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Puss in Boots (Illustrated) (Fairy eBooks)

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The classic fairy tale of Puss in Boots by Charles Perrault with color illustrations by Walter Crane. *** Fairy eBooks series *** This ebook features a colorful, full screen design optimized for Kindle Fire HD.


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The classic fairy tale of Puss in Boots by Charles Perrault with color illustrations by Walter Crane. *** Fairy eBooks series *** This ebook features a colorful, full screen design optimized for Kindle Fire HD.

30 review for Puss in Boots (Illustrated) (Fairy eBooks)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    What a lovely and fun book. Puss sure is smart. Still, I would think people are more amazed by a talking cat than anything else. That is the interesting part of the story for me. I think the artwork reminds me of Paul Zelinskys. Puss is working to help his young lad make it big in the world and he succeeds in doing so. I wonder what he does after this is over. I’m sure his story will continue. Someone needs to write more of this story. Also, does the ogre have any family that might come looking What a lovely and fun book. Puss sure is smart. Still, I would think people are more amazed by a talking cat than anything else. That is the interesting part of the story for me. I think the artwork reminds me of Paul Zelinskys. Puss is working to help his young lad make it big in the world and he succeeds in doing so. I wonder what he does after this is over. I’m sure his story will continue. Someone needs to write more of this story. Also, does the ogre have any family that might come looking for revenge?? That’s interesting to think on. The nephew loves Puss and those boots he walks in. The nephew likes anyone who can outsmart people. He gave this 4 stars. The niece enjoyed this too. She thought it was funny that the man was swimming without any clothes. They both laughed. She did feel like the ogre really didn’t do anything to deserve being eaten and she felt like that was thieving. She gave this 3 stars. Both kids loved the artwork and thought Puss looked so cute.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Although Fred Marcellino's illustrations are simply and utterly brilliant (lushly descriptive, authentically, historically 18th century French in style and movement, and more than well deserving of the Caldecott Honour Medal), I cannot say that I have ever really enjoyed Puss in Boots all that much as a tale, as a story. I have now read it in Perrault's French original, as well as in both German and English translation, and while I can appreciate the storyline to an extent, some parts have also Although Fred Marcellino's illustrations are simply and utterly brilliant (lushly descriptive, authentically, historically 18th century French in style and movement, and more than well deserving of the Caldecott Honour Medal), I cannot say that I have ever really enjoyed Puss in Boots all that much as a tale, as a story. I have now read it in Perrault's French original, as well as in both German and English translation, and while I can appreciate the storyline to an extent, some parts have also always rubbed me the wrong proverbial way. Why for instance, would the Ogre's peasants, his serfs so to speak, automatically believe a passing cat's threats that he would have them killed if they did not tell the king that the fields belonged to the Marquis of Carabas, aka the Miller's son? And even with the king, I find it kind of hard to fathom that he would have simply accepted the Marquis of Carabas as an existing nobleman, as the king would of course and naturally know of and be familiar with his country's noblemen and women, especially someone as high born as a Marquis (but on the other hand, how the cat defeats the ogre is indeed priceless and hilarious, albeit also a tad predictable, and I do love the fact that once the miller's son has made his fortune, and marries the king's daughter, his helper, his feline companion, is not forgotten, but becomes a great lord in his own right). Now I have been debating whether to rate Puss in Boots with three or four stars, and have finally decided on three stars. For although (thankfully) the original author and translator are indeed mentioned (Charles Perrault, Malcolm Arthur), the Puss in Boots tale actually has a rather interesting back-story, and a more detailed note on its genesis and history would increase the literary and folkloric value of the same. The Brothers Grimm included a Puss in Boots type of story in the first 1812 edition of their Kinder- und Hausmärchen but then removed it from subsequent editions as being not only "too French" but also supposedly "too literary" in scope, a salient point both interesting and also rather ironic, considering we now know that many of the Grimms' collected "German" folktales were actually gathered from friends and acquaintances of French Huguenot extraction, and that the Grimms' themselves relentlessly edited and stylised their folktales, so that by the 1857 edition, their collection of tales was actually in many ways considerably more literary than traditionally folkloric (all nuggets of knowledge that would and could be a great addition as an author's note in this otherwise excellent rendition of Charles Perrault's classic tale).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mariah Roze

    Very cute version of the story. My students read 2 Puss in Boots stories and then compared them. They were surprisingly very similar and this was one of them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Afaf Ammar

    "Puss in Boots was made a great  lord and wore the most beautiful clothes, and never again ran  after mice, except for entertainment." Funny story... I think Puss in Boots is the most smartest and resourceful cat in the world, but I still think all cats are very smart 😻 24.12.2020 "Puss in Boots was made a great  lord and wore the most beautiful clothes, and never again ran  after mice, except for entertainment." Funny story... I think Puss in Boots is the most smartest and resourceful cat in the world, but I still think all cats are very smart 😻 24.12.2020

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shanna Gonzalez

    Fred Marcellino's artistic interpretation of Puss in Boots, narrated by a spare translation of Perrault's original story, is nothing short of impressive. The book is a visual feast, its fantastical events unfolding with their own strange coherency. The mood of this book is a bit darker than Galdone's, with the puckish Puss killing rabbits for the king "without mercy or compassion" and the giant's ogreish meals peeking out from under silver trays as servants glide past Puss on his way up the lush Fred Marcellino's artistic interpretation of Puss in Boots, narrated by a spare translation of Perrault's original story, is nothing short of impressive. The book is a visual feast, its fantastical events unfolding with their own strange coherency. The mood of this book is a bit darker than Galdone's, with the puckish Puss killing rabbits for the king "without mercy or compassion" and the giant's ogreish meals peeking out from under silver trays as servants glide past Puss on his way up the lushly carpeted stair. Parents of sensitive readers may wish to stick with Galdone's version, but this version accurately captures the mood of Perrault's original story. Puss's outrageous success in advancing his master's interests through deception may well be troubling for parents, who will wish to interpret the story to their young children while still encouraging them to tell the truth. Puss's panache is undeniably attractive, and (unlike Toad in The Wind in the Willows), he never receives the just consequences of his unscrupulous behavior. While some parents will choose to avoid the story, it should be noted that Puss's victims were all taken in by means of their own moral weakness: the king was overly fond of good food, which made him vulnerable to Puss's blandishments. The princess was so shallow as to be impressed by the miller's son's clothing (provided in her presence by her weak-willed father). The ogre was too arrogant to view Puss as a threat, and foolishly turned himself into a mouse, opening himself up for attack. All of these people naively accepted the line presented to them, and so were taken in. Puss is a scoundrel, and children ought to know that there are scoundrels in the world who will prey upon the morally weak. The only danger is that the audience will actually be taken in by Puss's charm and admire him for his own sake.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    The text in this book could say, "blah, blah, blah" and I would still give it 5 stars. That is how amazing the illustrations are!! The text in this book could say, "blah, blah, blah" and I would still give it 5 stars. That is how amazing the illustrations are!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    A fantastic retelling of one of my all-time favorite fairytales.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    Oh, Goodreads, will you ever cease to amaze me? I discovered this interesting green "read book*" button beneath the cover icon of the book I was just reviewing (Puss in Boots by Charles Perrault, illustrated by Fred Marcellino - the one that received the Caldecott Honor in 1991.) Below the green button was an explanation that the book available was a different edition from the one I had read. So on a whim, I clicked the button and checked it out. So this review is for the ebook from The Planet, Oh, Goodreads, will you ever cease to amaze me? I discovered this interesting green "read book*" button beneath the cover icon of the book I was just reviewing (Puss in Boots by Charles Perrault, illustrated by Fred Marcellino - the one that received the Caldecott Honor in 1991.) Below the green button was an explanation that the book available was a different edition from the one I had read. So on a whim, I clicked the button and checked it out. So this review is for the ebook from The Planet, with ISBN13 9781908478184. Lo and behold, the entire book was available right there online. Wow! So very cool. This version was illustrated by Walter Crane, and while the stories were virtually identical, the illustrations were quite different. I liked both versions, although this version gives a much older, almost Victorian feel to it. I love this feature and once again, I am very thankful for Goodreads. It really has opened my eyes and made me so much more aware of books that I would have never discovered on my own. Thank you!

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Never really understood this story, but it's still a good children's book. Never really understood this story, but it's still a good children's book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Traci

    "Puss in Boots" by Charles Perrault always brings a smile to my face. Now when I think of the character I think of the character adapted in the Shrek series. The tale begins by a father passing away and leaving his belongings to his three sons. The youngest son gets Puss and he doesn't know what to do with a cat. Puss can talk, and tells his owner to give him a pair of boots so that he can walk and bring a fortune to his owner. Puss goes about capturing various things to bring to king to impress "Puss in Boots" by Charles Perrault always brings a smile to my face. Now when I think of the character I think of the character adapted in the Shrek series. The tale begins by a father passing away and leaving his belongings to his three sons. The youngest son gets Puss and he doesn't know what to do with a cat. Puss can talk, and tells his owner to give him a pair of boots so that he can walk and bring a fortune to his owner. Puss goes about capturing various things to bring to king to impress him. At one point, the king is out and about with his daughter and Puss foils a plan to have his owner pretend like he's drowning so that the king can save him. The princess and now lucky owner of Puss are soon married and live happily ever after (especially Puss). This is quite a funny story as I imagine Puss running about in his boots as he carries out his missions to make his owner rich and happy. The illustrations are simple, but they lend to the simplicity of the story. The cover has the title in yellow text, and Puss is walking through a valley with his bag slung over his shoulder. Birds are flying away from him, so it lends the idea that Puss may have birds in his bag. The back cover has Puss walking in the opposite direction, as if he's returning to his master triumphant. The end pages are fun and lively, with a creamy background with rows of Puss running back and forth. The title page and dedication page are on separate spreads. The title page has the title in simple black text, the publisher at the bottom, and an image of Puss in the middle. He is running in this image too...Puss must do a lot of running in this story. While researching this book I noticed that there are different covers for this book depending on the publish date. My copy is from 1998. As I said, the images are simple, but I enjoyed them. There are still details in the image, and while it doesn't explain the art type used, it appears that water color was used. The images are bright and cheery and draw the reader in. When Puss receives his pair of red boots in every image you are drawn to them. It's also entertaining to see the different expressions on Puss' face at each page turn. The images are bordered, and the border has a thin double line. At the top of each page is the title of the book. In some instances images are mixed within the text. The text size/font never changes. The only change in the text is the position on the page, whether it's on the right or left side of the page. To make a note, my favorite image is Puss at the end of the book lounging on a pillow fat and happy after having a feast. I can imagine how happy he is at not having to eat mice anymore.

  11. 4 out of 5

    SamZ

    1991 Caldecott Honor - Favorite Illustration: When the "Marquis" first appears in fine clothing at the coach; I love all the expressions on the faces! The Marquis looks a little overwhelmed and confused, Puss is so proud, the Princess is coy but interested in the handsome Marquis and the King is puffed up in his pink finery and so proud that he has "saved" a fine nobleman. I've never been the biggest fan of Puss in Boots: I've always wondered why the people totally believed everything the cat sai 1991 Caldecott Honor - Favorite Illustration: When the "Marquis" first appears in fine clothing at the coach; I love all the expressions on the faces! The Marquis looks a little overwhelmed and confused, Puss is so proud, the Princess is coy but interested in the handsome Marquis and the King is puffed up in his pink finery and so proud that he has "saved" a fine nobleman. I've never been the biggest fan of Puss in Boots: I've always wondered why the people totally believed everything the cat said. Or even listened to a talking cat in the first place! However, this version is told well and is filled with fun details without becoming too long. The illustrations, however, stand out so beautifully. I feel like (so long as you knew the cat talked) you could follow this story merely based on the rich and detailed illustrations!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marc Bisson

    In this book about a cat that helps his owners become rich and famous, but he does it through trickery and deceit. The illustrations in this book are a perfect addition to the witty and comical story. The illustrations certainly draw the reader into the story and my students thoroughly enjoyed both the pictures and the plot. I used this book to teach my students the difference between theme and moral. Traditional literature really focuses on the moral of stories and this book was no exception. A In this book about a cat that helps his owners become rich and famous, but he does it through trickery and deceit. The illustrations in this book are a perfect addition to the witty and comical story. The illustrations certainly draw the reader into the story and my students thoroughly enjoyed both the pictures and the plot. I used this book to teach my students the difference between theme and moral. Traditional literature really focuses on the moral of stories and this book was no exception. After talking about the difference between moral and theme with this book, they really seemed to understand the concept. Overall, this is a great book to teach with!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    Step inside this lovely illustrated book and meet Puss In Boots, the socipathic cat who is rather conniving, consistently a user of people and a regal stager of situations. His dastardly deeds of presenting gifts to the majesty in the name of his supposed master, The Marquis of Carabas, nets him and his master great wealth. Lying, stealing and deceiving at every twist and turn, he becomes a hero. Ah, such is life!!!! I don't care for the story line at all, but I do love the marvelous illustrations! Step inside this lovely illustrated book and meet Puss In Boots, the socipathic cat who is rather conniving, consistently a user of people and a regal stager of situations. His dastardly deeds of presenting gifts to the majesty in the name of his supposed master, The Marquis of Carabas, nets him and his master great wealth. Lying, stealing and deceiving at every twist and turn, he becomes a hero. Ah, such is life!!!! I don't care for the story line at all, but I do love the marvelous illustrations!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hillary

    I really enjoyed this version! It was so charming, the illustrations were fantastic, and it was very cleverly told. I found myself falling in love with Puss in Boots and found him very fun. Would be a hoot to read to young readers, they would enjoy Puss' antics and would really have fun with the story! *Read aloud with a British accent . . . so much more fun for kids and they will really get into the story! I really enjoyed this version! It was so charming, the illustrations were fantastic, and it was very cleverly told. I found myself falling in love with Puss in Boots and found him very fun. Would be a hoot to read to young readers, they would enjoy Puss' antics and would really have fun with the story! *Read aloud with a British accent . . . so much more fun for kids and they will really get into the story!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Abbie

    I love this one. The illustrations are fabulous; I'm always disappointed when I try to pet the cover, and it isn't soft and furry. Plus, the ghoulishness of the original is preserved. What threat is greater than being ground into sausage meat!? I love this one. The illustrations are fabulous; I'm always disappointed when I try to pet the cover, and it isn't soft and furry. Plus, the ghoulishness of the original is preserved. What threat is greater than being ground into sausage meat!?

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Briscoiu

    If I didn't read these children's books at the right time, I'm doing it now. Better now than never. If I didn't read these children's books at the right time, I'm doing it now. Better now than never.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Uri

    Beautifully illustrated short and little book that tells the story nicely. It's more than worth it if you can get it for 99 cents at Amazon.com, especially if you have kids you can share it with. Beautifully illustrated short and little book that tells the story nicely. It's more than worth it if you can get it for 99 cents at Amazon.com, especially if you have kids you can share it with.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rabbia Riaz

    How wise the puss is! If I were that puss? 🤔 A good moral story by the way. Childern must enjoy this!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karrington Stevens

    A classic tale of Puss in Boots, how he is mischievous and able to convince the King to give him everything. Truly, more horrific than I would have pictured though.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dolly

    This is a fun tale about a wise and resourceful cat who helps his new master, the miller's son, become rich beyond his wildest dreams. The story is entertaining and the cat is amazingly clever. The illustrations by Fred Marcellino are classically detailed, too and certainly worthy of the Caldecott Honor. We've read a couple of different versions of this story, including one by Paul Galdone and another by Steve Light. In all three cases, the story is very much the same, so the illustrator's touch This is a fun tale about a wise and resourceful cat who helps his new master, the miller's son, become rich beyond his wildest dreams. The story is entertaining and the cat is amazingly clever. The illustrations by Fred Marcellino are classically detailed, too and certainly worthy of the Caldecott Honor. We've read a couple of different versions of this story, including one by Paul Galdone and another by Steve Light. In all three cases, the story is very much the same, so the illustrator's touch really does make the difference. We enjoyed reading this classic children's book together. This book was selected as one of the books for the August 2016- Caldecott Honor discussion at the Picture-Book Club in the Children's Books Group here at Goodreads.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Katie Fitzgerald

    What a pleasant surprise this book was! I am not crazy about fairy tales, and I seemed to remember reading this during childhood and having a hard understanding the story, but this is a great story! I love the size and color of the text, as well as the gorgeous illustrations, and I love the way the illustrator draws the eyes of the ogre, and keeps them the same even when the ogre becomes a giant. Puss and his master have sort of a Jeeves and Wooster dynamic, where Puss looks after the master’s i What a pleasant surprise this book was! I am not crazy about fairy tales, and I seemed to remember reading this during childhood and having a hard understanding the story, but this is a great story! I love the size and color of the text, as well as the gorgeous illustrations, and I love the way the illustrator draws the eyes of the ogre, and keeps them the same even when the ogre becomes a giant. Puss and his master have sort of a Jeeves and Wooster dynamic, where Puss looks after the master’s interests when even the master doesn’t realize he needs looking after. I really enjoyed that relationship, and I finished the book with a smile on my face.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie Burns

    I was unaware of the story of Puss in Boots so I have no other version to compare it to. The text is large and takes up all the white spaces on the pages. It looked unusual, but would support novice readers and read aloud a where children may be sitting further away from the book. Puss is a clever, wily cat and persuades others (through the threat of violence) to tell lies to the King. These lies lead to Puss's master marrying the King's daughter and becoming owner of a great castle and lots of l I was unaware of the story of Puss in Boots so I have no other version to compare it to. The text is large and takes up all the white spaces on the pages. It looked unusual, but would support novice readers and read aloud a where children may be sitting further away from the book. Puss is a clever, wily cat and persuades others (through the threat of violence) to tell lies to the King. These lies lead to Puss's master marrying the King's daughter and becoming owner of a great castle and lots of lands. Puss also becomes a lord. The illustrations are nice and it is a good fairy tale. Nothing spectacular, but good.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    This fairy tale is about a miller who has three sons and when he dies they each receive his life's possessions: a mill, a donkey and a cat. The son who received the cat was sorely disappointed but the cat reassured him that if the son were to give the cat a pair of boots and a bag he would make him wealthy. True to his word, Puss in Boots turned the son into the Marquis of Carabas, who married the princess and inherited one of the most beautiful estates in all the land. How, you might ask? Near This fairy tale is about a miller who has three sons and when he dies they each receive his life's possessions: a mill, a donkey and a cat. The son who received the cat was sorely disappointed but the cat reassured him that if the son were to give the cat a pair of boots and a bag he would make him wealthy. True to his word, Puss in Boots turned the son into the Marquis of Carabas, who married the princess and inherited one of the most beautiful estates in all the land. How, you might ask? Near drownings, threats of sausage meat and morphing ogres may be the secret...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

    I have always liked this story, maybe because I am a cat-lover. I never questioned why everyone believed the cat's outlandish claims. And I do love the way the cat tricked the ogre at the end. However, the ogre looks more like a human giant, than some kind of monster. Otherwise, I did like Marcellino's paintings (especially the cover with the large cat face), but I like Wiesner and Pinkney better. I have always liked this story, maybe because I am a cat-lover. I never questioned why everyone believed the cat's outlandish claims. And I do love the way the cat tricked the ogre at the end. However, the ogre looks more like a human giant, than some kind of monster. Otherwise, I did like Marcellino's paintings (especially the cover with the large cat face), but I like Wiesner and Pinkney better.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Randie D. Camp, M.S.

    I read this classic fairy tale in the Classics of Children’s Literature (6th Edition) by John W. Griffith and Charles H. Frey. Published by Pearson in Upper Saddle River, NJ in 2005. I cannot decide if the master cat is truly clever or a just a lucky con artist...either way, I suppose the youngest son benefited the most from the cat's trickery so he you couldn't call him a selfish con. I read this classic fairy tale in the Classics of Children’s Literature (6th Edition) by John W. Griffith and Charles H. Frey. Published by Pearson in Upper Saddle River, NJ in 2005. I cannot decide if the master cat is truly clever or a just a lucky con artist...either way, I suppose the youngest son benefited the most from the cat's trickery so he you couldn't call him a selfish con.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    A highly entertaining book with awesome illustrations, cleverly written.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    The illustrations in this retelling of Perrault's tale are simply gorgeous...detailed and rich and a treat to look at! The illustrations in this retelling of Perrault's tale are simply gorgeous...detailed and rich and a treat to look at!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Angel Navarro

    A pretty classic! Great for kids.

  29. 5 out of 5

    ♥Mary♦Sweet♣Dreams♠Are♥Made♦of♣This♠

    I very much enjoyed this book!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Annie Cheesman

    I really like how the book has the big picture of "Puss" on the front cover because it shows the significance of him being the main character of the story. I have never had a story like this but, all the illustrations were made out of colored pencil or pencil because it was very plain so you put all your focus on the text on each page(s). I enjoyed the plain illustrations because you won't put all your attention towards the illustrations and you can put all your focus on the actual story instead I really like how the book has the big picture of "Puss" on the front cover because it shows the significance of him being the main character of the story. I have never had a story like this but, all the illustrations were made out of colored pencil or pencil because it was very plain so you put all your focus on the text on each page(s). I enjoyed the plain illustrations because you won't put all your attention towards the illustrations and you can put all your focus on the actual story instead. My favorite pages were the two pages showing the struggle of "puss" putting on his boots and trying to walk in them was quite comical to look at and imagine his struggle as a cat to walk on two legs. I have never read this story before, but I think its so clever how smart "puss" is by catching prey in the forest. I think cats regularly do not think that well and as a reader that really grabs my attention and helps me further understand how important and unique he is compared to an ordinary cat. I really enjoyed and I think all readers will enjoy how "puss" was like an extraordinary cat who had lots of tasks but did not hesitate to perform tasks to please the king or magician. The last two pages are super cool to look at because its such a dark two pages but the light colors such as the cats and stars are really outlined within those two pages. The last page is very important I think because it shows how the cat is just like any other human, entailing that he is exhausted after a long day of adventures.

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