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Among important books in the defense of Christianity, this one has few equals. Evidence That Demands a Verdict is an easy-to-read, front-line defense for Christians facing the tough questions of critics and skeptics. Using secular evidences and other historical sources, Josh McDowell's faith-building book is a "must read" for every Christian. Among important books in the defense of Christianity, this one has few equals. Evidence That Demands a Verdict is an easy-to-read, front-line defense for Christians facing the tough questions of critics and skeptics. Using secular evidences and other historical sources, Josh McDowell's faith-building book is a "must read" for every Christian.


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Among important books in the defense of Christianity, this one has few equals. Evidence That Demands a Verdict is an easy-to-read, front-line defense for Christians facing the tough questions of critics and skeptics. Using secular evidences and other historical sources, Josh McDowell's faith-building book is a "must read" for every Christian. Among important books in the defense of Christianity, this one has few equals. Evidence That Demands a Verdict is an easy-to-read, front-line defense for Christians facing the tough questions of critics and skeptics. Using secular evidences and other historical sources, Josh McDowell's faith-building book is a "must read" for every Christian.

30 review for Evidence that Demands a Verdict, eBook: Historical Evidences for the Christian Faith

  1. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    Not proven. And I really got tired of him constantly referring to Christian apologists as "the famous such-and-such". If they're all so famous, how come I've never heard of them? Not proven. And I really got tired of him constantly referring to Christian apologists as "the famous such-and-such". If they're all so famous, how come I've never heard of them?

  2. 5 out of 5

    jeff

    This book is what convinced me that to believe that Jesus raised from the dead or that the bible is a reliable historical document can be a belief founded firmly in rational, logical thinking. This book, combined with The Case for Christ, set me off on a apologetics rampage that I am still on today and look forward to being on the rest of my life. Easily over 700 pages, it covers nearly every objection to Christianity that I have heard. I only say "nearly" because I don't feel comfortable saying This book is what convinced me that to believe that Jesus raised from the dead or that the bible is a reliable historical document can be a belief founded firmly in rational, logical thinking. This book, combined with The Case for Christ, set me off on a apologetics rampage that I am still on today and look forward to being on the rest of my life. Easily over 700 pages, it covers nearly every objection to Christianity that I have heard. I only say "nearly" because I don't feel comfortable saying "all" but I don't think "all" is far off. If someone calls you ignorant because you believe Jesus is the exact representation of God, than you need to read this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    If I were a Christian, I would be insulted and embarrassed by the contents and presentation of this book. As an atheist, it is both hilarious and frustrating. "Evidence That Demands a Verdict" by Josh McDowell is, if I may be blunt, one of the biggest pieces of intellectually dishonest, self-serving tripe that I have ever read. The entire thing can be summed up with the old Sunday school song: "Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so." Although the book is titled "Evidence That Dem If I were a Christian, I would be insulted and embarrassed by the contents and presentation of this book. As an atheist, it is both hilarious and frustrating. "Evidence That Demands a Verdict" by Josh McDowell is, if I may be blunt, one of the biggest pieces of intellectually dishonest, self-serving tripe that I have ever read. The entire thing can be summed up with the old Sunday school song: "Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so." Although the book is titled "Evidence That Demands a Verdict," the verdict was made even before the book was written. Despite accusing critics of Christianity and the Bible of bringing their "anti-supernatural bias" to the table, making them unfit critics, Josh McDowell has based all of his so-called "evidence" on the presupposition that the Bible is true and that the Christian god is real. Without that presupposition, the entire book falls apart. There is not a single shred of actual evidence that the supernatural claims of the Bible (i.e. virgin birth, the resurrection of Jesus, and other miracles) are true. He focuses a lot on various historical details that the Bible gets right and tries to pass that off as proof that the Bible in its entirety is true. However, just because a few details are correct does not mean that a man rose from the dead three days after his own execution. Another bait-and-switch that McDowell likes to pull is going over (in excruciating detail) the various claims that the Bible makes. The Bible CLAIMS that the Torah was written by Moses. Jesus CLAIMS he was the son of god. The Bible CLAIMS that the world was created in six days. But then he presents no evidence outside of the Bible to corroborate those claims. In fact, he uses the Bible to "prove" the validity of the Bible ALL THE TIME. Because he's already decided that the Bible is true, the fact that the Bible makes those claims is enough "evidence" for him. (And his so-called "experts" that he quotes are all, surprise surprise, Christians who already believe that the Bible is true.) One of the most irritating sections for me was the part on prophecy. The Bible has a wonderful little trick: "Deuteronomy xviii claims that what does not become fulfilled, was not true prophecy" (pg. 280). Well, ain't that convenient. If a prophecy comes true, then it was either from god or a test for god's people. If it doesn't come true, then obviously it wasn't a true prophecy. The list of prophecies that follow are so vague and typical that pretty much anything could be used to fill them in. Several predict the destruction of various cities, but never give a specific time-frame, so a prophecy can be "fulfilled" decades or even centuries after the fact. And given all of the warfare going on, making a prediction about a city being destroyed and its people killed was a pretty safe bet. And if Star Wars has taught me anything, it's that relying on prophecy is a bad idea. (Interestingly, McDowell cites a prophecy about the destruction of Samaria. In the prophecy it says that "Their little ones will be dashed to pieces, and their pregnant women will be ripped open." First, wow, some loving god. Second, McDowell's analysis of the truth of the prophecy doesn't mention anything as specific as the murder of pregnant women in such a fashion. Once again, its fulfillment is so generic as to be useless.) In short, if you have masochistic literary tendencies and enjoy yelling at pieces of paper, you may want to try out this book. For those of you who are curious about the contents but don't feel like slogging through, I recommend watching the YouTube series "An Atheist Reads Evidence That Demands a Verdict" by Steve Shrives. His video series does cover the contents of the 1999 "updated" version of the book, so there's a lot of extra content, especially as the book goes on. Think of it as extra Easter eggs. Now, if you'll excuse me, I must go gargle some hydrochloric acid to get the bad taste of this book out of my mouth.

  4. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    Not the most objective book 18 January 2013 I have noticed that this book receives some bad responses, but then that is not surprising when you have a book that is purporting to outline all of the evidence supporting the authenticity of Christianity. Unfortunately it has been a while since I read it but it is one of those books that is ordered as notes as opposed to being written in prose to make it easier see the evidence that McDowell argues. However, the problem, as one person suggested, is th Not the most objective book 18 January 2013 I have noticed that this book receives some bad responses, but then that is not surprising when you have a book that is purporting to outline all of the evidence supporting the authenticity of Christianity. Unfortunately it has been a while since I read it but it is one of those books that is ordered as notes as opposed to being written in prose to make it easier see the evidence that McDowell argues. However, the problem, as one person suggested, is that there are a lot of logical fallacies and a lot of assumptions. One of the fallacies that I want to point out (which I do believe comes from this book) are the number of copies of the New Testament that we have, and the dating of these documents. In reality the earliest copy of the New Testament we have is the Codex Sinaticus (you can see it on display in the British Library) which dates back to about 500 AD. While we do have a lot of documents that predate the codex, they all tend to either be fragments, or single books, so when they talk about the oldest New Testament document that we have we are actually talking about a fragment. The same goes with the number of gospel documents we have, because once again a bulk of them are fragments. How is it that we claim that the oldest copy of the Republic we have dates to around 800 AD, when in reality we have fragments that are much earlier (and the same goes with the Iliad and the Odyssey). We Christians love to criticise and attack atheists for using logical fallacies and twisting the truth, when in reality we do it ourselves all the time. Look, there is a lot of evidence for Christianity, and the fact that it is one of the dominant religions of our time, which has doctrine that is almost unchanged from when the apostles first wrote their creed, is evidence enough, and I also have no argument against using or studying apologetics to defend our faith, however, as the Bible says, the key word here is to defend and promote our faith, not to destroy, ridicule or undermine other people's faith. In many ways I do not necessarily say people are wrong, but rather they have an understanding that is leading them in the right direction.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I read this book while researching my (at the time) fundamentalist Christian faith. It was recommended to me when I began asking questions like "why do we just follow the books in the bible, who decided what was in here?" and "whats the basis for all this anyway?" Josh McDowell prefaces the book saying he embarked on this research when he was not a Christian in an effort to disprove Christianity. When he was digging up all the "evidence" in the holy lands he was overwhelmed and converted. The book I read this book while researching my (at the time) fundamentalist Christian faith. It was recommended to me when I began asking questions like "why do we just follow the books in the bible, who decided what was in here?" and "whats the basis for all this anyway?" Josh McDowell prefaces the book saying he embarked on this research when he was not a Christian in an effort to disprove Christianity. When he was digging up all the "evidence" in the holy lands he was overwhelmed and converted. The book does not read that way. I give this 2 stars only because of the citations McDowell provides - he quotes all the usual historians i.e. Pliny but i found his arguments based on the facts to be quite poor. The conclusions he came to really only made sense if you had already decided what the conclusion would be. In general I was dissapointed with this book. I dont think it really addressed the issues as the author claimed.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Terry Morgan

    Have read this more than once, and several revisions. This is not a casual read. It is written more like a source book, or a thesis on the premises of who was Jesus Christ, and the claims of the Bible. Excellent read!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gerald Curtis

    This was my second reading. I love this book, written in defense of Christianity by a former doubter, now turned apologist. It is an amazing collection of evidence from history, world experts and even skeptics, and hundreds of presentations of logic and debate that are overwhelmingly compelling.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Best thing I can say is that Mr. McDowell has given an honest effort in gathering all the information he feels justifies his beliefs. The title of the book is misleading. Despite the impressive number of quotes and apologetics, evidence is lacking. This book suffers profusely from circular reasoning, "facts" with no support, and sources that don't matter. I love C.S. Lewis too, that doesn't mean his opinion carries any weight. Best thing I can say is that Mr. McDowell has given an honest effort in gathering all the information he feels justifies his beliefs. The title of the book is misleading. Despite the impressive number of quotes and apologetics, evidence is lacking. This book suffers profusely from circular reasoning, "facts" with no support, and sources that don't matter. I love C.S. Lewis too, that doesn't mean his opinion carries any weight.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    The verdict is in. This book is schmutzwasser. And I don't have to prove that it is, since he doesn't really prove his points, either. The verdict is in. This book is schmutzwasser. And I don't have to prove that it is, since he doesn't really prove his points, either.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Although I read it page by page this is more of a reference resource. The chapter on the resurrection is worth the price of the entire book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nikola Tasev

    Lots of claims. And, I admit, lots of citations. A lot of holes, though. Like, most of it. McDowell claims the bible is exceptional, because it is written over a vast period and by many different people in different backgrounds, yet it is miraculously and divinely free of inconsistencies. Then he says if you think you've found an inconsistency, there are 15 rules you have to check to see it it is an inconsistency or not. The most important one - "there are no inconsistencies, the bible can contrad Lots of claims. And, I admit, lots of citations. A lot of holes, though. Like, most of it. McDowell claims the bible is exceptional, because it is written over a vast period and by many different people in different backgrounds, yet it is miraculously and divinely free of inconsistencies. Then he says if you think you've found an inconsistency, there are 15 rules you have to check to see it it is an inconsistency or not. The most important one - "there are no inconsistencies, the bible can contradict itself, deal with it". No, really, it says "later revelations override previous revelations". Sons may be free from the sins of the fathers, and then not be, and then not be for several generations, and then be responsible for the original sin and back again - no problem. That's a little hard to accept, if you consider he claims he looks at it critically in the same way he would look at a secular historic document. He claims the bible is true to the original, and the selection of cannon was God guided. Yet there are several different versions of it. Then he claims that by proving a fragment of the bible true, it must be all true. This is not the case in ancient historic documents. Some parts may be true, some not, you can rely of what you've proven. The rest can be, at best, considered a fallible source. A accurate list of real pharaohs is not proof of the flood. Reasonable evidence for the existence of Jesus is not evidence of his miracles. Some of the "evidence" makes no sense. Non-christian historians describing Christians and their beliefs are not evidence these beliefs are true. Early Christians willing to die than reject Jesus, is cited as evidence that what they believed was real. History is full of zealots who willing to die for their beliefs, but that does not prove their beliefs at all! And so on, and so on. Showing a certain claim was made, and concluding that therefore it must be true, over and over again.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rock Rockwell

    Evidential apologetics to strengthen the faith of Christians. A good 'resource' to keep on your shelf. Evidential apologetics to strengthen the faith of Christians. A good 'resource' to keep on your shelf.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pete Bartel

    Excellent arguments for Christianity based on history.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Donnie Haflich

    From the outset of the massive undertaking that Evidence That Demands A Verdict has taken, Josh McDowell has been about sharing the word of God. “Evidence is not for proving the word of God, but rather for providing a reasoned basis for faith,” claims McDowell. The original Evidence was drawn up from a deep struggle Josh shares regarding the tough years he faced, and no doubt our own youth will face, while at college. Mad at God and mad at past abuse, Josh took up a challenge to consider the Chri From the outset of the massive undertaking that Evidence That Demands A Verdict has taken, Josh McDowell has been about sharing the word of God. “Evidence is not for proving the word of God, but rather for providing a reasoned basis for faith,” claims McDowell. The original Evidence was drawn up from a deep struggle Josh shares regarding the tough years he faced, and no doubt our own youth will face, while at college. Mad at God and mad at past abuse, Josh took up a challenge to consider the Christian worldview and in doing so, came to the conviction that the Jesus which the Scriptures spoke of was a real person who loved enough to die on the cross for his sins. This new version carries the same weightiness which the original certainly pressed onto the minds of college students during the early 80’s. It is no different today. There is a reason evidential apologetics has taken off like a wildfire today. People from all walks of life are looking for cracks in the secular. They are looking for, to steal a phrase from Peter Berger, “signals of transcendence.” Where this volume excels I feel like a captain obvious moment is coming up here. This volume comprehensively, though not to the fullest measure, gives us a depth of research into the evidence which is largely unrivaled in other volumes. Sure there are works like that of Craig Blomberg’s, The Historical Reliability of the New Testament, but he deals there largely with the textual and historical evidence for the New Testament. The McDowells have put before a skeptic world something much more substantial in dealing with the attacks atheists are railing against Christians, the questions skeptics are asking, and the gray-area thinking of many agnostics. They have shown us that to have a comprehensive understanding of the evidence itself is not enough. We need more than evidence. This book is written for those in a relationship with a culture unsure how to answer the big questions of life. They aren’t sure what happens after they die or what purpose their lives have. They are living restless lives in search of answers they aren’t going to find in the party scene or existential philosophy. This book is for parents, youth, churches, lay leaders, business professionals, and any other demographic who calls on the name of Christ. This is a catalytic book which points to the answer to all of our questions. Where this volume falls short (for me) Please notice the for me caveat above. This volume shines a glaring light on the evidence Christians have at our disposal. An area I wished there would be more discussion centered on, is presuppositions and epistemology. I completely understand that’s not the scope of this volume, and to be sure, they do address in a small way the fact that we are not “blank slates”. I would say that my biggest apprehension in coming to a volume like this is both a personal and theological one. While I hold to the Reformed tradition, theologically, I’m so grateful to God that he has provided brothers in the faith like the McDowells. It’s impossible for me to set aside a Reformed Apologetic approach in coming to a volume which deals extensively with the physical evidence. There isn’t enough room for transcendence and mystery in this book for me. I understand that the McDowells don’t claim to have all the answers to every question out there. They certainly don’t claim to know everything, and I appreciate that. As I wrestle with the Christian faith myself, I find that there are things I don’t understand and never will this side of eternity. So it is with cautious eyes and understanding that I approach evidential apologetics in general. There is certainly a place for proofs, as this volume clearly and implicitly shows. I think that while we start at different points, we end with the same conclusion. We end with the understanding that while there is a myriad of evidence and strong arguments for the biblical worldview, it is the Holy Spirit who illumines hearts. We are mere vessels used of God to shine his light into a dark world. Get This Volume At the end of the day, my recommendation is that you need this book. The Church needs this book. Parents with young kids in the home, teenagers on the way out, or those with no kids at all need this book. There may be a neighbor just across the street whose mind won’t let him get past all the “inconsistencies” in the bible. Maybe your coworker has heard that Jesus was just a myth someone made up. This volume helps us to meet others where they are at. I appreciate the honesty this book brings. It doesn’t shy away from the difficult questions, and from a distance, neither do the McDowells. This book is a stockpile of arguments, evidence, and examination that can only help the Christian be ready with a defense for the faith. The first book I ever read in the area of Christian Apologetics, or the art and science of defending the Christian worldview, was More Than A Carpenter. That little volume blew my mind and set me on a trajectory towards a well-reasoned understanding of the faith I profess. I’ve changed the directions a bit but nevertheless, I have set my life towards knowing Christ both with my heart and my mind. This volume doesn’t disappoint in inspiring the same feelings I had when I read that little book so many years ago. I have no doubt that it could do the same for a culture longing for authenticity and searching for answers. Sit down with a skeptic this week, invite your neighbor over for dinner, grab a friend from school and sit down with this book. May God use this endeavor mightily to the end that his glory is spread to the ends of the nations.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Charles van Buren

    Charles van Buren A very useful classic of apologetics October 28, 2019 Format: Kindle Edition Review of Kindle edition Publication date: October 13, 1999 Publisher: Thomas Nelson Language: English ASIN: B007V8Z61M Amazon.com Sales Rank: 82114 I listened to this book or perhaps it was just parts of it on older tapes which I had obtained at no charge from Fire Fighters for Christ. Josh McDowell himself was the narrator/speaker. I say speaker because he did more than simply read the book. McDowell is a powe Charles van Buren A very useful classic of apologetics October 28, 2019 Format: Kindle Edition Review of Kindle edition Publication date: October 13, 1999 Publisher: Thomas Nelson Language: English ASIN: B007V8Z61M Amazon.com Sales Rank: 82114 I listened to this book or perhaps it was just parts of it on older tapes which I had obtained at no charge from Fire Fighters for Christ. Josh McDowell himself was the narrator/speaker. I say speaker because he did more than simply read the book. McDowell is a powerful speaker who enlivened his presentation with humor and personal touches. Some of his points were stronger than others but this is still one of the best available books of apologetics. As much as I enjoyed the tapes, I recommend obtaining a hard copy of the book as well for simpler future reference.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bro

    you need this book in your library! You cannot find a more articulate defense of the truth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Great book, all 600 or so pages were worth it. Amongst other things, it pulls together a bundle of evidence that the Bible is historically accurate and that Jesus was a historical figure by the methods of our day. Also debunks some misconceptions and alternate resurrection theories, etc. Has a great section on the basics of philosophy which helps with understanding the illogical bases for mysticism, post-modernism, and skepticism. There's a lot more, but I'd be here forever explaining it. A great Great book, all 600 or so pages were worth it. Amongst other things, it pulls together a bundle of evidence that the Bible is historically accurate and that Jesus was a historical figure by the methods of our day. Also debunks some misconceptions and alternate resurrection theories, etc. Has a great section on the basics of philosophy which helps with understanding the illogical bases for mysticism, post-modernism, and skepticism. There's a lot more, but I'd be here forever explaining it. A great thing about this book is that Josh McDowell makes a point of not extrapolating too far from what the Bible says, what ancient historical documents say, and what we know about human nature. It's a little dry, but what factual book with so much to cover isn't? The only real beef I have with it is that even after reading the thing pretty much cover-to-cover, I still can't figure out McDowell's note-taking system!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Opa

    Great reference book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Magnus Von Black

    This is a fantastically well researched book and I enjoyed it, but there are a few things that severely weaken the case that McDowell is attempting to make. For one, it is written in an evangelical style. The introduction and first chapter sound like something you would hear at church; they are about his personal experiences and personal faith, and are very enthusiastic. That's fine, but he essentially begins the book by alienating skeptics and broadly trumpeting that his perspective is not even This is a fantastically well researched book and I enjoyed it, but there are a few things that severely weaken the case that McDowell is attempting to make. For one, it is written in an evangelical style. The introduction and first chapter sound like something you would hear at church; they are about his personal experiences and personal faith, and are very enthusiastic. That's fine, but he essentially begins the book by alienating skeptics and broadly trumpeting that his perspective is not even remotely objective. Second, I don't like how the first few chapters are laid out. There is a ton of amazing, well researched, and well articulated evidence in this book, and almost none of it is in chapter 1-4. It starts out with the weakest possible arguments for Christianity, like how widely read, how ancient, and how well respected the Bible is. Those are not cogent arguments for the stunning claims of the gospels. Overall, I thought this was an engrossing and informative book. I would like to see it re-written in a less confusing manner (i.e. instead of just collecting research notes with a weirdly organized outline structure, write an actual book), and I would like to see it re-written from a more stale, analytical perspective in which formal logic is applied to the arguments more explicitly. I think that putting this book through a sieve of formal logic would shake out much of the weaker content, and strengthen much of the good content. 4/5 stars. I plan on reading again because it's really dense and there is a lot of interesting stuff which escaped both my notice and my memory.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brian Chilton

    The updated classic is the new standard in apologetics. As good as the original Evidence that Demands a Verdict (ETDAV) was, this updated and revamped edition is even better. With new sections on the historicity of Jesus' existence, evaluations of the historical data, updated scientific information, and new updated stats on biblical manuscript evidence; this updated addition with insights from Dr. Sean McDowell makes this revision of ETDAV a must-have for anyone serious about Christian Apologeti The updated classic is the new standard in apologetics. As good as the original Evidence that Demands a Verdict (ETDAV) was, this updated and revamped edition is even better. With new sections on the historicity of Jesus' existence, evaluations of the historical data, updated scientific information, and new updated stats on biblical manuscript evidence; this updated addition with insights from Dr. Sean McDowell makes this revision of ETDAV a must-have for anyone serious about Christian Apologetics.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth

    I didn't realize there are so many evidences for the truth of the Bible and the Christian faith. The evidences are too many to list. I didn't realize there are so many evidences for the truth of the Bible and the Christian faith. The evidences are too many to list.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Great apologetics reference with lots of fascinating material.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    The worst of Christian apologetics. If taken seriously, it accomplishes the exact opposite of the authors goal.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew King

    Such a complete work that provides answers for many of skeptics' questions. What struck me, though, was the lack of the type of 100%, mathematical certainty for the Christian faith. And it makes me wonder if that's precisely how God intended it. If there were such crystal clear answers, we wouldn't see very many skeptics. God wants us to have a measure of faith like a child (Matthew 19). While we must always be prepared to give a defense (I Peter 3:15), and I'm indebted to this book in helping m Such a complete work that provides answers for many of skeptics' questions. What struck me, though, was the lack of the type of 100%, mathematical certainty for the Christian faith. And it makes me wonder if that's precisely how God intended it. If there were such crystal clear answers, we wouldn't see very many skeptics. God wants us to have a measure of faith like a child (Matthew 19). While we must always be prepared to give a defense (I Peter 3:15), and I'm indebted to this book in helping me begin to do so, we must ultimately accept the gospel with the wonder and belief of a child - a sort of faith that, though it is not a blind faith, rests in God Himself.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael O'Brien

    I found it to be a stirring defense of the Christian faith, and this book does do an outstanding job in also exposing much of the circular thinking and inconsistencies in critics of Christian doctrines and the Bible. My only criticisms are that it does tend, toward the end, to get bogged down in philosophy, and I do wish it had gone into more detail exposing inconsistencies in evolutionary theory as well.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    Every piece of "evidence" in this book is support (from the Bible) for McDowell's foregone conclusion. As far as I can tell, this book doesn't contain a single piece of actual evidence toward anything other than McDowell's delusion. Every piece of "evidence" in this book is support (from the Bible) for McDowell's foregone conclusion. As far as I can tell, this book doesn't contain a single piece of actual evidence toward anything other than McDowell's delusion.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    When this showed up today as one of my recommendations, I remembered I read this book many, many years ago. Don't remember much about it and nowadays I don't think I'd be impressed with it. When this showed up today as one of my recommendations, I remembered I read this book many, many years ago. Don't remember much about it and nowadays I don't think I'd be impressed with it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michaël Wertenberg

    Wow. I was a born-again fundamentalist when I read this book, and I still found it laughable. It almost reads like a parody.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Molly Rose

    This book reads as if it was written by someone who has never in their life even read the Wikipedia page on Biblical Archaeology (it's here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical..., and if you want to know anything about the Bible that's ACTUALLY backed by evidence, I'd recommend reading through that page and from the scholars it cites instead of reading McDowell's book). This book so thoroughly misses what the Bible actually is and how it got that way, as generally outlined by the scholars of s This book reads as if it was written by someone who has never in their life even read the Wikipedia page on Biblical Archaeology (it's here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblical..., and if you want to know anything about the Bible that's ACTUALLY backed by evidence, I'd recommend reading through that page and from the scholars it cites instead of reading McDowell's book). This book so thoroughly misses what the Bible actually is and how it got that way, as generally outlined by the scholars of such topics, that I have a hard time believing the author has ever read any genuine, academic, scholarly-rigorous research on the Bible. Furthermore, the ways in which McDowell seeks to refute claims against the Bible as he believes it is are poorly constructed and, in my opinion, frequently self-deluded as well. When discussing disbelief in the claims of the Bible, he rarely actually addresses what evidence he believes exists to affirm these claims, instead just waxing on and on about how the claims are consistent with the rest of the Bible. He frequently uses the Bible itself as the only evidence to support his claims about it as well, which is circular at best, and very disingenuous at worst. In particular, I found his arguing away of objections to the inconsistencies of the Bible to be very unconvincing, in which he simply explains that there can't be any, and any that appear as such are just being misinterpreted or taken in improper context. I'll refer anyone reading this review to this website in order to judge for themselves if they still think the Bible is internally consistent and inerrant after browsing through: http://bibviz.com/ I know I didn't in good conscious believe the Bible to the ultimate source of morality, truth, wisdom, etc. after reading through that link, and McDowell's weak arguments about this topic did little to suggest I should believe otherwise. Lastly, I think it is telling that in the introduction to this book, the author essentially states it's not aimed to explain the Bible to non-Christians. I heartily agree, since the only people who could possibly be convinced that the Bible is the inerrant word of God by such a book as this are people who agree with the conclusions before turning the first page. If you are looking for an intellectually-honest, evidence-backed explanation of what the Bible is and what we should think of the claims made about it, this book is not for you.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    First of all. This book is obnoxiously long. I feel no shame in admitting I skimmed this book since this is the second book that I read at the request of my family members. (See "Case for Christ" review) I did my part, but our conversation following really had nothing to do with this book, so just watch out for that if you haven't fallen for that book swap trap before. (ugh!) So let's just say, I'm done reading religious books for other people. I mean, that's probably a good rule of thumb anyway First of all. This book is obnoxiously long. I feel no shame in admitting I skimmed this book since this is the second book that I read at the request of my family members. (See "Case for Christ" review) I did my part, but our conversation following really had nothing to do with this book, so just watch out for that if you haven't fallen for that book swap trap before. (ugh!) So let's just say, I'm done reading religious books for other people. I mean, that's probably a good rule of thumb anyway... Once again this is an apologetic reference guide for Christians, I'm not going to spend a long time dissecting everything within this book... you can find plenty of people out there who have done that. But if you are reading this book honestly, I encourage you to look at these arguments objectively and see if there isn't any circular reasoning, pre-suppositions, and a Christian bias in there. I think it's filled with them... overall, not convincing.

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