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Spy Hunt in Dixie: Civil War Historical Fiction

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A retiring MI6 officer hits upon a clandestine ring hibernating in the upper echelons of the British Secret Service. Recognizing that he is under watch, and fearing for his own life, he resorts to unorthodox means. Zach Taylor, a Canadian Anglo-Saxon chauvinist, and a fellow combatant in the late WW I is his choice. The man is arguably the best detective journalist ever. N A retiring MI6 officer hits upon a clandestine ring hibernating in the upper echelons of the British Secret Service. Recognizing that he is under watch, and fearing for his own life, he resorts to unorthodox means. Zach Taylor, a Canadian Anglo-Saxon chauvinist, and a fellow combatant in the late WW I is his choice. The man is arguably the best detective journalist ever. Never failing a friend, and with little fear in his heart, the Canadian accepts the mission diligently. Taylor's journey takes him to incredibly fantastic situations and exotic lands. Few steps into his investigations, he has to hunt back an African soldier, from the French army invading Mexico in 1864, who runs into Civil War Louisiana, where he witnesses a terrible secret. Suddenly, something appears to be related to a Christian mission in Belgian Congo at the turn of the century, and the murder of the British Governor-General of Sudan a few years later. Then again, definitely every thing has to do with Napoleon III and his schemes in Protestant North America, correcting his great uncle's mistake, and retaking Dixie back. But how can those absurd events be relevant in a spymasters hunt eighty years later? Every character has a tale to tell, but the truth eludes Taylor, and his targets-turned-pursuers, to the very end, when suddenly the aberrant threads converge into the most incredible knot. "Spy Hunt in Dixie", literally is historical fiction, but as well a challenge to the mind and imagination of every fan of the mystery genre. Praise for "Spy Hunt in Dixie" "Recommended for the fans of Dean Koontz, Nelson DeMille and W.E.B. Griffin." "Absolute suspense, really to the last page." "This suspense thriller sails in that magical era of Antebellum & Postbellum America. Reads like Dean Koontz, only this one has an incredible plot about chasing spymasters around Civil War Dixie and WW II Europe." "When I finished it, I had equal satisfaction to reading Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy or watching a Jason Bourne movie. Only this work is more mental. " "Suspenseful and detective work of the first grade. Great civil war history as well."


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A retiring MI6 officer hits upon a clandestine ring hibernating in the upper echelons of the British Secret Service. Recognizing that he is under watch, and fearing for his own life, he resorts to unorthodox means. Zach Taylor, a Canadian Anglo-Saxon chauvinist, and a fellow combatant in the late WW I is his choice. The man is arguably the best detective journalist ever. N A retiring MI6 officer hits upon a clandestine ring hibernating in the upper echelons of the British Secret Service. Recognizing that he is under watch, and fearing for his own life, he resorts to unorthodox means. Zach Taylor, a Canadian Anglo-Saxon chauvinist, and a fellow combatant in the late WW I is his choice. The man is arguably the best detective journalist ever. Never failing a friend, and with little fear in his heart, the Canadian accepts the mission diligently. Taylor's journey takes him to incredibly fantastic situations and exotic lands. Few steps into his investigations, he has to hunt back an African soldier, from the French army invading Mexico in 1864, who runs into Civil War Louisiana, where he witnesses a terrible secret. Suddenly, something appears to be related to a Christian mission in Belgian Congo at the turn of the century, and the murder of the British Governor-General of Sudan a few years later. Then again, definitely every thing has to do with Napoleon III and his schemes in Protestant North America, correcting his great uncle's mistake, and retaking Dixie back. But how can those absurd events be relevant in a spymasters hunt eighty years later? Every character has a tale to tell, but the truth eludes Taylor, and his targets-turned-pursuers, to the very end, when suddenly the aberrant threads converge into the most incredible knot. "Spy Hunt in Dixie", literally is historical fiction, but as well a challenge to the mind and imagination of every fan of the mystery genre. Praise for "Spy Hunt in Dixie" "Recommended for the fans of Dean Koontz, Nelson DeMille and W.E.B. Griffin." "Absolute suspense, really to the last page." "This suspense thriller sails in that magical era of Antebellum & Postbellum America. Reads like Dean Koontz, only this one has an incredible plot about chasing spymasters around Civil War Dixie and WW II Europe." "When I finished it, I had equal satisfaction to reading Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy or watching a Jason Bourne movie. Only this work is more mental. " "Suspenseful and detective work of the first grade. Great civil war history as well."

32 review for Spy Hunt in Dixie: Civil War Historical Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Frankly, I thought I might have trouble getting into this short novel, a style of multiple viewpoints. Happily, I was wrong and sailed through this one very quickly. The basic plot is an Englishman, Galloway, returning from a seven year retirement in India in 1940 to learn that his protege, Michael Aniston, had been declared a Communist agent, fleeing into hiding somewhere. Galloway believes his man innocent as the key piece of evidence, a supposed telegram that Aniston passed on in 1924 that seem Frankly, I thought I might have trouble getting into this short novel, a style of multiple viewpoints. Happily, I was wrong and sailed through this one very quickly. The basic plot is an Englishman, Galloway, returning from a seven year retirement in India in 1940 to learn that his protege, Michael Aniston, had been declared a Communist agent, fleeing into hiding somewhere. Galloway believes his man innocent as the key piece of evidence, a supposed telegram that Aniston passed on in 1924 that seemed made up as it couldn't be found in records. Galloway knew it was real because he had received and passed it on while pursuing his latest female conquest, sending Aniston on the dull assignment that he was supposed to be on. He'd passed it on, posing as Aniston. An English nobleman had been murdered in 1924 and Aniston got most of the credit. Galloway set out to clear his protege's name and recruited a journalist, Zach Taylor, to aid him. The investigation spread out over years, interrupted by WWII, and clues and paperwork was uncovered stretching all the way back to the Civil War and the war in Mexico to defeat Maximillan. What did incidents eighty years in the past and a murder going back twenty years have to do with framing Aniston? Connelly has written a fine little puzzle constructed in a tight framework despite those multiple viewpoints. I had a fine time with this one and look forward to more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I was looking forward to reading this book but was very disappointed. The beginning was terrific and I was hooked. Then out of the blue it started reading like another author took over. That is when I lost interest. However, when I am asked to review a book by an author, I have an open mind and was dedicated to finish the book hoping for a return to the beginning hook. I'm sorry to say it never happened. I started reading the book on my flight to visit my mother. I was so confused 35% of the way I was looking forward to reading this book but was very disappointed. The beginning was terrific and I was hooked. Then out of the blue it started reading like another author took over. That is when I lost interest. However, when I am asked to review a book by an author, I have an open mind and was dedicated to finish the book hoping for a return to the beginning hook. I'm sorry to say it never happened. I started reading the book on my flight to visit my mother. I was so confused 35% of the way into the story, that I thought I would reread it from the beginning to my mother. She is an avid reader and loves history. I said nothing to her about my thoughts, just telling her it's a book I said I would read and review. We thought we were either stupid or going crazy with how the book was written. Like I mentioned before, the difference in writing styles were integrated into the story and it was extremely confusing. We weren't sure who was doing what or what was going on much of the time. There were so many points of view, but I don't think Max Connelly has mastered how to write whose point of view the reader is supposed to be reading. There were also many times I thought I knew what a word or phrase meant, but it was used incorrectly, therefore continuing to make the story more confusing. By the time we were 73% into the book, we were both counting the pages to be finished. The end of the book being the most confusing, we had no idea what was going on with which characters. There were so many characters and so many name changes, it was just absurd. Avoiding naming certain political characters in the very end I'm figuring was a bias on Max Connelly's part, but once again, not really sure. Most of the book felt like I was reading what I would read from a political reporter. This was supposed to be historical fiction. I felt like I could tell when Max was writing (which I actually enjoyed) and when this phantom writer took over. I am sorry to say I cannot recommend this book for anyone in particular because of the writing, point of view confusion, and too many characters without enough depth to make the story enjoyable and not confusing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    A Book Vacation

    2.5 stars To see my full review: http://bookvacations.wordpress.com/20... I’m sorry to say that this novel just wasn’t for me. Initially, I was reading a version the author gave me for review, quite some time ago, and truth be told, I had trouble following the story. Upon contacting the author about it, I found that a newer, edited version was now available, and he sent me that instead. I was very happy to note, as I began the new version, that it is much easier to read, and it flows more steadily, 2.5 stars To see my full review: http://bookvacations.wordpress.com/20... I’m sorry to say that this novel just wasn’t for me. Initially, I was reading a version the author gave me for review, quite some time ago, and truth be told, I had trouble following the story. Upon contacting the author about it, I found that a newer, edited version was now available, and he sent me that instead. I was very happy to note, as I began the new version, that it is much easier to read, and it flows more steadily, however, it’s still not for me. Now, I loved the idea of mystery and intrigue, and the morphing of stories of the late 1800s and post WWII was very interesting. I also enjoyed finding out the truth behind Michael Aniston, Henry Galloway, Idris, and the aristocracy, and how everything was connected, but the story itself still jumped around a little too much for me to really make a deep connection with any of the characters, or their plights. The novel itself seemed too move too quickly at times, and too slowly at others, and though I enjoyed the premise, it just wasn’t for me. I think those who like war stories complete with mystery and intrigue will really enjoy this story though, as it has a very historic feel and contains a very interesting secret.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    I don't usually give 5 stars to a book, but this book was different. I first was confused about it, never read something written in this style before and it was a pleasant surprise. I loved the different points of view and the mix of letters and the fact that the more I read the better I got the picture of it, but still was surprise to see the end. I liked the scene whit the 20man and how everything got settled! it was so good that I sometimes forgot it was fiction. it is fiction? :-) I was sad I don't usually give 5 stars to a book, but this book was different. I first was confused about it, never read something written in this style before and it was a pleasant surprise. I loved the different points of view and the mix of letters and the fact that the more I read the better I got the picture of it, but still was surprise to see the end. I liked the scene whit the 20man and how everything got settled! it was so good that I sometimes forgot it was fiction. it is fiction? :-) I was sad for Galloway and for his friend, but at least the journalist had a better future. Thank you author for sharing the book with me!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Evans

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve Haarer

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kim Brad

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Deyoung

  9. 4 out of 5

    Max Connelly

  10. 5 out of 5

    Quincy Roberts

  11. 4 out of 5

    Trending Books

  12. 5 out of 5

    Linda Rae

  13. 4 out of 5

    Beckie

  14. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Indie e-books

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Hallbrooks

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cindyplanchard

  18. 4 out of 5

    Therese

  19. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

  21. 5 out of 5

    B K

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Cacciatore

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Skjoldal

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jane(Janelba)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Stellar (Books, a Coffee, and a Sleepy Kitty)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andra

  30. 4 out of 5

    Babetta

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jannene

  32. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

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