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30 review for The Golden Age of Marvel Comics, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael P.

    An odd collection, this. Oddity 1: there are only super hero stories here, and Timely/Atlas published other genres at the time. There are two, but those are covered in oddity #3. 2: Angel and Vision stories are all terrible. Why does Marvel include them in these collections? 3: Ignore the title. This collection continues into Marvel's first version of the silver age when it imitated DC comics by reviving super heroes, but without the fineness or the success. That came in the sixties. 4: those fi An odd collection, this. Oddity 1: there are only super hero stories here, and Timely/Atlas published other genres at the time. There are two, but those are covered in oddity #3. 2: Angel and Vision stories are all terrible. Why does Marvel include them in these collections? 3: Ignore the title. This collection continues into Marvel's first version of the silver age when it imitated DC comics by reviving super heroes, but without the fineness or the success. That came in the sixties. 4: those fifties stories are wordy, so wordy that most of them are really bad. The partial exception are the stories reprinted from YOUNG MEN #24. The following is not an oddity, but it was a pleasure to discover just how fine an artist Bill Everett was. His golden age Sub-Mariner and even the fifties Sub-Mariner stories are a cut above most of the stories in this collection. On balance, however, this "golden age" collection is hardly golden.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence

    https://gnomeship.blogspot.com/2021/0... https://gnomeship.blogspot.com/2021/0...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    In this short volume, readers are treated to a sample of Golden Age Marvel works. A great portion of the book is focused on stories of the big three: Sub-mariner, the Human Torch, and Captain America. However, there are also appearances from lesser lights of the Marvel era including Marvel Boy, the Black Knight, the Yellow Law, and my personal World War II favorite, the Destroyer. Some of the highlights from the book include: -The first Sub-mariner story-which was actually the first real story in In this short volume, readers are treated to a sample of Golden Age Marvel works. A great portion of the book is focused on stories of the big three: Sub-mariner, the Human Torch, and Captain America. However, there are also appearances from lesser lights of the Marvel era including Marvel Boy, the Black Knight, the Yellow Law, and my personal World War II favorite, the Destroyer. Some of the highlights from the book include: -The first Sub-mariner story-which was actually the first real story in the Marvel universe. It's worth noting that DC began with Superman trying to ave the world and Marvel began with Sub-mariner trying to take it over. The book features the first battle between the Human Torch and Sub-mariner, but the highlight of the book for me was Marvel Comics #17 which features Sub-mariner and Human torch teaming up to battle the Nazis for a full 26 page adventure. While the Justice Society was conducting regular group meetings, this had to be one of the earlier two hero team ups. The 1950s Atlas Material was interesting for historical purposes and great see anti-Communist messages in books, but the philosophy of limiting stories to 6-7 pages to give good value led to a lot of rushed plot resolutions. In the first return of the Human Torch story, he discovers his former partner's been brainwashed by the Communists and doctors are quickly able to fix the brainwashing in the same seven page story. Still, despite the weaker parts, this a great overview with a lot of about Marvel's early and forgotten days.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jean-Pierre Vidrine

    What we have here is a pretty good overview of the different sorts of comics offered by Marvel during the Timely and Atlas years. The book starts with costumed superheroes and is dominated by them. But even within that genre there is some variety. Starting with early Sub-Mariner and Human Torch stories where they are at odds, we then go in to wartime hero stories they are All-American heroes, along with Captain America, the Destroyer, the Vision, and the Angel. After the war, where Captain Ameri What we have here is a pretty good overview of the different sorts of comics offered by Marvel during the Timely and Atlas years. The book starts with costumed superheroes and is dominated by them. But even within that genre there is some variety. Starting with early Sub-Mariner and Human Torch stories where they are at odds, we then go in to wartime hero stories they are All-American heroes, along with Captain America, the Destroyer, the Vision, and the Angel. After the war, where Captain America is the biggest name, we go into genre experiments like Marvel Boy and Venus. Then there are the attempts at reviving the big three superheroes. These stories are not as great as those that preceded them, but it should be noted that the Captain America tales from this era constitute a sort of continuity glitch that necessitated some retroactive rewriting that was truly interesting. The Black Knight is an obvious Batman-esque take on the old medieval legend. Last of all is the Yellow Claw. Though clearly a Fu Manchu pastiche, the story avoids the unfortunate racism of Sax Rohmer's novels by having the title villain's chief nemesis be an Asian American agent bereft of the caricature traits found all too often in ethnic characters in comics of the time. Though fun, I would like to have seen more stories featuring characters other than Captain America, Namor, and the Human Torch. Perhaps Vol. 2 will satisfy that want.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    An outline or possibly better stated as a taste of the Golden Age of comics. You get a text overview and than a reprint of some of the pivotal titles through that period of time. The run down will give a look at some "prehistory" of characters who have stayed around over the years (though sometimes in different "incarnations", and a taste for the time. there are stereotypes present in these books but remember the times in which they appeared. WWII was a time when it was literally kill or be kille An outline or possibly better stated as a taste of the Golden Age of comics. You get a text overview and than a reprint of some of the pivotal titles through that period of time. The run down will give a look at some "prehistory" of characters who have stayed around over the years (though sometimes in different "incarnations", and a taste for the time. there are stereotypes present in these books but remember the times in which they appeared. WWII was a time when it was literally kill or be killed. There was unapologetic "propaganda" in these books, the thing is it wasn't hidden and everyone knew what it was. To "hide it" or change it now to present a PC look would deny the history of the comics. I was a collector/reader in what is called the Silver Age of comics. just past these books, so this is a picture of my Dad's time and that of the people who lived into and through World War Two.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Very nice collection of Golden age and Silver age reprints. First silver age re-appearance of Captain America, Namor the Sub-Mariner and the Human Torch. Recommended to anyone wanting to see and read the ear years of comics.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dean

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Whitworth

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  10. 5 out of 5

    J.J.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kent

  12. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Proven

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hoskin

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  15. 4 out of 5

    Roderick Patterson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Hacker

  17. 4 out of 5

    BenDietz

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rick

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gonçalo

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  21. 4 out of 5

    Troy-David Phillips

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eugene booker

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steven

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter Cooper

  25. 4 out of 5

    Clay

  26. 4 out of 5

    ISMOTU

  27. 4 out of 5

    David

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

  29. 5 out of 5

    Asderathos

  30. 4 out of 5

    John Patterson

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