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Decolonizing Education: Nourishing the Learning Spirit

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Drawing on treaties, international law, the work of other Indigenous scholars, and especially personal experiences, Marie Battiste documents the nature of Eurocentric models of education, and their devastating impacts on Indigenous knowledge. Chronicling the negative consequences of forced assimilation and the failure of current educational policies to bolster the social a Drawing on treaties, international law, the work of other Indigenous scholars, and especially personal experiences, Marie Battiste documents the nature of Eurocentric models of education, and their devastating impacts on Indigenous knowledge. Chronicling the negative consequences of forced assimilation and the failure of current educational policies to bolster the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal populations, Battiste proposes a new model of education. She argues that the preservation of Aboriginal knowledge is an Aboriginal right and a right preserved by the many treaties with First Nations. Current educational policies must undergo substantive reform. Central to this process is the rejection of the racism inherent to colonial systems of education, and the repositioning of Indigenous humanities, sciences, and languages as vital fields of knowledge. Battiste suggests the urgency for this reform lies in the social, technological, and economic challenges facing society today, and the need for a revitalized knowledge system which incorporates both Indigenous and Eurocentric thinking. The new model she advocates is based on her experiences growing up in a Mi'kmaw community, and the decades she has spent as a teacher, activist, and university scholar.


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Drawing on treaties, international law, the work of other Indigenous scholars, and especially personal experiences, Marie Battiste documents the nature of Eurocentric models of education, and their devastating impacts on Indigenous knowledge. Chronicling the negative consequences of forced assimilation and the failure of current educational policies to bolster the social a Drawing on treaties, international law, the work of other Indigenous scholars, and especially personal experiences, Marie Battiste documents the nature of Eurocentric models of education, and their devastating impacts on Indigenous knowledge. Chronicling the negative consequences of forced assimilation and the failure of current educational policies to bolster the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal populations, Battiste proposes a new model of education. She argues that the preservation of Aboriginal knowledge is an Aboriginal right and a right preserved by the many treaties with First Nations. Current educational policies must undergo substantive reform. Central to this process is the rejection of the racism inherent to colonial systems of education, and the repositioning of Indigenous humanities, sciences, and languages as vital fields of knowledge. Battiste suggests the urgency for this reform lies in the social, technological, and economic challenges facing society today, and the need for a revitalized knowledge system which incorporates both Indigenous and Eurocentric thinking. The new model she advocates is based on her experiences growing up in a Mi'kmaw community, and the decades she has spent as a teacher, activist, and university scholar.

30 review for Decolonizing Education: Nourishing the Learning Spirit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

    This book is text book like, so not an easy read. I give it 4 stars for the information and the thinking it brought out. Writing style and flip in reading; more of a 3 stars. I did a book club with it where we met every few chapters, making it easier to process. As an educator, I think that this book is a must read for all educators in Canada. There is so much to learn and to unpack in this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bradley West

    I first discovered Marie Battiste' work, during my time at Red River College, where I was the Diversity Initiatives Coordinator - my portfolios were Intercultural Awareness and the LGBTT* Initiative - working closely with the School of Indigenous Education, one of my goals was to increase awareness of First Nations Culture for our staff, students and faculty. Marie is one of many academics who are working to reshape the experiences of education to allow room for the various ways of knowing that c I first discovered Marie Battiste' work, during my time at Red River College, where I was the Diversity Initiatives Coordinator - my portfolios were Intercultural Awareness and the LGBTT* Initiative - working closely with the School of Indigenous Education, one of my goals was to increase awareness of First Nations Culture for our staff, students and faculty. Marie is one of many academics who are working to reshape the experiences of education to allow room for the various ways of knowing that come to us, from Indigenous voices and communities. Her work helps to connect the Western views of rigor and to braid those into indigenous knowledge, knowledge keepers, while allowing us to become a safer, more inclusive and responsive learning environment for all our students, not just some of them. I would consider this an essential text for anyone who is involved in education, and wants to create a more responsive, student centered experience.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sofie Novak

    I had to read this book for one of my university classes. It is very content dense and reads like a textbook, therefore making it ideal for a university class and not reading for pleasure or curiosity. This book did teach me a lot.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kate Mixon (an.introspective.reader)

    Enlightening and interesting, offering new and different perspectives and important content about the realities of being an Indigenous person struggling with the colonization of our society. Highly recommend - especially to educators.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    An excellent book that offers insight into the many ways that colonization has determined the course of our education system. Battiste offers proven and viable solutions to recognize, reconcile, and reform education.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    Definitely an interesting read. It is always so important to read another's point of view. It gave me a lot to think about. Definitely an interesting read. It is always so important to read another's point of view. It gave me a lot to think about.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Noel

    An exceptional read on Aboriginal Education.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Greta

  9. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anne Laurie

  12. 4 out of 5

    Denis Campeau

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karen Bourke dingwall

  14. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maia Vesla

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alice Macpherson

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kat Combe

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hanaa

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mia

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  21. 5 out of 5

    Keegan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lorn Kennedy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Solverson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linda Doyle

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lydia B

  26. 4 out of 5

    ReadingRachelB

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Falco

  28. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tyson

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