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Aunt Dimity and the Wishing Well

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Cozy mystery lovers’ favorite paranormal sleuth is back with her nineteenth otherworldly adventure When a strapping young Australian named Jack MacBride arrives in Finch to wrap up his late uncle’s affairs, heads turn in the sleepy English village. But when Lori volunteers to help Jack clear out his uncle’s overgrown garden, they discover something even more shocking than Cozy mystery lovers’ favorite paranormal sleuth is back with her nineteenth otherworldly adventure When a strapping young Australian named Jack MacBride arrives in Finch to wrap up his late uncle’s affairs, heads turn in the sleepy English village. But when Lori volunteers to help Jack clear out his uncle’s overgrown garden, they discover something even more shocking than a stranger turning up in Finch. After Lori laughingly tosses a coin into the garden’s old well and makes a wish, she is baffled to find that the wish seems to have come true. Word spreads, and the villagers turn out in droves to make wishes of their own. But as they soon learn, one person’s wish is another person’s worst nightmare and the village is thrown into chaos. As more and more wishes come true, Lori resolves to find out what’s really going on. Is handsome Jack somehow tricking his neighbors? Or are they fooling themselves? With Aunt Dimity’s otherworldly help, Lori discovers that the truth is even more marvelous than a magical wishing well. Look out for Aunt Dimity and the Buried Treasure coming from Viking on May 24, 2016. 


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Cozy mystery lovers’ favorite paranormal sleuth is back with her nineteenth otherworldly adventure When a strapping young Australian named Jack MacBride arrives in Finch to wrap up his late uncle’s affairs, heads turn in the sleepy English village. But when Lori volunteers to help Jack clear out his uncle’s overgrown garden, they discover something even more shocking than Cozy mystery lovers’ favorite paranormal sleuth is back with her nineteenth otherworldly adventure When a strapping young Australian named Jack MacBride arrives in Finch to wrap up his late uncle’s affairs, heads turn in the sleepy English village. But when Lori volunteers to help Jack clear out his uncle’s overgrown garden, they discover something even more shocking than a stranger turning up in Finch. After Lori laughingly tosses a coin into the garden’s old well and makes a wish, she is baffled to find that the wish seems to have come true. Word spreads, and the villagers turn out in droves to make wishes of their own. But as they soon learn, one person’s wish is another person’s worst nightmare and the village is thrown into chaos. As more and more wishes come true, Lori resolves to find out what’s really going on. Is handsome Jack somehow tricking his neighbors? Or are they fooling themselves? With Aunt Dimity’s otherworldly help, Lori discovers that the truth is even more marvelous than a magical wishing well. Look out for Aunt Dimity and the Buried Treasure coming from Viking on May 24, 2016. 

30 review for Aunt Dimity and the Wishing Well

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dale Harcombe

    Sometimes you just want a book that is light and entertaining. I haven’t read others in this series but that didn’t present a problem. I quickly got to know the characters. Finch is a village of quirky characters. To read this novel you will need to suspend disbelief. In the Cotswold village of Finch lives Lori Shepherd. Lori has a pink stuffed rabbit and a book where writing appears from Aunt Dimity who is long dead. See why I said you need to suspend disbelief? It is light and whimsical. Even Sometimes you just want a book that is light and entertaining. I haven’t read others in this series but that didn’t present a problem. I quickly got to know the characters. Finch is a village of quirky characters. To read this novel you will need to suspend disbelief. In the Cotswold village of Finch lives Lori Shepherd. Lori has a pink stuffed rabbit and a book where writing appears from Aunt Dimity who is long dead. See why I said you need to suspend disbelief? It is light and whimsical. Even more so after Jack MacBride, an Australia arrives after the death of his uncle and uncovers a wishing well, that appears to work. Many in the village want to make a wish and have it granted. But what people wish for may not always be best for someone else. The cover perfectly depicts the whimsy of this book. I thoroughly enjoyed the story and its humour, until I came to the incident with Lori hitting her thumb with a hammer. Then what had been funny turned ridiculous. The way she and her husband carried on anyone would have thought she was dying. I finished the book but it lost its charm for me from that point. So what I thought might be a four star read ended up a three. If you are looking for a cosy mystery this is not the book for you. If you are looking for a whimsical read you should enjoy it, though I’m interested to see if others respond as I did after the thumb incident. I wasn’t convinced about the ending either.

  2. 4 out of 5

    LORI CASWELL

    Welcome to Finch. A small Cotswold Village in England. Lori Shepherd moved from the U.S. when she inherited a sizable estate–after she discovered the secret hidden in a treasure trove of letters in Dimity’s English country cottage. She now lives there with her husband Bill and their two sons. She now communicates with her “Aunt Dimity” in a very special way. In this 19th installment Australian Jack MacBride comes to Finch to settle his uncle’s estate. When he arrives he find his uncle’s property Welcome to Finch. A small Cotswold Village in England. Lori Shepherd moved from the U.S. when she inherited a sizable estate–after she discovered the secret hidden in a treasure trove of letters in Dimity’s English country cottage. She now lives there with her husband Bill and their two sons. She now communicates with her “Aunt Dimity” in a very special way. In this 19th installment Australian Jack MacBride comes to Finch to settle his uncle’s estate. When he arrives he find his uncle’s property in need of attention. Lori volunteers to help him. While clearing the garden they find a hidden well. Lori laughingly tosses a coin into the garden’s old well and makes a wish, she is baffled to find that the wish seems to have come true. Word travels fast in this little town and soon Jack has several visitors wanting to make wishes of their own. More and more wishes start to come true and with Aunt Dimity’s help Lori tries to find out what is really going on. What she discovers is that the truth is even more marvelous than a magical wishing well. Dollycas’s Thoughts What a breathe of fresh air!! This book is the perfect Springtime read. It is a true English mystery without any dead bodies or murderers running about. Just a mystery of a wishing well and a stranger in town. This author’s work has been called “adult fairy tales” and that describes them perfectly. Who wouldn’t love a wishing well that actually granted wishes? The problem is one person’s wish can really mess up another person’s wish or their life. Some of the wishes of the residents of Finch are really causing trouble. Thankfully Lori is on the case. She needs to solve the mystery before there is an actual murder in this quaint little village. I haven’t read an Aunt Dimity story in years and when I was asked to review this one I jumped right back in and was so happy I said “YES!”. This story reads well as a stand alone too. I wasn’t lost at all. Aunt Dimity was a friend of Lori’s mother and her ghost lives on in her home and has an interesting way to communicate with Lori. That’s all you need to know to enjoy these wonderful stories. Whether this is your first Aunt Dimity story or you have read them all or like me you fall somewhere in between, you will love this story. This series is a cozy lover’s favorite for a very good reason. I think we all wish we had an Aunt Dimity.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexia Gordon

    Thought I was getting a cozy mystery, got what read like a script for a Hallmark Channel movie. American ex-pat housewife in the Cotswolds investigates mysterious wish granter because everyone's wish-come-true threatens to destroy the village. Except the stakes were ridiculously low. The church sexton/local mechanic gets his wish to work on classic cars and--horrors!--actually makes money and has fun doing it but THE CHURCH CEMETERY DOESN'T GET MOWED and the vicar has to ask the young, healthy, Thought I was getting a cozy mystery, got what read like a script for a Hallmark Channel movie. American ex-pat housewife in the Cotswolds investigates mysterious wish granter because everyone's wish-come-true threatens to destroy the village. Except the stakes were ridiculously low. The church sexton/local mechanic gets his wish to work on classic cars and--horrors!--actually makes money and has fun doing it but THE CHURCH CEMETERY DOESN'T GET MOWED and the vicar has to ask the young, healthy, strapping newcomer in town to do it. OMG, what a tragedy. The protagonist (the ex-pat) has to try to build a bird feeder ALL BY HERSELF because the sexton is too busy having fun/making money to do it, despite the fact she's a klutz with zero knowledge of carpentry and she BANGS HER THUMB WITH THE HAMMER. Her lawyer husband rushes home from work early to whisk her to the hospital where she's given xrays! antibiotics! blood tests! and diagnosed with a--drum roll, please--CONTUSION! Which is a $50 word for bruise. She has a boo-boo. And she actually has to take to her sickbed and her husband all but spoon feeds her and won't let her have visitors. For a boo-boo. Oh, and she gets dehydrated. In England. In May. In England. Because they've had sunshine and no rain for a whole 6 days. It's not like she's stranded in the Australian Outback. Just duck inside and get a glass of water, lady. Of, course there's a MORAL to the story, actually spelled out in the end. Won't repeat it here, don't want to spoil the suspense. Of which there is none. The "mystery" to be solved is who is granting wishes and why? Less than halfway through the book you figure out who the wish-granter is, you don't care why (the reason is saccharine-sweet and obvious) and is there ever really any doubt whether the ex-pat will have her one true wish granted by the last page? As for the ghost of Aunt Dimity, she doesn't do much except scold and point out the obvious. Got through the book in about 2.5 hours. It really would be perfect for the Hallmark Channel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Aunt Dimity and the wishing well is a perfectly baked warm apple pie. The writing is quaint and sweet. In a world that is filled with strife and trouble is nice to read about a small town where things can get out of hand, but where ultimately everyone makes the best of what they have and be a true community. When I first picked this up I was initially put off by the designation supernatural mysterious. Supernatural usually means that you either get strange hunches or hear disembodied voices guid Aunt Dimity and the wishing well is a perfectly baked warm apple pie. The writing is quaint and sweet. In a world that is filled with strife and trouble is nice to read about a small town where things can get out of hand, but where ultimately everyone makes the best of what they have and be a true community. When I first picked this up I was initially put off by the designation supernatural mysterious. Supernatural usually means that you either get strange hunches or hear disembodied voices guiding you towards who the real murderer is. The only thing supernatural here is aunt Dimity, a woman who speaks beyond the grave through an old blue journal that once belonged to her. She only knows what is told her and her hunches seem to be good old fashion common sense. Another thing that bothers me in a mystery series is how static characters can sometimes be, the only thing changing from book to book being the murder, the murder weapon, and the scene of the crime, but here the characters change through the course of the book. Relationships change, goals change and time moves forward. the only person who doesn't change is Aunt Dimity and, well she's already dead. The last thing that differentiated this from other mystery novels is that there is no murder. An Author final captured the thrill of a mystery without someone ending up dead. A true cozy mystery. I want to experience the magic of this story again, I want to read more about the small town of Finch and the wonderful people that live there. I will be ordering book number one from the library as soon as I finish writing the last sentence of this review. This is something I want to get my hands on as soon as possible.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    If it was not for the previous eighteen books, there is no way that you would recognized all the names and faces at Hector Huggins’s funeral. A myriad of names are thrown at the reader and even I, being a long time reader of the series, had to stop and put back stories to them all. Rolling up to Hector’s funeral is his beloved nephew Jack MacBride, fresh from the Australian outback and here in Finch to sort out Hector’s final affairs. Namely, the disposition of Hector’s home, Ivy Cottage. During If it was not for the previous eighteen books, there is no way that you would recognized all the names and faces at Hector Huggins’s funeral. A myriad of names are thrown at the reader and even I, being a long time reader of the series, had to stop and put back stories to them all. Rolling up to Hector’s funeral is his beloved nephew Jack MacBride, fresh from the Australian outback and here in Finch to sort out Hector’s final affairs. Namely, the disposition of Hector’s home, Ivy Cottage. During renovations, a wishing well is discovered on the property and when Lori speaks into the wishing well for the rain to cease and her wish comes true, the villagers cannot get to the well fast enough to speak their desires. Finch being Finch means that there will be no end to the chaos that ensues when wishes are suddenly granted, but Lori with the help of Aunt Dimity, starts to become suspicious. Who is the puppet master behind the granting of the wishes? There are too many coincidences for this to be anything other than planned. Was it me, or was Lori being overly whiney in this book. Who is bedridden merely by having their thumb whacked by a hammer – unable to participate in the simplest of things because her thumb is trussed up like a mummy? Grated, a second wish of Lori’s was a surprise at the end, but that does not explain why she was completely incapacitated. The final chapters in the book were very good, almost as if someone else had written them. Throughout most of the book, the repetitiveness was burdensome. At times, I would have sworn full sentences and ideas were repeated. Then suddenly at the end, the ideas and structure were clear and straightforward. The epilogue tied the book together completely without having the reader once again rolling their eyes over facts that had been previously gnawed to death. This is one of my favorite series. Some books are much better than others and the reader has to be patient. The folks from Finch are wonderful even if the gossip vine travels faster than the speed of light; they do have your best interest in mind even if they are too wrapped up in their own lives to bring Lori a casserole when she has whacked her thumb.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I don't know why I keep reading this series. I really love the first two books and after that...mostly misses, I'm afraid. I think it's the fact that as the series rolls on the main character, Lori, gets less and less likeable. I mean, she's nosy (to the point of B&E) and a gossip and a bad flirt and a distracted mother and wife. Come on! She's even rich and has a good-looking, super sweet husband. I've only got one of those (and no, I'm not rich). I think what irks me the most is that the books I don't know why I keep reading this series. I really love the first two books and after that...mostly misses, I'm afraid. I think it's the fact that as the series rolls on the main character, Lori, gets less and less likeable. I mean, she's nosy (to the point of B&E) and a gossip and a bad flirt and a distracted mother and wife. Come on! She's even rich and has a good-looking, super sweet husband. I've only got one of those (and no, I'm not rich). I think what irks me the most is that the books are getting increasingly improbable. I still "enjoyed" this one more than the last few, but for now I'll find my dog-eared copy of Aunt Dimity's Death and be satisfied with that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

    Cozy: yes. Mystery: pretty wimpy. If you're dying to catch up on the village of Finch and its residents, read this book. If you want to read a mystery, don't waste your time with this. Cozy: yes. Mystery: pretty wimpy. If you're dying to catch up on the village of Finch and its residents, read this book. If you want to read a mystery, don't waste your time with this.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    This book, and the entire series, epitomizes the genre of cozy mysteries. Lori is an endearing main character and the village of Finch is one I would dearly love to visit. I'm not a fan of gossip, but the villagers, for the most part, are so charming that I can forgive them their idle chatter. In truth, they all care about each other immensely and they really don't mean any harm at all. This was a very easy, breezy read and a nice holiday from some of the more effortful books I've been reading l This book, and the entire series, epitomizes the genre of cozy mysteries. Lori is an endearing main character and the village of Finch is one I would dearly love to visit. I'm not a fan of gossip, but the villagers, for the most part, are so charming that I can forgive them their idle chatter. In truth, they all care about each other immensely and they really don't mean any harm at all. This was a very easy, breezy read and a nice holiday from some of the more effortful books I've been reading lately. The perfect cupcake for my brain. 3.5/5⭐️

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Cotswolds, England - May & September This story is about a well in a dead man's backyard. It involves wishes, meddling, and unexpected outcomes. I had figured out who was behind it, but I didn't know why they were doing the things that they did. There is also a bit of romance. I knew how it ended because I have been reading these out of order, but I didn't know how or where their relationship started. Cotswolds, England - May & September This story is about a well in a dead man's backyard. It involves wishes, meddling, and unexpected outcomes. I had figured out who was behind it, but I didn't know why they were doing the things that they did. There is also a bit of romance. I knew how it ended because I have been reading these out of order, but I didn't know how or where their relationship started.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I am never disappointed by an Aunt Dimity book, and this was no exception. In fact, I think this was one of the best I've read in the series. Anyone who has any experience with life in a small town will be familiar with the "all up in your business" reality that it includes. In this series, those busybodies and know-it-alls are presented as mostly good-hearted and lovable. These characters have become old friends to me at this point, and visiting with them is always a happy and comforting experie I am never disappointed by an Aunt Dimity book, and this was no exception. In fact, I think this was one of the best I've read in the series. Anyone who has any experience with life in a small town will be familiar with the "all up in your business" reality that it includes. In this series, those busybodies and know-it-alls are presented as mostly good-hearted and lovable. These characters have become old friends to me at this point, and visiting with them is always a happy and comforting experience. This time around all the action takes place right in the village of Finch, and everything revolves around the villagers. The addition of a cat among the pigeons - in the person of the nephew of a villager who's passed away - turns the quirks the various villagers have back at them, and makes everyone look at and deal with their various foibles. As a reader, it's an awful lot of fun! This is a series about characters, and they are a charming, delightful and entertaining bunch. I love this series, and hope Nancy Atherton keeps writing books forever! I will keep reading them as long as she does!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I just grabbed this at the library in audiobook format so I'd have something for the car. What I didn't know is that this is one of a mystery series. I think it would have been much better to start at the beginning, as there seem to have been a lot of references to previous books. Another problem for me was that the narrator's voice was terribly grating. I found myself despising all the characters because of that voice, and I eventually ditched the CDs and picked up a hard copy of the book to fi I just grabbed this at the library in audiobook format so I'd have something for the car. What I didn't know is that this is one of a mystery series. I think it would have been much better to start at the beginning, as there seem to have been a lot of references to previous books. Another problem for me was that the narrator's voice was terribly grating. I found myself despising all the characters because of that voice, and I eventually ditched the CDs and picked up a hard copy of the book to finish it. Had I started at the beginning of the series and never heard that voice, I know I would have liked this much better.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    I've read (and guiltily enjoyed) several of the series, but this is the first in audio format. I thought I was in for a treat, but dear lord, this audio version is dreadful. Teri Clark Linden, the reader, attempts to do an assortment of British accents, but none of them is successful. I am only one hour into the book, but I have to abandon it. I can't stand another moment listening to Linden's awful narration. I've read (and guiltily enjoyed) several of the series, but this is the first in audio format. I thought I was in for a treat, but dear lord, this audio version is dreadful. Teri Clark Linden, the reader, attempts to do an assortment of British accents, but none of them is successful. I am only one hour into the book, but I have to abandon it. I can't stand another moment listening to Linden's awful narration.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Why do I read these books? They have gotten more and more ridiculous and to be honest, I hate Lori. She's horrible, nosy, a drama queen, and annoying. Somehow I will still find myself reading the next one. Why do I read these books? They have gotten more and more ridiculous and to be honest, I hate Lori. She's horrible, nosy, a drama queen, and annoying. Somehow I will still find myself reading the next one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    ✨ Gramy ✨

    . This series offers cozy mysteries with amusing and quirky characters, in the life of Lori and her Aunt Dimity. Each one has been a fun and entertaining read to be sure. It is appreciated that each book is able to stand on its own and usually concludes with an HEA.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Opening with a rainy funeral for the town recluse, his dashing nephew comes into town for last respects and estate finalization. Set in a small burg in England, where things are proper and known to most all, it’s a story about community and the duty of maintaining a common care. I love the witticisms the Aussie nephew, Jack, flows with. Barely out of chapter two and my jaw hurts from smiling so much. Plus, I’ve begun my search for Anzac biscuits! Narrator, Lori, confuses her daily doings to her mo Opening with a rainy funeral for the town recluse, his dashing nephew comes into town for last respects and estate finalization. Set in a small burg in England, where things are proper and known to most all, it’s a story about community and the duty of maintaining a common care. I love the witticisms the Aussie nephew, Jack, flows with. Barely out of chapter two and my jaw hurts from smiling so much. Plus, I’ve begun my search for Anzac biscuits! Narrator, Lori, confuses her daily doings to her mother’s best friend, but magically through a “Harry Potter” style journal that responds in writing to her conversation. The correspondent is Dimity. Sage wisdom, historical facts and unending nurturing words come through before disappearing until opened again. During an acquainting lunch with Jack at his deceased uncles home, Lori and friend, Bree, are walked back to a discovered well, deeply embedded in vines and weeds. Clearing its coverings, they find a Celtic inscription at it base, identifying it as a wishing well. Lori makes a wish for the incessant rain to cease. The following morning, the sun greets them as they wake. News travels exponentially fast in Finch and soon nearly the whole town has snuck a wish in and has had it granted. But as the old adage goes, be careful what you wish for. Soon, the jovial neighbors are bickering, changing roles and making plans that most likely will fall flat. Lori and Dimity feel it’s her duty to find out the true cause and remedy it, pronto. And find out, she does. This is such a warm fuzzy read, with warm fuzzy people doing warm fuzzy things. Having a bad day? This will turn it around. Hoping the rest of the Dimity books are just as rewarding.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Desi Kennedy

    It is always a joy to sit down with Aunt Dimity.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Loraine Nunley

    I do enjoy visiting with Lori Shepard and the people of the village of Finch. Great characters and fun mystery to be solved. I recommend the entire series for a good read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bill Peschel

    I'm a fan of English village life, at least in fiction. I loved the Miss Marple stories, and as a reviewer discovered the books Robert Barnard, Ann Granger and Caroline Graham. So I was predisposed to like Nancy Atherton’s mystery series is set in a paradisaical English village overseen by a ghost full of sound advice, a spectral Dear Abby if you will. In the small Cotswold village of Finch, everyone knows everyone and their business. Then there’s Aunt Dimity. She extraordinary because she’s dead I'm a fan of English village life, at least in fiction. I loved the Miss Marple stories, and as a reviewer discovered the books Robert Barnard, Ann Granger and Caroline Graham. So I was predisposed to like Nancy Atherton’s mystery series is set in a paradisaical English village overseen by a ghost full of sound advice, a spectral Dear Abby if you will. In the small Cotswold village of Finch, everyone knows everyone and their business. Then there’s Aunt Dimity. She extraordinary because she’s dead, and she talks with Lori Shepherd with the help of a blue notebook in which she writes. Lori keeps the notebook next to a stuffed rabbit that is sort of her talisman. “Wishing Well” opens with the funeral for a quiet man who kept himself to himself and never got to know the villagers very well. At the graveside, the residents are surprised at the late arrival of a personable young nephew from Australia. Charged with fixing up his uncle's home for sale, he uncovers an unusual well in the backyard with a sign asking for wishes. Not surprisingly, wishes are made and, surprisingly, many of them are granted. And that’s where the fun kicks in, because while the village can be a paradise, the villagers are not. There’s jealousy, meanness, and pettiness, and the well’s gifts sometimes come with a sting attached. It all sounds rather twee, but the Aunt Dimity series is a comfort read, a way to escape the world for awhile. It's dessert for the soul.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Lynn

    This is my first Aunt Dimity book, the first of what looks like many. Throughout the book I could not help but wonder about the history of the many different characters that live in Finch. I wanted to belong to this small quaint village and be part of the gossip and neighborhood. This town was the perfect getaway for me every time I picked up Aunt Dimity and the Wishing Well. Lori is the main character. I loved her. She seemed like the neighbor who would always go the extra mile to help someone This is my first Aunt Dimity book, the first of what looks like many. Throughout the book I could not help but wonder about the history of the many different characters that live in Finch. I wanted to belong to this small quaint village and be part of the gossip and neighborhood. This town was the perfect getaway for me every time I picked up Aunt Dimity and the Wishing Well. Lori is the main character. I loved her. She seemed like the neighbor who would always go the extra mile to help someone out and she knew when to share secrets and when to keep them quiet. The mystery of who the puppeteer was kept me interested. I had ideas and I loved Lori and Aunt Dimity’s theories. The fact that when she found out who was behind granting all the wishes she let that person tell the town instead of running and spilling the gossip made her a great friend and neighbor to all. Watching her mull over the clues and search for hidden agendas kept me reading late into night and into the early morning. The town of Finch is amazing. I loved how Nancy Atherton described the different houses, the stores, and the other scenery. I could picture the town and loved every part of it. Finch is a place I would love to visit and maybe even live. I certainly will be checking out the rest of this series and will recommend them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    There are Big M Mysteries full of murder, mayhem, and page-turning, nail-biting thrills. And there are small m mysteries like the Aunt Dimity series, the coziest of all cozy mysteries. Although this current book starts with a death, it's the all too natural death of Hector Huggins of Ivy Cottage in the village of Finch, a man of whom the villagers know little to nothing. His Australian nephew arrives to settle the estate. In the course of reclaiming the overgrown gardens, a wishing well is disco There are Big M Mysteries full of murder, mayhem, and page-turning, nail-biting thrills. And there are small m mysteries like the Aunt Dimity series, the coziest of all cozy mysteries. Although this current book starts with a death, it's the all too natural death of Hector Huggins of Ivy Cottage in the village of Finch, a man of whom the villagers know little to nothing. His Australian nephew arrives to settle the estate. In the course of reclaiming the overgrown gardens, a wishing well is discovered and the first wish made comes true. Soon most of the villagers are making wishes & having them come true, upsetting the natural order of the village & causing strife & chaos. It's up to Lori Shepherd with the help of Aunt Dimity to figure out what's going on & return life in the village to its peaceful ways. If you're looking for blood & guts, look elsewhere. But, if you're looking for a loving look at a sweet mystery focused on why people behave the way they do, then welcome to Finch!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Narimasu

    This book might be a good read, but unfortunately I chose to listen to it as an audio book. While the reader's rendition of American accents was ok, the English and Australian accents were so awful that I'm going to have to stop and go look for a print version of the book before I can finish it. It wasn't just the accents, but the cadence of the speech and the switching back and forth trying to make all the characters sound different just didn't work. I certainly won't pick up any other books re This book might be a good read, but unfortunately I chose to listen to it as an audio book. While the reader's rendition of American accents was ok, the English and Australian accents were so awful that I'm going to have to stop and go look for a print version of the book before I can finish it. It wasn't just the accents, but the cadence of the speech and the switching back and forth trying to make all the characters sound different just didn't work. I certainly won't pick up any other books read by Terri Clark Linden, but will look for print versions.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Janell

    This series is a favorite of mine. Fun mysteries with nary a body in sight! :) Their biggest weakness is often the main character, Lori, who frequently acts like a child and doesn't seem to possess one ounce of common sense! Most of the time she and Aunt Dimity just feel like an annoying "necessity" I put up with - after all, it is their story. (sigh) This one, however, really toned down Lori's childishness as well as the Dimity connection, and was simply an enjoyable mystery with a heartfelt co This series is a favorite of mine. Fun mysteries with nary a body in sight! :) Their biggest weakness is often the main character, Lori, who frequently acts like a child and doesn't seem to possess one ounce of common sense! Most of the time she and Aunt Dimity just feel like an annoying "necessity" I put up with - after all, it is their story. (sigh) This one, however, really toned down Lori's childishness as well as the Dimity connection, and was simply an enjoyable mystery with a heartfelt conclusion. Loved the lessons it taught about getting what we wish for!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    I would give this Aunt Dimity mystery a SIX STAR rating, if I could. They are all endearing and have wonderful messages in them, but this may be my favorite for it's subtle telling of it's powerful message throughout the story, even with the big reveal at the end. These books are a treasure and well worth reading. ;-) There are only 5 left in the series (this is 19 of 24 books), and I hope there are more to come! I would give this Aunt Dimity mystery a SIX STAR rating, if I could. They are all endearing and have wonderful messages in them, but this may be my favorite for it's subtle telling of it's powerful message throughout the story, even with the big reveal at the end. These books are a treasure and well worth reading. ;-) There are only 5 left in the series (this is 19 of 24 books), and I hope there are more to come!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    I love Finch. I love Lori. I love Aunt Dimity. I love that these cozies are more about unraveling secrets than uncovering murderers. It makes for a nice change. I'm looking forward to the next installment. I love Finch. I love Lori. I love Aunt Dimity. I love that these cozies are more about unraveling secrets than uncovering murderers. It makes for a nice change. I'm looking forward to the next installment.

  25. 4 out of 5

    SandyL

    Another fun adventure in the village of Finch, with Lori Shepherd and Aunt Dimity. This one had an interesting twist that I didn't see coming! Another fun adventure in the village of Finch, with Lori Shepherd and Aunt Dimity. This one had an interesting twist that I didn't see coming!

  26. 5 out of 5

    A.J.

    Apathy kept me listening to this book: I couldn't be bothered to find another audio book for my commute. If it had been an ebook or paper book I would not have finished it and it would have only got one star. I can see that there would be an audience who would love this smug, twee type of story about an American woman living an idyllic life in an English village (who is in regular communication with a deceased aunt), but that audience does not include me. The whole premise seemed preposterous, an Apathy kept me listening to this book: I couldn't be bothered to find another audio book for my commute. If it had been an ebook or paper book I would not have finished it and it would have only got one star. I can see that there would be an audience who would love this smug, twee type of story about an American woman living an idyllic life in an English village (who is in regular communication with a deceased aunt), but that audience does not include me. The whole premise seemed preposterous, and some parts outrageously so: a woman taking over the business in a property she doesn't own because she is intending to buy it? That's not how real estate transactions work... Lori's relationship with her husband, Bill, seemed peculiar to me. He is overly controlling and protective. Who needs bed rest after bruising their thumb, for goodness sake? And he's English, so why is he obsessed by 'jelly donuts'? The whole Aunt Dimity angle seemed superfluous and the style of writing seemed downright lazy and repetitious at times. I was listening to the book, rather than reading it, which added a whole other layer of irritation: the narrator's idea of Australian and New Zealand accents was nothing like those of any Antipodeans I've ever met. I'm going to have to download something gritty and realistic to take the cloying taste of this book away.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    When a longtime Finch resident dies his nephew, Australian Jack MacBride, arrives to wrap up his late uncle's affairs. Lori Shepherd steps up to help Jack, and Finch resident Bree, take care of the house and clean up the overgrown garden when they discover a wishing well. Lori makes a wish for it to stop raining, and it does, which sets off a stampede of Finch residents who come to make their own wishes. But residents soon learn that sometimes getting what you wish for is not a good thing, and th When a longtime Finch resident dies his nephew, Australian Jack MacBride, arrives to wrap up his late uncle's affairs. Lori Shepherd steps up to help Jack, and Finch resident Bree, take care of the house and clean up the overgrown garden when they discover a wishing well. Lori makes a wish for it to stop raining, and it does, which sets off a stampede of Finch residents who come to make their own wishes. But residents soon learn that sometimes getting what you wish for is not a good thing, and things are soon in chaos. It's up to Lori, and the other worldly Aunt Dimity, to get to the bottom of things, and find out if the wishes are being granted by the well, or by someone else. This is the 19th book in the Aunt Dimity series, and it has not lost its charm for me. It is a true cozy, set in a sweet, loving English village. The residents are realistic, and are great fun to watch as the story plays out. The ghost, Aunt Dimity, plays a great part and I love watching her and Lori try to solve mysteries that don't involve murders. The twist in this one made me eager to read the 20th book, to see what happens next.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julie Garrett

    Sometimes the world is harsh, and we need our fiction to give us sweetness and warmth. On those days, I turn to Aunt Dimity. I've enjoyed this whole series. Yes, it's saccharine, and the mysteries are gentle and low-stakes, not page-turning thrillers. That's exactly why it appeals. In the book, Lori Shepherd remains the narrator, but the true protagonist is the Village of Finch. It is a living thing with all the characters we've met over the years important parts of the whole. Everything is inter Sometimes the world is harsh, and we need our fiction to give us sweetness and warmth. On those days, I turn to Aunt Dimity. I've enjoyed this whole series. Yes, it's saccharine, and the mysteries are gentle and low-stakes, not page-turning thrillers. That's exactly why it appeals. In the book, Lori Shepherd remains the narrator, but the true protagonist is the Village of Finch. It is a living thing with all the characters we've met over the years important parts of the whole. Everything is intertwined, and events never affect just one individual. Everything ripples out and touches the entire community. Everyone feels the pain when something goes wrong, and everyone comes together to heal. It's like a gossipy utopia. If this is the first Aunt Dimity book you've read, you might get a little overwhelmed by the sheer volume of characters. I'd recommend going back to the beginning, and then you have all the pleasure of a long series ahead of you, plus you learn all the rich backstories of the characters you meet here.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kathy England

    This would have been a cute story, except for the fact that Aunt Dimity was a notebook that wrote to the protagonist. That works in Harry Potter, because the author has already defined Harry as a magician. It doesn't work when everything else in the story is based on a normal, human village and noting else is out of the ordinary. The author clearly knows nothing about medicine either, if she thinks a swat with a hammar needs a trip to the hospital and antibiotics. Pain medication maybe, but a tr This would have been a cute story, except for the fact that Aunt Dimity was a notebook that wrote to the protagonist. That works in Harry Potter, because the author has already defined Harry as a magician. It doesn't work when everything else in the story is based on a normal, human village and noting else is out of the ordinary. The author clearly knows nothing about medicine either, if she thinks a swat with a hammar needs a trip to the hospital and antibiotics. Pain medication maybe, but a trip to her general practitioner would have sorted this out. I listened to the book on CD. The Aussie and Kiwi accents about drove me nuts, and every time the reader said "pergola", I cringed. I also question the ability of the editor who let go the sentence, "Now don't let yourself be pressurized..." (instead of "pressured"). I'm sure it was a computer that let that one slide, but honestly, I see so many mistakes in books these days. It was also clear that the author was not English by the way she sometimes used words in a way that an Englishman or woman wouldn't.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Coller

    Inconsistencies abound in this next installment of Why is Sarah Reading Books She Can't Stand? Bree has a bit too much of a chip on her shoulder in this one. The author tries to set up a situation in which she falls for Jack despite her best intentions not to but this ultra-harsh character doesn't mesh with the mature and considerate Bree of the last book. Plus, the match-making trope is too obvious. This one ended up coming in almost last place on my list of "favorites" by Atherton. The "mystery" Inconsistencies abound in this next installment of Why is Sarah Reading Books She Can't Stand? Bree has a bit too much of a chip on her shoulder in this one. The author tries to set up a situation in which she falls for Jack despite her best intentions not to but this ultra-harsh character doesn't mesh with the mature and considerate Bree of the last book. Plus, the match-making trope is too obvious. This one ended up coming in almost last place on my list of "favorites" by Atherton. The "mystery" was so ridiculous and far-fetched that it wasn't even fun and the perps came off as pretty creepy. (Of course, he/she/they are perfectly normal in the next book with no one seeing the creepy but me, I guess...) I grabbed the rest of what the library had the other day and started the book after this one. I'm probably gonna need to be done after the one I'm on though because I'm starting to lose respect for myself...

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