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H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror

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H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror features twenty of horror master H.P. Lovecraft's classic stories, among them some of the greatest works of horror fiction ever written, including: "The Rats in the Walls," "Pickman's Model," "The Colour out of Space," "The Call of Cthulhu," "The Dunwich Horror," "The Shadow over Innsmouth," "At the Mountains of Madness," "The Shadow o H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror features twenty of horror master H.P. Lovecraft's classic stories, among them some of the greatest works of horror fiction ever written, including: "The Rats in the Walls," "Pickman's Model," "The Colour out of Space," "The Call of Cthulhu," "The Dunwich Horror," "The Shadow over Innsmouth," "At the Mountains of Madness," "The Shadow out of Time," and "The Haunter of the Dark."


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H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror features twenty of horror master H.P. Lovecraft's classic stories, among them some of the greatest works of horror fiction ever written, including: "The Rats in the Walls," "Pickman's Model," "The Colour out of Space," "The Call of Cthulhu," "The Dunwich Horror," "The Shadow over Innsmouth," "At the Mountains of Madness," "The Shadow o H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror features twenty of horror master H.P. Lovecraft's classic stories, among them some of the greatest works of horror fiction ever written, including: "The Rats in the Walls," "Pickman's Model," "The Colour out of Space," "The Call of Cthulhu," "The Dunwich Horror," "The Shadow over Innsmouth," "At the Mountains of Madness," "The Shadow out of Time," and "The Haunter of the Dark."

30 review for H.P. Lovecraft: Great Tales of Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Izzy Smith

    Woof, was this one a doozy. This book, as the title implies, is a collection of some of H.P. Lovecraft's better known works, like The Rats in The Walls, The Colour Out of Space, and how could we forget, The Call of Cthulhu. I was honestly pretty delighted when I first saw this on shelves because let me tell you, this book is big. I'm talking big enough to bruise your leg on your walks due to where it is in your bag, and the hardcover corner won't move no matter how much you fidget with it. But th Woof, was this one a doozy. This book, as the title implies, is a collection of some of H.P. Lovecraft's better known works, like The Rats in The Walls, The Colour Out of Space, and how could we forget, The Call of Cthulhu. I was honestly pretty delighted when I first saw this on shelves because let me tell you, this book is big. I'm talking big enough to bruise your leg on your walks due to where it is in your bag, and the hardcover corner won't move no matter how much you fidget with it. But that's besides the point, which is that this is 600 pages of lovcraftian horror. Most of his work includes some eldritch being of incomprehensible size or ability, but it's how he writes these which is what really makes them good. Lovecraft could easily turn these into kaiju typo stories, giant creature comes out of nowhere and wrecks an innocent town all in a flash. But he drags it out, and has his creations creep up on the characters and readers along the way. Our good friend Cthulhu, for example. An incredibly large demonic priest of The Old Ones, even more beasts that once roamed the earth, killing and running free, all ruled over by a horrific, massive mix of a human, dragon, and octopus, all in one green, gooey hell on legs. Throughout human times, instead of calling the forces of nature upon the world, he sleeps deep beneath the ocean, and he speaks through dreams. Mixes of twisted, ancient tongue and figures, messages sent to a small but special amount of people who will form cults and sacrifices to this God speaking to them in their dreams. And that's just a summary of the beginning of /one/ of the stories in this collection. I'd say it's worth the read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Some very creepy and scary stories in this collection, takes a little while to get used to the writing style. Hardly any dialogue, just 99% prose. Some stories are hard to understand, yet overall i did enjoy the collection and my first introduction to H.P.Lovecraft.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    “Great Tales Of Horror” is a compendium of some of the greatest horror stories written by one of the most influential and thought provoking writers of the genre. This book brings together 20 of Lovecraft's best tales. From Cthulhu to Dagon, Lovecraft's most iconic characters and chilling tales are portrayed within it. One of the best things about Lovecraft’s stories is that they’re unique. Rather than just exploring common monsters or fears, Lovecraft explores things like human insignificance, iso “Great Tales Of Horror” is a compendium of some of the greatest horror stories written by one of the most influential and thought provoking writers of the genre. This book brings together 20 of Lovecraft's best tales. From Cthulhu to Dagon, Lovecraft's most iconic characters and chilling tales are portrayed within it. One of the best things about Lovecraft’s stories is that they’re unique. Rather than just exploring common monsters or fears, Lovecraft explores things like human insignificance, isolation, hopelessness, and the unknown. Lovecraft’s use of imagery leaves a lasting image in the reader's mind. Whether it’s a desolate church, an old house, or, an evil wizard’s hidden lair, Lovecraft’s imagery always creates an intriguing atmosphere for his tales. While Lovecraft might not be for everyone, anyone who is a fan of horror should definitely read his tales. I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes questioning and thinking deeper into things after reading them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Denise Spicer

    This book has a two page introduction by Stefan Dziemianowicz and cover art illustrations by Dana MacKenzie. The 600 pages contain twenty stories. This is a must read for fans of HPL. His stories are classics of the horror genre and it is a creepy, scary, delight to read these stories. One can wallow in Lovecraft’s feverish and florid descriptions of --- the un-describable! Some of his work can also be examined on an allegorical level with psychological interpretations.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Malik

    !!!!!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill S.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I kept on running across his name as a major influence on modern horror writers, but had trouble finding any of Lovecraft's work in my area libraries. Turns out that book publishers at the time were not interested in his work. All of his short stories were published in magazines and gained little attention during the 1920's and 30's. He was incredibly inventive, but the racist comments hold me back in offering him excessive praise. His preferred style was first person narrative in which the prota I kept on running across his name as a major influence on modern horror writers, but had trouble finding any of Lovecraft's work in my area libraries. Turns out that book publishers at the time were not interested in his work. All of his short stories were published in magazines and gained little attention during the 1920's and 30's. He was incredibly inventive, but the racist comments hold me back in offering him excessive praise. His preferred style was first person narrative in which the protagonist is looking back on some strange occurrence. As such, there is little dialogue. His prose is not what one would call "lucid." His best: "The Call of Cthulbu" - Eons ago an alien race ruled the planet. A giant octopus-man-dragon being lies asleep waiting for the stars to line up to awaken him and his city to reemerge from the ocean. In the meantime, his thoughts lead to nightmares among the sensitive and a cult of worshipers protecting this secret. Three stories reveal the secret. "The Rats in the Walls" - A man returns to the ruins of his ancestors castle in England. A terrible secret about his father has been hidden from him. Every generation gave a letter to the eldest son of the next upon the death of the father. However, the letter was burned during the American Civil War. He rebuilds the castle. Turns out it is on the ruins of an earlier religious site. When he hears rats in the walls he investigates, goes beneath the castle to discover a vast network of bodies which had been sacrificed over the years and the rats lived off of. His ancestors continued the ancient ritual. At the close of the story we find that he was writing from a madhouse. They blame him for the murder of another man investigating the caverns. He claims that it was the rats. "Pickman's Model" - Captures one side of a conversation in which the protagonist describes why he no longer hangs out with the artist, Pickman. Pickman's paintings of terrible monsters look so life-like because he uses models - real monsters that live in tunnels below Boston. This is revealed when the artist claims that he has a camera to take pictures of backgrounds he wishes to use. The teller of the tale ends up grabbing one of the photos and finds the monster models. The title gave away the ending. "At the Mountains of Madness" - An expedition to the Antartic uncovers the remains of an ancient race - "the old ones" who first inhabited Earth and created other life forms to serve them. Turns out that they are still around.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

    A collection of excellent classic stories.

  8. 5 out of 5

    WarpedRose

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lee Dickinson

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tokkan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nic

  12. 5 out of 5

    Izzy

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  14. 4 out of 5

    ReadingWithRiley

  15. 5 out of 5

    London Mays

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dan Meyer

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rolland Vandersluis

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hadas

  20. 5 out of 5

    Frank Scopilliti

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rogelio Sanson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ayden

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  24. 5 out of 5

    Macenzi

  25. 4 out of 5

    isit?

  26. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erika

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adam Frye

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary

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