Hot Best Seller

Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture

Availability: Ready to download

2014 Locus Awards Finalist, Nonfiction Category In this hip, accessible primer to the music, literature, and art of Afrofuturism, author Ytasha Womack introduces readers to the burgeoning community of artists creating Afrofuturist works, the innovators from the past, and the wide range of subjects they explore. From the sci-fi literature of Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, an 2014 Locus Awards Finalist, Nonfiction Category In this hip, accessible primer to the music, literature, and art of Afrofuturism, author Ytasha Womack introduces readers to the burgeoning community of artists creating Afrofuturist works, the innovators from the past, and the wide range of subjects they explore. From the sci-fi literature of Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, and N. K. Jemisin to the musical cosmos of Sun Ra, George Clinton, and the Black Eyed Peas’ will.i.am, to the visual and multimedia artists inspired by African Dogon myths and Egyptian deities, the book’s topics range from the “alien” experience of blacks in America to the “wake up” cry that peppers sci-fi literature, sermons, and activism. With a twofold aim to entertain and enlighten, Afrofuturists strive to break down racial, ethnic, and social limitations to empower and free individuals to be themselves.


Compare

2014 Locus Awards Finalist, Nonfiction Category In this hip, accessible primer to the music, literature, and art of Afrofuturism, author Ytasha Womack introduces readers to the burgeoning community of artists creating Afrofuturist works, the innovators from the past, and the wide range of subjects they explore. From the sci-fi literature of Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, an 2014 Locus Awards Finalist, Nonfiction Category In this hip, accessible primer to the music, literature, and art of Afrofuturism, author Ytasha Womack introduces readers to the burgeoning community of artists creating Afrofuturist works, the innovators from the past, and the wide range of subjects they explore. From the sci-fi literature of Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, and N. K. Jemisin to the musical cosmos of Sun Ra, George Clinton, and the Black Eyed Peas’ will.i.am, to the visual and multimedia artists inspired by African Dogon myths and Egyptian deities, the book’s topics range from the “alien” experience of blacks in America to the “wake up” cry that peppers sci-fi literature, sermons, and activism. With a twofold aim to entertain and enlighten, Afrofuturists strive to break down racial, ethnic, and social limitations to empower and free individuals to be themselves.

30 review for Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elle (ellexamines)

    Overall, a solid introduction to the history of Afrofuturism, the themes that often appear in Afrofuturistic texts, and its future. Womack argues that Afrofuturism uses hope to counter the hopelessness that experiences of systematic racism can bring forth in future generations. Imagination, hope, and the expectation for transformative change is a through line that undergirds most Afrofuturistic art, literature, music, and criticism. It is the collective weighted belief that anchors the a Overall, a solid introduction to the history of Afrofuturism, the themes that often appear in Afrofuturistic texts, and its future. Womack argues that Afrofuturism uses hope to counter the hopelessness that experiences of systematic racism can bring forth in future generations. Imagination, hope, and the expectation for transformative change is a through line that undergirds most Afrofuturistic art, literature, music, and criticism. It is the collective weighted belief that anchors the aesthetic. It is the prism through which some create their way of life. It’s a view of the world. Where there is no vision, the people perish. Some things that I liked about this framing: ➽The idea of science fiction being, in some cases, less traumatic than the actual past of black people ➽The idea of technology and aliens as a good rather than an evil ➽The questioning of why we actually think of aliens as “bad” ➽Janelle Monae having an entire section of her own (as she deserves) ➽The emphasis on how this has always existed, and the history of people such as Sun Ra afrofuturism 2019: book one *Fair warning: at least twelve of the books I read in the next few months are going to be for my Afrofuturism class. So far, we've read Binti and Skin Folk. I'm so excited for more. Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Spotify | Youtube | About |

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I wanted to love this book, I truly did, but I couldn't help but find it disappointing. I first heard about Afrofuturism a few years ago when I discovered Octavia Butler, and then again few months ago while browsing Tumblr, and as an ardent fan of science fiction/fantasy culture I was immediately intrigued. Its a fascinating concept, no doubt but I felt the ideas were not fully fleshed out, as the movement is still growing and developing, there wasn't really any concrete answers on what Afrofutur I wanted to love this book, I truly did, but I couldn't help but find it disappointing. I first heard about Afrofuturism a few years ago when I discovered Octavia Butler, and then again few months ago while browsing Tumblr, and as an ardent fan of science fiction/fantasy culture I was immediately intrigued. Its a fascinating concept, no doubt but I felt the ideas were not fully fleshed out, as the movement is still growing and developing, there wasn't really any concrete answers on what Afrofuturism/afrosurrealism actually is. It left me wanting more. I feel like this book is very surface level and more of a primer, something to give you a small taste but you have to delve a bit deeper to truly "get it." I had my highlighter out the entire time while reading this. Highlighting all of the albums, artists, films, and books I want to check out after reading. There's so much to explore, and this book definitely gave me a great starting point. For that reason alone I recommend it. *listens to Sun Ra's Space Is The Place, while ordering the rest of Octavia Butler's books from Amazon*

  3. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    Mae Jemison, the first African-American to go into space, was inspired to become an astronaut by seeing Lt. Nyota Uhura, one of the first Black, Sci-Fi characters, kick ass in Star Trek. Possibly the best Non-Fiction work I have ever read. I discovered so many new things from amazing music, to films and books that I definitely need to watch/ read in the near future. Afrofuturism is difficult to explain or define. It aims to imagine a future where Black people are central figures in society. It' Mae Jemison, the first African-American to go into space, was inspired to become an astronaut by seeing Lt. Nyota Uhura, one of the first Black, Sci-Fi characters, kick ass in Star Trek. Possibly the best Non-Fiction work I have ever read. I discovered so many new things from amazing music, to films and books that I definitely need to watch/ read in the near future. Afrofuturism is difficult to explain or define. It aims to imagine a future where Black people are central figures in society. It's a relatively new term, but if you analyse works of the past, you find that it's definitely not a new concept. Representation matters. And it cultivates social change.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    OMG I've only just read the introduction and the first couple paragraphs of the first chapter but I'm already in lurv! ******************* This was a great book. I'd been a fan of Nnedi Okorafor, Octavia Butler, George Clinton/Parliament, and Sun Ra for some time now, and have been meaning to check out a few other authors in the Afrofuturism and Afrosurrealism vein, but I never really made a connection insofar as a movement or genre. Ytasha Womack is engaging and balances well her personal experie OMG I've only just read the introduction and the first couple paragraphs of the first chapter but I'm already in lurv! ******************* This was a great book. I'd been a fan of Nnedi Okorafor, Octavia Butler, George Clinton/Parliament, and Sun Ra for some time now, and have been meaning to check out a few other authors in the Afrofuturism and Afrosurrealism vein, but I never really made a connection insofar as a movement or genre. Ytasha Womack is engaging and balances well her personal experiences with an expository look into the movers and shakers of the AF scene. I now have a laundry list of artists, films, and filmmakers to check out. I especially loved the final chapters where Womack connects AF to community outreach, which is something I would LOVE to get involved in. The only drawbacks to this book: (1) (echoing another reviewer here) This book would have done well to include a recommended bibliography/discography, etc. As it stands now, just be prepared to take notes! You're going to want to explore. (2) There were just a couple cringe-worthy incorrect historical notes (one I couldn't get over was that Napoleon had destroyed the library in Alexandria--I believe part of it caught fire with Julius Caesar's Civil War and was later subject to continued destruction by regional bigwigs). (3) I tired a little with some of the digressions that were along the lines of "so these people aren't exactly AFs, but they did this one thing that could be included in the genre." This wasn't bad by any means, and it generally just illustrated Womack's point that African Americans have a rightful stake in the Sci-Fi/Fantasy/Surrealist communities, but it did strike me as a little bit of a stretch. Regardless of these minor setbacks, this is such a terrific primer. I hope lots of people read it and are inspired to look more into the AF genre. I know I'll be thinking and talking about it for a long time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    KLC

    This is an interesting subject matter, but I didn't love the book. It's a decent resource, but I was hoping for something more in-depth. This is a slightly more thoughtful version of Wikipedia. However, that's not a bad thing if you're just looking for an introduction into some influential Afrofuturist artists. Even though I didn't like the book, I would encourage people to read it. Womack's whole intention was to let black Americans know that there is a place for them to be smart and creative. S This is an interesting subject matter, but I didn't love the book. It's a decent resource, but I was hoping for something more in-depth. This is a slightly more thoughtful version of Wikipedia. However, that's not a bad thing if you're just looking for an introduction into some influential Afrofuturist artists. Even though I didn't like the book, I would encourage people to read it. Womack's whole intention was to let black Americans know that there is a place for them to be smart and creative. She quotes someone early in the book. I didn't write it down and I can't remember who it was. But they said they were frustrated with writing about black people because there was really no way to write a story in the past without it being about a tragedy. They said it better than I did, but it's a powerful sentiment. It's the whole reason Afrofuturism exists. If writers want to tell a story about African Americans without the characters being reduced to their race, they have to create a fictional, futuristic world. There were several things I liked. But one glaring flaw is that I came away not understanding what the author thinks Afrofuturism really is. Is it a genre? A philosophy? A cultural movement? I think it's all three, but the book doesn't put it in clear terms. If the book is titled "Afrofuturism," it should give a clear, concise definition of what it is. I also found some passages way too hyperbolic and even problematic. I wrote down several examples, but I'll just share a small one. In the chapter on Egyptian influences - chapter five, I believe - she says that some people believe aliens built the pyramids because no one thinks people of color could do anything like that. First of all, no one with any kind of critical thinking ability believes it was aliens. But those who do, think so because they underestimate how advanced ancient societies were. It has nothing to do with color. They feel the same way about ancient European societies as well. She throws that statement out there and moves on, as though it's common knowledge. That's what I find problematic. A lot of people will just accept that she's right, especially younger people. I could go on and on and on about what I don't like, but it's at least worth skimming for the artists mentioned.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sachi Argabright

    [ 4.5/5 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫] AFROFUTURISM: THE WORLD OF BLACK SCI-FI AND FANTASY CULTURE by Ytasha L. Womack defines and celebrates the many facets of Afrofuturism. By refocusing the lens on black people and the black experience, Afrofuturism can reimagine black history as well as the vast possibilities in black future. This book explores various formats of Afrofuturistic media (mainly movies, music, literature), and the creators and artists behind them. When I first heard this was technically a textbook, I [ 4.5/5 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫] AFROFUTURISM: THE WORLD OF BLACK SCI-FI AND FANTASY CULTURE by Ytasha L. Womack defines and celebrates the many facets of Afrofuturism. By refocusing the lens on black people and the black experience, Afrofuturism can reimagine black history as well as the vast possibilities in black future. This book explores various formats of Afrofuturistic media (mainly movies, music, literature), and the creators and artists behind them. When I first heard this was technically a textbook, I was worried it might be too “academic” for me (especially since I didn’t know much about afrofuturism before I read this book). But that wasn’t the case at all! This book is very approachable, and has a good balance of research and interviews. It’s short and concise (around 200 pages), but rich in detail. It also features many references to Afrofuturistic works and media, and there is no shortage of content. Your list of additional things to watch, read, and listen will grow very long very fast. I really enjoyed learning from this book, and I feel like it’s a great introduction to the genre. My only *small* complaint is that I felt like I needed more detailed information to truly understand the differences between things like Afrofuturism vs. Afrosurrealism vs. black fantasy, but that also could be because the content is very new to me. I know there are many articles and resources I can pick up for further reading, and plan to take advantage of those to learn more. Highly recommend for those who want to learn more about Afrofuturism, or would like to build a long list of Afrofuturistic content to dive into!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paolo

    A terrific look into and introductory text for Afrofuturism, or speculative and science fiction as created in all of its forms by African-Americans, and one that is sorely needed in a genre and culture so heavily entrenched in its straight-white-maleness. On a personal note, the section discussing afrofuturistic music basically had me shaking in excitement and agreement, making me feel that all those hours studying ethnomusicology were not in vain.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Interesting and wide ranging, but scattered, overview of African-derived futurist and science fiction works in film, music, literature, visual arts, and comics. Very thoughtful but would have benefited from some greater theoretical structure and a careful editor!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This was absolutely amazing, honestly everyone should read this book. It combines history, art, music, literature, everything to dissect one of the most important art movements of our time. More people need to know about afrofuturism!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Regina Leslie

    This was a super accessible & imaginative look into Afrofuturist themes, folks, & works.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dan Plonsey

    This is a terrible book -- for me, at least, because it's about a subject which is very dear to me. Without the life and music of Sun Ra, I don't know where I would have gone off to. This book, however, has nothing to give but useless gushing, generalizations, and descriptions which seem curiously second-hand. For instance, about Sun Ra: "he was a total original." "He explored with healing tones, new sounds, and pushed jazz beyond its bebop dimensions." That is, it reads like an extended essay b This is a terrible book -- for me, at least, because it's about a subject which is very dear to me. Without the life and music of Sun Ra, I don't know where I would have gone off to. This book, however, has nothing to give but useless gushing, generalizations, and descriptions which seem curiously second-hand. For instance, about Sun Ra: "he was a total original." "He explored with healing tones, new sounds, and pushed jazz beyond its bebop dimensions." That is, it reads like an extended essay by a high school student. Womack provides no original analysis, nor does she even find significant ideas in secondary sources. The only creativity manifest is the frequent misuse of words, possibly intended poetically, or perhaps merely the result of lack of editing. The fascinating creators of whom Womack writes are poorly served --damned by uncomprehending praise -- by this shallow and misleading work.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    I think my own expectations of what this book were set me up to not enjoy it as much. This is an interesting topic, but the way it was presented could be a little confusing. It felt unorganized at times, with people discussed before they were explained and quotes from people just plopped into the chapter even if they weren't the most relevant. You definitely need some base information about Afrofuturism before going into this book to get the most out of it. I think my own expectations of what this book were set me up to not enjoy it as much. This is an interesting topic, but the way it was presented could be a little confusing. It felt unorganized at times, with people discussed before they were explained and quotes from people just plopped into the chapter even if they weren't the most relevant. You definitely need some base information about Afrofuturism before going into this book to get the most out of it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    erika

    Great overview, but I wish it had gone a bit more in-depth, plus some parts felt repetitive and maybe in need of an editor. That said, I now have a ton more music and books to dive into, so...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This book rocked my world. I wrote all over my copy in a fevered frenzy to capture every morsel. It's safe to say that Afrofuturism is my aesthetic. This book rocked my world. I wrote all over my copy in a fevered frenzy to capture every morsel. It's safe to say that Afrofuturism is my aesthetic.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    3.5 stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture is an anthology of a dozen personal essays written by Ytasha L. Womack. It is a collection of essays about defining the term: Afrofuturism. For the most part, I really like most – if not all of these contributions. Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture contain a dozen personal essays, which are written and researched exceptionally well. Womack explains that Afrofuturistic work is not confined within certain genres, Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture is an anthology of a dozen personal essays written by Ytasha L. Womack. It is a collection of essays about defining the term: Afrofuturism. For the most part, I really like most – if not all of these contributions. Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture contain a dozen personal essays, which are written and researched exceptionally well. Womack explains that Afrofuturistic work is not confined within certain genres, such as science or speculative fiction, but rather an aesthetic which is marked by a desire to be free and unconstrained in any forms of media and genre. Afrofuturism is an intersection of imagination, technology, the future and liberation and combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, speculative fiction, fantasy, Afrocentricity, and magic realism with non-Western beliefs. Like most anthologies, there are weaker contributions, and Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture is not an exception. There are a couple of essays that seems like an outlier, which wasn't as constructed or conveyed rather well – comparatively speaking. All in all, Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture is a wonderful collection of essays that celebrates and defines Afrofuturism.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture is a great introduction to afrofuturism. While reading, I ended up making a list in pencil at the back of the book of authors, books, films, and music to check out -- while I am reasonably well-read in terms of afrofuturist sci-fi and fantasy literature, other areas like music, comics, and art I knew almost nothing about before reading this book so I definitely learned a lot. I also enjoyed learning about afrofuturism's history -- the c Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture is a great introduction to afrofuturism. While reading, I ended up making a list in pencil at the back of the book of authors, books, films, and music to check out -- while I am reasonably well-read in terms of afrofuturist sci-fi and fantasy literature, other areas like music, comics, and art I knew almost nothing about before reading this book so I definitely learned a lot. I also enjoyed learning about afrofuturism's history -- the coining of the term, the use of listservs and websites to share afrofuturist ideas, and the emergence of afrofuturist classes in some college/universities. While I wanted a little more in-depth analysis in some places, I really appreciate the detailed endnotes which are full of further reading for me to explore.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Fee Scott-Bolden

    I absolutely enjoyed this book and it peaked my interest in the subject. The author provides a wealth of resources and artists/activists/ scholars who are actively working in the genre. Afrofuturism is a great tool for wielding the imagination for personal change and societal growth. Empowering people to see themselves and their ideas in the future gives rise to innovators and free thinkers, all of whom can pull from the best of the past while navigating the sea of possibilities to create communit I absolutely enjoyed this book and it peaked my interest in the subject. The author provides a wealth of resources and artists/activists/ scholars who are actively working in the genre. Afrofuturism is a great tool for wielding the imagination for personal change and societal growth. Empowering people to see themselves and their ideas in the future gives rise to innovators and free thinkers, all of whom can pull from the best of the past while navigating the sea of possibilities to create communities, culture, and a new, balanced world. The imagination is the key to progress, and it's the imagination that is all too often smothered in the name of conformity and community standards.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    An introduction to Afrofuturism - a movement which is still being shaped, but can be a way for black people in particular to envision another future, or tap into some supernatural stuff from the past. Womack talks about touchstone artists (Sun Ra, George Clinton, Octavia Butler, etc), but also people studying the intersection between technology and people of color. A quick and informative read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reginas..Haunted..Library

    This is a good introduction to an exciting art movement. It definitely made me want to explore more.

  21. 5 out of 5

    LAS

    I love this book because it gives you so many avenues of film, fiction, music, art, and culture to look into and keep reading. There's a lot of big ideas in here, but not a lot of analysis of them. I feel like his book works more as a foundation to let you do your own research and thinking, which I think fits well with its concept. This was ac tally a reread, the first time I read it was for a college course on Afrofuturism, and I'm very happy I read it again. I love this book because it gives you so many avenues of film, fiction, music, art, and culture to look into and keep reading. There's a lot of big ideas in here, but not a lot of analysis of them. I feel like his book works more as a foundation to let you do your own research and thinking, which I think fits well with its concept. This was ac tally a reread, the first time I read it was for a college course on Afrofuturism, and I'm very happy I read it again.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    All kinds of interesting tidbits of history and ideas woven together in this easy to read cultural/sociological sci/fi & African American collection that gives a massive overview of what we can understand is Afrofuturism.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    The best primer for thinking and writing about Afrofuturism, full of inspiring quotations and great material from a wide variety of media.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mary Brickthrower

    A fantastic overview of Afrofuturism in all media.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lull Mengesha

    A great explainer for the macro understanding of Afrofuturism, black science fiction.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ayoola

    This is an excellent survey of afrofuturist thought, history, philosophies, and manifestations. As someone whose understanding of afrofuturism isn't so deep yet, this was a solid introduction that gave me ideas of resources to look into next. This is an excellent survey of afrofuturist thought, history, philosophies, and manifestations. As someone whose understanding of afrofuturism isn't so deep yet, this was a solid introduction that gave me ideas of resources to look into next.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (AK)

    I'll admit, a big part of why I like this book is because no one else bothered to sit down and write this all out. So it's new, and different, and I love that. I think there's an inclination to say, "sci-fi is sci-fi" and point at Asimov and Clarke. They're good examples, sure, but they're not the be-all end-all. A writer's history and culture informs their viewpoint, and to ignore that is to deprive oneself of a certain richness. Ytasha Womack has taken the time to compile an overview of black sf I'll admit, a big part of why I like this book is because no one else bothered to sit down and write this all out. So it's new, and different, and I love that. I think there's an inclination to say, "sci-fi is sci-fi" and point at Asimov and Clarke. They're good examples, sure, but they're not the be-all end-all. A writer's history and culture informs their viewpoint, and to ignore that is to deprive oneself of a certain richness. Ytasha Womack has taken the time to compile an overview of black sf/fantasy culture, in the written word, in music, and in other media--explaining it's history and major themes. And yet, she also takes the time to point out that not every black author is an afrofuturist. Samuel R. Delany, while a great writer, does not fit the definition. One note I think should be made, is that although this is a very good overview, it's also the voice of an author who is very passionate about her subject. While decently cited, there were a few subsections that could have used more editorial oversight. I'm not going to ding the book too hard for that, though. It's not meant to be a textbook. 4/5 - recommended. (Maybe not in one sitting, though).

  28. 5 out of 5

    TheCloudRunner

    I think this book was just okay. It sparked quite a few ideas in my head about stories I would like to tell. But I do wish it had more to offer though. Many of the ideas presented and the quotes/interviews from people were merely brushed over. And the interviews from others that did have any type of depth, the speaker explained things in a convoluted, almost pretentious way that left me rather bored and not any closer to actually understanding what afrofuturism actually is. Long story short, I th I think this book was just okay. It sparked quite a few ideas in my head about stories I would like to tell. But I do wish it had more to offer though. Many of the ideas presented and the quotes/interviews from people were merely brushed over. And the interviews from others that did have any type of depth, the speaker explained things in a convoluted, almost pretentious way that left me rather bored and not any closer to actually understanding what afrofuturism actually is. Long story short, I think this book's topic could have been expanded upon more, and the language used could have been switched to everyday usage instead of the "woke" jargon that people use to make themselves seem more knowledgeable than they really are. I want to clarify that it wasn't the author doing this, but the people she spoke to, whose commentary she included in the book. Overall, the book was okay. There were artists and people mentioned that I have never heard of and would like to look them up. I'm still interested in Afrofuturism and would like to know more about it. This book was an intro to the topic and nothing more.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katie Cat Books

    Academic. What it says on the tin. Broad. Multimedia author Ytasha Womack explores the history and lead up of afrofuturism to the present in regards to literature, art, music and more. The author is well versed in the topic, having written an afrofuturistic comic. This book is oddly told in first person, with the author using herself and her own experiences as examples. To me, this seemed to limit and put a bubble around the topic. While short in length, the author repeats herself citing the same e Academic. What it says on the tin. Broad. Multimedia author Ytasha Womack explores the history and lead up of afrofuturism to the present in regards to literature, art, music and more. The author is well versed in the topic, having written an afrofuturistic comic. This book is oddly told in first person, with the author using herself and her own experiences as examples. To me, this seemed to limit and put a bubble around the topic. While short in length, the author repeats herself citing the same examples over and over. It's not a textbook, but it reminded me of one of those "for further reading" books a professor would put on a syllabus. I enjoyed the book and learned new things, but I was never hooked in or inspired by what I was reading. I still want to learn more about the topic though, so I think this book makes a good springboard book to other resources that might serve me better.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Inda

    I've had this book on my shelf for about a year and finally got around to reading it. This is not only a great primer on afrofuturism but also affirming for anyone who had trouble putting a name on their afrofuturist leanings. I love that it gets in that space between academia, or rather scholarship, and personal experience that academia tries to stay away from much to its detriment. We learn about the music, the books and the philosophies as well as real-life applications of scifi for Black peo I've had this book on my shelf for about a year and finally got around to reading it. This is not only a great primer on afrofuturism but also affirming for anyone who had trouble putting a name on their afrofuturist leanings. I love that it gets in that space between academia, or rather scholarship, and personal experience that academia tries to stay away from much to its detriment. We learn about the music, the books and the philosophies as well as real-life applications of scifi for Black people. One thing everyone should take away from this is that imagination is a powerful thing and a powerful tool we can use to ensuring our survival. Highly recommend.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...