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The Wandering Earth: Classic Science Fiction Collection

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“The Wandering Earth” is a collection of short stories by Liu Cixin, China's most acclaimed contemporary science-fiction author. Unabashedly classic in the great tradition of Asimov and Clarke, Liu Cixin's science-fiction is firmly rooted in the cosmic. “[most] literature has always left me with the impression of indulging an intense anthropocentric narcissism. […] In the “The Wandering Earth” is a collection of short stories by Liu Cixin, China's most acclaimed contemporary science-fiction author. Unabashedly classic in the great tradition of Asimov and Clarke, Liu Cixin's science-fiction is firmly rooted in the cosmic. “[most] literature has always left me with the impression of indulging an intense anthropocentric narcissism. […] In the world of literature, the Sun exists for no other reason than to illuminate the pure, unadulterated countryside, the Moon has no other reason to shine than to cast the shadows of the seaside lovers, [but] if the universe is the Sahara, then all that makes the Earth a grain of gold within it, is that a particular bacteria called humanity clinging to its surface.” Liu Cixin uses the unique perspective of science-fiction to take us on a journey into this majestic, desolate cosmos. He gives us the chance to reacquaint ourselves with the fundamental truth that in the face of a vast universe we are no more than a speck of dust; That the Earth is just another celestial body – And an extremely vulnerable one at that. The flash of a gamma-ray burst or the blast of a nearby supernova could, at any moment, reduce our cherished home to nothing but ashes. It can be terrifying to contemplate the end of our world and stories that describe such destruction can be disturbing. At the same time however, they can leave us feeling not only entertained, but exhilarated and inspired. Maybe, they can even give us a chance to renew our love of life. Most stories found in the “The Wandering Earth” collection take us to a sci-fi vision of Earth's end. But here, there are no Hollywood aliens, descending from the depths of space to blow up our cities. In these futures, the dangers humanity faces are much stranger and whimsical than that. The unexpected calamities that befall his richly detailed worlds are only eclipsed by humanity's epic, but always plausible, attempts to escape destruction. In all this peril and doom, Liu Cixin always feels for humanity. His stories are full of a deep love for all of Earth's peoples. But even this love does not escape reflection and even ridicule when viewed through his unrelenting cosmic lens. No matter how dearly one loves the Earth, humanity and all its cultures, there is no avoiding the cold, hard truth that they mean absolutely nothing when viewed against the vastness of the universe. But even an infinite universe could not change the simple fact that we are worthy of love, that we need love. It is this twist that lies at the very heart of the stories in this collection. Table of Contents 1 The Wandering Earth 2 Mountain 3 Of Ants and Dinosaurs 4 Sun of China 5 The Wages of Humanity 6 Curse 5.0 7 The Micro-Age 8 Devourer 9 Taking Care of Gods 10 With Her Eyes 11 The Longest Fall


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“The Wandering Earth” is a collection of short stories by Liu Cixin, China's most acclaimed contemporary science-fiction author. Unabashedly classic in the great tradition of Asimov and Clarke, Liu Cixin's science-fiction is firmly rooted in the cosmic. “[most] literature has always left me with the impression of indulging an intense anthropocentric narcissism. […] In the “The Wandering Earth” is a collection of short stories by Liu Cixin, China's most acclaimed contemporary science-fiction author. Unabashedly classic in the great tradition of Asimov and Clarke, Liu Cixin's science-fiction is firmly rooted in the cosmic. “[most] literature has always left me with the impression of indulging an intense anthropocentric narcissism. […] In the world of literature, the Sun exists for no other reason than to illuminate the pure, unadulterated countryside, the Moon has no other reason to shine than to cast the shadows of the seaside lovers, [but] if the universe is the Sahara, then all that makes the Earth a grain of gold within it, is that a particular bacteria called humanity clinging to its surface.” Liu Cixin uses the unique perspective of science-fiction to take us on a journey into this majestic, desolate cosmos. He gives us the chance to reacquaint ourselves with the fundamental truth that in the face of a vast universe we are no more than a speck of dust; That the Earth is just another celestial body – And an extremely vulnerable one at that. The flash of a gamma-ray burst or the blast of a nearby supernova could, at any moment, reduce our cherished home to nothing but ashes. It can be terrifying to contemplate the end of our world and stories that describe such destruction can be disturbing. At the same time however, they can leave us feeling not only entertained, but exhilarated and inspired. Maybe, they can even give us a chance to renew our love of life. Most stories found in the “The Wandering Earth” collection take us to a sci-fi vision of Earth's end. But here, there are no Hollywood aliens, descending from the depths of space to blow up our cities. In these futures, the dangers humanity faces are much stranger and whimsical than that. The unexpected calamities that befall his richly detailed worlds are only eclipsed by humanity's epic, but always plausible, attempts to escape destruction. In all this peril and doom, Liu Cixin always feels for humanity. His stories are full of a deep love for all of Earth's peoples. But even this love does not escape reflection and even ridicule when viewed through his unrelenting cosmic lens. No matter how dearly one loves the Earth, humanity and all its cultures, there is no avoiding the cold, hard truth that they mean absolutely nothing when viewed against the vastness of the universe. But even an infinite universe could not change the simple fact that we are worthy of love, that we need love. It is this twist that lies at the very heart of the stories in this collection. Table of Contents 1 The Wandering Earth 2 Mountain 3 Of Ants and Dinosaurs 4 Sun of China 5 The Wages of Humanity 6 Curse 5.0 7 The Micro-Age 8 Devourer 9 Taking Care of Gods 10 With Her Eyes 11 The Longest Fall

30 review for The Wandering Earth: Classic Science Fiction Collection

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tudor Vlad

    I can’t help but compare this short story collection with Ted Chiang’s Stories of Your Life and Others, which prior to reading this was my favorite science fiction short story collection. It still has my favorite short story (Story of Your Life) but while Ted Chiang had an amazing story coupled with some good and average ones, Liu Cixin had just great stories. The Wandering Earth has 11 stories and I can honestly say that the quality was consistent from start to end and all the stories were memo I can’t help but compare this short story collection with Ted Chiang’s Stories of Your Life and Others, which prior to reading this was my favorite science fiction short story collection. It still has my favorite short story (Story of Your Life) but while Ted Chiang had an amazing story coupled with some good and average ones, Liu Cixin had just great stories. The Wandering Earth has 11 stories and I can honestly say that the quality was consistent from start to end and all the stories were memorable, which is something I thought was impossible in such a big collection. The short stories, in my vision, felt like a display of death and destruction, an excuse to show the beauty of Earth and of the human kind, beauty that we oh so often take for granted.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    The most wonderful collection of stories ever read. It is an ode to Earth, to its beauties and history. Some are related but they can be read on their own. Very powerful, with the focus on social and environmental issues, highly actual nowadays. The Wandering Earth - to escape from Sun explosion, Earth was put on an accelerated course to the nearest star, Proxima Centauri. As I got used by now, the author emphasize the impact and consequences of this enormous change on the survivors through the e The most wonderful collection of stories ever read. It is an ode to Earth, to its beauties and history. Some are related but they can be read on their own. Very powerful, with the focus on social and environmental issues, highly actual nowadays. The Wandering Earth - to escape from Sun explosion, Earth was put on an accelerated course to the nearest star, Proxima Centauri. As I got used by now, the author emphasize the impact and consequences of this enormous change on the survivors through the eyes of one of the wanderers, on this first part of the journey. Mountain - the SF version of Baricco's Novecento. A geological engineer (passionate mountaineer), working on a sailing ship is tormented by the guilt of letting his companions die in the mountains and therefore chooses a life on sea to be away as far as possible from his life time passion. But destiny brings the ultimate challenge down his path - a sea water mountain... A story about how hard it is to make some decisions, no matter how different we all are. Of Ants and Dinosaurs - an alternate reality in which Cretaceous is the Informational Era and Earth is ruled by ants and dinosaurs. It looks like the big is not always the strongest and that the arrogance can lead to total annihilation. Again, LC touches some hotspots like birth control, territory expansion and war. Sun of China - the story of an almost illiterate country boy who became the first long range explorer of space or what is the outcome when chance and determination meet. Heart-touching. The Wages of Humanity - what starts as a gangsters story, turns out to be a strong attack on cultural and social differences between rich and poor. Tax on breathable air is no longer a mocking issue... Curse 5.0 - very funny at the beginning, with the author himself a character in his own story. But as with the others, the course is drastically changed on the way: what begins as a childish revenge, ends up as a global destruction, because of accumulated frustrations, anger and hate. The Micro-Age - a new micro-generation is genetically modified in order to ensure humans continuity on Earth. Nothing can destroy this new human race but the previous macro-fellows... Devourer - a fable about the insignificance of human race yet at the same time about the enormous importance of sacrifice of even just a few of us. Taking Care of Gods - the ancient humans who created the current civilization(s) are returning to Earth to rest. It is the most heartbreaking story of all: how elders are perceived through the eyes of most young, once they become feeble. With Her Eyes - reminded me of movie "The Core" but, of course, this is just the set up. We are so overwhelmed by every day struggles, work and worries that we cannot longer see the beauties of the Earth around us. The Longest Fall - whenever something does not work right, an entire generation is to blame, even more when those people are thinking outside the box. Conclusion: don't take the Earth for granted and go get this book :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bonita

    Book rating : 3/5 —————————————— The Wandering Earth : 3.5/5 Mountain: 3/5 Sun of China : 4/5 For the Benefit of Mankind: 2/5 Curse 5.0 : 2.5/5 The Micro-Era : 1.5/5 Devourer : 0.5/5 Taking Care of God : 0.5/5 With Her Eyes : 5/5 Cannonball : 5/5

  4. 5 out of 5

    Florin Constantinescu

    Hands down this is the best science-fiction collection I have ever read. At least in the past ten years or so. The very accessible style (at least the English translation that I had the pleasure of reading), combined with cool original ideas is the perfect recipe. Granted, the stories hover in the same general "genre", a future Earth, with either some kind of alien invasion or a technological breakthrough threatening the planet. A personal touch that I was surprised to find and enjoyed are the " Hands down this is the best science-fiction collection I have ever read. At least in the past ten years or so. The very accessible style (at least the English translation that I had the pleasure of reading), combined with cool original ideas is the perfect recipe. Granted, the stories hover in the same general "genre", a future Earth, with either some kind of alien invasion or a technological breakthrough threatening the planet. A personal touch that I was surprised to find and enjoyed are the "soft" links between a few of the stories. Breakdown: • The Wandering Earth (novelette): 5* Sun is going to "explode" and scientists decide that our planet should "clear the neighbourhood". The concept may not be totally new (see Larry Niven's puppeteer worlds back in the 70's), but the execution is fabulous! We follow Earth's journey to the stars from its normal orbit all the way to Jupiter and beyond through the eyes of a boy growing up terrified of the sun's destructive abilities. This story is now made into a multi-million Chinese blockbuster. • Mountain (novelette): 5* Stories about strange life forms are my absolute favorites. The ones in this story originated in a planet's solid core. The description of their evolution, from the discovery of gravity and fluids to their cosmological theories and journey to Earth are what makes great sci-fi to me. • Of Ants and Dinosaurs (novella): 5* This is the best alternate history story I have ever read. In the Cretaceous, the dinosaurs develop a symbiotic relationship with the ants and their civilizations evolve on Earth together. War however follows and their extinction is NOT because of an asteroid, but because of reasons we humans might be more than familiar with. • Sun of China (novelette): 3* A large mirror is constructed in space to turn China's night into day. A poor Chinese window cleaner becomes a "space mirror cleaner" and ultimately flies off to another solar system with the mirror. • The Wages of Humanity (novelette): 3* The most bizarre (and probably weakest) story in this collection follows a ruthless assassin tasked with taking out a bunch of paupers. Otherwise Earth is invaded by aliens. Wait, what? A lot of slashing at the capitalism form of statehood is also going on. • Curse 5.0 (novelette): 3* A computer virus evolves through the years, and, as in all good virus stories, ends up destroying the Earth. Not the most terribly original idea, but well-written like everything else here. • Micro-Era (novelette): 3* A human who had left on a starship some millennia ago returns to Earth to discover that the remaining inhabitants have shrunk down to microscopic size in order to avoid the latest ecological catastrophe. The science here felt a little 'stretched'. • Devourer (novelette): 5* Aliens approach the Earth, hell-bent on devouring it with their massive ship. Humankind scrambles to put up a fight. Cool ideas again. Superb twist at the end. Sequel of sorts to "Of Ants and Dinosaurs". • Taking Care of God (novelette): 3* "Aliens" again approach the Earth, but they turn out to actually be humans who have seeded life on Earth a long time ago and now are fleeing their home world and are looking to live among us. • With Her Eyes (short story): 3* Ships are sent into the Earth's core. One breaks down and is lost. Nothing special here. • The Longest Fall (novella): 4* A large tunnel is dug through the Earth, connecting China and Antarctica. By using the 'hypersleep' trick, we see its evolution and the effect it has on humans through the eyes of a man traveling forward through time. Sequel to "With Her Eyes". Averages out to 4, but I have discretionary powers in my review, so I'll make it a five!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Grace Tenkay

    A brilliant collection of Science Fiction stories, imaginative and engaging. Some a bit over the top but the broad range of subjects makes this a great collection to enjoy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    ash | spaceyreads

    My thoughts of some of the stories: Mountain - loved this one - just like Liu to think of something so creative. I won't say much here - it's best going in blind! Sun of China - this hit close to home. Up til now most of Singapore's infrastructure is built by immigrants from China and other parts of Asia. The hard work and long hours they put in, together with their constant refrain of making enough money for their family is admirable and touching. I wish the nation would do more for them. The Wage My thoughts of some of the stories: Mountain - loved this one - just like Liu to think of something so creative. I won't say much here - it's best going in blind! Sun of China - this hit close to home. Up til now most of Singapore's infrastructure is built by immigrants from China and other parts of Asia. The hard work and long hours they put in, together with their constant refrain of making enough money for their family is admirable and touching. I wish the nation would do more for them. The Wages of Humanity - Very Black Mirror-esque and an enjoyable story about capitalism gone too far. Taking Care of Gods - nicely-tied together story about the origin of life on Earth. The Longest Fall & With Her Eyes - I love the continuity of these two stories. A touching story about science and humanity.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Juli

    After reading and loving The Three Body Problem, I definitely wanted to enjoy more stories by Cixin Liu. I love sci-fi, and these translated stories bring something different to the table than most of the modern Sci-Fi I read. The Wandering Earth is a collection of 11 stories. I first wanted to read this collection for the title story - The Wandering Earth - since a movie was made from this novella. I have a rule of always reading the book/story that a film is based on before watching the movie, After reading and loving The Three Body Problem, I definitely wanted to enjoy more stories by Cixin Liu. I love sci-fi, and these translated stories bring something different to the table than most of the modern Sci-Fi I read. The Wandering Earth is a collection of 11 stories. I first wanted to read this collection for the title story - The Wandering Earth - since a movie was made from this novella. I have a rule of always reading the book/story that a film is based on before watching the movie, and wanted to experience the story the way the author wrote it first before going to Netflix to watch the movie version. I heard the movie version was terrible so wanted to have an informed opinion. The reviews are correct -- the movie is terrible IMHO. Story is awesome....a bit absurd in spots but a great story nonetheless. The movie.....well.....watch it for yourself and see what you think. I'm glad I listened to this audio book in its entirety instead of just listening to the main story I wanted to hear. All 11 of these stories are an ode to the Earth. Some are related to each other, but all can be read as stand alone stories. The author's stories encompass some hard-hitting topics - the environment, culture, society, human nature, and science. Cixan Liu's writing is very thought provoking. It isn't the sort of sci-fi that involves robots and laser gun fights -- although I love that sort too. It's the sort of Sci-fi that makes one think about the place of human kind in the universe. The stories are varied...some are awesome, others a bit absurd....but all make the reader think deeper thoughts. At least I did. **I voluntarily listened to an review copy of this audio book from Macmillan Audio. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  8. 5 out of 5

    Malu

    Most of these stories just felt like a collection of random, underdeveloped ideas that the author was testing out. A lot of exposition, with characters simply explaining story concepts to each other rather than letting them develop over the course of the story. The writing was clunky. Also, very insistently sexist. All of the female characters were described as pretty, delicate, beautiful, with soft hair and fair voices, etc. Also there was this odd element that also existed in Death's End where Most of these stories just felt like a collection of random, underdeveloped ideas that the author was testing out. A lot of exposition, with characters simply explaining story concepts to each other rather than letting them develop over the course of the story. The writing was clunky. Also, very insistently sexist. All of the female characters were described as pretty, delicate, beautiful, with soft hair and fair voices, etc. Also there was this odd element that also existed in Death's End where female characters weren't allowed to age. Liu either kills them off or has them hibernate / space travel so that they can remain young and beautiful while the male characters become grizzled old men but they still love each other. Finally, this passage, from the story Curse 5.0: "Using the same epic framework, Cixin would write a version that embodied the hardest of hard science fiction. This edition would be aimed at the male demographic. Haitan, on the other hand, would get to work on a version that was the softest of soft fantasy literature. It would be aimed at the female demographic."

  9. 5 out of 5

    James F

    Wandering Earth is a collection of eleven science fiction stories by Liu Cixin, the author of the Remembrance of Earth's Past trilogy. I would say that all the stories in this collection are well worth reading; they offer a representative sample of his science fiction ranging from "hard" technology-based stories to more humorous and allegorical writing. Two of the stories, the first, title story "The Wandering Earth" and the seventh, "The Micro-Age", deal with humanity's attempts to survive a co Wandering Earth is a collection of eleven science fiction stories by Liu Cixin, the author of the Remembrance of Earth's Past trilogy. I would say that all the stories in this collection are well worth reading; they offer a representative sample of his science fiction ranging from "hard" technology-based stories to more humorous and allegorical writing. Two of the stories, the first, title story "The Wandering Earth" and the seventh, "The Micro-Age", deal with humanity's attempts to survive a cosmic disaster, the explosion of the sun. The first is hard science fiction, though with a human angle, while the second is less realistic. The second story, "Mountain", was perhaps my favorite; it starts from the simple idea of a "hollow earth", not as the cranks who think the Earth is hollow with people living on the inner surface conceive it but (as we all proved in first year physics) with no gravity in the interior, and proceeds to ask how physics would have developed in such a world. This is combined with a frame story set on Earth. The third story, "Of Ants and Dinosaurs", is an obvious allegory of "Mutual Assured Destruction" and at first seemed somewhat too blatently didactic, until I realized that it was also an homage to Isaac Asimov who wrote a similar story about dinosaurs back in the "golden age". The eighth story, "Devourer" is a sort of sequel to this; the basic premise was reminiscent of a certain Doctor Who episode but that may be coincidence. It also fits in with the "dark forest" hypothesis of the trilogy but with a difference. The fourth story, "Sun of China", has a technological device in common with one episode in the trilogy, and is also somewhat outdated, having an appearance by a hundred-year-old Stephen Hawking; one slight problem with Liu Cixin's science fiction in general is that many of his stories, and the first book of the trilogy, take place or at least begin in the present or recent past with events which have obviously not occurred and technology which doesn't yet exist. I liked the way he points out that space exploration will not be real until the working class goes into space. Number five, "The Wages of Humanity" (apparently in a different edition this is titled "For the Benefit of Mankind"), is a social satire, which reminded me of a story by Stanislaw Lem (of course) but this might also be coincidence. These two stories seemed the most specifically "Chinese". Number six, "Curse 5.0" is obviously related to an incident in the second book of his trilogy, the virus which targets specific individuals (and perhaps the danger of viruses taking control of internet-linked appliances should be given more thought in the real world), but is also a sort of self-parody of his fascination with disasters, with Liu Cixin himself as one of the characters. Number nine, "Taking Care of Gods" was included in the anthology edited by Ken Liu that I read a couple months back. The last two stories, "With Her Eyes", and "The Longest Fall" are also related to one another, with the first story referred to in the second, although I'm not sure they are entirely compatible. They also go back to the ideas of first year physics.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Alexander

    A delightful collection of imaginative science fiction. Each story in The Wandering Earth is a cascade of ideas. Liu Cixin starts each one with a concept, which then leads to another, and then a third, and on. He's not shy about yanking a narrative sideways into another world, then circling back to the start to ring changes. Most of the stories feature embedded stories. The stories have a large emotional range, from joy to tragedy, civilizational disaster to triumph. Generically all are recogniza A delightful collection of imaginative science fiction. Each story in The Wandering Earth is a cascade of ideas. Liu Cixin starts each one with a concept, which then leads to another, and then a third, and on. He's not shy about yanking a narrative sideways into another world, then circling back to the start to ring changes. Most of the stories feature embedded stories. The stories have a large emotional range, from joy to tragedy, civilizational disaster to triumph. Generically all are recognizable as science fiction, but touch on other genres and tones, including crime and satire. (For the latter, Cixin mocks himself as a character in one story.) These are very political stories - not in the sense of urging a point of view upon the reader, but as studies of how humans act together, especially in the face of huge challenges and scientific developments. Well, I take that back. One story openly celebrates workers and ordinary people becoming heroes in space in terms of anti-elitism. Several topes run through the stories deeply, even to the point of being shared world tales. Cixin focuses on disaster coming from the skies, either through alien incursions or solar catastrophe. Balancing this is a focus on heading underground, even to (and through) the Earth's center. Several stories involve dinosaurs. And size is an issue, with arguments about the importance of smallness and the fragility yet awesomeness of gigantism. I wish I could read Chinese, and also be more sensitive to details of current Chinese culture and politics, so that I could suss out some of the references and resonances. For example, in one story the Earth becomes a gigantic spacecraft, dotted with enormous rockets. At one point only the "eastern" and "Asian" rockets succeed. Should I read this as a nationalist statement? The aforementioned tale about ordinary workers becoming space heroes: does this fit squarely with the Communist Party line today, or is it satirical? One character is noted for his "proverbial Asian cool"; is that prideful or mocking? I can't tell the meaning of Chinese language names... and neither can I assess the translation's quality. Each story is quite readable. One interesting note for the future of education: in "The Wages of Humanity" we learn of a planet that invents a way to teach people through direct brain stimulation. Interestingly, the process is so expensive that it remains the province of the elite. Recommended for anyone interested in science fiction or contemporary China.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I had a difficult time trying to think of ways to explain how Cixin Liu's collection of science fiction short stories, The Wandering Earth, affected me. But in the end, I have to say it was sheer awe at his writing ability that was the overwhelming factor in my decision to go buy more of his books. (And I have!) This was indeed the first work I'd read by him, being personally more enamored of 'softer' sci-fi. I prefer more rollicking space adventures usually, so this book of novellas was a depar I had a difficult time trying to think of ways to explain how Cixin Liu's collection of science fiction short stories, The Wandering Earth, affected me. But in the end, I have to say it was sheer awe at his writing ability that was the overwhelming factor in my decision to go buy more of his books. (And I have!) This was indeed the first work I'd read by him, being personally more enamored of 'softer' sci-fi. I prefer more rollicking space adventures usually, so this book of novellas was a departure for me. I worried that the "hard" sci-fi within would lose me, or that the science would be so esoteric as to leave me feeling cold. I am happy to say that this was not the case! The characters in the stories captured my attention first, then my heart as I came to care for each one, even those who were not as immediately likable as human beings, such as the narrator of the story "Mountain". When first faced by aliens, this man asks not "Why are you destroying our planet", nor does he scream "Stop killing us!". Instead, he begins a long discourse with them on explorations and thereby finally finds a common link between humans and aliens. Now that did shock me out of my usual mindset a bit. I expected more an immediate alarmist response like the yelling and screaming at the aliens who were killing us all by sheer accident of their arrival. However, that isn't really what the story was about, and as soon as that was obvious (really quickly so) then I settled in for a more philosophically enlightening read. The narrator might have felt initially cold, but this was a man so profoundly affected by his personal history of mountain climbing and the tragedy he suffered during it, that he decided to basically punish himself forever. Many of the people and beings found within Liu's stories are traumatized in some way. Their tragedies propel actions and carry us along for the ride. One of the most moving tales in the book was "With Her Eyes", a tale of a man exploring a world using the 'eyes' of a woman trapped within said world, yet unable to see it anymore. I dare not explain further as it would spoil the story too much. Not all is tragic, however. There is plenty of humor to be found amidst the debris and destruction in these stories. "Curse 5.0" had me chuckling and shaking my head at the quickly spiraling events caused by one little computer virus. There were moments of humor amongst the pathos of the story entitled "Of Ants and Dinosaurs", a tale which originally felt as though the moral would conk me over the head a little too hard but became one of my favorites as it irresistibly drew me into an alternate Earth and it's vastly changed history. Overall, the language of Liu's writing captured my mind and heart most of all, more so than his possible worlds or characters. His writing is absolutely lyrical at times, and intelligent throughout. One of my favorite sections of the book is in the first, title, story: "I’ve never seen the night, nor seen a star; I’ve seen neither spring, nor fall, nor winter. I was born at the end of the Reining Age, just as the Earth’s rotation was coming to a final halt. The Sun is about to unleash a helium flash, threatening to swallow all terrestrial planets in the solar system. On Earth, the Unity Government has erected Earth Engines. With them it plans to propel our planet out of the solar system, setting it on a journey into outer space in search of a new sun. The Earth begins its centuries-long, wandering travels through outer space. Just as we began our journey, my grandfather passed away, his burnt body ravaged by infection. In his final moments, he repeated over and over, “Oh, Earth, my wandering Earth...”" Just like *that* I was sucked into the story and carried along on an epic journey of hopes and fears. I highly recommend "The Wandering Earth" for anyone who appreciates the 'what if's and 'maybes' that are presented in science fiction. The sci-fi within these pages may be considered 'hard' by some but was easily understandable by this layperson with only a passing interest in the depths of physics and genetics (to name two) dealt with here. The science may have driven a lot of the action, but it was never the entire centerpiece of any story, which makes this writing readable, relatable, and wonderful. This review is an unbiased and faithful personal view of a book in return for a free copy from NetGalley. It also refers to a newly released English language edition of a collection previously released in China and once before years ago. The latest publisher, Head of Zeus, is releasing much of the author's work to the delight of us new fans in beautiful new editions with excellent translation.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chip

    Some intriguing concepts, but the characterization and other human elements are so lacking as to be almost nonexistent - characters exist only a framework is needed upon which stories can be hung.

  13. 4 out of 5

    p ☁️

    3.5 stars overall. As usual with a collection of short stories, some of the stories were amazing, some were good and some were boring. So I’m rating and reviewing each story separately. The Wandering Earth 5 stars Mind blowing. Incredible. This story set up my really high expectations for the rest of the book. I’m not going to spoil anything -it’s best to go in knowing nothing, just waiting to be amazed by how smart Liu is. I’m so glad this was the first story because it’s so imaginative! Mountain 5 3.5 stars overall. As usual with a collection of short stories, some of the stories were amazing, some were good and some were boring. So I’m rating and reviewing each story separately. The Wandering Earth 5 stars Mind blowing. Incredible. This story set up my really high expectations for the rest of the book. I’m not going to spoil anything -it’s best to go in knowing nothing, just waiting to be amazed by how smart Liu is. I’m so glad this was the first story because it’s so imaginative! Mountain 5 stars Another super creative story. I really love this one because a l i e n s. It’s quite different to the first story and almost as good. Sun of China 4 stars This story was alright. It’s not very original, but it’s written in an epic style. I think it’s pretty wild that the Sun of China was written before China’s artificial moon was announced. For the Benefit of Mankind 3 stars This story was very strange. I can’t say I understood what was going on but all the different characters and cultures were entertaining! Curse 5.0 4 stars At the expense of sounding like a t3rrori$t, I think this story is hilarious! Liu inserts himself as a sci-fi writer who’s friends with another sci-fi author, Pan Dajiao. Pan writes in lighter style than Liu, but they’re both homeless. The technological advancement of the city is pretty generic/accepted, which makes the plot of Curse 5.0 really funny. The Micro-Era 3 stars As the name indicates, humanity lives in the micro-era in this story. Everything is at the microscopic scale, including humans, spaceships and units of measurement. The Micro-Era is told from the perspective of a normal-sized or macro-era human. I found it a bit boring honestly. Devourer 2 stars This story made no sense to me. The passage of time, aliens, the devourer, dirt?? none of that worked. I don’t really know anything except it’s a pre-apocalypse and post-apocalypse kind of story. Taking Care of God 4 stars The title pretty much tells you what this story is about. It’s fantastical and sad. With Her Eyes 3 stars This story isn’t very unique. It’s a cool concept that normalises space travel, but it’s been done before. Cannonball 1 star I skimmed through this one. It was mindnumbingly boring. The concept was honestly really cool, except it was written really badly. It was pretty much was an info dump of engineering that gave you no opportunity to actually understand the world or the character’s interests.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hicks

    (Not the Kindle edition in my case, but a trade-format paperback) So, take some Big SF Ideas, add a dash of unlikely, shake well, and examine the consequences. Extinction of humanity? Cool - where's the human story, let's see, aha! There it is. Extinction of earth? Same. Ants vs. dinosaurs. OK, skip the "human" part, where's the POV story of one character? ... and so on. Maybe not really a five-star, but it got there on bonuses -- for fresh ideas, for attitude that suggests Jack Vance without rea (Not the Kindle edition in my case, but a trade-format paperback) So, take some Big SF Ideas, add a dash of unlikely, shake well, and examine the consequences. Extinction of humanity? Cool - where's the human story, let's see, aha! There it is. Extinction of earth? Same. Ants vs. dinosaurs. OK, skip the "human" part, where's the POV story of one character? ... and so on. Maybe not really a five-star, but it got there on bonuses -- for fresh ideas, for attitude that suggests Jack Vance without really being anything like him, maybe for the overall feeling of "Isn't this fun to think about?" And maybe even a bonus for presenting these as stories, so that the character development expected in a novel isn't there. I think that's appropriate in this case. And the last story has as much human pathos as one could want. In this publication, I felt that it was produced by people who speak English very well but not natively. There are typos, word swaps, unusual use of hyphens, and other small distractions. I forgive it all when the translators have managed to maintain a distinct authorial attitude or character while also giving us the stories. These stories won awards from 1999-2004, so the oldest is probably 20 years old. Worth remembering if you are comparing to his more recent work. And if you don't like Big Idea hard SF, maybe look elsewhere. This ain't space opera, or Hammer's Slammers; no 20-km-long spaceships, no rogue AIs, no ansibles, no teleportation, no telepathy. Just some interesting What If?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ajam

    4⚝ I had previously read 'Of Ants and Dinosaurs', 'Mountain' and 'The Wandering Earth'. At the time, my excitement was immeasurable and hardly contained that I dived straight into his The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth's Past Trilogy) and read them all back to back. After a year of hiatus, and a significant lack of some good Liu Cixin in my life, I decided I had better finish this. And I am not disappointed. Here's hoping to get around to more of his published works sooner than later. ⩨ 4⚝ I had previously read 'Of Ants and Dinosaurs', 'Mountain' and 'The Wandering Earth'. At the time, my excitement was immeasurable and hardly contained that I dived straight into his The Three-Body Problem (Remembrance of Earth's Past Trilogy) and read them all back to back. After a year of hiatus, and a significant lack of some good Liu Cixin in my life, I decided I had better finish this. And I am not disappointed. Here's hoping to get around to more of his published works sooner than later. ⩨NFO ⩐ Read Via Moon+ReaderPro Android-AsusXOOTD The Wandering Earth - 5★ Mountain - 5★ Of Ants and Dinosaurs - 5★ Sun of China - 4.5★ The Wages of Humanity - 4★ Curse 5.0 - 3.5★ The Micro-Age - 3★ Devourer - 4★ Taking Care of Gods - 4★ With Her Eyes - 3.5★ The Longest Fall - 3.5★ ⩨FootNotes/Remarks: -N/A

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Wandro

    Very cool to see the beginnings of ideas that ended up in the "Three Body Problem" trilogy. Liu Cixin amazes me with his ability to take the most outlandish scenarios involving the future (and past) of Earth and its technology, and turn them into totally believable situations with scientific backing. For example: the Sun is going to explode, so of course humanity would build giant rockets to move the Earth to a new star. He seems to have a weird fascination with ants and dinosaurs. I would absol Very cool to see the beginnings of ideas that ended up in the "Three Body Problem" trilogy. Liu Cixin amazes me with his ability to take the most outlandish scenarios involving the future (and past) of Earth and its technology, and turn them into totally believable situations with scientific backing. For example: the Sun is going to explode, so of course humanity would build giant rockets to move the Earth to a new star. He seems to have a weird fascination with ants and dinosaurs. I would absolutely recommend reading the "Three Body Problem" trilogy first, and then reading these short stories later when you are desperate to recapture the magic because nothing else you've read has even come close. My favorite stories were 1. Mountain 2. Devourer 3. of Ants and Dinosaurs. Thoughts on each story "The Wandering Earth": Cool idea, nice story. End was a bit silly. "Mountain": Favorite story. The history of the alien civilization was brilliant. "Of Ants and Dinosaurs": Neat story. Feels weird at first but ends up being pretty great. "Sun of China": Nice story. Not super exciting but very uplifting. "The Wages of Humanity":the overall story was weak but the backstory of the main character was very cool. "Curse 5.0": the weakest story. Idea is kinda decent but execution not great. "The Micro-Age": Interesting story. Average. "Devourer": Coolest and most exciting story. "Taking Care of Gods": Interesting idea. Good story. Fun take on religion. "With Her Eyes": A short, emotional punch in the kidneys. "The Longest Fall": Neat idea. Decent story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    LAS

    The Wandering Earth 5/5, I was obsessed and now I get it. I get why people like to read Liu’s work. Mountain 5/5, I like how morally grey the protagonist is. Of Ants and Dinosaurs 5/5, this one made me laugh several times. Very interesting. Sun of China, 5/5 I think this was my favorite. It left me feeling very hopeful. The Wages of Humanity, 3/5 I was a bit bored by this one. Curse 5.0, 5/5 love that for her. The Micro-Age 5/5, I thought this one was so interesting and also took a suddenly dark turn. The Wandering Earth 5/5, I was obsessed and now I get it. I get why people like to read Liu’s work. Mountain 5/5, I like how morally grey the protagonist is. Of Ants and Dinosaurs 5/5, this one made me laugh several times. Very interesting. Sun of China, 5/5 I think this was my favorite. It left me feeling very hopeful. The Wages of Humanity, 3/5 I was a bit bored by this one. Curse 5.0, 5/5 love that for her. The Micro-Age 5/5, I thought this one was so interesting and also took a suddenly dark turn. Devourer 5/5, Ultron could never. Taking Care of Gods 5/5, I really liked this concept even if it did feel a bit long winded by the end but that kind of fit the God’s character. With Her Eyes 5/5, I think the twist with this one made it more heartfelt. I think the idea of terranauts is so cool. The Longest Fall 4/5, I like how this one looped back to the story before, but it also got to be a little long winded in the end.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shreyas Karanth

    Just when I thought I'd read most of the great sci-fi short story collections, Liu Cixin comes along and surprises me. I loved the sheer variety and novelty of stories, and the subtle connections between them. It's also been translated really well; I never felt that the stories weren't originally written in English at any point of time. Highly recommend this for sci-fi fans! Just when I thought I'd read most of the great sci-fi short story collections, Liu Cixin comes along and surprises me. I loved the sheer variety and novelty of stories, and the subtle connections between them. It's also been translated really well; I never felt that the stories weren't originally written in English at any point of time. Highly recommend this for sci-fi fans!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sheity Williams

    I'm not used to reading standalone short stories. I tend to have a hard time relating to the characters and caring about their fate. I don't have enough time to get immersed in the story and when I do, the story's already over. But I guess I had yet to come across the exception when my way of thinking was this. Utter fascination is the word I'd use to describe my opinion of this. Even if there were a couple of stories I did not like as much, the rest were true diamond treasures. Wild ideas develo I'm not used to reading standalone short stories. I tend to have a hard time relating to the characters and caring about their fate. I don't have enough time to get immersed in the story and when I do, the story's already over. But I guess I had yet to come across the exception when my way of thinking was this. Utter fascination is the word I'd use to describe my opinion of this. Even if there were a couple of stories I did not like as much, the rest were true diamond treasures. Wild ideas developed to the point where you might actually believe they could be true. If you look past the possible scientific inaccuracies (I don't think this book was meant to be 100% scientifically accurate, it's fiction, after all), you get a unique experience that'll take you across stars and into the deepest layers of our planet as well, a fact I did not expect, but welcomed with open arms. This book sparked my interest in various fields of science. Now I want to dig a bit into everything! I've been beyond inspired by this book, I want to include and morph so many things into my own projects I don't even know where to start. It is true there were a couple of slower stories, where it was harder for me to get into the flow of the story, but the rest made up for it so well it was easy for me to forget. I've never been more impressed by the unexpected. Reading this filled me with satisfaction and I believe it's a must for any sci-fi fan out there.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sherron Wahrheit

    If you like golden age science fiction, you will enjoy this collection of stories. The focus is on science, the plots unfold in a straightforward manner, and the social mores fit better with the 1950s. However, the observations, dark humor, and irony are every bit characteristic of the 2020s. I do see his treatment of women as something that was sexist back in the golden age of sf, but it may be representative of his cultural mores and personal experiences. Republished in 2021 and narrated by Th If you like golden age science fiction, you will enjoy this collection of stories. The focus is on science, the plots unfold in a straightforward manner, and the social mores fit better with the 1950s. However, the observations, dark humor, and irony are every bit characteristic of the 2020s. I do see his treatment of women as something that was sexist back in the golden age of sf, but it may be representative of his cultural mores and personal experiences. Republished in 2021 and narrated by Theodore Chen and Greg Chung. In these stories, the author gives us stories about the continuing fallibility of man and mankind. Wandering Earth. 2000 In the future, scientists have discovered that the sun is dying, so what is humanity to do? Of course there is no consensus. Some, having little understanding of science, want to build self-sufficient generation ships from which to search for a new planet to call home. Others, having seen no successful model of a self-sufficient system, want to move the ENTIRE earth to the next closest star instead. Right up until launch time, both sides are still arguing, even though genetic manipulation science has created a higher percentage of smarter people. The process of guiding the earth out of our galaxy is narrated by a Chinese man over the course of his lifetime. Along the way, he shows us a people made rational by science to tamp down the illogical human emotional response: no more hindrance of hormones, no more stifling marital fidelity, no waste of love on children. He speaks of the impact on climate change and universal fear—so it seems that emotions cannot actually be subsumed. The telling is taut, compressed, and bleakly emotional. Mountain. 2006 This is a story about a man who has the mind of an engineer and the soul of a mountaineer. He’s currently working onboard a ship in the ocean, and he begins by explaining to the captain how his responsibility for a climbing disaster in the past has shaped his current life. To punish himself for the deaths of his climbing mates, he has relegated himself to life at sea—never to set foot on land much less on a mountain. From the boat they see a “mountain” of water and understand this anomaly was created by aliens hovering above in a spaceship. “Why do you climb mountains?” “Because it’s there!” A universally recognizable call and response. Whether Chinese, British, German, this urge seems universal and I was surprised to see that sentiment explored here. Mountaineers and explorers are important to the race, so the engineer hops out of the boat to climb the water. Meanwhile, the ship captain quickly steers clear of this strange anomaly, as the converse urge of self preservation is also important to humanity’s success. This is also a first contact story. As such, it shows the hubris of assuming you understand others. And the telling is interesting as well as humorous. Incidentally, this story is full of puns—intentional? Probably not. Sun of China. 2002 This story begins with a poetic analogy between the old dry cracked lines of a farmer’s face and the destroyed, dry cracked ground below. Both—lacking moisture. The crux of the story is water, fulfilling desires, and personal ambition as the farmer’s son searches for clean water, along the way, he thinks and grows as he learns new things. This story speaks to the inability of even wise people to see value and utility of inventions—or even other people. Wages of Humanity. 2005 An elite hitman learns lessons in economic theory from an alien. Explores education. Class. Hierarchy. Post humanism. Greed. Curse 5.0. 2010 A computer virus kicking around on the internet gains power as jilted lovers and jaded hackers incrementally ratchet up its destructive parameters. The final team of two hackers are none other than Cixin Liu himself as a disillusioned sf author accompanied by an equally disillusioned friend and fellow fantasy author. There is lots of dark and self-deprecatory humor. *,*,* Micro-age. In preparation for a cataclysmic solar event, earth sends astronauts to find a new planet for human colonization. Long after the destructive event has torn through earth, and long all other astronauts have died, the last astronaut gives up and returns back to earth—where he discovers he’s supersized, like Gulliver among the Lilliputians, when meets teenie tiny earth people—and makes a really big decision. Devourer. 2002 Our big ol’ dinosaurs are baaaaa-ack and boy are they hungry! This story is funny yet horrifying. Conveys many themes pertaining to war, compassion, social disparity, and tenacity. Taking Care of God. 2005 A humorous yet sad depiction of the race of gods who created us but have now lost their power and in retirement need our support. A story about responsibility, aging, and pride. With Her Eyes. 1999 Mankind has explored the seas and skies and now the earth’s core. This poignant exploration into earth calls to mind Edgar Rice Burrows tunneling stories but with heaps of loneliness. A fervent reminder to enjoy life. Cannonball/The Longest Fall. 2003 After a worldwide nuclear peace treaty, a scientist uses his invention of a super dense material in the efficient subterranean destruction of these banned nuclear devices. His precocious 8 yo child watches in awe and glee, while the geologist mother wonders if she has birthed a monster. The scientist soon becomes ill and goes into suspended sleep until he can be cured. Meanwhile, the son grows up and uses this material to bore straight through the earth, which becomes the crux of the story. A few decades later, the scientist awakens with his cancer cured—only to face the aftermath of his son’s actions. This is another “deep” story, (sorry, pun intended) fraught with mistakes and misunderstandings. Referencing Jules Verne, it explores ideas of judgment, unintended consequences, criminality, revenge, and punishment. Thank you NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for my feedback.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Blind_guardian

    Cixin is apparently known for destroying everything within reach of his stories, and that shows in this collection of often depressing, sometimes enthralling, and always hard science-type science fiction from the Chinese author. There are times when his hard materialistic view does bog down the wonder inherent in the fantastic setpieces he creates, and as is often the case with short stories, it's a crapshoot whether the human race becomes a shaggy dog story in the footnotes of the galaxy or if Cixin is apparently known for destroying everything within reach of his stories, and that shows in this collection of often depressing, sometimes enthralling, and always hard science-type science fiction from the Chinese author. There are times when his hard materialistic view does bog down the wonder inherent in the fantastic setpieces he creates, and as is often the case with short stories, it's a crapshoot whether the human race becomes a shaggy dog story in the footnotes of the galaxy or if greater things await us. Some of the short stories tie into one another, with two stories making mention of a race of "Gods" from deep space, who seeded the Earth with its biology billions of years ago, and two stories dealing with a race of spacefaring dinosaurs and their opponents, the sentient ants. Turns out it wasn't a meteor that killed the dinosaurs ... Overall, it's a good collection of stories, but I need something a bit less dreary and deterministic to cleanse my palette now...

  22. 5 out of 5

    SR

    This is a lot of heavy nerd crap - needless to say, I love it. Translation suffers a bit in punctuation and speech tags but I'll live. This is a lot of heavy nerd crap - needless to say, I love it. Translation suffers a bit in punctuation and speech tags but I'll live.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tofu

    Since it's a collection of short stories, the stories range from great ones, where I wished he would turn them into a 2000 pages trilogy to so bad, it was hard to finish them. I try to rate each one: 1. 5/5 probably the reason, to read the book. This story is in the quality of the three body problem, but way to short. 1000+ pages would be acceptable 2. 3/5 Nice story about the first contact with aliens, only the mountaneering-part was a little bit weird in it 3. 4,5/5 my second favorite. It just sh Since it's a collection of short stories, the stories range from great ones, where I wished he would turn them into a 2000 pages trilogy to so bad, it was hard to finish them. I try to rate each one: 1. 5/5 probably the reason, to read the book. This story is in the quality of the three body problem, but way to short. 1000+ pages would be acceptable 2. 3/5 Nice story about the first contact with aliens, only the mountaneering-part was a little bit weird in it 3. 4,5/5 my second favorite. It just shows, what kind of crazy ideas Cixin Liu has, and I love to read one of those ideas in a wonderful story like this 4. 3/5 Nice idea, but somehow I didn't really liked the story to much. And the story ended, when it started to become exciting 5. 4/5 I really liked the story. It's kind of a Genesis-Story of Humanity, but in a Cixin-Liu-Way. 6. 1/5 or even less. The best part of the story was, that it was quite short. It was just awful. Some parts were quite sexist, and it was full of unlogic parts. 7. 4/5 Again, a very crazy idea packed into a nice story. It shows one possible future for humanity, and teaches us about how to be human 8. 4,5/5 It's kind of a sequel to the third story, but totally different. It's about war, but in a scientific way. Liked it 9. 2,5/5 This story focused to much on individual persons, also I didn't like the explanations given for what happens 10. 3/5 could be a great story, but had a big plothole in my opinion: Spoilerwarning: Why did the future people hated the father so much? I mean, it was like, everyone, even policeman hated him and wanted not just to kill him, but to hurt him really bad by doing so. Just for giving birth and rising a child, which created a great idea later, which lead to accidents national bankruptcy? Made no sense at all! 11. 3,5/5 A really short, but lovely story about to esteem our environment and our world

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zella

    I really liked this collection. It has the same issues as other works by Liu - unchallenged sexism, limited character development, a universal speaking voice for almost all characters that doesn't sound like real speech, and a reliance on the same character tropes (the genius scientist with no regard for the consequences of his actions, the cool-under-pressure military man who solves problems politicians are too afraid to even attempt, etc). But having said that, I think there are some really coo I really liked this collection. It has the same issues as other works by Liu - unchallenged sexism, limited character development, a universal speaking voice for almost all characters that doesn't sound like real speech, and a reliance on the same character tropes (the genius scientist with no regard for the consequences of his actions, the cool-under-pressure military man who solves problems politicians are too afraid to even attempt, etc). But having said that, I think there are some really cool ideas here. Liu is at his best when he's inventing interesting aliens, in my opinion, and this collection has several good ideas along those lines. I'm especially fond of "Mountain" and I also quite liked the story about the hitman that satirizes both communism and capitalism. There's also a story that feels like it would have never been written by a western author, focusing on themes of filial piety towards aliens who may be our progenitors. Overall I think many of the themes here are really strong, and this collection of shorter stories allows the themes and ideas to shine without being weighed down too much by anything else.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Yevgeniy Brikman

    The good Liu Cixin comes up with some of the most original, epic sci fi ideas of any author in recent memory. There are several wow moments in these short stories that'll make your eyes go wide, and you'll have to pause and take a few moments to process them. A few of the short stories are especially memorable: - The Wandering Earth - The Longest Fall - With Her Eyes - The Micro-Age - Devourer Of these, the first short story, from which this collection takes its name, is my favorite, with a wow moment The good Liu Cixin comes up with some of the most original, epic sci fi ideas of any author in recent memory. There are several wow moments in these short stories that'll make your eyes go wide, and you'll have to pause and take a few moments to process them. A few of the short stories are especially memorable: - The Wandering Earth - The Longest Fall - With Her Eyes - The Micro-Age - Devourer Of these, the first short story, from which this collection takes its name, is my favorite, with a wow moment right in the opening few paragraphs. The not so good - The characters in these short stories, as in Cixin's other stories, don't feel like people at all. They are effectively overly dramatized, two dimensional plot devices. - The writing is not great. Note that this could be more of an artifact of the particular English translation I'm reading. - As often happens with short stories, just as you're getting into the story, it ends.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nilesh

    The collection has eleven stories, each deserving of the highest rating - something this reviewer has felt about any anthology he has read. The author has absolutely the wildest imagination of any writer of any time. In addition, he is bestowed with two other qualities: an ability to create simple, heart-warming stories amid the most complex backdrops and weave in humanities' important social issues while providing fresh views and perspectives. That said, all these are bonuses. The author keeps c The collection has eleven stories, each deserving of the highest rating - something this reviewer has felt about any anthology he has read. The author has absolutely the wildest imagination of any writer of any time. In addition, he is bestowed with two other qualities: an ability to create simple, heart-warming stories amid the most complex backdrops and weave in humanities' important social issues while providing fresh views and perspectives. That said, all these are bonuses. The author keeps conjuring extraordinary worlds in every story, with each more outstanding than the rest! From the stories where our globe becomes a rocket ship to another where an end-to-end tunnel through the earth's core works as a runway, from the human-eating giant aliens to humans turning nano-sized Lilliputians for survival, planet-eating aliens and two billion gods, Cixin Liu flaunts how is the master of conjuring the unthinkable. In a way, there are eleven five-star books in this one collection.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    His short stories are an interesting flavor in comparison to his full-length books. When he doesn't have to go too much into detail, relative to his books, he's much freer to explore some wilder concepts. I liked the hope and optimism for space and the future some of the stories had, especially in The China Sun (my fave of the book). If people found the 3BP trilogy long-winded, I'd recommend giving his short stories a try. His short stories are an interesting flavor in comparison to his full-length books. When he doesn't have to go too much into detail, relative to his books, he's much freer to explore some wilder concepts. I liked the hope and optimism for space and the future some of the stories had, especially in The China Sun (my fave of the book). If people found the 3BP trilogy long-winded, I'd recommend giving his short stories a try.

  28. 4 out of 5

    baibai

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Did not realise when i bought this that it was a short story collection but still i really enjoyed it and actually finished reading (at first i didnt think i would). Would definitely read Liu Cixin again and also would read collection of short stories again. The Wandering Earth- 3, the ending ruined it for me Mountain - 5 - thought the concept of the other planet was so original Sun of China - 3 For the Benefit of Mankind - 3 Curse 5.0 - 4 The Micro-Era - 2 Devourer - 4 Taking Care of God - 3 With Her Ey Did not realise when i bought this that it was a short story collection but still i really enjoyed it and actually finished reading (at first i didnt think i would). Would definitely read Liu Cixin again and also would read collection of short stories again. The Wandering Earth- 3, the ending ruined it for me Mountain - 5 - thought the concept of the other planet was so original Sun of China - 3 For the Benefit of Mankind - 3 Curse 5.0 - 4 The Micro-Era - 2 Devourer - 4 Taking Care of God - 3 With Her Eyes - 4 Cannonball - 5, liked the link to With Her Eyes, wasn't expecting that

  29. 4 out of 5

    Roel

    Some refreshing and interesting ideas. Big fan of this guy so far.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Subramaniam

    Beautiful collection of short stories which are fascinating, mind blowing and thought provoking. Liu Cixin never ceases to amaze us with his audacious imagination.

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