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Smokejumper: A Memoir by One of America's Most Select Airborne Firefighters

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A rare inside look at the thrilling world of smokejumpers, the airborne firefighters who parachute into the most remote and rugged areas of the United States, confronting the growing threat of nature’s blazes. Forest and wildland fires are growing larger, more numerous, and deadlier every year — record drought conditions, decades of forestry mismanagement, and the increasin A rare inside look at the thrilling world of smokejumpers, the airborne firefighters who parachute into the most remote and rugged areas of the United States, confronting the growing threat of nature’s blazes. Forest and wildland fires are growing larger, more numerous, and deadlier every year — record drought conditions, decades of forestry mismanagement, and the increasing encroachment of residential housing into the wilderness have combined to create a powder keg that threatens millions of acres and thousands of lives every year. One select group of men and women are part of America's front-line defense: smokejumpers. The smokejumper program operates through both the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. Though they are tremendously skilled and only highly experienced and able wildland firefighters are accepted into the training program, being a smokejumper remains an art that can only be learned on the job. Forest fires often behave in unpredictable ways: spreading almost instantaneously, shooting downhill behind a stiff tailwind, or even flowing like a liquid. In this extraordinarily rare memoir by an active-duty jumper, Jason Ramos takes readers into his exhilarating and dangerous world, explores smokejumping’s remarkable history, and explains why their services are more essential than ever before.


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A rare inside look at the thrilling world of smokejumpers, the airborne firefighters who parachute into the most remote and rugged areas of the United States, confronting the growing threat of nature’s blazes. Forest and wildland fires are growing larger, more numerous, and deadlier every year — record drought conditions, decades of forestry mismanagement, and the increasin A rare inside look at the thrilling world of smokejumpers, the airborne firefighters who parachute into the most remote and rugged areas of the United States, confronting the growing threat of nature’s blazes. Forest and wildland fires are growing larger, more numerous, and deadlier every year — record drought conditions, decades of forestry mismanagement, and the increasing encroachment of residential housing into the wilderness have combined to create a powder keg that threatens millions of acres and thousands of lives every year. One select group of men and women are part of America's front-line defense: smokejumpers. The smokejumper program operates through both the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. Though they are tremendously skilled and only highly experienced and able wildland firefighters are accepted into the training program, being a smokejumper remains an art that can only be learned on the job. Forest fires often behave in unpredictable ways: spreading almost instantaneously, shooting downhill behind a stiff tailwind, or even flowing like a liquid. In this extraordinarily rare memoir by an active-duty jumper, Jason Ramos takes readers into his exhilarating and dangerous world, explores smokejumping’s remarkable history, and explains why their services are more essential than ever before.

30 review for Smokejumper: A Memoir by One of America's Most Select Airborne Firefighters

  1. 4 out of 5

    Joy D

    This book is part memoir, part history of wildfires, and part smokejumper publicity. The author recounts his early experiences in California to his training as a smokejumper to his smoke jumping assignments in the Washington Cascades. He provides an account of both triumphs and tragedies in wildland firefighting history. It gives the background of smokejumping, dating back to 1939, and outlook for the future. It is a story of hard work, dedication, and comradeship. Each summer, I am a first-hand This book is part memoir, part history of wildfires, and part smokejumper publicity. The author recounts his early experiences in California to his training as a smokejumper to his smoke jumping assignments in the Washington Cascades. He provides an account of both triumphs and tragedies in wildland firefighting history. It gives the background of smokejumping, dating back to 1939, and outlook for the future. It is a story of hard work, dedication, and comradeship. Each summer, I am a first-hand observer of the results of wildfires – either from the smoky environment where we are encouraged to stay indoors or observing burning areas from a distance. So, I was interested to find out more about the ways these fires are managed and extinguished. This book provides a detailed description of the methods and gear used. The strength of this book is the sheer amount of information conveyed in a relatively short number of pages. The style is direct and colloquial. Ramos expresses his opinions and ideas for improvements. It certainly fit the bill for what I had been seeking. I particularly enjoyed segment of past and personal photos. 3.5

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gea

    I absolutely loved this book. Smokejumper by Jason A. Ramos and Julian Smith is a whip fast, fun, and fascinating read. It is also, at times, deeply sad. As a firefighter myself, I've always been intrigued by smokejumpers--the fittest and most elite of wildland firefighters. Not only do they parachute out of planes to get to fires that no one else can reach, they hike across unbelievably rough terrain, often where no trails exist, carrying over a hundred pounds of gear and equipment on their bac I absolutely loved this book. Smokejumper by Jason A. Ramos and Julian Smith is a whip fast, fun, and fascinating read. It is also, at times, deeply sad. As a firefighter myself, I've always been intrigued by smokejumpers--the fittest and most elite of wildland firefighters. Not only do they parachute out of planes to get to fires that no one else can reach, they hike across unbelievably rough terrain, often where no trails exist, carrying over a hundred pounds of gear and equipment on their backs. Fewer than 500 of them are active at any time in the US, which means they don't have much backup and if they get in trouble, there is no quick or easy exit. In other words, they're the badasses of wildland firefighting. Highly independent. Tough. Individualistic. No matter how competent and conscientious you are on a fire, sometimes bad shit just happens, even to the best of us. There are three threads to Smokejumper: FF Ramos' own story (how a city boy from L.A. became a remote wilderness firefighter), a history of smokejumping (absolutely fascinating in and of itself) and a concise overview of three of our deadliest wildland fires including the Yarnell Hill Fire which killed 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots in 2013. Ramos assesses these fires and covers lessons learned while never blaming the victims and recognizing how it is in their very nature to push the limits and dive into the thick of things. No one wants to be benched. You want to be in the shit, to be able to say 'I was there.' That's human, the lure of action. It's like dreaming about making the winning touchdown or beating the buzzer with a fadeaway three-pointer. This game, though, can cost you your life, and that's the fine line: to dance, or to step back and take the next song. Each thread of Smokejumper could be it's own book and some of them are. Norman Maclean wrote about the 1949 Mann Gulch Fire in Young Men and Fire and his son John N. Maclean (who wrote the foreward to Smokejumper) recounts the Storm King Mountain tragedy that took the lives of fourteen smokejumpers and hot shots (including 4 women) in Fire on the Mountain: The True Story of the South Canyon Fire. The history of smokejumping reads like it's own adventure novel depicting Japanese bombs, forgotten battalions, and covert military operations. Each story is unbelievable. Ramos tells us about the Japanese "balloon bombs" launched to cross the Pacific and deploy over the US during WWII; The Triple Nickles, an all-black Parachute Infantry Battalion retrained as smokejumpers because so many American smokejumpers were fighting the war; and the fifty or so smokejumpers performing secret paramilitary missions for the CIA in Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, and Cambodia during the Vietnam war. The only issue I had with this book was that I wanted more. More history. More training. More Ramos. More about the personalities of the jumpers themselves. (And the women? What the hell are they like?) Ramos shies away from describing any of his cohorts and yet I imagine there are some serious characters amongst this group. Also, like a typical firefighter, he remains resolutely silent on the emotional/personal toll of the job, such as witnessing the burned remains of fallen firefighters, losing people in a such a small community, and living away from family and friends for months at a time. It is a sad and painful reality than when wildland fires claim lives they often take entire crews. The strongest and the bravest. And yet these fires are getting larger and more deadly every year while the very people who fight them become ever more besieged by political obstacles. Fortunately, there will always be men and women willing to fight fires despite intense conditions, little pay, and overwhelming danger. No one is better at this than smokejumpers and I applaud Jason Ramos for finally telling their story and giving the rest of us a tantalizing glimpse into their world.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carl Nelson

    3.5 stars. Parachuting into a forest fire, controlling its furious and unpredictable flames, and packing out of rugged terrain carrying well in excess of 100 pounds pretty much fulfills the definition of "badass" in anyone's book. Jason Ramos recounts his 20+ year career as a smokejumper, combining his memoirs with a concise history of firefighting and lucid discussions of the problems facing wilderness firefighters today. As with many memoirs by the elites of dangerous professions, there's a hum 3.5 stars. Parachuting into a forest fire, controlling its furious and unpredictable flames, and packing out of rugged terrain carrying well in excess of 100 pounds pretty much fulfills the definition of "badass" in anyone's book. Jason Ramos recounts his 20+ year career as a smokejumper, combining his memoirs with a concise history of firefighting and lucid discussions of the problems facing wilderness firefighters today. As with many memoirs by the elites of dangerous professions, there's a humility and "all in a day's work" understatement of risk to Smokejumper: A Memoir by One of America's Most Select Airborne Firefighters. The smokejumpers are men who have no need to brag; their accomplishments stand on their own merits with no embellishment necessary. I can't imagine anyone who would read this book and not feel a sense of awe at these brave firefighters. Smokejumper is easily readable, with direct prose. While the narrative tends to be pretty jumpy--moving from Ramos' part in a fire to discussions of firefighting equipment to the history of the deadliest fires--it maintains a natural feel, like a long chat over some beers (and don't even think of not picking up the tab, he deserves a beer and then some!). I would have liked a little more personal stories of Mr. Ramos; he almost casually mentions his role in fighting fires as an afterthought when I get the feeling he could have written much more about his role, and I did not feel as emotionally bound to the story as its contents would have allowed. I also appreciated his reflection on the firefighting profession and man's role with nature. Esoteric details of forest management, firefighting tactics, and the behavior of fires are presented very clearly; Ramos is a natural explainer. As man encroaches more upon wilderness, the topic of forest fires becomes more and more relevant. Smokejumper is a readable, enjoyable look at the problems posed by wildfires, and the brave men and women who risk their lives to control them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Ramos is a smokejumper. A firefighter who parachutes into the forest to fight fires. Yes, it as a dangerous as it sounds. This profession has started in 1939 and every year 500 men and women train and prepare to fight nature at her worst. Why I started this book: I'm fascinated by dangerous, yet essential professions and the people that choose to do them. Why I finished it: So I prejudged this book and profession. It turns out that there are more than two reasons that I'm not a smokejumper. First, Ramos is a smokejumper. A firefighter who parachutes into the forest to fight fires. Yes, it as a dangerous as it sounds. This profession has started in 1939 and every year 500 men and women train and prepare to fight nature at her worst. Why I started this book: I'm fascinated by dangerous, yet essential professions and the people that choose to do them. Why I finished it: So I prejudged this book and profession. It turns out that there are more than two reasons that I'm not a smokejumper. First, skydiving. Second, firefighting. These two are obvious and are not in my skill base. But third, pack in and pack out. These brave men and women jump in, fight the fire for hours or days and then turn around and hike back out to civilization carrying all their firefighting gear, parachuting gear and garbage. And we're talking hikes over rough terrain of four to fourteen hours. And finally, procrastination. This I will admit is one of my strengths but it can be the difference between life and death for fighting fires. The sooner you start, arrive on scene, etc. the better. So basically its a great thing that there are people who are my complete opposite to fight these fires. And the fires are only getting bigger.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Heard of this book by a review in the Seattle Times, which I have found not always reliable... But in this case, with the local aspect -it was right on! Read it cover to cover in less than a day! Somewhat difficult to read after the Wenatchee fire, but incredible stories and brings to the forefront our firefighters and specifically the Smokejumpers - crazy fit men and women who help keep us safe! Highly recommend this book! Thanks to all who put their lives on the line to keep us safe! An excell Heard of this book by a review in the Seattle Times, which I have found not always reliable... But in this case, with the local aspect -it was right on! Read it cover to cover in less than a day! Somewhat difficult to read after the Wenatchee fire, but incredible stories and brings to the forefront our firefighters and specifically the Smokejumpers - crazy fit men and women who help keep us safe! Highly recommend this book! Thanks to all who put their lives on the line to keep us safe! An excellent historical perspective on wild land fires as well!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Mercer

    I have such deep respect for these brave men and women. There's lots of history in this book and some scientific/technical info - none of which interests me. I just like the stories. The pictures were very interesting too. I loved reading that they rarely find animal carcasses because I always worry about the animals when I see coverage about forest fires. Lots of really interesting tid bits in this book plus some of the author's opinions and perspective on how we need to change the education on I have such deep respect for these brave men and women. There's lots of history in this book and some scientific/technical info - none of which interests me. I just like the stories. The pictures were very interesting too. I loved reading that they rarely find animal carcasses because I always worry about the animals when I see coverage about forest fires. Lots of really interesting tid bits in this book plus some of the author's opinions and perspective on how we need to change the education on this industry to keep these men and women "in business" and safe. I had never read about this topic before and I'm glad I did!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    This book is a fantastic read. It's fast-paced and full of adventure, but it also brings alive the history of smokejumping and tells of the pioneers who began the program in 1939. It weaves Jason's story together and current events together with the past, and gives you understanding and insight into wildland firefighting that you'll not find anywhere else. Plus, it's a darn good read for anyone who is interested in the West, climate change, wildfires and of course, smokejumping. Loved it!!!! This book is a fantastic read. It's fast-paced and full of adventure, but it also brings alive the history of smokejumping and tells of the pioneers who began the program in 1939. It weaves Jason's story together and current events together with the past, and gives you understanding and insight into wildland firefighting that you'll not find anywhere else. Plus, it's a darn good read for anyone who is interested in the West, climate change, wildfires and of course, smokejumping. Loved it!!!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    SouthWestZippy

    Jason A Ramos has been in the fire service for twenty six years. He started as a volunteer at the age of seventeen then over time became a smokejumper in Winthrop Washington at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base which is the birthplace of smokejumping. Quick easy read but storytelling leaves a bit to be desired. Jumps around and had a hard time connecting story lines. I still did enjoy this book very much. Jason not only talks about himself but gives a lot of history. I found that to be a nice Jason A Ramos has been in the fire service for twenty six years. He started as a volunteer at the age of seventeen then over time became a smokejumper in Winthrop Washington at the North Cascades Smokejumper Base which is the birthplace of smokejumping. Quick easy read but storytelling leaves a bit to be desired. Jumps around and had a hard time connecting story lines. I still did enjoy this book very much. Jason not only talks about himself but gives a lot of history. I found that to be a nice touch to give you a true look into a nature of firefighters and the horrible things they have to face and deal with.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    4.5 stars. This is a very well-written book on the history of smokejumpers, the challenges they face, and some major events in wildland firefighting. Even though I was already familiar with a lot of the concepts and terminology, this should be easy for anyone outside of wildland firefighting to follow. I appreciate the honest and straightforward way that Ramos has described famous fatalities from wild fires. It's obvious that he loves the work that he does, but is eager to get the Forest Service 4.5 stars. This is a very well-written book on the history of smokejumpers, the challenges they face, and some major events in wildland firefighting. Even though I was already familiar with a lot of the concepts and terminology, this should be easy for anyone outside of wildland firefighting to follow. I appreciate the honest and straightforward way that Ramos has described famous fatalities from wild fires. It's obvious that he loves the work that he does, but is eager to get the Forest Service to innovate and improve their methods and gear in wildland firefighting. Reading this book brought back a lot of fond memories I have of my time on the fireline, but also reminded me of the danger wildland firefighters face regularly. I hope this book will help raise awareness of the brave men and women who face extreme situations and work themselves to exhaustion to protect property, lives, and natural resources. Changing climate has resulted in increasingly more dangerous fire conditions in the west and resources like smokejumpers should be utilized before small fires become huge complex fires. They deserve continued funding and support.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robert Davidson

    Engrossing read about a select band of very brave people who parachute into forest fires and spend days trying to put out or contain each fire. Considering this past summer in southern Alberta where we had numerous fires and heavy thick smoke for days this is a very timely book. The Authors explain the early history and training required for Smokejumpers and the many "interesting" situations they find themselves in where a mistake in a judgement call may result in loss of life. This is a great Engrossing read about a select band of very brave people who parachute into forest fires and spend days trying to put out or contain each fire. Considering this past summer in southern Alberta where we had numerous fires and heavy thick smoke for days this is a very timely book. The Authors explain the early history and training required for Smokejumpers and the many "interesting" situations they find themselves in where a mistake in a judgement call may result in loss of life. This is a great read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Timely, given the massive wildfire season this year. 3.5 stars. Not very artfully written but it's a quick read that does a good job combining memoir with wildland firefighting history and recommendations for the future. Gives you a very strong appreciation for the men and women who fight wildfires -- backbreaking work under almost impossibly difficult conditions. Timely, given the massive wildfire season this year. 3.5 stars. Not very artfully written but it's a quick read that does a good job combining memoir with wildland firefighting history and recommendations for the future. Gives you a very strong appreciation for the men and women who fight wildfires -- backbreaking work under almost impossibly difficult conditions.

  12. 4 out of 5

    N.N. Light

    Such a riveting story! I couldn't put it down. My Rating: 5 stars Reviewed by: MRS N Such a riveting story! I couldn't put it down. My Rating: 5 stars Reviewed by: MRS N

  13. 4 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    Elite airborne firefighter Jason Ramos provides a brief history of wildfire fighting and the rigorous physical training smokejumpers endure. Their missions are extremely dangerous as fires can quickly jump and/or change directions. The slightest mistakes can end lives. Much like the military, this career requires special individuals. I admire and appreciate Ramos for his work, his constant drive to improve equipment, and for sharing his story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Connie Johnson

    Read this to help me better understand my son’s career choice. Learned a lot from the author, and I am grateful for people like him who protect life and Property. And now my prayers for my son have increased!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ricky Stewart

    Jason Ramos is a man of character... His book takes readers on a facinating ride! A little bit history, a little bit legacy... a little bit personal experience but all relevant in understanding the job these risk-takers have and the incredible way they serve our nation. It would have been easier for Jason to give readers only sizzle and horn blowing accounts of his own heroics. In truth... he left many of his own stories out and focused on the heroics of others. Instead of making readers believe Jason Ramos is a man of character... His book takes readers on a facinating ride! A little bit history, a little bit legacy... a little bit personal experience but all relevant in understanding the job these risk-takers have and the incredible way they serve our nation. It would have been easier for Jason to give readers only sizzle and horn blowing accounts of his own heroics. In truth... he left many of his own stories out and focused on the heroics of others. Instead of making readers believe they walk on water and that the government always has its business squared away... he dared to reveal both the good and the bad that goes with this professional calling. Integrity is what you do when no one's watching.... and I am here to tell you that Jason is a man of his word, a man of upmost integrity, and the kind of servant that promotes others far more often than he promotes his own team or himself. Rick Stewart, Host Executive Producer NRA Life of Duty Television

  16. 4 out of 5

    Frode

    This book was part history, part personal reflection, and a bit of commentary on smokejumping and the political aspects of trying to do a job within multiple jurisdictions who can't agree or come to a conclusion. Jason's wish is that the smokejumpers were free to do their jobs and not have to wait and often watch a fire get big that he and his fellow smokejumpers could have taken care of initially. There are some nice pictures in the book and some good commentary on certain fires, primarily in th This book was part history, part personal reflection, and a bit of commentary on smokejumping and the political aspects of trying to do a job within multiple jurisdictions who can't agree or come to a conclusion. Jason's wish is that the smokejumpers were free to do their jobs and not have to wait and often watch a fire get big that he and his fellow smokejumpers could have taken care of initially. There are some nice pictures in the book and some good commentary on certain fires, primarily in the Pacific Northwest, but that is where he is based. Being from the NW and having lived here for over 45 years, I remember well some of the fires he spoke of. It was an easy read and moved along quite well. It was informative about training and equipment and so forth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mariah

    I have always had the fascination with smokejumpers. Some of it is due to the fact my grandfather was a long-time firefighter/fire chief and the other part is my mom's first cousin was a smokejumper and killed at Mann Gulch in 1949. Jason Ramos' memoir was very interesting to learn about the intensity of the training and the extreme dangers of wildfire fighting and smoke jumping. Ramos mixes wildfire fighting and history with his own experiences and the result is a lovely balanced story about wh I have always had the fascination with smokejumpers. Some of it is due to the fact my grandfather was a long-time firefighter/fire chief and the other part is my mom's first cousin was a smokejumper and killed at Mann Gulch in 1949. Jason Ramos' memoir was very interesting to learn about the intensity of the training and the extreme dangers of wildfire fighting and smoke jumping. Ramos mixes wildfire fighting and history with his own experiences and the result is a lovely balanced story about what it's like now, and what happened to bring the fire service to what it is today.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Despite the obvious differences, I couldn't help but compare this to Courage Has No Color by Tanya Stone (one of my favorite teen nonfiction books -- must be the whole jumping out of planes component, something you couldn't pay me to do, even in my dreams!) and in that regard it came up short -- just failed to get under my skin in quite the same way. Don't get me wrong, its good, & makes for a fine read (would, in fact, be a pretty good recommendation of an older teen looking for a grown up true Despite the obvious differences, I couldn't help but compare this to Courage Has No Color by Tanya Stone (one of my favorite teen nonfiction books -- must be the whole jumping out of planes component, something you couldn't pay me to do, even in my dreams!) and in that regard it came up short -- just failed to get under my skin in quite the same way. Don't get me wrong, its good, & makes for a fine read (would, in fact, be a pretty good recommendation of an older teen looking for a grown up true story tale) it's just not GREAT in comparison (or, in comparison the author & his brethren).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Chaney

    I was at a rally with Jason and fortunate to speak with him and receive an advance copy of this book to read during the four days we were there. It is a page turner - a tale of overcoming physical odds, honor, determination and compassion. I loved reading it and intend to buy a copy when it is released. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys a tale of courage, modesty and history of these brave men and women who seek no glory other than to serve.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    A very good book that combines historical and current aspects, politics and trying to do the best job possible....under very difficult circumstances. I am from the PNW so can relate to all the places he talks about. As I write this there is another horrible fire going on near Chelan. I can picture events much better now in my mind thanks to the information from this book. What a punishing, grueling, back-breaking, scary job....Thank you one and all who do this.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brenda

    From the very first time I read a pre-released review of this book, I have wanted to read it. The author took the time to construct a balanced story. The book was full of facts and showed the human side of Smoke-jumping. By reading this book I gained a stronger and truer respect for the men and women that choose to fight wild fires for a living. The book took this reader on an emotional roller coaster ride. This book is well worth the time it takes to read it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    When I read a review for this book I knew I had to read it. This topic hits very close to home for me. I have a brother who is a hotshot, so I have great respect for these brave men and women. Romas did a great job giving a history on the Forest Service, wild land firefight, hotshots and smoke jumpers. Anyone who wonders what these men and women do should read this book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Kessler

    This book follows closely the latest technology and techniques used by today's firefighters on the ground and the smokejumpers from the air. Jason is a professional and operates out of Winthrop,WA. His true stories tell the story of just how dangerous our forests are in a increasing warm and dry climate. This book follows closely the latest technology and techniques used by today's firefighters on the ground and the smokejumpers from the air. Jason is a professional and operates out of Winthrop,WA. His true stories tell the story of just how dangerous our forests are in a increasing warm and dry climate.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Don

    confidence not arrogance, Idaho1910, Japan fire balloons 300, Helena escape via burnt grass, Russia started1936 US39, Peshtigo WI 1871 worst ever then Chicago, Glenwood 7minutes, boulders bowling for hot shots, homes within risk area, need to prioritize fighters over buildings, do checklist to prevent, politics in WA2014 delayed reaction, live fully prepared to die anytime.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cory

    If you have no background in wildfire this may be a good read to give insight. I enjoyed Murray Taylor's "Jumping Fire" more, was chapter after chapter of boasting until the few last chapters which were slightly critical of failed agencies and policies, would have liked to hear more on his opinion in that area and less on how much of a bad ass he is. If you have no background in wildfire this may be a good read to give insight. I enjoyed Murray Taylor's "Jumping Fire" more, was chapter after chapter of boasting until the few last chapters which were slightly critical of failed agencies and policies, would have liked to hear more on his opinion in that area and less on how much of a bad ass he is.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    The advanced reader copy was full of errors and still needed some serious editing. That said, it was an interesting look into an elite group of public safety workers. I know I could never do what they do, but I'm glad that they can. The advanced reader copy was full of errors and still needed some serious editing. That said, it was an interesting look into an elite group of public safety workers. I know I could never do what they do, but I'm glad that they can.

  27. 4 out of 5

    hoopiefoot

    I really enjoyed the parts of the book about historic wildfires and firefighting history and also the parts about training and the actual job. I enjoyed much less the rants of frustration about the state of modern woodland firefighting, although I appreciate what he was trying to do there.

  28. 5 out of 5

    James R Jackson III

    Awesome, just awesome, and ordinary It's not just evil that can be ordinary. These people hear things that I don't. My blessings on them. Not all protectors are killers. Thanks be to God. Awesome, just awesome, and ordinary It's not just evil that can be ordinary. These people hear things that I don't. My blessings on them. Not all protectors are killers. Thanks be to God.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    The book gives an idea of the Smokejumper's life and the dangers they face. The book gives an idea of the Smokejumper's life and the dangers they face.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    As I am reading this book, the air around me is full of smoke from fires in Central Washington. The book brings the reader to the front lines of wilderness firefighting. It is a captivating story.

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