also having trouble with her boyfriend. She finds a strange friendship with the new boarder, Pierre. A friendship she can't seem to The Night Wanderer tells the story of a vampire who returns home after hundreds of years. His people lived as Native Americans off the land. He is on a self imposed fast during his journey. He takes a room with a broken family. Tiffany, her father and grandmother are still feeling the effects of Tiffany's mother leaving the family behind for a white man. Tiffany is also having trouble with her boyfriend. She finds a strange friendship with the new boarder, Pierre. A friendship she can't seem to make with her own father. The story began life as a play by Drew Hayden Taylor, then became a graphic novel. The art by Michael Wyatt is not my favorite. It's a little over digital, so it lacks a bit on shading and warmth, but it serves the story well. The art is black and white, except when Pierre is fighting hunger or anger, then his eyes glow red. It's a better told tale than other contemporary teenage vampire stories. Tiffany and Pierre are both sympathetic in their own ways.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katbyrdie

    What a beautiful book. I don't think they ever meant for this book to be described that way, but I don't know how else to describe it. The story is of a man coming home to Canada after being gone for 300 years. He originally left after being enticed by the fancy white men who introduced him to the larger world. While coming home, he stays at an Indian reservation with a broken family. The novel starts to focus on the family's teenage daughter's problems. The daughter and "wanderer" bond in a uni What a beautiful book. I don't think they ever meant for this book to be described that way, but I don't know how else to describe it. The story is of a man coming home to Canada after being gone for 300 years. He originally left after being enticed by the fancy white men who introduced him to the larger world. While coming home, he stays at an Indian reservation with a broken family. The novel starts to focus on the family's teenage daughter's problems. The daughter and "wanderer" bond in a unique way, which leads to the final scene and climax of the graphic novel. The last page is why my word for this book is "beautiful," and if you read it and find a better word for it, let me know.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fantasy Literature

    This graphic novel The Night Wanderer is an adaptation by Alison Kooistra of Drew Hayden Taylor’s novel The Night Wanderer: A Native Gothic Novel. Since it’s a vampire novel — a genre of which I’ve about had my fill — I almost passed it by. But I was very interested in the Native American angle. I’m glad I picked this up — the book is only using the vampire genre to tell a Native American tale and make us look at an all-too-familiar tale in a new light. In other words, the Native American elemen This graphic novel The Night Wanderer is an adaptation by Alison Kooistra of Drew Hayden Taylor’s novel The Night Wanderer: A Native Gothic Novel. Since it’s a vampire novel — a genre of which I’ve about had my fill — I almost passed it by. But I was very interested in the Native American angle. I’m glad I picked this up — the book is only using the vampire genre to tell a Native American tale and make us look at an all-too-familiar tale in a new light. In other words, the Native American element isn’t added... Read More: http://www.fantasyliterature.com/revi...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Khara

    A good quick read. A Native American vampire graphic novel! I love the idea behind this book (graphic novel) I liked the idea and the characters, but i felt like there should have been more depth to the story. Pierre is mysterious vampire, returning home to Otter Lake. Yet you only get a quick glimpse of his life through his story, that he tells Tiffany on the last few pages. Tiffany is your typical teen. Messing up school, crappy boyfriend, and a broken home. I know there's a novel written about A good quick read. A Native American vampire graphic novel! I love the idea behind this book (graphic novel) I liked the idea and the characters, but i felt like there should have been more depth to the story. Pierre is mysterious vampire, returning home to Otter Lake. Yet you only get a quick glimpse of his life through his story, that he tells Tiffany on the last few pages. Tiffany is your typical teen. Messing up school, crappy boyfriend, and a broken home. I know there's a novel written about this story. I'd like to read that to see if there's more background and depth to it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bailey

    For 100 pages, this comic is pretty good! It is clearly written for a younger audience being introduced to Indigenous culture, as the writing and characters are very simple and they explain the culture and uses of language carefully, but it is very effective. I enjoyed the vampire character (because I'm biased) and found it interesting in connections to the themes of colonialism. I read this for a class about contagion so I am curious to see how those themes connect. For 100 pages, this comic is pretty good! It is clearly written for a younger audience being introduced to Indigenous culture, as the writing and characters are very simple and they explain the culture and uses of language carefully, but it is very effective. I enjoyed the vampire character (because I'm biased) and found it interesting in connections to the themes of colonialism. I read this for a class about contagion so I am curious to see how those themes connect.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lotuslulu

    I read this and will potentially read the novel as well looking for a novel that will appeal to 15/16 grade 10 English students. The story has more potential than anything. Often, a graphic novel will have the art that builds the detail lacking in the dialogue or narrative, but this was not the case here. While the use of black and white flecked with red is an effective tonal choice for the art, the images themselves are quite literally what's happening in the moment without much to understand s I read this and will potentially read the novel as well looking for a novel that will appeal to 15/16 grade 10 English students. The story has more potential than anything. Often, a graphic novel will have the art that builds the detail lacking in the dialogue or narrative, but this was not the case here. While the use of black and white flecked with red is an effective tonal choice for the art, the images themselves are quite literally what's happening in the moment without much to understand symbolically or to tell a bigger picture (except the final frames which I found to be beautiful and worthy of their own separate tale). This is a fast read, and the idea of Pierre the Indigenous vampire is an interesting one, even if it is under-developed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Urthwild Darkness Beckons

    I received this arc from the publisher for an honest review. Pierre L'Errant is a vampire and was an Anishinabe man, he has come home, back to the Otter Lake Reserve after an absence of some 300 years. Tiffany Hunter is an Ojibway teen, and has spent her entire sixteen years of life living in the Otter Lake Reserve. It is inevitable that their paths will cross, not least because Pierre has chosen to lodge with the Hunter family for the duration of his stay. The native American Hunter family has ex I received this arc from the publisher for an honest review. Pierre L'Errant is a vampire and was an Anishinabe man, he has come home, back to the Otter Lake Reserve after an absence of some 300 years. Tiffany Hunter is an Ojibway teen, and has spent her entire sixteen years of life living in the Otter Lake Reserve. It is inevitable that their paths will cross, not least because Pierre has chosen to lodge with the Hunter family for the duration of his stay. The native American Hunter family has experienced a relatively recent upheaval with Tiffany's mother having abandoned the family the year before, leaving her living with her father and grandmother. Tiffany's mother left the reservation with a white boyfriend and Tiffany's new boyfriend Tony is white and whilst he does not come out and say it plainly, we are led to assume that this is behind her father's antipathy towards Tony, result more grief for Tiffany. Tiffany is a native American and lives on a reservation, but aside from that I did not see what made her so particularly extra-special. She appears to be a typical teenager, going through a typical teenage phase. Pierre does a of of moping and lurking about, visits a few old haunts, terrifies the locals and tells a tale or two. Pierre was a bored teenager and longed to go and explore the wider world, and off he went, Tiffany is a bored, angry teenager and naturally assumes the grass is greener elsewhere. This is a novel in which the graphics are either black, white or red, chosen to enhance rather than detract from the story, however, whilst I have no complaints about the technique used internally, I found the cover art a little basic. It did not immediately appeal to me as a book I would want to read. I felt that the use of flashback was extremely effective to tell Pierre's story of how he came to leave the village, this aspect of the story was engaging but much too short. The original novel is apparently 215 pages long, so it is plainly obvious that a great deal of information was not transferred over to this graphic novel. I do not know how the original play or the novel addresses the character of an adult Pierre, but aside from an incident on a baseball field, I thought much more could have been added. Apart from being moody, old and liking blood who was Pierre? Apart from being moody, angry and ditching her friends for her boyfriend who was Tiffany? Engaging, but empty and over too soon. Urthwild

  12. 4 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    The Night Wanderer is a graphic novel adaptation of the book by Drew Taylor. The story is about a native American (Canadian) vampire named Pierre who returns to his home 300+ years after he was turned in France. He comes to stay on the reservation with a native family whose family was broken by their mother leaving to Edmonton to live with a white man. The father, grandmother, and very bitter teen daughter are barely making ends meet, both financially and emotionally, when they open up one of th The Night Wanderer is a graphic novel adaptation of the book by Drew Taylor. The story is about a native American (Canadian) vampire named Pierre who returns to his home 300+ years after he was turned in France. He comes to stay on the reservation with a native family whose family was broken by their mother leaving to Edmonton to live with a white man. The father, grandmother, and very bitter teen daughter are barely making ends meet, both financially and emotionally, when they open up one of their rooms to the European boarder. What follows is Pierre's final journey home and what he finds in the current state of his ancestors at Otter Lake. The novel is in black and white with a touch of red at the end. It is in a modern digital illustration style with minimal backgrounds and focus on the details of the characters. The artist does a good job of capturing the nuances of the characters from the original book. It is easy to follow and the story is smooth in its translation to a graphic format. If I have one complaint, it's that the teens are rather one dimensional. The overwrought teen with the jerk boyfriend has really been done and there aren't a lot of reasons to feel for her. As a female myself who did go through those teen years (and with a tween daughter), I kind of had to roll my eyes quite a bit - which took me out of the story. Teens girls may look irrational and contrary on the outside but it's a different perspective inside that I felt the author completely failed to realize. As such, there's no empathy or sympathy for her - not even in an anti-hero sense. But other than that, an enjoyable and quick read with some nice native American insights. Received as an ARC from the publisher.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher for an honest review. Native Paranormal YA Graphic Novel It took me a little while to get into the art style of this book. That's not a criticism so much as an explanation of why this wasn't a home-run for me, personally. However, the story is something I've been wanted to read since I was a kid. A modern, paranormal native american tale with non-white leads and a teenage girl at the center of the story. It's got all the ingredients to Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by the publisher for an honest review. Native Paranormal YA Graphic Novel It took me a little while to get into the art style of this book. That's not a criticism so much as an explanation of why this wasn't a home-run for me, personally. However, the story is something I've been wanted to read since I was a kid. A modern, paranormal native american tale with non-white leads and a teenage girl at the center of the story. It's got all the ingredients to be epic, and while it is a good story it isn't everything I'd hoped it would be. Pierre/Owl's story is interesting, but brief. The narrative focus mainly on his life prior to his shift and his return home. We see glimpse of his life as a vampire, that hint at the fantastic possibility but never delivers. I mean, what wouldn't I give to read the story of a century old native american vampire living in Europe during some of the most pivotal moments in Western European history. His perspective on World Wars alone would make for a great story. But nope. Then there's Tiffany, a confused teenage girl struggling with being abandoned by her mother and being manipulated by a white boyfriend. While Tiffany's story is real and relatable, her character was never more than a jumble of reactions. She acts like a construct of what an adult thinks a teen is and the story lost points with me because of that. I also wanted much more interaction between Pierre/Owl and Tiffany to spend more time together. In the end, I still think this is a great story, with interesting artwork and a unique story to tell.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Tiffany comes home to be told that she must move everything out of her room and move to the he basement. Why? Her father needs the money so he has decided to rent her room out. When Pierre L'Errant arrives, he asks for the basement room due to a health problem he has--an allergy to daylight. At the Otter Lake Reserve, Pierre feels at home because it was his home which he left for Europe. Tiffany is living in a home without a mother, only her father and grandmother reside there sides her. Her mot Tiffany comes home to be told that she must move everything out of her room and move to the he basement. Why? Her father needs the money so he has decided to rent her room out. When Pierre L'Errant arrives, he asks for the basement room due to a health problem he has--an allergy to daylight. At the Otter Lake Reserve, Pierre feels at home because it was his home which he left for Europe. Tiffany is living in a home without a mother, only her father and grandmother reside there sides her. Her mother ran off with another man. She is having a difficult time in her life as she is considered an outsider at school and her boyfriend's pals. This coming of age story shows Tiffany has difficulty with her heritage of the Hunter Clan. Her grandmother speaks to her in the language of the Anishinabe. The grandmother is the only fluent speaker of this language on the reservation. How does Pierre understand her, while Tiffany can barely understand it? You also learn that the swamp on the northern part of the reservation is considered to be full of monsters. I felt that the characters in the novel were authentic. It is a thought-provoking book. The only thing I didn't like was the black and whit with a drop of red illustrations--the colors. Note:This graphic novel is an adaptation by Allison Kooistra of the book written by Drew Taylor. Disclaimer: I received a digital galley of this book free from the publisher from NetGalley. I was not obliged to write a favorable review, or even any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ruth B

    The Night Wanderer is a fast, well-illustrated and solid graphic novel. It has good characters, great dialogues and a plot that is easy to follow. Basically, the book is about Pierre L'Errant returning to Otter Lake, a native reserve, looking for redemption. There is a story going on the background that provides Pierre with the opportunity of having a good last action. It's very simple to understand; an anguished teenager having problems with her father, a boy and an absent mum. It’s a paranormal The Night Wanderer is a fast, well-illustrated and solid graphic novel. It has good characters, great dialogues and a plot that is easy to follow. Basically, the book is about Pierre L'Errant returning to Otter Lake, a native reserve, looking for redemption. There is a story going on the background that provides Pierre with the opportunity of having a good last action. It's very simple to understand; an anguished teenager having problems with her father, a boy and an absent mum. It’s a paranormal story where vampires are real. However, for me the paranormal aspect was not that relevant or wasn’t adequately exploded. It’s always present and you know he is a paranormal being but I would have like to see more scenes of him being as a vampire. There were things I really enjoyed for example the illustrations, which were amazing. They were my favorite part. The choice of colors seems appropriate to create a really good atmosphere. The gray scale presents an environment where tension and suspense are always present. It’s a short book so you get to the climax very quickly, the action comes really soon but I it leaves you waiting for something more. Overall, it is a good graphic novel and I’m sure it looks really good in paperback or hardcover version. *** I received a complimentary copy from the publisher in exchange of an honest review. ***

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Birss

    I read the novel of this story, itself an adaptation from a play, before reading this graphic novel adaptation of the novel. If I wasn't already so familiar with the myth of Pierre L'errant, the Ojibway vampire from the book, I might have only given this comic one star. I really want to watch the original play. If the erosion of the story between the novel and this comic is an indication of the erosion of the story when adapted from play to novel, then perhaps the play was actually really good. I read the novel of this story, itself an adaptation from a play, before reading this graphic novel adaptation of the novel. If I wasn't already so familiar with the myth of Pierre L'errant, the Ojibway vampire from the book, I might have only given this comic one star. I really want to watch the original play. If the erosion of the story between the novel and this comic is an indication of the erosion of the story when adapted from play to novel, then perhaps the play was actually really good. There are a lot of good elements here. I really liked the story of the Ojibway vampire. There is so much potential here for an exploration of colonialism and institutionalized racism and more. The story and this character are so Canadian and honest. Unfortunately, I just don't see the potential realized in this retelling. See my review of the novel for more on this not terrible story that I just wish was better. If you liked this graphic novel at all, or saw its potential, I highly recommend reading the novel for a much more complete experience. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1... If the author were to ever rewrite this book, or write another longer, more complete, more adult version of the story, or expand the story of Pierre L'errant, I would definitely read it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Pierre L'Errant has returned home after centuries of roaming Europe as a vampire. He becomes a boarder with a family on the Otter Lake reserve as he explores what used to be his home and tries to reclaim his Ojibwa roots. Meanwhile, 16-year-old Tiffany, a member of the family Pierre is staying with, feels like her world is caving in on her and not worth living. Their lives intertwine culminating with a chilling encounter in the woods. The novel has been on my radar for awhile now (it's a recommen Pierre L'Errant has returned home after centuries of roaming Europe as a vampire. He becomes a boarder with a family on the Otter Lake reserve as he explores what used to be his home and tries to reclaim his Ojibwa roots. Meanwhile, 16-year-old Tiffany, a member of the family Pierre is staying with, feels like her world is caving in on her and not worth living. Their lives intertwine culminating with a chilling encounter in the woods. The novel has been on my radar for awhile now (it's a recommended title by Debbie Reese on her blog American Indians in Children's Literature), but I haven't had a chance to take a look at it. Thanks to Netgalley for a copy of the graphic novel, which has me even more intrigued to read the novel! Taylor's indigenized version of the European legend is refreshing. For one thing, there's no romance between the teenage girl and the centuries old vampire. The black and white art (with a few splashes of red) is highly focused on the characters and has a creepy horror story vibe to it. My major complaint is the abruptness of the ending. I wasn't ready for the story to be over when it was.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sara Thompson

    I wanted to love this graphic novel. In some ways, I did. It's a good story but there are a few things that prevent me from giving this my usual 5 stars. The color pages look a little too computer generated. The black and white pages are great, I liked the art but the colored pages had an amateurish look to them. One can overlook that as we transition from hand drawn graphics to computer generated. The thing that really got me was how rushed this story felt. There was no chance to really get to k I wanted to love this graphic novel. In some ways, I did. It's a good story but there are a few things that prevent me from giving this my usual 5 stars. The color pages look a little too computer generated. The black and white pages are great, I liked the art but the colored pages had an amateurish look to them. One can overlook that as we transition from hand drawn graphics to computer generated. The thing that really got me was how rushed this story felt. There was no chance to really get to know the characters. That would have been fine if this was the first part (which I had thought for a moment). The story ended too abruptly for my taste as well. I had to go back through the ending a couple of times to get it. It was a subtle ending. In the end, this will become something I'll forget. It's a good start but not the sort of graphic novel that will call me back. It won't be one that I recommend solely based on the fact that it's forgettable. That's the real shame. It has elements that make for a great story. A twist on the vampire story (just a little). There's so much potential and it fell flat.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read the novel version of this particular story, which appears here in graphic novel form, several years ago. The story seems to have survived the changes fairly well. The plot involves the arrival of Pierre L'Errant who clearly is a vampire with a history in the Otter Lake area, After hundreds of years, he has returned to the area for purposes he reveals near the end of the book. He has made arrangements to stay in the basement of one Native family. Sixteen-year-old Tiffany at first resents h I read the novel version of this particular story, which appears here in graphic novel form, several years ago. The story seems to have survived the changes fairly well. The plot involves the arrival of Pierre L'Errant who clearly is a vampire with a history in the Otter Lake area, After hundreds of years, he has returned to the area for purposes he reveals near the end of the book. He has made arrangements to stay in the basement of one Native family. Sixteen-year-old Tiffany at first resents him and then fears him. She's dealing with a faithless white boyfriend, friends who are tired of being dropped for her boyfriend, a controlling father, and an absent mother. Luckily for her, she has a loving grandmother who tries to intercede when her father becomes too angry. After a series of disappointments, Tiffany runs into the woods where Pierre follows her and helps her see that she has much to live for. The tints, tones, and shades of the illustrations evoke a suspenseful mood quite well. I particularly liked the last few pages of the book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elle Markov

    Pierre L'Errant, once known as Owl, is a native who centuries ago left his home in search of something new. Pierre traveled to Europe with a group of French traders, but upon arrival, he realized these people did not see him as a person, but as entertainment. Pierre eventually becomes ill and is on the verge of death, when a vampire turns him. Centuries later, Pierre is coming home, to cleanse his soul and say goodbye. Tiffany is a modern day native with a lot of issues following her parents sepa Pierre L'Errant, once known as Owl, is a native who centuries ago left his home in search of something new. Pierre traveled to Europe with a group of French traders, but upon arrival, he realized these people did not see him as a person, but as entertainment. Pierre eventually becomes ill and is on the verge of death, when a vampire turns him. Centuries later, Pierre is coming home, to cleanse his soul and say goodbye. Tiffany is a modern day native with a lot of issues following her parents separation. So, basically, she's a troubled teenager. She has a few run-ins with Pierre who is renting a room from Tiffany's family; in those run-ins, Pierre imparts on her that running from home is never good and that parents only nag because they care. Pierre is supposed to be the main character of the story but it seems more time is spent on Tiffany and her teenage angst. The illustrations are really good, but the story focusing too much on Tiffany kind of killed it for me. Rating 3 out of 5 [email protected]

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nay Denise

    **Received a copy via NetGally.** I had to give this a 4.5 stars because I just wish there was more to it. This graphic novel follows Pierre L’Errant a vampire who returns home after hundreds of years. His people lived as Native Americans off the land. He is on a fast during his journey. His goal: the ultimate death. While returning to him to his home he stays with a family and ends up helping them out with their daughter in a strange way. Tiffany is the young Lady Pierre's helps to realize that li **Received a copy via NetGally.** I had to give this a 4.5 stars because I just wish there was more to it. This graphic novel follows Pierre L’Errant a vampire who returns home after hundreds of years. His people lived as Native Americans off the land. He is on a fast during his journey. His goal: the ultimate death. While returning to him to his home he stays with a family and ends up helping them out with their daughter in a strange way. Tiffany is the young Lady Pierre's helps to realize that life does not revolve solely around her. She lives with her father and grandmother because her mother left them and ended up with a white man. Due to the things her mother did, her father seems to be very protective and demanding of her. Especially with her boyfriend Tony -- who is white. In the end, Tiffany gets overwhelmed with everything and decides to run away. Pierre goes after her and teaches her that family counts in the end and its never too late to show it. Pretty cool read and the artwork was pretty cool as well.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Scattergood

    Before I start I just wanted to say that on my site this graphic novel got a 2 and a half score but they don't do halves on this site so I rounded it out. Well, I have to admit that I had some really high hopes for this one. It's not every day that you have a vampire story where the vampire is a Native American or in this case Native Canadian yet for some reason this adaptation of the superb novel just doesn't fly for me. The story seems like there is something missing while the art work really do Before I start I just wanted to say that on my site this graphic novel got a 2 and a half score but they don't do halves on this site so I rounded it out. Well, I have to admit that I had some really high hopes for this one. It's not every day that you have a vampire story where the vampire is a Native American or in this case Native Canadian yet for some reason this adaptation of the superb novel just doesn't fly for me. The story seems like there is something missing while the art work really doesn't work at all with the story. It's too cold and clinical and in some places it seems completely out of place with what is going on in the story. For the full review please click on the link. Based on the graphic novel by Drew Hayden Taylor, does this vampire tale suck or does it have a lot of bite? http://curiosityofasocialmisfit.blogs...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    This is not a typical vampire story. Pierre L'Errant is an Aboriginal vampire. He returns to Canada to find that for which he seeks. After centuries of wandering he seeks to discover his innermost yearnings. In his search, he comes across Tiffany, and sees her hurt. Understanding pain from his own experiences, he tries to help her. I picked this book up as I was shelving it, and started to read it. I was drawn by the idea of an Aboriginal vampire, and how it would fit into the legends and mytholo This is not a typical vampire story. Pierre L'Errant is an Aboriginal vampire. He returns to Canada to find that for which he seeks. After centuries of wandering he seeks to discover his innermost yearnings. In his search, he comes across Tiffany, and sees her hurt. Understanding pain from his own experiences, he tries to help her. I picked this book up as I was shelving it, and started to read it. I was drawn by the idea of an Aboriginal vampire, and how it would fit into the legends and mythology of the Anishinaabe. I finished it quickly, in one reading session. Pierre is haunted by his past. Yet, he has the discipline to withhold his hunger to do what is right. He tells a story in one part that his grandfather told him about the duality of human nature. Which part of us will be the strongest? The one we feed. Wise words. I recommend this to Angelica. I think she would like Tiffany's character and empathize with her struggles.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elia

    My biggest gripe with this story is that it's too short and the ending seems too abrupt. However, I did enjoy it. It's not often you get a vampire story where the main vamp is Native American (or in this case Native Canadian). It's the story of Pierre L'Errant, known in life as Owl, who has spent the past 300 years hunting in nearly every country in Europe. He finally decides it's time to go home to Canada where his life becomes entwined with a 16 year old girl living on the reservation near his My biggest gripe with this story is that it's too short and the ending seems too abrupt. However, I did enjoy it. It's not often you get a vampire story where the main vamp is Native American (or in this case Native Canadian). It's the story of Pierre L'Errant, known in life as Owl, who has spent the past 300 years hunting in nearly every country in Europe. He finally decides it's time to go home to Canada where his life becomes entwined with a 16 year old girl living on the reservation near his old home. His purpose is a mystery until the aforementioned abrupt ending. Good, but could have been much better.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mrjoslin

    The Night Wanderer tells the story of a Native American turned vampire who returns home after hundreds of years. When he returns home he fasts and ends up living with a broken family. The art by Michael Wyatt is okay, but not my favorite. It's seems too digital, by this I mean to me it lacks a bit on shading and warmth. It works though. I did like how the art is done in black and white, except when Pierre is fighting hunger or anger, then his eyes glow red. Overall, I thought this was a better t The Night Wanderer tells the story of a Native American turned vampire who returns home after hundreds of years. When he returns home he fasts and ends up living with a broken family. The art by Michael Wyatt is okay, but not my favorite. It's seems too digital, by this I mean to me it lacks a bit on shading and warmth. It works though. I did like how the art is done in black and white, except when Pierre is fighting hunger or anger, then his eyes glow red. Overall, I thought this was a better told tale than other contemporary teenage vampire stories. The characters are sympathetic in their own ways.

  26. 5 out of 5

    hannah pachet

    We had to read this for English. It was a really quick read, I got through it in about fifteen minutes. I feel sort of bad giving a 2 star review because I think the main reason I wasn't a huge fan of this was because it was a graphic novel. I wouldn't have chosen to read on on my own. I didn't particularly care for the main character, and there wasn't a ton of detail (which is mainly because it's a short graphic novel). It wasn't for me, but take this with a grain of salt because I'm not review We had to read this for English. It was a really quick read, I got through it in about fifteen minutes. I feel sort of bad giving a 2 star review because I think the main reason I wasn't a huge fan of this was because it was a graphic novel. I wouldn't have chosen to read on on my own. I didn't particularly care for the main character, and there wasn't a ton of detail (which is mainly because it's a short graphic novel). It wasn't for me, but take this with a grain of salt because I'm not reviewing from the mind of a graphic novel reader. I didn't even read all the speech bubbles in the right order.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josée

    I feel like the meat of the story was there, but everything else made it hard to like. The graphic novel hit a lot of cliches and because the pace was too fast, I couldn't overlook them. And speaking of pacing, I also found the action predictable because there was nothing break it up. So all in all, I didn't have time to spend with any of the characters so I wasn't attached to them, the art did nothing for me either, and the dialogue in some places felt superficial... I've seen someone's review ta I feel like the meat of the story was there, but everything else made it hard to like. The graphic novel hit a lot of cliches and because the pace was too fast, I couldn't overlook them. And speaking of pacing, I also found the action predictable because there was nothing break it up. So all in all, I didn't have time to spend with any of the characters so I wasn't attached to them, the art did nothing for me either, and the dialogue in some places felt superficial... I've seen someone's review talking about how much more the novel delivers, so I would say if you're looking to read the story, try the book instead.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Get Booked Fans

    Episode 14: 3. Dear Get Booked, I am working my way through the 2015 Read Harder challenge, and am having trouble fwith the indigenous cultures requirement. I’ve realized recently what a big gap that is in my reading, and I don’t really know where to start. I’ve considered One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus and Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown, but I’m a little uncomfortable with the idea of having the book (or books) that I choose be written by white men and not people who are thems Episode 14: 3. Dear Get Booked, I am working my way through the 2015 Read Harder challenge, and am having trouble fwith the indigenous cultures requirement. I’ve realized recently what a big gap that is in my reading, and I don’t really know where to start. I’ve considered One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus and Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown, but I’m a little uncomfortable with the idea of having the book (or books) that I choose be written by white men and not people who are themselves from an indigenous culture. I prefer fiction, but am certainly open to non-fiction as well. Any suggestions? Thanks! –Katherine Recommended by: Amanda

  29. 4 out of 5

    Liz Dahl

    This graphic novel really needed to be fleshed out more than it was. Most of the characters were sketched out instead of fully actualized. The story itself is intriguing, but the characters needed more depth to fully make the story memorable and sympathetic. It was also too short for all the back story given to Pierre and the ending felt abrupt as a result. Tiffany was interesting, and while she was convincingly written as a sixteen year old girl, she needed more motivation to justify her action This graphic novel really needed to be fleshed out more than it was. Most of the characters were sketched out instead of fully actualized. The story itself is intriguing, but the characters needed more depth to fully make the story memorable and sympathetic. It was also too short for all the back story given to Pierre and the ending felt abrupt as a result. Tiffany was interesting, and while she was convincingly written as a sixteen year old girl, she needed more motivation to justify her actions. The art was beautiful and had nice clean lines, but I felt like the story wasn't finished.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I was excited when I found out that The Night Wanderer was made into a graphic novel, I remember the original book being a great combination of reality of Aboriginal issues and history as well as a fictional aspect of a mythical creature. To see this novel being played out was very enjoyable because it felt familiar with the small part of it being new to me so in short I got to re-experience a great book. It was also educational in Aboriginal people of the past and present. In conclusion, this w I was excited when I found out that The Night Wanderer was made into a graphic novel, I remember the original book being a great combination of reality of Aboriginal issues and history as well as a fictional aspect of a mythical creature. To see this novel being played out was very enjoyable because it felt familiar with the small part of it being new to me so in short I got to re-experience a great book. It was also educational in Aboriginal people of the past and present. In conclusion, this was a very enjoyable, quick read.

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